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Encyclopedia > Anna Akhmatova
Akhmatova in 1922 (Portrait by Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin)
Akhmatova in 1922 (Portrait by Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin)

Anna Akhmatova (Russian: А́нна Ахма́това, real name А́нна Андре́евна Горе́нко) (June 23 [O.S. June 11] 1889March 5, 1966) was the pen name of Anna Andreevna Gorenko, the leader and the heart and soul of the Saint Petersburg tradition of Russian poetry for half a century. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kuzma Sergeevich Petrov-Vodkin (Кузьма Сергеевич Петров-Водкин), 1878-1937, is a famous Russian and Soviet painter. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style or O.S. is a designation indicating that a date conforms to the Julian calendar, formerly in use in many countries, rather than the Gregorian calendar, currently in use in most countries. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the day. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and... Russian literature refers to the literature of Russia or its émigrés, and to the Russian-language literature of several independent nations once a part of what was historically Russia or the Soviet Union. ...


Akhmatova's work ranges from short lyric poems to universalized, ingeniously structured cycles, such as Requiem (1935-40), her tragic masterpiece on the Stalinist terror. Her work addresses a variety of themes including time and memory, the fate of creative women, and the difficulties of living and writing in the shadow of Stalinism. For architecture, see Stalinist architecture. ...

Contents

Early life

Akhmatova was born at Bolshoy Fontan in Odessa. Her childhood does not appear to have been happy; her parents separated in 1905. She was educated in Tsarskoe Selo (where she first met her future husband NIkolay Gumilyov) and Kiev. Anna started writing poetry at the age of 11, inspired by her favourite poets: Racine, Pushkin, and Baratynsky. As her father did not want to see any verses printed under his "respectable" name, she chose to adopt the surname of her Tatar grandmother as a pseudonym. The ODESSA, which stands for the German phrase Organisation der ehemaligen SS-Angehörigen, which phrase in turn translates as “Organization of Former Members of the SS,” is the name commonly given to an international Nazi network alleged to have been set up towards the end of World War II... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... Tsarskoye Selo (Царское Село in Russian, may be translated as “Tsar’s Village”), a former residence of the royal families and visiting nobility 24 km south of St. ... Map of Ukraine with Kiev highlighted Coordinates: , Country Ukraine Oblast Kiev City Municipality Raion Municipality Government  - Mayor Leonid Chernovetskyi Elevation 179 m (587 ft) Population (2006)  - City 4,450,968  - Density 3,299/km² (8,544. ... Jean Racine. ... Pushkin may refer to: People Aleksandr Pushkin - a famous Russian poet Apollo Mussin-Pushkin - chemist and plant collector Aleksei Musin-Pushkin - statesman, historian, art collector Other Pushkin, a town in Russia Pushkin Square - square in Moscow Pushkin Museum - fine arts museum in Moscow This is a disambiguation page — a... Evgeny Baratynsky (1800-1844) was a Russian Romantic and symbolic poet. ... Historically, the term Tatar (or Tartar) has been ambiguously used by Europeans to refer to many different peoples of Inner Asia and Northern Asia. ...


[1].

Grey-Eyed King (1910)


Hail to thee, o, inconsolate pain!
The young grey-eyed king has been yesterday slain.


That autumnal evening was stuffy and red.
My husband, returning, had quietly said,


"He'd left for his hunting; they carried him home;
They found him under the old oak's dome.


I pity his queen. He, so young, passed away!...
During one night her black hair turned to grey."


He picked up his pipe from the fireplace shelf,
And went off to work for the night by himself.


Now my daughter I will wake up and rise --
And I will look in her little grey eyes...


And murmuring poplars outside can be heard:
Your king is no longer here on this earth.
[2]

Many of the male Russian poets of the time declared their love for Akhmatova; she reciprocated the attentions of Osip Mandelstam, whose wife Nadezhda Mandelstam would eventually forgive Akhmatova in her autobiography, Hope Against Hope [2]. In 1910, she married the boyish poet Nikolay Gumilyov, who very soon left her for lion hunting in Africa, the battlefields of the World War I, and the society of Parisian grisettes. Her husband did not take her poems seriously, and was shocked when Alexander Blok declared to him that he preferred her poems to his. Their son, Lev, born in 1912, was to become a famous Neo-Eurasianist historian. Osip Mandelstam Osip Emilyevich Mandelstam (also spelled Mandelshtam) (Russian: ) (January 15 [O.S. January 3] 1891 – December 27, 1938) was a Jewish Russian poet and essayist, one of the foremost members of the Acmeist school of poets. ... Nadezhda Mandelstam Nadezhda Yakovlevna Mandelstam (Russian: , neé Hazin; 18 October 1899 — 29 December 1980) was a Russian writer and a wife of poet Osip Mandelstam. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Nikolai Gumilev during his senior years in gymnasium Nikolay Stepanovich Gumilyov (Russian: , April 15 NS 1886 - August 1921) was an influential Russian poet who founded the acmeism movement. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Blok in 1907 Alexander Blok (Александр Александрович Блок, November 28 [O.S. November 16] 1880 – August 7, 1921), was perhaps the most gifted lyrical poet produced by Russia after Alexander Pushkin. ... Lev Gumilyov and Anna Akhmatova, 1960s Lev Nikolayevich Gumilyov (Russian: ) (October 1, 1912, St. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Neo-Eurasianism is a Russian school of thought, initiated by Konstantin Leontyev and developed by Lev Gumilev, that thinks of Russia as culturally and ethnically closer to Central Asia than to Europa. ...


Silver Age

In 1912, she published her first collection, entitled Evening. It contained brief, psychologically taut pieces which English readers may find distantly reminiscent of Robert Browning and Thomas Hardy. They were acclaimed for their classical diction, telling details, and the skilful use of colour. // H. E. Monro edits The Poetry Review, journal of the Poetry Recital Society Harriet Munroe founds Poetry: A Magazine of Verse in Chicago (with Ezra Pound as foreign editor); in 1912 she described its policy this way: Ezra Pound, during a meeting with his one-time fiancee Hilda Doolittle in... Robert Browning (May 7, 1812 – December 12, 1889) was a British poet and playwright whose mastery of dramatic verse, especially dramatic monologues, made him one of the foremost Victorian poets. ... “Thomas Hardy” redirects here. ...


By the time her second collection, the Rosary, appeared in 1914, there were thousands of women composing their poems "after Akhmatova". Her early poems usually picture a man and a woman involved in the most poignant, ambiguous moment of their relationship. Such pieces were much imitated and later parodied by Nabokov and others. Akhmatova was prompted to exclaim: "I taught our women how to speak but don't know how to make them silent". // The cover of the first edition of BLAST March — The Little Review founded by Margaret Caroline Anderson as part of Chicagos literary renaissance July 2 — BLAST, a short-lived journal of the Vorticist movement, is founded with the publication of the first of its total of two editions The... Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Russian: Влади́мир Влади́мирович Набо́ков, pronounced ) (April 22 [O.S. April 10] 1899, Saint Petersburg – July 2, 1977, Montreux) was a Russian-American, Academy Award nominated author. ...


Together with her husband, Akhmatova enjoyed a high reputation in the circle of Acmeist poets. Her aristocratic manners and artistic integrity won her the titles of the "Queen of the Neva" and the "soul of the Silver Age", as the period came to be known in the history of Russian poetry. Many decades later, she would recall this blessed time of her life in the longest of her works, the "Poem Without Hero" (1940–65), inspired by Pushkin's Eugene Onegin. Acmeism, or the Guild of Poets, was a poetic school which emerged in 1910 in Russia under leadership of Nikolai Gumilyov and Sergei Gorodetsky. ... Pushkin may refer to: People Aleksandr Pushkin - a famous Russian poet Apollo Mussin-Pushkin - chemist and plant collector Aleksei Musin-Pushkin - statesman, historian, art collector Other Pushkin, a town in Russia Pushkin Square - square in Moscow Pushkin Museum - fine arts museum in Moscow This is a disambiguation page — a... Eugene Onegin (Russian: Евгений Онегин, BGN/PCGN: Yevgeniy Onegin) is a novel in verse written by Aleksandr Pushkin. ...


The accursed years

Nikolay Gumilyov was executed in 1921 for activities considered anti-Soviet; Akhmatova presently remarried a prominent Assyriologist Vladimir Shilejko, and then an art scholar, Nikolay Punin, who died in the Stalinist Gulag camps.[3] After that, she spurned several proposals from the married poet Boris Pasternak. Nikolai Gumilev during his senior years in gymnasium Nikolay Stepanovich Gumilyov (Russian: , April 15 NS 1886 - August 1921) was an influential Russian poet who founded the acmeism movement. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Anti-Soviet refers to persons and activities actually or allegedly aimed against the Soviet Union or the Soviet power within the Soviet Union. ... Nikolai Punin (also spelled in English as Nikolay Punin) (Russian: ) (November 28 [O.S. December 11] 1888 – August 21, 1953) was a Russian art scholar and writer. ... Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვი&#4314... Gulag ( , Russian: ) was the government body responsible for administering prison camps across the former Soviet Union. ... Boris Leonidovich Pasternak (Russian: ) (February 10 [O.S. January 29] 1890 – May 30, 1960) was a Nobel Prize-winning Russian poet and writer, in the West best known for his epic novel Doctor Zhivago. ...

My Way (1940)


One goes in straightforward ways,
One in a circle roams:
Waits for a girl of his gone days,
Or for returning home.


But I do go -- and woe is there --
By a way nor straight, nor broad,
But into never and nowhere,
Like trains -- off the railroad.

After 1922, Akhmatova was condemned as a bourgeois element[2], and from 1925 to 1940 her poetry was banned from publication. She earned her living by translating Leopardi and publishing essays, including some brilliant essays on Pushkin in scholarly periodicals. All of her friends either emigrated or were repressed. Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bourgeois at the end of the thirteenth century. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Giacomo Leopardi Giacomo Leopardi, Count (June 29, 1798; June 14, 1837) was an important Italian poet. ... Pushkin may refer to: People Aleksandr Pushkin - a famous Russian poet Apollo Mussin-Pushkin - chemist and plant collector Aleksei Musin-Pushkin - statesman, historian, art collector Other Pushkin, a town in Russia Pushkin Square - square in Moscow Pushkin Museum - fine arts museum in Moscow This is a disambiguation page — a...


Only a few people in the West suspected that she was still alive, when she was allowed to publish a collection of new poems in 1940. During the Great Patriotic War, when she witnessed the nightmare of the 900-Day Siege, her patriotic poems found their way to the front pages of Pravda. After Akhmatova returned to Leningrad following the Central Asian evacuation in 1944, she was disconcerted with "a terrible ghost that pretended to be my city". Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Eastern Front1 was the theatre of combat between Nazi Germany and its allies against the Soviet Union during World War II. It was somewhat separate from the other theatres of the war, not only geographically, but also for its scale and ferocity. ... Combatants Germany Spanish Blue Division Soviet Union Commanders Wilhelm von Leeb Georg von Küchler Agustín Muñoz Grandes Kliment Voroshilov Georgiy Zhukov Strength 725,000 930,000 Casualties Unknown Red Army: 332,059 KIA 24,324 non-combat dead 111,142 missing 16,470 civilians 1 million civilians... Pravda (Russian: , The Truth) was a leading newspaper of the Soviet Union and an official organ of the Central Committee of the Communist Party between 1912 and 1991. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Upon learning about Isaiah Berlin's visit to Akhmatova in 1946, Stalin's associate in charge of culture, Andrei Zhdanov, publicly labelled her "half harlot, half nun", had her poems banned from publication, and attempted to have her expelled from the Writers' Union, tantamount to a sentence of death by starvation.[2] Her son spent his youth in Stalinist gulags, and she even resorted to publishing several poems in praise of Stalin to secure his release. Their relations remained strained, however. Sir Isaiah Berlin, OM (June 6, 1909 – November 5, 1997), was a political philosopher and historian of ideas, regarded as one of the leading liberal thinkers of the 20th century. ... // W.H. Auden becomes a U.S. citizen Cleanth Brooks, The Well Wrought Urn: Studies in the Structure of Poetry Roy Campbell, Talking Bronco Walter De la Mare, The Traveller Henry Reed, A Map of Verona, including Naming of Parts Dylan Thomas, Deaths and Entrances, including Fern Hill and A... Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვი&#4314... Andrei Zhdanov Andrei Aleksandrovich Zhdanov (Андре́й Алекса́ндрович Жда́нов) (February 26 [O.S. February 14] 1896–August 31, 1948) was a Soviet politician. ... The Zhdanov decree was issued by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union on 10 February 1948. ... Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვი&#4314... Gulag ( , Russian: ) was the government body responsible for administering prison camps across the former Soviet Union. ...


Although officially stifled, Akhmatova's work continued to circulate in samizdat form and even by word of mouth, as she became a symbol of suppressed Russian heritage[2]. Samizdat, book published by Pathfinder Press containing a collection of forbidden Trotskyist Samizdat texts. ... Word of mouth, is a reference to the passing of information by verbal means, especially recommendations, but also general information, in an informal, person-to-person manner. ...


The thaw

After Stalin's death, Akhmatova's preeminence among Russian poets was grudgingly conceded, even by party officials, and a censored edition of her work was published; conspicuously absent was Requiem, which Isaiah Berlin had predicted in 1946 would never be published in the Soviet Union[2]. Her later pieces, composed in neoclassical rhyming and mood, seem to be the voice of many she has outlived. Her dacha in Komarovo was frequented by Joseph Brodsky and other young poets, who continued Akhmatova's traditions of St Petersburg poetry into the 21st century. For the subgenre of darkwave, see Neoclassical (Dark Wave). ... Shchuche Ozero (Pike Lake), Komarovo Komarovo (Russian: ; Finnish: ) is a municipal settlement under jurisdiction of Saint Petersburg, Russia, located on the Karelian Isthmus on the shore of the Gulf of Finland. ... Bookcover of Works and Days in Russian Joseph Brodsky (May 24, 1940 – January 28, 1996), born Iosif Aleksandrovich Brodsky (Russian: ) was a Russian-born poet and essayist who won the Nobel Prize in Literature (1987) and was chosen Poet Laureate of the United States (1991-1992). ...


In honor of her 75th birthday in 1964, special observances were held and new collections of her verse were published.[4] // Sir John Betjeman, Ring of Bells Leonard Cohen, Flowers for Hitler, including The Only Tourist in Havana Turns his Thoughts Homeward Philip Larkin, The Whitsun Weddings. ...


Akhmatova got a chance to meet some of her pre-revolutionary acquaintances in 1965, when she was allowed to travel to Sicily and England, in order to receive the Taormina prize and the honorary doctoral degree from Oxford University (in the trip she was accompanied by her life-long friend and secretary Lydia Chukovskaya). In 1962, her dacha was visited by Robert Frost. In 1968, a two volume collected edition of Akhmatova's prose and poetry was published by Inter-Language Literary Associates of West Germany[2]. // Meic Stephens founds Poetry Wales Russian poet Anna Akhmatova was allowed to travel outside the Soviet Union to Sicily and England in order to receive the Taormina prize and an honorary doctoral degree from Oxford University Randall Jarrell, Little Friend, Little Friend Seamus Heaney, Death of a Naturalist Philip Larkin... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Isola Bella from the North Isola Bella Bay from the south Greek theatre in Taormina Taormina is a small town in the island of Sicily in Italy. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Lydia Chukovskaya Lydia Korneievna Chukovskaya (Russian: ) (March 24, 1907 – February 8, 1996) was a Russian writer and poet. ... // Eric Gregory Award: Donald Thomas, James Simmons, Brian Johnson (poet, Jenny Joseph Queens Gold Medal for Poetry: Christopher Fry National Book Award for Poetry: Alan Dugan, Poems Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Alan Dugan: Poems Poetry List of poetry awards Categories: | ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Song of the Last Meeting (1911)


My breast grew helplessly cold,
But my steps were light.
I pulled the glove from my left hand
Mistakenly onto my right.


It seemed there were so many steps,
But I knew there were only three!
Amidst the maples an autumn whisper
Pleaded: "Die with me!


I'm led astray by evil
Fate, so black and so untrue."
I answered: "I, too, dear one!
I, too, will die with you..."


This is a song of the final meeting.
I glanced at the house's dark frame.
Only bedroom candles burning
With an indifferent yellow flame.

Akhmatova's reputation continued to grow after her death, and it was in the year of her centenary that one of the greatest poetic monuments of the 20th century, Akhmatova's Requiem, was finally published in her homeland.


There is a museum devoted to Akhmatova at the Fountain House (more properly known as the Sheremetev Palace) on the Fontanka Embankment, where Akhmatova lived from the mid 1920s until 1952. Fontanka River in the 1820s. ... The 1920s is a decade that is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Works

Poetry

  • Anna Akhmatova: Poems (1983)
  • Anno Domini MCMXXI (1922) - rus
  • Evening (1912) - rus
  • Plantain (1921)
  • Poems of Akhmatova (1967)
  • Rosary (1914)
  • Selected Poems (1976)
  • Selected Poems (1989)
  • The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova (1990)
  • Twenty Poems of Anna Akhmatova (1985)
  • White Flock (1914)
Anna Akhmatova's Grave in Komarovo (photo by Aleksandr E. Bravo)
Anna Akhmatova's Grave in Komarovo (photo by Aleksandr E. Bravo)

She translated the Collected Works of Rabindranath Tagore in 8 volumes, into Russian. A monumental task for anyone. // Maya Angelou, Shaker, Why Dont You Sing? Elizabeth Bishop, Collected Poems 1927-1979 (posthumous) Amy Clampitt, Kingfisher Hilda Doolittle (H.D.), Collected Poems, 1912–1944 (posthumous) Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry: Vivian Smith, Tide Country See 1983 Governor Generals Awards for a complete list of winners and finalists... // Pulitzer Prize for Poetry established The Criterion appears William Butler Yeats Who goes with Fergus (first published in 1892 is the song James Joyce has his character Stephen Daedalus sing to his mother as she lies dying in the novel Ulysses, published this year (the poem was Joyces favorite... // H. E. Monro edits The Poetry Review, journal of the Poetry Recital Society Harriet Munroe founds Poetry: A Magazine of Verse in Chicago (with Ezra Pound as foreign editor); in 1912 she described its policy this way: Ezra Pound, during a meeting with his one-time fiancee Hilda Doolittle in... // Jorge Luis Borges, writer and poet, returns to Buenos Aires after a period living in Europe. ... // Cecil Day-Lewis is selected as the new Poet Laureate of the UK. Margaret Atwood, The Circle Game Ted Hughes, Wodwo Wole Soyinka, Idanre, and Other Poems See 1967 Governor Generals Awards for a complete list of winners and finalists for those awards. ... // The cover of the first edition of BLAST March — The Little Review founded by Margaret Caroline Anderson as part of Chicagos literary renaissance July 2 — BLAST, a short-lived journal of the Vorticist movement, is founded with the publication of the first of its total of two editions The... // Two poems written in 1965 by Mao Zedong just before the Cultural Revolution, including Two Birds: A Dialogue, are published on January 1[1] Elizabeth Bishop, One Act Marya Fiamengo, In Praise of Older Women Thom Gunn, Jack Straws Castle Derek Walcott, Sea Grapes James Merrill: Divine Comedies, including... // Dead Poets Society, a film with excerpts from many traditional poets, ending with the title and opening line of Walt Whitmans lament on the death of Abraham Lincoln, O Captain! My Captain! My Left Foot, a film about Christy Brown, the Irish poet, and based on his autobiography Edward... // Allen Ginsberg crowned Majelis King in Prague on May Day Maya Angelou, I Shall Not be Moved Derek Walcott, Omeros C. J. Dennis Prize for Poetry: Robert Adamson, The Clean Dark Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry: Robert Adamson, The Clean Dark Mary Gilmore Prize: Kristopher Rassemussen - In the Name of... // The term New Formalism was first used in the article The Yuppie Poet in the May 1985 issue of the AWP Newsletter in an attack on the poetry movement. ... // The cover of the first edition of BLAST March — The Little Review founded by Margaret Caroline Anderson as part of Chicagos literary renaissance July 2 — BLAST, a short-lived journal of the Vorticist movement, is founded with the publication of the first of its total of two editions The... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... (Bengali: , IPA: ) (7 May 1861 – 7 August 1941), also known by the sobriquet Gurudev, was a Bengali poet, Brahmo Samaj philosopher, visual artist, playwright, novelist, and composer whose works reshaped Bengali literature and music in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ...


References

  1. ^ Anderson, Nancy K.; Anna Andreevna Akhmatova (2004). The word that causes death's defeat. Yale University Press. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f James, Clive (2007-02-05). Anna Akhmatova Assessed. Clive's Lives. Slate.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-06.
  3. ^ N. N. (Nikolai Nikolaevich) Punin Diaries. [1]
  4. ^ Harrison E. Salisbury, "Soviet" section of "Literature" article, page 502, Britannica Book of the Year 1965 (covering events of 1964), published by The Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1965

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Harrison Salisbury (November 14, 1908 – March 5, 1993), an American journalist, was the first regular New York Times correspondent in Moscow after World War II. During the Vietnam War, Salisbury was the first mainstream, well known and respected journalist to oppose the war after visiting North Vietnam in 1966 (as...

Bibliography

  • Feinstein, Elaine. Anna of all the Russias: A life of Anna Akhmatova. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2005 (ISBN 0-297-64309-6); N.Y.: Alfred A. Knopf, 2006 (ISBN 1-4000-4089-2).
  • Poem Without a Hero & Selected Poems, trans. Lenore Mayhew and William McNaughton (Oberlin College Press, 1989), ISBN 0-932440-51-7

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
The Academy of American Poets - Anna Akhmatova (793 words)
Anna Andreyevna Akhmatova was born Anna Gorenko into an upper-class family in Odessa, the Ukraine, in 1889.
Though Akhmatova was frequently confronted with official goverment opposition to her work during her lifetime, she was deeply loved and lauded by the Russian people, in part because she did not abandon her country during difficult political times.
Akhmatova also translated the works of Victor Hugo, Rabindranath Tagore, Giacomo Leopardi, and various Armenian and Korean poets, and she wrote memoirs of Symbolist writer Aleksandr Blok, the artist Amedeo Modigliani, and fellow Acmeist Osip Mandelstam.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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