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Encyclopedia > Anna Pavlova
Photographic postcard of Anna Pavlova as the Princess Aspicia in the Petipa/Pugni The Pharaoh's Daughter. St. Petersburg, circa 1910.
Photographic postcard of Anna Pavlova as the Princess Aspicia in the Petipa/Pugni The Pharaoh's Daughter. St. Petersburg, circa 1910.

Anna Pavlovna Pavlova (in Russian: А́нна Па́вловна Па́влова) (31 January 1881 (Old Style)/12 February 1881 (New Style) – 23 January 1931) was a famous Russian ballerina of the late 19th and the early 20th century. Her name along with that of Nijinsky is synonymous with the art of ballet. Pavlova is a legend largely remembered for her famous dance The Dying Swan and because she was the first ballerina to travel around the world and bring ballet to people who had never seen it. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Anna Anatolievna Pavlova (Анна Павлова) (born September 6, 1987 in Orekhovo-Zuyevo, Moscow, Russia), is a Russian artistic gymnast training at MGFSO Dynamo in Moscow who was a double bronze medalist (team, vault) at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, Greece. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (435x617, 38 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (435x617, 38 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Pharaohs Daughter is a ballet by Marius Petipa, first performed in 1862. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Old Style redirects here. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... In Britain and countries of the British Empire, Old Style or O.S. after a date means that the date is in the Julian calendar, in use in those countries until 1752; New Style or N.S. means that the date is in the Gregorian calendar, adopted on 14 September... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Maya Plisetskaya, prima ballerina of the Bolshoi Ballet from 1943 to 1960 and prima ballerina assoluta from 1960 to 1990. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Nijinsky can refer to: Vaslav Nijinsky Nijinsky II This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Dying Swan is a poem by Lord Alfred Tennyson. ...

Contents

Life

Pavlova was born two months premature on 12 February [O.S. 31 January] 1881 in Ligovo, a suburb of St. Petersburg, then the capital of the Russian Empire. Her mother was an impoverished laundress named Lyubov Pavlova. The identity of her father has been open to debate: she later claimed her father (who was of possible Jewish origin)[1]) had died when she was two years old. The newspaper The St. Petersburg Gazette published an article in 1913 claiming that her father was a banker named Poliakov, and that her mother's second husband, Matvey Pavlov, had adopted her at the age of three, by which she acquired her last name. is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style redirects here. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ...


Pavlova's passion for the art of ballet was sparked when her mother took her to a performance of Marius Petipa's original production of The Sleeping Beauty at the Imperial Mariinsky Theatre. The lavish spectacle made a profound impression on the young Pavlova, and at the age of eight her mother took her to audition for the renowned Imperial Ballet School. She was rejected due to her age and for what was considered to be a "sickly" physique, but she was finally accepted at the age of ten in 1891. She made her first appearance in a ballet as a cupid in Petipa's Un conte de fées (A Fairy Tale), which the Ballet Master staged especially for the students of the school. For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... Maestro Marius Ivanovich Petipa, Maître de Ballet of the Imperial Theatres. ... Sleeping Beauty (Op. ... The Mariinsky Theatre of St. ... The Mariinsky Ballet is the most famous ballet school in history (formerly the Kirov Ballet), located in the Mariinsky Theatre of St. ... Students of the Imperial Ballet School in the Petipa/Richter A Fairy Tale, St. ...


Pavlova's years at the Imperial Ballet School were difficult. Ballet technique did not come easily to the young Pavlova. Her extremely arched feet, thin ankles, and long limbs clashed with the small, compact body which was at that time in favor for the ballerina. Her fellow students taunted her with such nicknames as The broom and La petite sauvage. Undeterred, Pavlova trained relentlessly to improve her technique. She took extra lessons from the great teachers of the year—Christian Johansson, Pavel Gerdt and Nikolai Legat. In 1898 she entered the classe de perfection of Ekaterina Vazem, former Prima ballerina of the St. Petersburg Imperial Theatres. The Imperial Ballets great teacher Christian Johansson Christian Johansson (1817-1903) was a teacher, choreographer and coaching balletmaster for the Russian Imperial Ballet. ... Pavel Gerdt Pavel Andreyevich Gerdt, better known as Paul Gerdt (1844-1917), was the foremost male dancer of the Mariinsky Theatre for 50 years. ... Nicholas Legat (also spelled Nikolai or Nicolai, 1869 - 1937) was a Russian Balletmaster. ...


During her final year at the Imperial Ballet School, she performed many soloist roles with the principal company, performing small roles in many of the grand ballets of the era. She graduated in 1899 at age 18, being allowed to enter the Imperial Ballet a rank ahead of corps de ballet as a coryphée. She made her debut with the Imperial Ballet performing a variation in Pavel Gerdt's Les Dryades prétendues (The False Dryads), set to music taken from Cesare Pugni's score for Jules Perrot's romantic ballet Éoline, ou La Dryade. Her performance garnered praised from the critics, particularly the great critic and historian Nikolai Bezobrazov, who praised the young danseuse for her " ... natrual ballon, lingering arabesques, and frail femininity.". Maestro Cesare Pugni, London, circa 1843 Cesare Pugni (31 May 1802?, Genoa?, Italy — 26 January 1870, St. ... Jules-Joseph Perrot (born August 18, 1810 in Lyon, France; died August 18, 1892 in Paramé) was a dancer and choreographer who created some of the most famous ballets of the 19th century. ...


At the height of Petipa's strict academicism, the public was at first somewhat reserved in their reaction to Pavlova's unique style—an unusual combination of an extraordinary dance gift that paid little heed to academic rules: she frequently performed with bent knees, poor turnout, misplaced port de bras and incorrectly placed tours. Such a style in many ways harkened back to the time of the romantic ballet and the great ballerinas of old. Pas de Quatre: Carlotta Grisi, Marie Taglioni, Lucile Grahn and Fanny Cerito The Romantic period in ballet occurred in the early to mid 1800s, and roughly corresponds to Romanticism movements in art and literature. ...


Pavlova performed in various classical variations, pas de deux and pas de trois in such ballets as La Camargo, Le Roi Candaule, Marcobomba and The Sleeping Beauty. Her enthusiasm often led her astray—once during a performance as the river Thames in Petipa's The Pharaoh's Daughter her energetic double pique turns led her to lose her balance, and she ended up landing in the prompter's box. Her weak ankles caused her great difficulty during a performance of the variation of the fairy Candide in Petipa's The Sleeping Beauty, leading the ballerina to revise the fairy's hops en pointe, much to the surprise of the Ballet Master Petipa. She nevertheless tried to imitate the great virtuosas of the day, particularly Pierina Legnani, Prima ballerina assoluta of the Imperial Theatres. Once during class she attempted Legnani's fouettés, causing her teacher Pavel Gerdt to fly into a rage. He exclaimed "Leave acrobatics to others ... it is positively more than I can bear to see the pressure such steps put on your delicate muscles and the severe arch of your foot. I beg you to never again try to imitate those who are physically stronger than you. You must realize that your daintiness and fragility are you greatest assets. You should always do the kind of dancing which brings out your own rare qualities instead of trying to win praise by mere acrobatic tricks." This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Pas de deux is also a dressage preformance using two horses. ... (left to right) Elsa Vill, Pierre Vladimirov, and Elizaveta Gerdt in the Paquita Pas de Trois (AKA Minkus Pas de Trois), St. ... Camargo (AKA La Camargo) is a Grand ballet in 3 acts/9 scenes, with choreography by Marius Petipa, and music by Léon Minkus. ... Sleeping Beauty (Op. ... The Pharaohs Daughter is a ballet by Marius Petipa, first performed in 1862. ... The prompters box, also called the prompt box, is the raised box in the apron of a stage, opening towards the actors. ... Pierina Legnani (1863-1923) was an Italian ballerina responsible for the inclusion of 32 consecutive fouettés en tournant en pointe to the ballet Swan Lake. ... Dancer performing Fouetté en tournant Pierina Legnani in the title role of the Petipa/Ivanov/Cecchetti/Fitinhof-Schell Cinderella. ...


Pavlova rose through the ranks quickly, she was a favorite of the old Maestro Petipa. She was second soloist in 1902, Première Danseuse in 1905, and finally Prima Ballerina in 1906 after a resounding performance in Giselle, for which Petipa revised the Ballerina's dances especially for her (they are still performed today in this version at the Mariinsky). Petipa would revise many Grand Pas for the Ballerina, as well as supplemental variations (among them, the famous variation to a solo harp danced by the lead Ballerina of the famous Paquita Grand Pas Classique, to the music of Riccardo Drigo, which Petipa choregraphed for the Ballerina's début in Paquita in 1904). She was much celebrated by the fanatical balletomanes of Tsarist St. Petersburg. Her legions of fans called themselves the Pavlovatzi. She had an extreme amount of fans which made other ballerina's such as Mathilde Kschessinskaya and Tamara Karsavina jealous. Anna Pavlova as Giselle in Act I (ca. ... For more on the equestrian movement, see pirouette (dressage). ... Riccardo Drigo, Circa 1900 Riccardo Eugenio Drigo (June 30, 1846 - October 1, 1930) was an Italian composer and conductor who spent many years working with the Saint Petersburg Imperial Ballet and Imperial Opera. ...


When the Prima ballerina assoluta of the Imperial Theatres Mathilde Kschessinskaya was with child in 1901, she coached Pavlova in the role of Nikya in La Bayadère. Kschessinskaya, not wanting to be upstaged, was certain Pavlova would fail miserably in the role, as she was considered technically inferior due to her small ankles and lithe legs. Instead audiences became enchanted with Pavlova and her frail, ethereal look, which fit the role perfectly, particularly in the scene The Kingdom of the Shades. Maya Plisetskaya, prima ballerina of the Bolshoi Ballet from 1943 to 1960 and prima balerina assoluta from 1960 to 1990. ... Mathilde Kschessinska (Polish: Matylda KrzesiÅ„ska, 19 August 1872 (O.S.) Ligovo near Peterhof — 7 June 1971 Paris), (also known as Her Serene Highness Princess Romanova-Krasinskaya since 1921) was the first Russian prima ballerina assoluta in the world. ...

Anna Pavlova in the Fokine/Saint-Saëns The Dying Swan. St. Petersburg, 1905.
Anna Pavlova in the Fokine/Saint-Saëns The Dying Swan. St. Petersburg, 1905.
Anna Pavlova as Lise in the Pas de ruban from the Petipa/Ivanov/Hertel La Fille Mal Gardée. St. Petersburg, 1912.
Anna Pavlova as Lise in the Pas de ruban from the Petipa/Ivanov/Hertel La Fille Mal Gardée. St. Petersburg, 1912.

Her feet were extremely rigid, so she strengthened her pointe shoe by adding a piece of hard wood on the soles for support and curving the box of the shoe. At the time, many considered this "cheating", for a Ballerina of the era was taught that she, not her shoes, must hold her weight in pointe. In Pavlova's case this was extremely easy, as the shape of her feet required her to balance her weight on her little toes. Her solution became, over time, the precursor of the modern pointe shoe,as pointe work became less painful and easier for curved feet. According to Margot Fonteyn's biography, Pavlova did not like the way her invention looked in photographs, so she would remove it or have the photographs altered so that it appeared she was using a normal pointe shoe. [2] The Dying Swan is a poem by Lord Alfred Tennyson. ... Nadia Nerina as Lise and David Blair as Colas in the Pas de Ruban from Act I of Sir Frederick Ashtons La Fille Mal Gardée, London, 1960 La Fille Mal Gardée (The Badly Watched Daughter) is a Ballet presented in 2 Acts, inspired Choffarts engraving of... Parts of a pointe shoe by ohka- cc-by Pointe shoes (also known as toe shoes) are a special type of shoe used by ballet dancers. ...


In the first years of the Ballets Russes Pavlova worked briefly for Serge Diaghilev. Originally she was to dance the lead in Mikhail Fokine's The Firebird, but refused the part, as she could not come to terms with Stravinsky's avant-garde score, and the role was given to Tamara Karsavina. All her life Pavlova preferred the melodious "Musique dansante" of the old Maestros such as Cesare Pugni and Ludwig Minkus, and cared little for anything else which strayed from the salon-styled ballet music of the 19th century. Léon Bakst: Firebird, Ballerina, 1910 There was also the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo from 1932 to 1963 The Ballets Russes was a ballet company established in 1909 by the Russian impresario Serge Diaghilev and resident first in the Théâtre Mogador and Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris... Sergei Pavlovich Diaghilev (Сергей Павлович Дягилев) (March 19, 1872 – August 19, 1929), often known as Serge, was a Russian ballet impresario and founder of the Ballets Russes from which many famous dancers and choreographers would later arise. ... Michel Fokine or Mikhail Mikhailovich Fokin (Михаил Михайлович Фокин) (April 23, 1880 (OS: April 11) – August 22, 1942) was a Russian choreographer and dancer. ... The Firebird (French: LOiseau de feu; Russian: Жар-птица, Žar-ptica) is a 1910 ballet by Igor Stravinsky. ... Igor Fyodorovitch Stravinsky () (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a composer of modern classical music. ... Tamara Platonovna Karsavina (March 10, 1885 – May 26, 1978) was a famous Russian ballerina who eventually settled in England, where she helped found the Royal Academy of Dancing in 1920. ... Maestro Cesare Pugni, London, circa 1843 Cesare Pugni (31 May 1802?, Genoa?, Italy — 26 January 1870, St. ... Maestro Ludwig Minkus, Paris, circa 1870. ...


By the mid 1900s she founded her own company and performed throughout the world, with a repertory consisting primarily of abridgements from the Imperial Petipa works, and specially choreographed pieces for herself. The ballet writer Cyril Johnson described that "her bourrées were like a string of pearls". The bourree was a dance common in Auvergne and Biscay in Spain in the 17th century, danced in quick double time, somewhat resembling the gavotte. ...


Her most famous showpiece was "The Dying Swan", choreographed for her by Michel Fokine in 1905, danced to The Swan from Carnival of the Animals by Camille Saint-Saëns. Michel Fokine or Mikhail Mikhailovich Fokin (Михаил Михайлович Фокин) (April 23 [O.S. April 11] 1880) – August 22, 1942) was a groundbreaking Russian choreographer and dancer. ... Le Cygne captures the idea of a swimming swan. ... The Carnival of the Animals (Le carnaval des animaux in the original French) is a musical suite of 14 movements by the French Romantic composer Camille Saint-Saëns. ... Charles Camille Saint-Saëns () (9 October 1835 – 16 December 1921) was a French composer, organist, conductor, and pianist, known especially for his large-scale orchestral works The Carnival of the Animals, Danse Macabre, Samson et Dalila, and Symphony No. ...


Death

While touring in The Hague, Netherlands, Pavlova was in a train which malfunctioned and had a mild derailment. Dressed only in pajamas and a light scarf, she got out and walked the length of the train to see what had happened. Three weeks later she was dead of pneumonia, three weeks short of her 50th birthday. Reportedly, she said "If I can't dance then I'd rather be dead," and asked to hold her costume from The Swan. Her last words were "Play that last measure very softly." Hague redirects here. ...


In accordance with old ballet tradition, on the day she was to have next performed, the show went on as scheduled, with a single spotlight circling an empty stage where she would have been. Memorial services were held in the Russian Orthodox church in London. Anna Pavlova was cremated, and her ashes placed in a columbarium at Golders Green Crematorium, where her urn was subsequently adorned with her ballet shoes. Her remains were finally moved in 2001 to the Novodevichy Cemetery in Moscow in accordance with her requests and after considerable controversy.[3] The Russian Orthodox Church (Русская Православная церковь) is that body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Columbarium niches built into the side of St. ... Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum is one of the oldest crematoria in Britain and opened in 1901 having been designed by the architect Sir Ernest George. ... Grave of Anton Chekhov Novodevichy Cemetery (Новодевичье кла́дбище, Novodevichye kladbishche) is the most famous cemetery in Moscow, Russia, situated next to the World Heritage Site, the 16th-century Novodevichy Convent, which is the citys third most popular tourist site. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ...


Other points of her legacy

  • The Pavlova dessert was named after her. Although its origins are disputed with both New Zealand and Australia claiming the credit, the actual earliest first entry of the recipe is found in New Zealand recipe books of the period, before those in Australia. Te Papa - New Zealand's new national museum in Wellington celebrated its first birthday in February 1999 with the creation of the world's largest Pavlova, named "Pavzilla", cut by New Zealand's Prime Minister of the time - the Hon. Jenny Shipley.

A pavlova bought from a Foodtown in New Zealand. ... Not to be confused with Desert. ...

References

  1. ^ Lewis, Jone Johnson. "Anna Pavlova". Retrieved on 23 September 2007.
  2. ^ Fonteyn, Margot, Pavlova, Portrait of a Dancer. Viking, 1984.
  3. ^ Collett-White, Mike. "Row Escalates Over Anna Pavlova's Ashes". The St. Petersburg Times, 13 March 2001. Retrieved on 23 September 2007.

is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
National Library of Australia National Library of Australia as viewed from Lake Burley Griffin The National Library of Australia is located in Canberra, Australia. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Anna Pavlova, great Russian dancer (1233 words)
Anna Pavlova was born on January 31, 1881 in a suburb of St. Petersburg.
Pavlova hadn't the strength for it; her delicate, highly arched feet were too weak for the flamboyant pointework coming into vogue.
But ultimately Pavlova made such a virtue of her over-arched feet that critics said they represented the yearnings of the Russian soul.4 She cleverly devised a shank and platform for her pointe shoes that conserved her energy and let her balance in arabesque until the audience was breathless.
Heroine Worship: Anna Pavlova, The Swan (811 words)
Pavlova was already an acclaimed ballerina when, in 1905, Michel Fokine choreographed "The Dying Swan" for her to music by Saint-Saens; it became her personal emblem.
Anna Pavlova was Magellan as well as Father Junipero Serra, with a little Audubon mixed in, and ballet was her mission.
Anna Pavlova continues to dance for us through her photographs: they evoke a moment in flight, and our imagination recreates the rest.
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