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Encyclopedia > Anne de Mowbray, 8th Countess of Norfolk

Anne de Mowbray, 8th Countess of Norfolk, later Duchess of York and Duchess of Norfolk (10 December 1472 - 19 November (?) 1481) was the child bride of Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York, one of the Princes in the Tower, and died at the age of 9. December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 20 - The Orkneys and Shetlands are annexed to the crown of Scotland Discovery of Newfoundland by Didrik Pining and João Vaz Corte-Real. ... November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events May 3 - Mehmed II, Sultan of the Ottoman Empire dies and is succeeded by his son Beyazid II. May 21 - Christian I, King of Denmark and Norway dies and is succeeded by his son John (1481-1513) With the death of Duke Charles IV of Anjou, Anjou was reverted... Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York and 1st Duke of Norfolk (17 August 1473–1483?) was the second son of King Edward IV of England and Elizabeth Woodville and, thus, the younger brother of King Edward V. In January 1478, when he was about 4 years old, he married... The Princes in the Tower Edward V of England (1470–1483?) and Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York, (1473–1483?) were the two young princes, sons of Edward IV of England and Elizabeth Woodville, who were declared illegitimate by the Act of Parliament known as Titulus Regius. ...


She was born at Framlingham Castle in Suffolk, the only (surviving) child of John de Mowbray, 4th Duke of Norfolk and Elizabeth Talbot. Her maternal grandparents were John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and his second wife Lady Margaret Beauchamp. Framlingham Castle is an important castle in the market town of Framlingham, Suffolk, England. ... Suffolk (pronounced suffuk) is a large traditional and administrative county in the East Anglia region of eastern England. ... John Mowbray, 4th Duke of Norfolk was born in 1444 and died in 1476. ... John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury (1384/90-17 July 1453) was an important English military commander during the Hundred Years War. ...


The death of her father in 1476 left Anne a wealthy heiress. On 15 January 1478, she was married in St. Stephen's Chapel, Westminster, to Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York, the 4-year-old son of Edward IV of England and Queen consort Elizabeth Woodville. They were married rather than betrothed — as would have been the custom for children of their ages — so that the king could get control of her vast estates. January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events February 18 - George, Duke of Clarence, convicted of treason against his older brother Edward IV of England, is privately executed in the Tower of London. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470-1471. ... King George V of the United Kingdom and his consort, Queen Mary A queen consort is the wife and consort of a reigning king. ... Elizabeth Woodville or Wydville (c. ...


Anne died at Greenwich in London, nearly two years before her husband disappeared into the Tower of London with his older brother Edward V of England, and she was entombed in a lead coffin in the Chapel of St. Erasmus of Formiae in Westminster Abbey. When that chapel was demolished in about 1502 to make way for the Henry VII Lady Chapel, Anne's coffin was moved to a vault under the Abbey of the Minoresses, run by nuns of the Order of Poor Ladies, which eventually disappeared. Greenwich (pronounced gren-itch , or by the locals) is a town, now part of the south eastern urban sprawl of London, on the south bank of the river Thames in the London Borough of Greenwich. ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... The Tower of London, seen from the river, with a view of the water gate called Traitors Gate. ... Edward V (4 November 1470 – 1483?) was an English monarch, although never crowned. ... Saint Erasmus of Formiae (died AD 303), also known as Saint Elmo, is the patron saint of sailors. ... Westminster Abbeys western facade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to as Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral, in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Events January 1 - Portuguese explorers sailed into Guanabra Bay, Brazil and mistook it for the mouth of a river which they named Rio de Janeiro May 9 - Christopher Columbus leaves Spain for his fourth and final trip to the New World. May 21 - Portuguese discover island of St Helena. ... The Henry VII Lady Chapel is a large chapel at the far eastern end of Westminster Abbey. ... The Order of Poor Ladies, also known as the Poor Clares, the Poor Clare Nuns, the Clarisse, or the Minoresses is a Franciscan order founded by Saint Clare of Assisi. ...


In December 1964, construction workers in Stepney accidentally dug into the vault and found Anne's coffin. It was opened, and her remains were analyzed by scientists and then entombed in Westminster Abbey in May 1965. Her red hair was still on her skull and her shroud still wrapped around her. 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Stepney is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. ... Westminster Abbeys western facade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to as Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral, in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Earls and dukes of Norfolk - LoveToKnow 1911 (3019 words)
Norfolk was deprived of his offices, but not of his titles; his "heavier doom" was exile for life, and he was ordered to confine himself to Germany, Hungary and Bohemia.
Norfolk was a brutal and licentious man, but was a supporter of the Roman church, being, as he himself admits, "quick against the sacramentaries." As a soldier he was serviceable to Henry VIII., but as a diplomatist he was a failure, being far inferior to Wolsey and to Cromwell.
Norfolk's first wife, Mary (1540-1557), daughter and heiress of Henry Fitzalan, 12th earl of Arundel, bore him a son, Philip, who in consequence of his father's attainder was not allowed to succeed to the dukedom of Norfolk, but became 13th earl of Arundel in succession to his maternal grandfather in 1580.
Earl of Norfolk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (274 words)
Arundel's grandson, the 20th Earl of Arundel and 3rd Earl of Norfolk, was restored to the Dukedom as 5th Duke upon the Restoration in 1660, and the title continues to be borne by the Dukes of Norfolk.
Margaret of Brotherton, Duchess of Norfolk, 2nd Countess of Norfolk (d.
Thomas Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk, 3rd Earl of Norfolk (1365-1399) (dukedom forfeit 1399)
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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