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Encyclopedia > Anne de Montmorency
Anne de Montmorency, 1530. By Jean Clouet.
Anne de Montmorency, 1530. By Jean Clouet.

Anne de Montmorency, duc de Montmorency, KG (March 15, 1493November 12, 1567), was a French soldier, statesman and diplomat. He became Marshal of France and Constable of France. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... François I of France - Jean and François Clouet (c. ... This is an incomplete list of people who have been created honorary Knights (or Dames) by the British crown, as well as those who have been raised to the two comparable Orders of Chivalry (Order of Merit and Order of the Companions of Honour) and the Royal Victorian Chain, which... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1493 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The Duke of Alva arrives in the Netherlands with Spanish forces to suppress unrest there. ... Baton of a modern Marshal of France The Marshal of France (French: Maréchal de France) is a military distinction in contemporary France, not a military rank. ... The Constable of France (French connétable de France, from Latin comes stabulari for count of the stables), as the First Officer of the Crown, was one of the original five Great Officers of the Crown of France (along with seneschal, chamberlain, butler, and chancellor) and Commander in Chief of...

Contents

Early life

Montmorency was born at Chantilly to the ancient Montmorency family. His father had a senior status in the household of the king Louis XII. As a young boy he was brought up with the future King Francis I and they became close. In 1512 de Montmorency fought at the Battle of Ravenna, and in 1514 his sister Louise de Montmorency married Gaspard I de Coligny, and their children included the admiral of France. Chantilly is a commune in the metropolitan area of Paris, France. ... Montmorency is the name of one of the oldest and most distinguished families in France, derived from the city of Montmorency, now in the Val-dOise département, in the immediate neighborhood of Enghien-les-Bains and Saint-Denis, and about 9 m. ... Louis XII (b. ... Francis I (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... The Battle of Ravenna, fought on April 11, 1512, by forces of the Holy League and France, was a major battle of the Italian Wars. ... Louise de Montmorency, wife of Gaspard I de Coligny and sister of the future constable, she had three sons: Odet, Cardinal de Châtillon; Gaspard, the Admiral; and François, Seigneur dAndelot. ... Gaspard I de Coligny, known as the Marshal of Châtillon, served in the Italian Wars from 1495 to 1515, and was created Marshal of France in 1516. ... Gaspard de Coligny Gaspard de Coligny (February 16, 1519 – August 24, 1572), Seigneur (Lord) de Châtillon held the office of Admiral of France and is best remembered as a Huguenot leader. ...


Reign of Francis I

When the young king acceded to the throne in January 1515, de Montmorency became an influential member of his court. When the king reasserted the French claim to Milan the same year, De Montmorency followed his king into Italy and distinguished himself at Marignano. For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... Combatants France, Republic of Venice Duchy of Milan Commanders Francis I, Gian Giacomo Trivulzio, Bartolomeo dAlviano, Louis de la Trémoille Maximilian Sforza, Cardinal Matthaeus Schiner Strength 30,000 Unknown The Battle of Marignano, in the phase of the Italian Wars (1494–1559) that is called the War of...


De Montmorency was named captain of the Bastille in 1516 and became governor of Novara. In 1518 he was one of the hostages in England for Francis' debt to Henry VIII for the city of Tournai. He returned to France to attend a short and unsuccessful peace conference between the French and the Holy Roman Empire in May 1519. In 1520 he was present at the Field of the Cloth of Gold and afterwards had charge of diplomatic negotiations in England when relations between the two once again countries began to sour. This article is about the building. ... Novara is a city of Piedmont, in North-west Italy, to the west of Milan. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... Tournai (in Dutch: Doornik in Latin: Tornacum) is a municipality located 85 kilometres southwest of Brussels, on the river Scheldt (in French: Escaut, in Dutch: Schelde), in the Belgian province of Hainaut. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... The Field of Cloth of Gold , or in French Le Camp du Drap dOr, is the name given to a place in Balinghem, between Guînes and Ardres, in France, near Calais. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy...


In August 1521, de Montmorency helped to command the defence of Mézières against the Imperial German army. In the same year he commanded Swiss troops in Italy. His troops were defeated in the Battle of La Bicocca on April 27, 1522 but he was made Marshal of France in recognition of his courage. Charleville-Mézières is a town and commune in northeastern France, préfecture (capital) of the Ardennes département which is itself part of the Champagne-Ardenne région. ... Swiss mercenaries crossing the Alps (Luzerner Schilling) Swiss mercenaries were soldiers notable for their service in foreign armies, especially the armies of the Kings of France, throughout the Early Modern period of European history, from the Later Middle Ages into the Age of the European Enlightenment. ... Combatants France, Republic of Venice Holy Roman Empire, Spain, Papal States, Duchy of Milan Commanders Vicomte de Lautrec Prospero Colonna Strength 19,000–31,000+[1] 7,000+[2] Casualties 3,000+ killed Light The Battle of Bicocca, sometimes known as the Battle of La Bicocca, was fought on April... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 9 - Adrian Dedens becomes Pope Adrian VI. February 26 - Execution by hanging of Cuauhtémoc, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan under orders of conquistador Hernán Cortés. ... Baton of a modern Marshal of France The Marshal of France (French: Maréchal de France) is a military distinction in contemporary France, not a military rank. ...


De Montmorency spent the next three years defending northern France against the English invasion of 1523. By that time England had allied with the Holy Roman Empire. In 1524 he again joined Francis I in a campaign to retake Milan. On February 24, 1525 the allied army of Italians, Spanish and Germans defeated the French at the Pavia and captured both de Montmorency and his king. Both of them were sent to Spain but de Montmorency was released soon afterwards. He was one of the negotiators of the Treaty of Madrid in 1526 and attended his king when he was exchanged for his two eldest sons. In 1530 he returned the king's sons into France. is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 21 - The Swiss Anabaptist Movement was born when Conrad Grebel, Felix Manz, George Blaurock, and about a dozen others baptized each other in the home of Manzs mother on Neustadt-Gasse, Zürich, breaking a thousand-year tradition of church-state union. ... “Battle of Pavia” redirects here. ... The Treaty of Madrid was a truce signed between Francis I of France and Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire and the Monarchia. ...


On March 23, 1526 de Montmorency was named Grand Master of France charged with supervision of the royal household and the king's private service. In 1527 he married Madeleine, the daughter of René of Savoy. He supported the king's efforts to form an alliance against Charles V. He worked with Cardinal Wolsey to form an alliance between Francis I and Henry VIII in 1527. This led to a new war against the Holy Roman empire that ended with the Peace of Cambrai. is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 14 - Treaty of Madrid. ... The Grand Master of France or Grand Maître de France was, during the Ancien Régime and Bourbon Restoration in France, one of the Great Officers of the Crown of France and head of the Maison du Roi, the kings royal household. ... For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ... Thomas Cardinal Wolsey, (c. ... Combatants Holy Roman Empire, Spain, Genoa France, Papal States, Republic of Venice, Florence, England, Duchy of Milan Commanders Charles de Bourbon â€ , Georg Frundsberg, Philibert of Châlon â€  Vicomte de Lautrec *, Francesco Ferruccio â€ , Giovanni de Medici â€ , Comte de St. ...


In 1536 Francis I invaded the Savoy, against the advice of de Montmorency, staking claim to the lands of the duchy but also to pressure Charles V to give Milan back to him. Charles V invaded Provence from Northern Italy in retaliation. Francis appointed De Montmorency, who had now retired from the court to be a governor of Languedoc, the lieutenant general in the southeast of France and they led the defence of Provence using scorched earth tactics. De Montmorency evacuated Aix-en-Provence and concentrated his forces near Avignon. By the early autumn Charles V had retreated his army to Genova and lifted the siege of Marseille. For the earlier history of Savoy, see County of Savoy. ... Coat of arms of Provence Provence (Provençal Occitan: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm) was a Roman province and now is a region of southeastern France on the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to Italy. ... For the computer game, see Scorched Earth (computer game). ... Aix (prounounced eks), or, to distinguish it from other cities built over hot springs, Aix-en-Provence is a city in southern France, some 30 km north of Marseille. ... For the Municipality in Quebec, see Avignon Regional County Municipality, Quebec. ... Alternate uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban...


De Montmorency joined the king in Picardy and at the end of the Netherlands campaign marched to the relief of Turin. He led the French troops in 1537 when they attacked Artois in the Netherlands and captured many towns before the ten-year truce. On February 10 1538 the king made him Constable of France. Coat of arms of Picardy Picardy (French: Picardie) is an historical province of France, in the north of France. ... Torino redirects here. ... The Constable of France (French connétable de France, from Latin comes stabulari for count of the stables), as the First Officer of the Crown, was one of the original five Great Officers of the Crown of France (along with seneschal, chamberlain, butler, and chancellor) and Commander in Chief of...

Equestrian monument to Anne de Montmorency in the courtyard of his chateau at Chantilly.
Equestrian monument to Anne de Montmorency in the courtyard of his chateau at Chantilly.

Afterwards de Montmorency begun to support peace with the Holy Roman Emperor, against the prevailing attitude of the court. He renewed negotiations with the Holy Roman Empire and encouraged the Pope Paul II to create a settlement. He managed to get the two kings to meet at Aigues-Mortes in July 1538. According to the deal he had brokered, Francis expected that Charles would give Milan to one of Francis' sons as a sign of alliance, but Charles gave the title to his son Philip. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 430 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)A picture of Chateau de Chantilly, taken in March 2005 by Craig Patik For high resolution version (2304x1728) feel free to contact user Patik I... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 430 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)A picture of Chateau de Chantilly, taken in March 2005 by Craig Patik For high resolution version (2304x1728) feel free to contact user Patik I... The front entrance and courtyard at the Château de Chantilly The Château de Chantilly is a historic château located in the town of Chantilly, France. ... Paul II, cardinal-nephew of Eugene IV, who was cardinal-nephew of Gregory XII. Paul II (February 23, 1417 – July 26, 1471), born Pietro Barbo, was Pope from 1464 until his death in 1471. ...


The result was a diplomatic failure and de Montmorency fell out of royal favor. Francis turned to his rivals Cardinal Tournon, Claude d'Annebault and his mistress Anne de Pisseleu d'Heilly, the Duchess of Etampes. De Montmorency retired from court in June 1541. De Montmorency lost his post as a governor of Languedoc and was forbidden to exercise his other offices. He continued to maintain correspondence with the prince Henry. Anne de Pisseleu dHeilly Anne de Pisseleu dHeilly, duchesse dÉtampes (1508 – 1580), mistress of Francis I of France, daughter of Guillaume de Pisseleu, a nobleman of Picardy. ...


Henry II

De Montmorency did not return to public life until the accession of Henry II in March 1547. The new king gave him back all his former offices and dismissed the Duchess of Etampes and her followers. In 1548 de Montmorency crushed the insurrections in the southwest, particularly at Bordeaux. Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... For other uses, see Bordeaux (disambiguation). ...


On 1549-1550 de Montmorency led the war in the Boulonnais, negotiating the treaty for the surrender of Boulogne on March 24, 1550. As a reward the king created him a duke and peer of France and in 1551 his barony was expanded into a duchy. Soon afterwards his armies fought in the northeast when the French army seized Metz, Toul and Verdun. The Boulounnais is a patch of chalk country in the Pas de Calais in France. ... Boulogne-sur-Mer is a city and commune in northern France, in the Pas-de-Calais département of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 7 - Julius III becomes Pope. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) Cathedral St. ... Cathédrale Saint-Étienne de Toul Toul is a historic fortified town of France, a sous-préfecture of the Meurthe-et-Moselle département. ... Verdun, (German: Wirten) sometimes also called Verdun-sur-Meuse, is a city and commune in northeast France, in the Meuse département, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ...


Francis II

De Montmorency's attempt to relieve St Quentin in August 10, 1557 led to his defeat and capture. He was not released until October 1558, at the Peace of Cateau-Cambrésis. The Spanish won a significant victory over the French in the Battle of San Quentin (1557) during the Franco-Habsburg War (1551-1559), which Philip II of Spain resumed having gained English support with Queen Mary as an ally. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Spain is effectively bankrupt. ... The Peace of Cateau-Cambrésis is an agreement reached between Elizabeth I of England and Henry II of France on April 2 and between Henry II and Philip II of Spain on April 3, 1559, at Le Cateau-Cambrésis, around twenty kilometres south-east of Cambrai, that ended...


By this time the Guises had supplanted him and the 15-year-old king Francis II treated him with indifference. De Montmorency had to give up his Great Master status to the Duke of Guise. However, his son was appointed marshal by way of indemnity. He himself retired to his estates. The House of Guise was a French ducal family, primarily responsible for the French Wars of Religion. ... Francis II (French: François II) (January 19, 1544 – December 5, 1560) was a King of France (1559 – 1560). ...


French Wars of Religion

On the accession of Charles IX in 1560 de Montmorency again assumed his duties in the court. However, when the Protestant-minded Bourbons begun to assert influence over the young king, Catholic de Montmorency left the court again. In April, 1561 he allied with Francis, Duke of Guise, his former enemy, and Jacques d'Albon, Marshal Saint-Andre to form the Triumvirate, an association for the defense of Catholicism. Charles IX (June 27, 1550 – May 30, 1574) born Charles-Maximilien, was a member of the Valois Dynasty, King of France from 1560 until his death. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... // Events The Edict of Orleans suspends the persecution of the Huguenots. ... Francis, Duke of Guise Francis II, Prince of Joinville, Duke of Guise, Duke of Aumale (February 17, 1519 – February 24, 1563), called Balafré (the scarred), was a French soldier and politician. ... As a Christian ecclesiastical term, Catholic—from the Greek adjective , meaning general or universal[1]—is described in the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: ~Church, (originally) whole body of Christians; ~, belonging to or in accord with (a) this, (b) the church before separation into Greek or Eastern and Latin or...


De Montmorency played an important part in the war of 1562. He was captured early in the Battle of Dreux when the cavalry under him was routed. De Montmorency's soldiers eventually won the battle, but it was one of the bloodiest of the 16th century. He helped to negotiate the Treaty of Amboise on March 19, 1563. Combatants Catholics Huguenots Commanders Anne de Montmorency, Guise Louis I, Prince of Condé, Coligny Strength Casualties de Montmorency captured Louis I captured The Battle of Dreux was fought on December 19, 1562 between Catholics and Huguenots. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 1 - Sarsa Dengel succeeds his father Menas as Emperor of Ethiopia February 18 - The Duke of Guise is assassinated while besieging Orléans March - Peace of Amboise. ...


In 1567 the Huguenots tried to pressure for a better settlement, threatening the King. In November 10 1567 de Montmorency led the royal army to victory in the Battle of Saint-Denis, but was himself fatally wounded. He died in Paris two days later. The Battle of Saint-Denis was fought on November 10, 1567 between Catholics and Protestants during the French Wars of Religion in Saint-Denis near Paris, France . ...


Children

His marriage produced twelve children:

  • François (1530-1579), succeeded his father as duke of Montmorency.
  • Henri (1534-1614), succeeded his elder brother as duke of Montmorency.
  • Charles
  • Gabriel
  • Guillaume (died 1593)
  • Eléonore (died 1557)
  • Jeanne (1528-1596), married Louis III de La Trémoille.
  • Catherine
  • Marie
  • Anne
  • Louise
  • Madeleine

François, Duc de Montmorency (1530 - 1579), was the eldest son of the first Duc de Montmorency, Anne. ... Henri I de Montmorency (1534 - 1614), Marshal of France, became duc de Montmorency on his brothers death in 1579, had been governor of Languedoc since 1563. ...

Family tree

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Guillaume de Montmorency
 
Anne Pot
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gaspard I
 
Louise de Montmorency
 
Anne de Montmorency
 
Madeleine,
daughter of
René of Savoy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gaspard II
 
Odet
 
François
 
François de
Montmorency
 
Henry
 
10 others
 
 
 
 
 
 
François
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gaspard III
Preceded by
elevated from Barony
Duc de Montmorency
15511567
Succeeded by
Francois

Gaspard I de Coligny, known as the Marshal of Châtillon, served in the Italian Wars from 1495 to 1515, and was created Marshal of France in 1516. ... Louise de Montmorency, wife of Gaspard I de Coligny and sister of the future constable, she had three sons: Odet, Cardinal de Châtillon; Gaspard, the Admiral; and François, Seigneur dAndelot. ... Gaspard de Coligny Gaspard de Coligny (February 16, 1519 – August 24, 1572), Seigneur (Lord) de Châtillon held the office of Admiral of France and is best remembered as a Huguenot leader. ... Odet de Coligny (10 July 1517 - 14 February 1571), cardinal of Châtillon, bishop of Beauvais, son of Gaspard I de Coligny and Louise de Montmorency, and brother of Gaspard and François, Seigneur dAndelot. ... François, Duc de Montmorency (1530 - 1579), was the eldest son of the first Duc de Montmorency, Anne. ... Henri I de Montmorency (1534 - 1614), Marshal of France, became duc de Montmorency on his brothers death in 1579, had been governor of Languedoc since 1563. ... The title of Duc de Montmorency was created several times for members of the Montmorency family. ... Year 1551 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Events The Duke of Alva arrives in the Netherlands with Spanish forces to suppress unrest there. ... François, Duc de Montmorency (1530 - 1579), was the eldest son of the first Duc de Montmorency, Anne. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • Glenn Richardson - Anne de Montmorency: Great Master, Great Survivor (History Today September 2002)
Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Anne, Duc de Montmorency - LoveToKnow 1911 (459 words)
ANNE, DUC DE MONTMORENCY (1493-1567), constable of France, was born at Chantilly, and was brought up with the future King Francis I., whom he followed into Italy in 1515, distinguishing himself especially at Marignano.
Released soon afterwards, he was one of the negotiators of the treaty of Madrid, and in 1530 reconducted the king's sons into France.
On the renewal of the war by Charles V.'s invasion of France in 1536, Montmorency compelled the emperor to raise the siege of Marseilles; he afterwards accompanied the king of France into Picardy, and on the termination of the Netherlands campaign marched to the relief of Turin.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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