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Encyclopedia > Anointing Of the sick
"Extreme Unction", part of The Seven Sacraments (1445) by Roger van der Weyden.

Anointing of the Sick is the ritual anointing, practised in many Christian Churches, of a sick person. It is also described, using the more archaic synonym "unction" in place of "anointing", as unction of the sick.[1] Administration to the sick is used by some Churches.[2] Image File history File links Extreme_Unction_Rogier_Van_der_Weyden. ... Image File history File links Extreme_Unction_Rogier_Van_der_Weyden. ... Events Discovery of Senegal and Cape Verde by Dinas Diaz Births March 1 - Sandro Botticelli, Italian painter (died 1510) March 16 - Johann Geiler von Kaisersberg, Swiss-born preacher (died 1510) Albert Brudzewski, Polish astronomer (died 1497) Nicolas Chuquet, French mathematician Deaths June 5 - Leonel Power, English composer June 11 - Henry... Deposition by Rogier van der Weyden (c. ... To anoint is to grease with perfumed oil, animal fat, or melted butter, a process employed ritually by many religions and races. ...


The chief Biblical text concerning anointing of the sick is James 5:14-15: "Is any among you sick? Let him call for the elders of the church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord; and the prayer of faith will save the sick man, and the Lord will raise him up; and if he has committed sins, he will be forgiven." (RSV) This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ...


Matthew 10:8, Luke 10:8-9 and Mark 6:13 are also quoted in this regard.


The early-twentieth-century Catholic Encyclopedia states: "In previous ages the sacrament was known by a variety of names, e.g., the holy oil, or unction, of the sick; the unction or blessing of consecrated oil; the unction of God; the office of the unction; etc. In the Eastern Church the later technical name is euchelaion (i.e. prayer-oil); but other names have been and still are in use, e.g. elaion hagion (holy), or hegismenon (consecrated), elaion, elaiou Chrisis, chrisma, etc."


The term "Last Rites" is not equivalent to "Anointing of the Sick", since it refers also to two other distinct rites: Penance and Eucharist, the last of which, when administered to the dying, is known as "Viaticum", a word whose original meaning in Latin was "provision for the journey". The normal order of administration is: first Penance (if the dying person is physically unable to confess, absolution, conditional on the existence of contrition, is given), then Anointing, then Viaticum. The Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation is popularly called Confession. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... Viaticum is the term the Catholic Church and some Anglo Catholic Anglicans uses for the Eucharist (Communion) given to a dying person. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...

Contents

Status as sacrament

The Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Oriental Orthodox Churches and Anglo-Catholics count Anointing of the Sick as one of the seven sacraments. Protestant Churches that practise the rite of anointing of the sick generally do not think of it as a sacrament. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to... The terms Anglo-Catholic and Anglo-Catholicism describe people, groups, ideas, customs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise continuity with Catholic tradition. ... In Christian belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


In Roman Catholic, Eastern and Oriental Orthodox, Anglican and some Protestant Churches, the oil used ("oil of the sick") is specifically blessed for this purpose.


Roman Catholic Church

Main article:Anointing of the Sick (Catholic Church)

An extensive account of the teaching of the Catholic Church on Anointing of the Sick is given in Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1499-1532. Anointing of the Sick is the ritual anointing of a sick person and is a Sacrament of the Catholic Church. ...


In the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church the sacrament now called Anointing of the Sick was called Extreme Unction (i.e. final anointing), a name attached to it when it was administered, as one of the "Last Rites", only to people in immediate danger of death. The change of name reflects the restored discipline whereby, in the Latin Church as in other ancient Christian Churches, the sacrament is to be conferred on those who are "dangerously ill".[3] The Latin Rite is one of the 23 sui iuris particular Churches within the Catholic Church. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Anointing of the Sick is one of the seven Sacraments, and is associated not only with bodily healing but with forgiveness of sins. Only a priest (bishop or presbyter) can administer it. Canon 1004 of the Code of Canon Law indicates succinctly who may receive the sacrament: "The anointing of the sick can be administered to any member of the faithful who, having reached the use of reason, begins to be in danger by reason of illness or old age." A new illness or a renewal or worsening of the first illness enables a person to receive the sacrament a further time. And "in the case of a person who is chronically ill, or elderly and in a weakened condition, the sacrament of anointing may be repeated when in the pastoral judgment of the priest the condition of the sick person warrants the repetition of the sacrament" (Rite of Anointing of the Sick, 102). Sacraments in the Roman Catholic Church or preferably, the Catholic Church are efficacious signs, perceptible to the senses, of grace. ... Canon Law is the ecclesiastical law of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


The text of the Rite (97) also states that the sacrament of anointing can be administered to an individual whether at home, in a hospital or institution, or in church; and several sick persons may be anointed within the rite, especially if the celebration takes place in a church or hospital; the celebration may also take place within Mass. A Medieval Low Mass by a bishop. ...


As indicated in the Code of Canon Law, it is illicit to administer indiscriminately to the sick and the healthy this sacrament, which, as its very name shows, is intended to benefit only the seriously ill.


The Catholic Church sees the effects of the sacrament as follows. As the sacrament of Marriage gives grace for the married state, the sacrament of Anointing of the Sick gives grace for the state into which people enter through sickness. Through the sacrament is given a gift of the Holy Spirit that renews confidence and faith in God and strengthens against temptations to discouragement and anguish at the thought of death and the struggle of death. It thus leads to spiritual healing with forgiveness of sins and, sometimes, to bodily healing as well.


The oil used in the sacrament is usually olive oil, though other vegetable oil may also be used (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1513). It is blessed by the bishop of the diocese at the Chrism Mass he celebrates on Holy Thursday or on a day close to it. In case of necessity, the priest administering the sacrament may bless the oil within the framework of the celebration (Code of Canon Law, canon 999). Chrism (Greek word literally meaning an anointing), also called Myrrh (Myron), Holy Oil, or Consecrated Oil, is a consecrated oil used in the Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Orthodox churches, in the Assyrian Church of the East, in the Old-Catholic churches, and in Roman Catholic, Anglican and Lutheran churches in... In the Christian calendar, Holy Thursday (also called Maundy Thursday) is the Thursday before Easter, the day on which the Last Supper is said to have occurred. ...


In the Roman Rite of the Western Catholic Church, the priest anoints the sick person's forehead with oil (usually in the form of a cross), saying: "Through this holy anointing, may the Lord in his love and mercy help you with the grace of the Holy Spirit." He then anoints the hands, saying, "May the Lord who frees you from sin save you and raise you up." He may also, in accordance with local culture and traditions, and the needs of the sick person, anoint other parts of the body, but without repeating the sacramental formula. Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article, refers to the sui juris particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church that developed in the area of western Europe and northern Africa where Latin was for many centuries the language of education and culture. ... The Latin Rite is one of the 23 sui iuris particular Churches within the Catholic Church. ...


This is the form established for the Roman Rite through the papal document Sacram unctionem infirmorum of 1972. The form used in the Roman Rite in the preceding period included anointing of seven parts of the body (though that of the loins was generally omitted in English-speaking countries), while saying (in Latin): "Through this holy anointing, may the Lord pardon you whatever sins/faults you have committed by..." The sense in question was then mentioned: sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, walking, carnal delectation. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...


Liturgical rites of the Catholic Church, both Western and Eastern, other than the Roman, have a variety of other forms for celebrating the sacrament.


Eastern Orthodox Church

The teaching of the Eastern Orthodox Church on the Holy Mystery (sacrament) of Unction is similar to that of the Roman Catholic Church. However, the reception of the Mystery is not limited to those who are enduring physical illness. The Mystery is given for healing (both physical and spiritual) and for the forgiveness of sin. For this reason, it is normally required that one go to Confession before receiving Unction. Because it is a Sacred Mystery of the Church, only Orthodox Christians may receive it. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... In Christian belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. ... Modern confessional in the Church of the Holy Name, Dunedin, New Zealand. ...


The solemn form of Eastern Christian anointing requires the ministry of seven priests. A table is prepared, upon which is set a vessel containing wheat. Into the wheat has been placed an empty shrine-lamp, seven candles, and seven anointing brushes. Candles are distributed for all to hold during the service. The rite begins with reading Psalm 50 (the great penitential psalm), followed by the chanting of a special Canon. After this, the senior priest (or bishop) pours pure olive oil and a small amount of wine into the shrine lamp, and says the "Prayer of the Oil", which calls upon God to "...sanctify this Oil, that it may be effectual for those who shall be anointed therewith, unto healing, and unto relief from every passion, every malady of the flesh and of the spirit, and every ill..." Then follow seven series of Epistles, Gospels, long prayers, Ektenias (litanies) and anointings. Each series is served by one of the seven priests in tern. The afflicted one is anointed with the sign of the cross on seven places: the forehead, the nostirls, the cheeks, the lips, the breast, the palms of both hands, and the back of the hands. After the last anointing, the Gospel Book is opened and placed with the writing down upon the head of the one who was anointed, and the senior priest reads the "Prayer of the Gospel." At the end, the anointed kisses the Gospel, the Cross and the right hands of the priests, taking their blessing. Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. compactum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 For the indie rock group see: Wheat (band). ... This article should be transwikied to Wikibooks or Wikisource Psalms 51 1 Have mercy upon me, O God, according to thy lovingkindness: according unto the multitude of thy tender mercies blot out my transgressions. ... A canon is a structured hymn used in a number of Eastern Orthodox services. ... An epistle (Greek επιστολη, epistolÄ“, letter) is a writing directed or sent to a person or group of persons, usually a letter and a very formal, often didactic and elegant one. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... Ektenia (from Greek: ; literally, diligence), often called simply Litany, is a prayerful petition in the Eastern Orthodox liturgy. ... The Sign of the Cross is a ceremonial hand motion made by the vast majority of the worlds Christians. ... A Gospel Book is a codex or bound volume, containing one or more of the four Gospels of the Christian New Testament. ...


Unction is considered to be a public rather than a private sacrament, and so as many of the faithful who are able are encouraged to attend. It should be celebrated in the church when possible, but if this is impossible, it may be served in the home or hospital room of the aflicted.


Unction in the Greek Orthodox Church and those Churches of Hellenic custom, (i.e., e.g. - Melkite, Antiochian Orthodox, etc...) is usually served with a minimum of ceremony. Greek Orthodox Church (Greek: Hellēnorthódoxē Ekklēsía) can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches. ... The term Melkite (also written Melchite) is used to refer to various Christian churches and their members originating in the Middle East. ... The Antiochian Orthodox Church is one of the five churches that comprised the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church before the Great Schism, and today is one of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Churches. ...


Unction may also be given during Forgiveness Vespers and Great Week, on Great and Holy Wednesday, to all who are prepared. Those who receive Untion on Holy Wednesday should go to Holy Communion on Maundy Thursday. The significance of receiving Unction on Holy Wednesday is shored up by the hymns in the Triodion for that day, which speak of the sinful woman who anointed the feet of Christ (Matthew 26:6-16). Just as her sins were forgiven because of her penitence, so the faithful are exhorted to repent of their sins. In the same narrative, Jesus says, "in that she hath poured ths ointment on my body, she did it for my burial" (Id., v. 12), linking the unction with Christ's death and resurrection. Clean Monday (Greek: Καθαρή Δευτέρα), also known as Ash Monday or (in Cyprus only) Green Monday, is the first day of the Eastern Orthodox Christian lent. ... Holy Week (Latin: ) in Christianity is the last week of Lent. ... In Christianity, Holy Wednesday is the Wednesday of Holy Week, the week before Easter. ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ... The Last Supper - museum copy of Master Pauls sculpture, from the main altar in St. ... The Triodion (Greek: ; Slavonic: Постнаѧ Трїωдь/Postnaya Triod; Romanian: ), also called the Lenten Triodion (Τριῴδιον κατανυκτικόν/Triodion katanuktikon), is the liturgical book used by the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches of Byzantine rite during Great Lent and the preparatory weeks leading up to it. ...


In some dioceses the Russian Orthodox Church it is customary for the bishop to visit each parish or region of the diocese sometime during Great Lent and serve Unction for the faithful, together with the local clergy. Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Great Lent is the greatest fasting period in the church year in Eastern Christianity, which prepares Christians for the greatest feast of the church year, Easter (or Holy Pascha). Although it is in many ways similar to Lent in Western Christianity, there are important differences in the timing of Lent...


Anglican Communion

Some members of the Anglican churches consider Extreme Unction a sacrament since they recognize the same seven sacraments of Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy. Some Anglicans only deem rites established by Jesus Christ himself to be sacraments. However, all accept that anointing of the sick is an "outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace" which is the definition of a sacrament. Hence, most would accept that anointing has a sacramental character and is therefore a channel of God's grace. The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ...


Protestant Churches

Protestant Churches have either revived the practice of anointing the sick in the past century or have always offered the rite since the Protestant Reformation with varying degrees of frequency and a wide variety of liturgical formats. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For other uses, see Reformation (disambiguation). ...


Liturgical or Mainline Protestant churches (e.g. Presbyterian, Congregationalist/United Church of Christ, Methodist, Lutheran, etc.) all have official yet often optional liturgical rites for the anointing of the sick which are modeled in part on traditional pre-Reformation rites. Anointing need not be associated with grave illness or imminent danger of death as is the usual custom in the Roman Catholic Church. In this, Protestant churches are similar in practice to the Eastern Orthodox churches since one need not be near death or even physically sick to receive anointing. While most Protestant churches have no formal set of Last Rites, all offer Communion to the sick, confession or some form of assurance of pardon for sins, and anointing or laying on of hands or both to persons gravely ill. The frequency of the practice of anointing of the sick varies greatly among Protestant congregations - some local churches may practice anointing frequently and include it in the Sunday service weekly or monthly, while others may offer it rarely or never - though if a congregant requested it, it is more than likely a minister would agree to perform the rite. Most Protestant churches allow laypersons to administer these rites, but the usual officiant would be an ordained minister. Laying on of hands for the sick without anointing is also common in mainline Protestant churches. In all cases, whether the rite includes anointing, laying on of hands or both, the recipient need not be physically ill. Many churches offer this ritual for the healing of body, mind or spirit to anyone wishing to receive it. There is no limit on how often the rite can be administered. While confession of sins may accompany the rite (usually as a general confession and absolution), it is not required. From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may be refer to, or include, an elaborate... In the United States, the Mainline churches are those Protestant denominations with moderate theologies which attempt to be open to new ideas and societal changes without abandoning what they consider to be the historical basis of the Christian faith. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The laying on of hands is a religious practice found throughout the world in varying forms. ... The laying on of hands is a religious practice found throughout the world in varying forms. ...


Protestant churches vary widely on the sacramental character of anointing. Evangelical churches generally use the term ordinance rather than sacrament. Mainline Protestants have two sacraments (the Lord's Supper and Baptism) with anointing being deemed one of the rites of the church. In Charismatic and Pentecostal churches, anointing of the sick is a frequent practice and it has been an important ritual in these churches since their respective movements were founded in the 19th and 20th centuries. These churches use a non-liturgical form for its administration drawing direct inspiration from the James passage quoted above. The officiant need not be an ordained pastor. There is minimal ceremony attached to its administration, but the act can be a highly emotional and powerful experience. It is the usual practice that several people will physically touch the recipient (laying on of hands) during the anointing. It is often practiced as part of a worship service with the full assembly of the church present, but is also practiced in more private settings, such as homes or hospital rooms. Pentecostal Christians believe that physical healing is within the anointing and so there is often great expectation or at least great hope that a miraculous cure or improvement will occur when someone is being prayed over for healing. In Mormonism, an ordinance is a religious ritual of special significance, often involving the formation of a covenant with God. ... The Lords Supper is a variation of the name and the service of The Last Supper or Eucharist. ... Baptism in early Christian art. ... Charismatic is an umbrella term used to describe those Christians who believe that the manifestations of the Holy Spirit seen in the first century Christian Church, such as healing, miracles and glossolalia, are available to contemporary Christians and ought to be experienced and practiced today. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ...


In Evangelical and Fundamentalist Christian churches, anointing of the sick is performed with varying degrees of frequency, although laying on of hands may be more common than anointing. The ritual would be similar to that of Charismatic and Pentecostal churches in its simplicity, but would usually not have the same emotionalism attached to it. Unlike Pentecostals, Evangelicals and Fundamentalists generally do not believe that physical healing is within the anointing. Therefore, God may or may not grant physical healing to the sick. The healing conferred by anointing is thus a spiritual event that may not result in physical recovery. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... Look up fundamentalism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


With the shortage of Roman Catholic priests in the United States, US military chaplains are often Protestant ministers, but many soldiers are Catholics. In recent conflicts in Iraq, Protestant chaplains are often called upon to give wounded or dying soldiers Last Rites on the battle field or in field hospitals. Almost all do so when no priest is available, and they consider that charity demands that they offer comfort to these persons in a form that is customary to them. Some Protestant chaplains carry the Roman Rite version of the Anointing of the Sick with them for this purpose. However, the Catholic Church holds that only validly ordained priests, such as those of the Eastern Orthodox Church and Oriental Orthodoxy, as well as its own clergy, can confer the sacrament of Anointing of the Sick and Penance. It does not extend the same recognition to Protestant clergy. A priest shortage describes the situation of a reduced number of priests in a certain area. ... Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article, refers to the sui juris particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church that developed in the area of western Europe and northern Africa where Latin was for many centuries the language of education and culture. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to...


Latter Day Saints

Latter Day Saint Christians —who consider themselves restorationists rather than Protestants—also practice ritual anointing of the sick and anointing for other purposes. Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints consider anointing to be an ordinance (see category:Latter Day Saint ordinances, rituals, and symbolism). The term Latter Day Saint most commonly refers to (but is not limited to) members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints which, its members believe, was founded under the direction of Jesus Christ by the prophet Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Restorationism is not a single religious movement, but a wave of comparably motivated movements that arose in the eastern United States and Canada in the early 19th century in the wake of the Second Great Awakening. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ... In Mormonism, an ordinance is a religious ritual of special significance, often involving the formation of a covenant with God. ...


Administration to the sick is one of the eight sacraments practiced in the Community of Christ. In the Community of Christ the sacrament of administration to the sick has also been known to be practiced for people seeking spiritual, emotional or mental healing. The sacraments are viewed as vital ministries in the Community of Christ for both individual and community spiritual development. ... The sacraments are viewed as vital ministries in the Community of Christ for both individual and community spiritual development. ... It has been suggested that Community of Christ membership statistics be merged into this article or section. ...


References

  1. ^ The Council of Trent (Sess. XIV, cap. i, De Extr. Unct.) in an English translation quoted in Catholic Encyclopedia; the Coptic Church (Sacrament of Unction of the Sick); Old Catholic Church (Unction of the Sick); etc.
  2. ^ Community of Christ: The Sacraments
  3. ^ canon 997 of the Code of Canon Law]; cf. apostolic constitution Sacram Unctionem Infirmorum of 30 November 1972; and Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1512-1513

Christ - Coptic Art Coptic Orthodox Christianity is the indigenous form of Christianity that, according to tradition, the apostle Mark established in Egypt in the middle of the 1st century AD (approximately AD 60). ... The Old Catholic Church is a community of Christian churches. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Western

Eastern


  Results from FactBites:
 
Anointing of the Sick - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (760 words)
Anointing of the Sick is one of the sacraments of the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion of Churches, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Oriental Orthodox Churches, and is also administered in some Protestant Churches.
Anointing of the Sick can be administered on an individual basis according to the individual person's needs, at home or in a hospital, usually (in the case of Catholics) in connection with Confession and administration of Holy Communion.
Anointing other parts of the body was obligatory in the Western Church before the Second Vatican Council (when the sacramental form was "Through this holy anointing, may the Lord pardon you whatever sins you have committed"), and still is in the Eastern Churches.
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