FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Anglican views of homosexuality
Part of a series on
Anglicanism
Organization

Anglican Communion
'focus of unity':
Archbishop of Canterbury
'instruments of communion':
Lambeth Conferences
Anglican Consultative Council
Primates' Meeting
Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Anglicanism is the term used to encapsulate... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3200x2400, 1040 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: United Kingdom Canterbury Cathedral ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Anglican Consultative Council is one of the four Instruments of Unity of the Anglican Communion. ... The Anglican Communion Primates Meetings are regular meetings of the senior archbishops and bishops of the Anglican Communion. ...

Background

Christianity
English Reformation
Apostolic Succession
Catholicism
Episcopal polity
Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... King Henry VIII of England The English Reformation refers to the series of events in sixteenth century England by which the church in England broke away from the authority of the Pope and consequently the entire Catholic church; it formed part of the wider Protestant Reformation, a religious and political... In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor to the original body of believers in Christ, composed of the Apostles. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      As a Christian ecclesiastical... It has been suggested that episcopal be merged into this article or section. ...

People

Henry VIII
Thomas Cranmer
Thomas Cromwell
Elizabeth I
Richard Hooker
Charles I
William Laud
Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland, later King of Ireland, from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books of Common Prayer which established the basic structure of Anglican liturgy for centuries and... Thomas Cromwell: portrait by Hans Holbein the Younger, 1532–3 Thomas Cromwell, 1st Earl of Essex ( 1485 – July 28, 1540) was an English statesman, King Henry VIII of Englands chief minister 1532–1540. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... This article is about the Anglican theologian. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Archbishop William Laud (October 7, 1573 – January 10, 1645) was Archbishop of Canterbury and a fervent supporter of King Charles I of England, whom he encouraged to believe in divine right. ...

Liturgy and Worship

Book of Common Prayer
High Church · Low Church
Broad Church
Oxford Movement
Thirty-Nine Articles
Doctrine · Ministry
Sacraments
Saints in Anglicanism For the novel by Joan Didion, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... High Church relates to ecclesiology and liturgy in Christian theology and practice. ... Low church is a term of distinction in the Church of England or other Anglican churches, initially designed to be pejorative. ... Broad church is a term referring to latitudinarian churches in the Church of England. ... The Oxford Movement was a loose affiliation of High Church Anglicans, most of them members of the University of Oxford, who sought to demonstrate that the Church of England was a direct descendant of the Christian church established by the Apostles. ... The Thirty-Nine Articles are the defining statements of Anglican doctrine. ... Look up doctrine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Like other churches in the Catholic tradition, the Anglican Communion recognises seven sacraments. ... The provinces of the Anglican Communion commemorate many of the same saints as those in the Roman Catholic calendar, often on the same days, but also commemorate various famous (often post-Reformation and/or English) Christians who have not been canonized. ...

This box: view  talk  edit
Homosexuality and Christianity
Anglican
Eastern Orthodox
Latter-day Saints
Metropolitan Community Church
Presbyterian
Religious Society of Friends (Quaker)
Roman Catholic
United Church of Christ
Uniting Church in Australia
Detailed list
v  d  e

The issue of homosexuality is controversial in the Anglican Communion. During the thirteenth Lambeth Conference in 1998, a resolution was passed stating that homosexual acts are "incompatible with Scripture" by a vote of 526-70;[1] however, it also contained a statement declaring this policy would not be the final word and research would continue. (Lambeth Resolutions are not binding on member churches of the Anglican Communion, but carry considerable moral authority.) Other resolutions passed include Issues in Human Sexuality, approved in 1991, which states that stable same-sex relationships are acceptable for laypersons but not for clergy.[2] The issue of Homosexuality within Christianityis that some old fuck wits think that there going 2 hell 4 being themselves, wat i say 2 them is go rape a donkey, and then someone might take an interest in them Traditionally, Christian churches have regarded homosexual sex as sinful, based on... The Eastern Orthodox Church is particular in its view of sin. ... Main article: Sexuality and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, homosexuality is officially seen as a set of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and not an immutable condition or an indication of an innate identity (Oaks 1995). ... Logo of the Metropolitan Community Churches The Metropolitan Community Church (in full, The Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches or UFMCC, or more commonly MCC) is an international fellowship of Christian congregations. ... // The Presbyterian Church (USA), the largest U.S. Presbyterian body, is sharply divided over the issue of homosexuality. ... The views of Quakers toward homosexuality has a dramatic range from complete acceptance and celebration of same-sex marriages, to viewing homosexuality as abhorrent and sinful. ... The Roman Catholic Church considers human sexual behavior that it sees as properly expressed to be sacred, almost sacramental in nature. ... ... Logo of the UCA The Uniting Church in Australia (UCA) was formed on June 22, 1977 when the Methodist Church of Australasia, Presbyterian Church of Australia and Congregational Union of Australia came together under the Basis of Union document. ... This is a list of Christian denominational positions on homosexuality. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... The Lambeth Conferences was the name given to the periodical assemblies of bishops of the Anglican Communion (Pan-Anglican synods), which since 1867 have met at Lambeth Palace, the London residence of the archbishop of Canterbury. ... Many religions and spiritual movements hold certain written texts (or series of spoken legends not traditionally written down) to be sacred. ...


In 2003, the Church of England announced the appointment of Jeffrey John, a clergyman living in a celibate domestic partnership with another man, as Bishop of Reading. Traditionalists within the Church were outraged and John eventually succumbed to pressure from the Archbishop of Canterbury (who had initially supported the appointment) and others to withdraw before he had been formally elected. He was appointed Dean of St Albans instead. As of 2004, other provinces such as the Episcopal Church in the USA, the Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil, the Anglican Church of Mexico, the Scottish Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church of Southern Africa permitted the ordination of non-celibate gay clergy and the blessing of same-sex unions. In the Anglican Church of Canada, six parishes in the Diocese of New Westminster bless same sex unions, and Dean Peter Elliott of that diocese is a gay man in a committed relationship. The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Reverend Dr Jeffrey Philip Hywel John, MA DPhil (born 1953) is a Church of England cleric, and the current Dean of St Albans. ... The Bishop of Reading is a suffragan bishop in the Church of England, based in Reading, Berkshire. ... , St Albans is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35. ... The Episcopal Churchs Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington, D.C. is often referred to as the National Cathedral. The Episcopal Church in the United States of America is the Province of the Anglican Communion in the United States and several other nations, including dioceses... The Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil (IEAB; Portuguese for: Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil) is an ecclesiastical province of the Anglican Communion that covers Brazil. ... The Anglican Church of Mexico (La Iglesia Anglicana de México) is the Anglican province in Mexico. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... The Anglican Church of Southern Africa (formerly the Church of the Province of Southern Africa) is the Anglican province in the southern part of Africa, including dioceses in Angola, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Saint Helena, South Africa and Swaziland. ... The blessing of same-sex unions is a practice officially sanctioned in some parishes of the Anglican Church of Canada and the Episcopal Church in the USA. It is also, according to the current Anglican Primate of Canada, widely practised in parishes of other churches of the Anglican Communion, without... Anglican Church of Canada The Anglican Church of Canada (the ACC) is the Canadian branch of the Anglican Communion. ... The Diocese of New Westminster is an Anglican Church of Canada diocese in British Columbia, based in Vancouver. ... Dean Peter Elliott (St. ...


Responding to these theological disputes, many provinces, primarily from central Africa, but a few in Asia and South America—representing half of the 80 million practicing Anglicans worldwide—declared a state of impaired communion with their counterparts.[3] Minority groups in Western provinces have stated their opposition to what they consider unscriptural actions by the Churches of England, Canada, Australia, and the ECUSA, and in the United States, some (such as the Anglican Mission in America) have withdrawn their affiliation with the ECUSA and realigned themselves with African provinces such as the Churches of Uganda and Rwanda. The Anglican Mission in America (AMiA) is a Christian missionary organization active in the United States. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Summary of issues

Main article: Anglican doctrine

There is a wide range of beliefs within the Anglican Communion regarding homosexuality. Some of the more specific issues which member churches and dioceses are struggling with are: Look up doctrine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

  • Homosexual members of the church/communion
    • May they exist?
    • Must they be celibate?
    • Should we bless same sex unions of GLBT members?
  • Homosexual Clergy
    • May they exist?
    • May they be openly homosexual?
      • To what extent may they be "out" (eg. only to their Bishop/partner/family, or to the wider public)
      • May they openly have a partner?
    • Must they be celibate?
    • May any of these individuals (those who are celibate and those who are non-celibate) be Bishops?

Churches run the gamut, from churches which do not accept any GLBT members, to churches which are happy to have openly GLBT, partnered, non-celibate bishops. The nature of the Anglican Communion is such that not all churches or dioceses must agree with each other in every particular in order to share a common faith and baptism. Part of the current controversy concerns how much and what sort of disagreement over these issues can exist while still calling it a "common faith." Celibacy may refer either to being unmarried or to sexual abstinence. ... Faith has two general implications which can be implied either exclusively or mutually; To Trust: Believing a certain variable will act a specific way despite the potential influence of known or unknown change. ... Baptism in early Christian art. ...

  • The Anglican Communion as a whole in 1998 affirmed the historic Christian teaching that marriage is between a man and a woman and that others not called to marriage should remain celibate.
  • The Church of England considers a celibate person of homosexual orientation to be eligible for ordination, even if the person has entered into a civil same-sex partnership, noting "The Church should not collude with the present assumptions of society that all close relationships necessarily include sexual activity."[4]
  • The Church of England affirmed in 2005 that lay homosexuals who have entered into civil partnerships are still eligible for the sacraments of baptism, confirmation, and communion.[4]
  • In 2002, the Anglican Church of Canada, the Diocese of New Westminster voted to allow the blessing of same-sex unions by those parishes who choose to do so.
  • The Anglican Church of Nigeria issued a statement in 2006 affirming "our commitment to the total rejection of the evil of homosexuality which is a perversion of human dignity and encourages the National Assembly to ratify the Bill prohibiting the legality of homosexuality".[5]

Anglican Church of Canada The Anglican Church of Canada (the ACC) is the Canadian branch of the Anglican Communion. ... The Diocese of New Westminster is an Anglican Church of Canada diocese in British Columbia, based in Vancouver. ... The Church of Nigeria is the Anglican Church in Nigeria. ...

Gay bishop controversy

Gene Robinson, Bishop of New Hampshire
Gene Robinson, Bishop of New Hampshire

In August 2003 the Episcopal Diocese of New Hampshire elected an openly gay priest, Gene Robinson as bishop. This came shortly after a similar controversy in the UK, when the gay Canon Jeffrey John was almost consecrated Bishop of Reading. However, at that time John agreed to withdraw in order to avoid division. Although later in 2004 in the aftermath of the Gene Robinson, Jeffrey John was then installed as Dean of St Albans Cathedral, the site of England's first Christian martyr. Download high resolution version (1040x1560, 256 KB) This work is copyrighted. ... Download high resolution version (1040x1560, 256 KB) This work is copyrighted. ... The Episcopal Diocese of New Hampshire is a diocese in the Episcopal Church of the United States of America (ECUSA). ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... The Rt. ... The Reverend Dr Jeffrey Philip Hywel John, MA DPhil (born 1953) is a Church of England cleric, and the current Dean of St Albans. ... Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... Look up Martyr in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The 2003 Lambeth Palace meeting

As a result of the controversy over the ordination of gay bishops and the blessing of same-sex unions, on October 15, 2003, Anglican leaders from around the world met in Lambeth Palace in an attempt to avoid a schism on the issue. The day after, they released a lengthy statement:[6] is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lambeth Palaces gatehouse. ... The word schism (IPA: or ), from the Greek σχίσμα, skhísma (from σχίζω, skhízō, to tear, to split), means a division or a split, usually in an organization or a movement. ...

"We must make clear that recent actions in New Westminster and in the Episcopal Church (USA) do not express the mind of our Communion as a whole, and these decisions jeopardise our sacramental fellowship with each other." [...]
"If his [Gene Robinson's] consecration proceeds, we recognise that we have reached a crucial and critical point in the life of the Anglican Communion and we have had to conclude that the future of the Communion itself will be put in jeopardy." [...]
"In this case, the ministry of this one bishop will not be recognised by most of the Anglican world, and many provinces are likely to consider themselves to be out of Communion with the Episcopal Church (USA). This will tear the fabric of our Communion at its deepest level, and may lead to further division on this and further issues as provinces have to decide in consequence whether they can remain in communion with provinces that choose not to break communion with the Episcopal Church (USA)." [...]
"Similar considerations apply to the situation pertaining in the Diocese of New Westminster."
"We commend the report of that Conference in its entirety to all members of the Anglican Communion, valuing especially its emphasis on the need "to listen to the experience of homosexual persons, and [...] to assure them that they are loved by God and that all baptised, believing and faithful persons, regardless of sexual orientation, are full members of the Body of Christ"; and its acknowledgement of the need for ongoing study on questions of human sexuality." [...]
"As Primates, it is not for us to pass judgement on the constitutional processes of another province. We recognise the sensitive balance between provincial autonomy and the expression of critical opinion by others on the internal actions of a province."

The Body of Christ is a term used by Christians to describe believers in Christ. ... This article is about human sexual perceptions. ...

Statements from Rowan Williams

Rowan Williams

In 2004 the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams wrote a letter to Anglican churches worldwide in which he condemned comments by bishops outside the Western world for inciting violence against gay men and women.[7] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (493x677, 68 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Anglicanism Rowan Williams Anglican ministry User:WJBscribe Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (493x677, 68 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Anglicanism Rowan Williams Anglican ministry User:WJBscribe Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... For the English boxer, see Rowan Anthony Williams. ...

"Any words that could make it easier for someone to attack or abuse a homosexual person are words of which we must repent. Do not think repentance is always something others are called to, but acknowledge the failings we all share, sinful and struggling disciples as we are."

In a 2007 speech to theology students in Toronto, Williams argued that conservatives have failed to consider the wider context of Romans 1:27, which states, "and the men likewise gave up natural relations with women and were consumed with passion for one another, men committing shameless acts with men and receiving in their own persons the due penalty for error." Williams pointed out that although St. Paul (the author of this epistle) and his contemporaries viewed homosexual behaviour "as obviously immoral as idol worship or disobedience to parents", the main thrust of this passage is that humans must not judge one another for being sinful: Romans 2:1 says "Therefore you have no excuse, O man, whoever you are, when you judge another: for in passing judgment upon him you condemn yourself, because you, the judge, are doing the very same things." Williams admitted that his analysis "does nothing to settle the exegetical questions fiercely debated at the moment", but called upon conservatives to avoid self-righteousness rather than "happily identifying with Paul's castigation of someone else".[8] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Sin is a term used mainly in a religious context to describe an act that violates a moral rule, or the state of having committed such a violation. ... In Christianity, the disciples were the students of Jesus during his ministry. ... The Epistle to the Romans is one of the letters of the New Testament canon of the Christian Bible. ... St. ... An epistle (Greek επιστολη, epistolē, letter) is a writing directed or sent to a person or group of persons, usually a letter and a very formal, often didactic and elegant one. ... Idolatry is a major sin in the Abrahamic religions regarding image. ... now. ... Sin is a term used mainly in a religious context to describe an act that violates a moral rule, or the state of having committed such a violation. ...


Subsequent division

Bishops from two Anglican provinces, Rwanda and the Province of South East Asia, consecrated missionary bishops for the United States in January 2000 and formally established the Anglican Mission in America later that year (see Continuing Anglican Movement). Bishops in Uganda cut relations with the Diocese of New Hampshire following Robinson's consecration on November 2, 2003. The Church of Nigeria declared itself in "impaired communion" with the Episcopal Church on November 2, 2003,[9] and nine days later announced it was planning to establish a United States branch of its province to support Nigerian Anglicans living in the U.S. The Province of South East Asia broke communion with the Episcopal Church on November 20, 2003, citing Robinson's consecration as the reason for its action.[10] The Church of the Province of South East Asia was formed in 1996 and consists of the dioceses of Kuching, Sabah, Singapore and West Malaysia. ... The Anglican Mission in America (AMiA) is a Christian missionary organization active in the United States. ... The Continuing Anglican Movement is a group of Christian churches which follow the Anglican tradition but which split from one or another province of the Anglican Communion because of its perceived rejection of orthodoxy. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Windsor Report and 2005 Primates Meeting

In 2004, the Lambeth Commission on Communion issued a report on the issue of homosexuality in the Anglican Communion, which became known as the Windsor Report. This report took a strong stand against homosexual practice, recommended a moratorium on further consecrations of actively homosexual bishops and blessings of same-sex unions,[11] and called for all involved in Robinson's consecration "to consider in all conscience whether they should withdraw themselves from representative functions in the Anglican Communion".[12] However, it stopped short of recommending discipline against the Episcopal Church or Anglican Church of Canada. The Windsor Report was the document containing the finding of the Eames Commission. ...


In February 2005, the Primates of the Anglican Communion held a regular meeting at Dromantine in Northern Ireland at which the issue of homosexuality was heavily discussed. Of the 38 Primates, 35 attended. The Primates issued a communiqué that reiterated most of the Windsor Report's statements, but added a new twist. The Episcopal Church and Anglican Church of Canada were asked to voluntarily withdraw from the Anglican Consultative Council, the main formal international entity within the Anglican Communion until the next Lambeth Conference in 2008. The Anglican Communion Primates Meetings are regular meetings of the senior archbishops and bishops of the Anglican Communion. ... Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The Lambeth Conferences was the name given to the periodical assemblies of bishops of the Anglican Communion (Pan-Anglican synods), which since 1867 have met at Lambeth Palace, the London residence of the archbishop of Canterbury. ...


Stance of Churches

Within the Anglican Communion there is diverse opinion over homosexuality. Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ...


Church of England

Main article: Church of England

The issue erupted when Jeffrey John, a gay canon, was elected Bishop of Reading in May 2003. Before he could take up his post there was strong opposition from a minority of Bishops and he was persuaded to resign. However, many senior Bishops have voiced disappointment at his decision to resign. Later in 2004 he was then installed as Dean of St Albans Cathedral. Further controversy erupted when churches in the Diocese of St Albans decided that they would withhold contributions until further notice to protest this appointment. St Peter and St Paul's Church in Cranfield, near Bedford, and Holy Trinity Church, in New Barnet, north London pledged to withhold money from diocese funds in protest. St Andrews Church in the Hertfordshire town of Chorleywood has also announced that it would withhold funds until further notice. The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Reverend Dr Jeffrey Philip Hywel John, MA DPhil (born 1953) is a Church of England cleric, and the current Dean of St Albans. ... The Bishop of Reading is a suffragan bishop in the Church of England, based in Reading, Berkshire. ... The Diocese of St Albans forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England and is part of the wider Church of England, in turn part of the world-wide Anglican Communion. ... According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... Bedford is the county town of Bedfordshire, England. ... This article concerns the holy Trinity of Christianity. ... New Barnet is a place in the London Borough of Barnet. ... Saint Andrew (Greek: Andreas, manly), the Christian Apostle, brother of Saint Peter, was born at Bethsaida on the Lake of Galilee. ... Hertfordshire (pronounced Hartfordshire and abbreviated as Herts) is an inland county in the United Kingdom and part of the East of England Government Office region. ... Chorleywood is a town in the Three Rivers district of Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom. ...


Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia

Official policy remains that of the Anglican Commnion (all homosexual activity is sin). The Maori and Pasifika tikanga are committed to this. Any participation leads to immediate summary withdraws of any Bishop's licences, tantamount to immediate Excommunication. The previous Archbishop of New Zealand Whakahuihui Vercoe created a stir after his consecration in 2004 when he expressed the hope that Christians would one day see a world without gays free of sexual immorality, including homosexuality. Anglican Church in New Zealand and Polynesia The Anglican Church in New Zealand and Polynesia is a church of the Anglican Communion serving New Zealand, Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, and the Cook Islands. ... Te Puni, Māori Chief Māori is the name of the indigenous people of New Zealand, and their language. ... Pacific Islands (or Pacific Person, pl: Pacific People, also called Oceanic[s]), is a geographic term used in several places, such as New Zealand and the United States, to describe the inhabitants of any of the three major sub-regions of Oceania. ... Excommunication is a religious censure used to deprive or suspend membership in a religious community. ... The Archbishop of New Zealand is the head of the Anglican church in the Province of New Zealand and has under his direction nine dioceses. ...


Some Pākehā clergy and parishes are accepting same-sex unions, such as St. Matthews in the City and their vicar Glynn Cardy. The Dunedin and Auckland Dioceses are notable for other such examples, including the ordination of a non-celibate gay priest, and the blessings of same-sex relationships be performed by priests in an official capacity. [13] Pākehā is a term generally used to describe New Zealanders of Anglo/European extraction, but some Māori may use it to refer to any non-Māori person. ... Dunedin (ÅŒtepoti in Maori) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the region of Otago. ... Schematic map of Auckland. ...


Anglican Church of Australia

At its 2004 General Synod held in Perth, the Anglican Church of Australia passed four resolutions on human sexuality. The key resolutions stated that, "Recognising that this is a matter of ongoing debate and conversation in this church and that we all have an obligation to listen to each other with respect, this General Synod does not condone the liturgical blessing of same sex relationships" and "this General Synod does not condone the ordination of people in open committed same sex relationships." The current national Church leader, Primate Phillip Aspinall, has stated the topic is not worth splitting the church over.[14] Peter Jensen, Archbishop of the Evangelical Anglican Diocese of Sydney, has vigorously opposed homosexuality, stating that accepting homosexuality is "calling holy what God called sin".[15] The former Australian Primate, Archbishop Peter Carnley, who retired in 2005, criticized "Sydney Anglicans" and questioned if the Bible condemns homosexuality in a statement: Arms of the Anglican Church of Australia The Anglican Church of Australia, a member church of the Anglican Communion, was previously officially known as the Church of England in Australia and Tasmania (renamed in 1981). ... Catholic Patriarchal (non cardinal) coat of arms Primate (from the Latin Primus, first) is a title or rank bestowed on some bishops in certain Christian churches. ... The Most Revd Phillip Aspinall (born 1959) has been the Anglican Archbishop of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia since February 2002, and Primate_(religion) of the Anglican Church of Australia since July 2005. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Diocese of Sydney in the Anglican Church of Australia is unusual in Western Anglicanism in that the majority of the diocese is Evangelical and low church in nature, and committed to Reformed and Calvinist theology. ... The Most Reverend Dr Peter Carnley AO (1937-) was the Archbishop of Perth, Australia from 1981 to 2005 and was Primate of the Anglican Church of Australia from 2000 until July 2005. ... The Diocese of Sydney in the Anglican Church of Australia is unusual in Western Anglicanism in that the majority of the diocese is Evangelical and low church in nature, and committed to Reformed and Calvinist theology. ...

"The exact meaning to be read from these texts and whether they can rightly be made to provide a neat pre-packaged answer to our contemporary questions is what is at issue. Anybody brave enough to claim to know the inner mind of God on the basis of a personal claim to be privy to the only conceivable interpretation of some biblical texts is guilty of self-delusion."[16]

Anglican Church of Canada

"Canadian gays and lesbians will continue to be welcomed and received in our churches and to have their contributions to our common life honoured", in a letter by then-primate Archbishop Michael Peers.[17] The Church has been a strong supporter of the inclusion of gay and lesbian Anglicans in the communion. Same sex union blessings have been authorized by one diocese with others considering such blessings. In 2004 the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada passed a resolution on homosexuality which includes this section urging the church to continue dialogue on homosexuality and whether the Church should facilitate religious same-sex marriages, not just blessings: Anglican Church of Canada The Anglican Church of Canada (the ACC) is the Canadian branch of the Anglican Communion. ... Michael Geoffrey Peers was Anglican Primate of Canada from 1986 till 2004. ...

"Affirm the crucial value of continued respectful dialogue and study of biblical, theological, liturgical, pastoral, scientific, psychological and social aspects of human sexuality; and call upon all bishops, clergy and lay leaders to be instrumental in seeing that dialogue and study continue, intentionally involving gay and lesbian persons...to prepare resources for the church to use in addressing issues relating to human sexuality including the blessing of same sex unions and the changing definition of marriage in society."

Furthermore, the resolution concluded that the Synod:

"Affirm the integrity and sanctity of committed adult same sex relationships."[18]

One Canadian diocese, New Westminster, authorized a rite for the blessing of same-sex unions at its 2002 Diocesan Synod. The use of the rite by individual parishes was incumbent upon a specific request of the parish made through its annual vestry meeting or resolution of its parochial church council. In May 2003, six of the diocese's 76 parishes received authorization to use the rite.[19] The Diocese of New Westminster is an Anglican Church of Canada diocese in British Columbia, based in Vancouver. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Parochial Church Council or PCC, is the executive body of a Church of England parish. ...


In July 2005, the Canadian government legalised same-sex marriage. Although the Anglican Church of Canada has an authorized rite for the blessing of civil marriages, its Marriage Canon is used for interpreting the rite. Since it presumes opposite-sex partners, clergy were disallowed from using the rite in all dioceses of the Church, including New Westminster. The Very Rev. Peter Wall, Dean of Niagara and the Most Rev. Terence Finlay, retired Archbishop of Toronto and Metropolitan of Ontario have each been disciplined for celebrating lesbian weddings, Wall at Christ's Church Cathedral (Hamilton) and Finlay in a United Church.[20][21] Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Diocese of Niagara Coat of Arms The Diocese of Niagara is one of thirty regional divisions (29 dioceses and one former diocese) in the Anglican Church of Canada. ... The Diocese of Toronto is an administrative division of the Anglican Church of Canada. ... The Ecclesiastical Province of Ontario is one of the Anglican Church of Canadas four ecclesiastical provinces ((similar to an archdiocese in the Roman Catholic Church). ... Christs Church Cathedral, Hamilton, Ontario, is the cathedral church of the Anglican Diocese of Niagara. ... The United Church of Canada (French: lÉglise Unie du Canada) is Canadas second largest church (after the Roman Catholic Church), and its largest Protestant denomination. ...


In 2005, at the request of the primate, Andrew Hutchison, a theological commission produced the St. Michael Report. It recommended, among other things, that the national church treat the blessing of same-sex unions as analogous to marriage, and hence a matter touching on doctrine (although not what it called "core doctrine")[22]. Catholic Patriarchal (non cardinal) coat of arms Primate (from the Latin Primus, first) is a title or rank bestowed on some bishops in certain Christian churches. ... The Most Reverend Andrew S. Hutchison is the primate of the Anglican Church of Canada. ... The Report of the Primates Theological Commission of the Anglican Church of Canada on the Blessing of Same-Sex Unions (commonly known as the St. ... Doctrine, from Latin doctrina, (compare doctor), means a body of teachings or instructions, taught principles or positions, as the body of teachings in a branch of knowledge or belief system. ...


The General Synod, meeting in June, 2007, voted to affirm that the blessing of same-sex unions was not a matter of core doctrine; but a motion to authorise dioceses to permit the blessing of such unions was narrowly defeated by the order of bishops (it was passed by the orders of clergy and laity)[23]. A subsequent motion passed by General Synod called for the Primate's Theological Commission to make proposals regarding the revision of the marriage canon, to allow for the marriage of all legally qualified individuals (which, in Canada, would include gays and lesbians). The Diocese of New Westminster construed the actions of Synod as permitting it to continue its blessings of same-sex unions. Logo of the 2007 General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada The General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada is the chief governing and legislative body of the Anglican Church of Canada (ACC), the sole Canadian representative of the Anglican Communion. ...


Church of the Province of Central Africa

Archbishop Malango was quoted as stating Gene Robinson's election "brought darkness, disappointment, sadness and grief" to his Church.[24] The Church of the Province of Central Africa is part of the Anglican Communion, and includes dioceses in Botswana, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe. ...


Church of Ireland

Main article: Church of Ireland

Within the Church of Ireland there is a wide spectrum of opinion. Conservatives were outraged at an alleged blessing of the relationship of a lesbian couple in St Nicolas' Collegiate Church, Galway in September 2002 and the Bishop of Limerick's attendance at Gene Robinson's consecration.[25] [26] Views at parish level reflect this with many evangelical parishes as well as those in the more populous (in terms of CofI membership) north being generally opposed to homosexual practice, while middle and high church parishes, especially in the south, have openly gay parishioners as a matter of routine. For example, at General Synod 2005, Dean (now Bishop) Michael Burrows stated that he regularly gives Holy Communion to parishioners in long-standing homosexual relationships.[27] The Church of Ireland (Irish: ) is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion, operating seamlessly across the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Connacht County: Dáil Éireann: Galway West European Parliament: North-West Dialling Code: 091 Postal District(s): G Area: 50. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference R574572 Statistics Province: Munster County: Area: 20. ...


The Bishops have announced a process of listening and reflection within the Church. A preliminary response to the Windsor Report was produced by the Church's Standing Committee in January 2005.


Most of the northern dioceses have passed motions favouring Lambeth Resolution I.10, although a similar motion failed to receive overall endorsement in the Diocese of Connor, covering most of County Antrim, and the diocese with the most members in the Church of Ireland.[28] Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Antrim Area: 2,844 km² Population (est. ...


Anglican Church of Kenya

Archbishop Nzimbi has strongly spoken against admitting homosexuals into the Church.[14] The Anglican Church of Kenya (AC Kenya) is a member church of the Anglican Communion. ...


Church of Nigeria

Main article: Church of Nigeria

The church remains sharply opposed to homosexuality, calling it "a perversion of human dignity".[5] The Church of Nigeria is the Anglican Church in Nigeria. ...


Scottish Episcopal Church

The Scottish Episcopal Church does not have a policy against ordaining noncelibate gay clergy, thus such ordinations are theoretically allowed. They announced this on March 23, 2005: The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

(We) had never regarded the fact that someone was in a close relationship with a member of the same sex as in itself constituting a bar to the exercise of an ordained ministry...We do not have a synodical decision like the Church of England has, which it made a number of years ago, and therefore if someone who was of a homosexual orientation felt a sense of call to the ordained ministry then we would begin the process of testing that vocation. We wouldn't bar him or her simply because they were homosexual.

Sensational headlines in North America announced that the SEC had agreed to ordain gays and lesbians in committed partnerships. The Church thus released a statement pointing out that the policy was not "news". Regarding the media release that the above quote came from, it noted that "Press interest has focused on one small part of the overall statement". It continued to say that:

"In referring to the fact that there is no current bar to ordination for someone who might be in a close relationship with a member of the same sex, the Bishops were simply stating the present position as it applies in Scotland where, unlike some other provinces, no motion discouraging such ordinations has ever been passed by our General Synod. Consequently, the statement earlier this month does not represent any change in policy on the part of the Bishops."[29]

Church of the Province of South East Asia

(Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos,Malaysia, Nepal, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam) The Church of the Province of South East Asia was formed in 1996 and consists of the dioceses of Kuching, Sabah, Singapore and West Malaysia. ...


The Province of South East Asia criticised the confirmation of Gene Robinson as a Bishop by the Episcopal Church (USA), stating: The Episcopal Churchs Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington, D.C. is often referred to as the National Cathedral. The Episcopal Church in the United States of America is the Province of the Anglican Communion in the United States and several other nations, including dioceses...

"The said confirmation therefore seriously raises the question of ECUSA's genuine commitment to our corporate responsibility as members of the church catholic to uphold and promote only the Apostolic Faith and Order inherited. A natural, holistic and consistent reading of the Scriptures clearly show that it is against the practice of homosexuality. In the context of orthodox and classical Christianity, the canonical authority of the Scriptures is taken to be recognised and received by the community of faith and not subject to majority, culturally relevant or even theological voting."[30]

On 24 November 2003, the Province declared that it had entered into a state of impaired communion with the Episcopal Church (USA) by releasing the following statement: is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

"The Synod of the Province of the Anglican Church of South East Asia ("the Province") unanimously reject the purported consecration of Dr Gene J Robinson ('Robinson') on 2 November 2003 by the Episcopal Church in the United States of America ('ECUSA') in New Hampshire, as a bishop in the Anglican Church. The Province views the purported consecration as a flagrant disregard of the fundamental teachings of the Bible and the long established doctrines of the Church."
"As Dr Gene J Robinson is a practising homosexual who had divorced his wife and has for the last 13 years been living with a male partner, the Province cannot and do not recognise his consecration and ministry in the Anglican church."
"In view of ECUSA's action in proceeding with the consecration despite the warnings and pleas of a large majority of Anglican churches worldwide, the Province regrets that communion with the ECUSA as well as those who voted for the consecration and those who participated in the consecration service is now broken."
"This means that the Province no longer treats those in ECUSA who carried out and supported the act of consecration as brothers and sisters in Christ until and unless they repent of their action and return to embrace Biblical truths. At the same time, the Province remains in fellowship with the faithful believers within ECUSA who rightly oppose and reject the erroneous actions of their house."
"This decision was made unanimously at an Extraordinary Meeting of the Synod held in Kudat, Sabah, Malaysia on 20 November 2003."[10]

is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Anglican Church of Southern Africa

Archbishop Njongonkulu Ndungane has criticised other African Churches against homosexuality and said that the church's attention should be focussed on other concerns such as AIDS and poverty. Their previous Archbishop, Desmond Tutu, stated: The Anglican Church of Southern Africa (formerly the Church of the Province of Southern Africa) is the Anglican province in the southern part of Africa, including dioceses in Angola, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Saint Helena, South Africa and Swaziland. ... Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ... Desmond Mpilo Tutu (born 7 October 1931) is a South African cleric and activist who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. ...

"The Jesus I worship is not likely to collaborate with those who vilify and persecute an already oppressed minority [...]. I could not myself keep quiet whilst people were being penalized for something about which they could do nothing, their sexuality. For it is so improbable that any sane, normal person would deliberately choose a lifestyle exposing him or her to so much vilification, opprobrium and physical abuse, even death. To discriminate against our sisters and brothers who are lesbian or gay on grounds of their sexual orientation for me is as totally unacceptable and unjust as Apartheid ever was."[31]

Anglican Church of the Southern Cone of the Americas

Archbishop Gregory Venables has also been strongly critical of homosexuality. Bishops in his province criticized the Windsor Report for failing to call liberal churches to repentance. The province has declared itself in "impaired communion" with ECUSA, but continues to maintain full communion with opponents of the Robinson consecration.[32] Venables has authorized dioceses within his province to provide episcopal oversight to United States churches that have left ECUSA. The Iglesia Anglicana del Cono Sur de las Americas (Spanish for: Anglican Church of the Southern Cone of the Americas) is the ecclesiastical province of the Anglican Communion that covers the countries of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay. ...


The Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil

The Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil is characterized by its somewhat progressive theological views on homosexuality. After the 1998 Lambeth Conference, the Anglican Church in Brazil has decided to promote two national forums on Human Sexuality, both held in Rio de Janeiro. Its decisions guide the actual policy on this subject. According to the final document, the consensus of the Brazilian Church is that human sexuality is a gift from God, and it should be experienced in peace, freedom, love and respect. It is understood that the Church should respect the privacy of its members and clergy. So, any kind of public exposure of someone's sexual orientation (as a pre-requisite to be a member or take part of any ministry) violates this privacy. Because of that progressive position, the Bishop of the Diocese of Recife (the only one that is still strongly Evangelical), Robinson Cavalcanti, declared Recife to be independent of the Church of Brazil, an action that result in his being deposed as Bishop by the Ecclesiastical Tribunal.[33] Among his main reasons, he pointed that the Brazilian Church was sympathetic to the ordination of Gene Robinson's and dangerously coping with the allowing of homosexuals being part of its clergy. This split separated the Diocese of Recife in two parts: one of them, loyal to Bishop Orlando Santos de Oliveira, primate of the Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil, and currently coordinated by Bishop Sebastião Gameleira, and the other, under Cavalcanti's leadership, tied to the Anglican Church of the Southern Cone. The Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil (IEAB; Portuguese for: Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil) is an ecclesiastical province of the Anglican Communion that covers Brazil. ... Lambeth is a place in the London Borough of Lambeth. ... Location of Rio de Janeiro Coordinates: Country Brazil Region Southeast State Rio de Janeiro Government  - Mayor Cesar Maia (PFL) Area  - City 1,260 km²  (486. ... The Rt. ...


Episcopal Church of the Sudan

Archbishop Marona says the Church should help with the effects of war and poverty before homosexuality. "We have much worse things to face", he has been quoted.[14] The Episcopal Church of the Sudan is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion in Sudan. ...


Anglican Church of Tanzania

Archbishop Donald Mtetemela has said homosexuality is against the Bible: "The Anglican Church of Tanzania believes that homosexuality is contrary to the teaching of the Word of God. It is a sin."[34] The Anglican Church of Tanzania (ACT) is a member of the Anglican Communion based in Dodoma. ...


Church of the Province of Uganda

The Ugandan church has cut ties with its North American counterparts over homosexuality. It has officially recognized the Anglican Communion Network, a theologically conservative group formed by several diocesan bishops and large parishes in the United States opposed to the Robinson consecration, as the legitimate representative of Anglicanism in the U.S.[35] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The symbol of the Anglican Communion Network combines the arms of the Church of England with the compass and mitre of the global Anglican Communion. ...


Episcopal Church in the United States of America

In 2003, ECUSA became the first Anglican province to ordain an openly gay bishop; however, the church's stance on gay issues has been debated for decades. In 1976, ECUSA's General Convention passed a resolution stating: The Episcopal Churchs Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington, D.C. is often referred to as the National Cathedral. The Episcopal Church in the United States of America is the Province of the Anglican Communion in the United States and several other nations, including dioceses... The General Convention of The Episcopal Church takes place every three years, and it the way legislation is passed in the Episcopal Church. ...

"It is the sense of this General Convention that homosexual persons are children of God who have a full and equal claim with all other persons upon the love acceptance, and pastoral concern and care of the Church."

Various interpretations were held within ECUSA on this resolution, ranging from the majority of dioceses that ordain noncelibate gay and lesbian clergy to the minority group who founded the Anglican Communion Network which opposes such ordinations. On June 23, 2005 the ECUSA defined its meaning in a one hundred and thirty page document entitled "To Set Our Hope on Christ": The symbol of the Anglican Communion Network combines the arms of the Church of England with the compass and mitre of the global Anglican Communion. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

"We believe that God has been opening our eyes to acts of God that we had not known how to see before...the eligibility for ordination of those in covenanted same-sex unions...a person living in a same-gendered union may be eligible to lead the flock of Christ...members of the Episcopal Church have discerned holiness in same-sex relationships and have come to support the blessing of such unions and the ordination or consecration of persons in those unions...Their holiness stands in stark contrast with many sinful patterns of sexuality in the world...The idea that there is only one correct way to read or interpret scripture is a rather modern idea."[36]

Church in the Province of the West Indies

Archbishop Gomez has said Robinson's confirmation is incompatible with scripture.[14] The Church in the Province of the West Indies is a member Church in the worldwide Anglican Communion. ...


See also

Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      A Christian () is a person who... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... The Lesbian and Gay Christian Movement (LGCM) describes itself as a UK-based international Charity who are praying for an inclusive church. The Gay Christian Movement was founded in 1976 with the Reverend Richard Kirker as its first General Secretary. ... IntegrityUSA is a U.S. non-profit organization of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Episcopalians and straight friends. ... Integrity/Toronto is the oldest Canadian chapter of Integrity, a network of support and advocacy groups for gay and lesbian members of the Anglican Church of Canada, Episcopal Church USA, Anglican Church of Australia, and Church of Uganda. ... Propitiation is a fellowship of gays and lesbians within the Anglican Church of Canada, based in Toronto. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

References

  1. ^ David Skidmore, 1998-08-07, Lambeth Conference 1998 Archives. Accessed 2007-04-12.
  2. ^ House of Bishops of the General Synod of the Church of England (1992). Issues in Human Sexuality. New York City: Morehouse. ISBN 0819215880. 
  3. ^ The Tablet, 2003-07-26, Row over homosexuality splits Anglican Communion. Accessed 2007-03-21.
  4. ^ a b Church of England News, 2005-07-25. House of Bishops issues pastoral statement on Civil Partnerships. Accessed 2007-07-18.
  5. ^ a b Peter Akinola, Message to the nation. Accessed 2007-07-17.
  6. ^ BBC News, 2003-10-16, Anglican leaders' statement. Accessed 2007-03-22.
  7. ^ BBC News, 2004-11-28, Churches warned over 'gay slurs'. Accessed 2007-04-12.
  8. ^ Tom Heneghan, Yahoo! News, Anglican head Williams says anti-gays misread Bible. Accessed 2007-04-19.
  9. ^ Peter J. Akinola, Statement of the Primates of the Global South in the Anglican Communion in response to the consecration of Gene Robinson on 2 November 2003. Accessed 2007-07-17.
  10. ^ a b Office of the Archbishop of the Province of the Anglican Church in South East Asia, 2003-11-24. Breaking of Communion with the Episcopal Church of the United States of America (ECUSA) consequent on the purported consecration of a gay bishop. Accessed 2007-07-17.
  11. ^ The Windsor Report 2004. On public Rites of Blessing of same sex unions. Accessed 2007-07-17.
  12. ^ The Windsor Report 2004. On elections to the episcopate. Accessed 2007-07-17.
  13. ^ Ashford, Ron, A Right to a Rite?, 2006.
  14. ^ a b c d BBC News, 2007-02-13. BBC Factfile: Anglican Church around the world. Accessed 2007-07-18.
  15. ^ Barney Zwartz, The Age, 2006-02-03. Church imperilled by gays: archbishop. Accessed 2007-07-22.
  16. ^ Patrick Goodenough, CNSNews.com, June 30, 2003, Anglican leaders in Australia at odds over homosexuality issue. Accessed 2007-03-22.
  17. ^ Anglican Church of Canada News, 2003-10-21. Church’s acceptance of gays and lesbians has not changed, Anglican Primate says. Accessed 2007-07-18.
  18. ^ Anglican Church of Canada General Synod 2004. Resolutions concerning the blessing of same sex unions. Accessed 2007-07-18.
  19. ^ Diocese of New Westminster, Information on Same-Sex Blessings Chronology of Actions taken by the Anglican Church Of Canada & the Diocese of New Westminster in regard to the Issue of Same Sex Unions. Accessed 2007-07-22.
  20. ^ Solange de Santis, Anglican Journal, 2003-12-01, Dean who married same-sex couple prayed he could "Welcome all people". Accessed 2007-03-22.
  21. ^ Marites N. Sison, Anglican Journal, 2006-10-01, Archbishop disciplined for performing same-sex marriage. Accessed 2007-03-22.
  22. ^ Anglican Church of Canada, 2005. The St. Michael Report. Accessed 2007-07-22.
  23. ^ Solange de Santis, Anglican Journal, 2007-06-28. "Bishops discuss fallout from same-sex vote at General Synod". Accessed 2007-07-22.
  24. ^ Afrol News, 2003-09-02. Ugandan Church attacks gay community. Accessed 2007-07-18.
  25. ^ Evangelical Fellowship of Irish Clergy, 2004-03-23, EFIC Statement on Robinson consecration. Accessed 2007-06-13.
  26. ^ Reform Ireland, 2004-03-23, The Creeping Acceptance of Same-sex Relationships in the Church of Ireland. Accessed 2007-06-13.
  27. ^ Irish Angle, 2006-03-31, Michael Burrows goes to Cashel. Accessed 2007-06-13.
  28. ^ Irish Angle, 2004-12-27, Mapping Attitudes to Sexuality. Accessed 2007-03-22.
  29. ^ Thinking Anglicans: Book review archives, 2005-03-24. More on Scotland. Accessed 2007-07-18.
  30. ^ Diocese of Singapore, 2003-08-13. Statement of Bishops of the Province of the Anglican Church in South East Asia. Accessed 2007-03-22.
  31. ^ Archbishop Desmond Tutu, 2004-02-01. Sermon at Southwark Cathedral. Accessed 2007-03-22.
  32. ^ Anglican Communion News Service, 2004-01-12. Statement from the Province of the Southern Cone. Accessed 2007-03-22.
  33. ^ D. Orlando Santos de Oliveira, 2005-06-17. Canonical Trial # 001/2005 of Bishop Edward Robinson de Barros Cavalcanti. Accessed 2007-07-22.
  34. ^ Afrol News, 2003-11-13. Church of Tanzania breaks ties with US church. Accessed 2007-03-22.
  35. ^ Rev. Canon Stanley Ntagali, 2003-12-17. Open letter to the Most Rev. Frank Griswold. Accessed 2007-03-22.
  36. ^ Jill Lawless, Associated Press, 2005-06-21. U.S. Episcopals Defend Openly Gay Bishop. Accessed 2007-07-17.

Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 71 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Desmond Mpilo Tutu (born 7 October 1931) is a South African cleric and activist who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Integrity A witness of GBLT persons in the Episcopal Church and to the world.
  • American Anglican Council (a leading conservative group in the Episcopal Church)
  • Top bishop's vision - a world without gays
  • Gay cleric installed at St Albans
  • UnEnglish and unmanly: Anglo-Catholicism and homosexuality, by David Hilliard.
  • Episcopal Dissidents, African Allies: The Anglican Communion and the Globalization of Dissent (on Homosexuality), by Miranda K. Hassett.

Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance

  • The Worldwide Anglican Communion and Homoseuxality
  • The Anglican Church of Canada and Homosexuality
  • The Church of England and Homosexuality
  • The Episcopal Church USA and Homosexuality

  Results from FactBites:
 
Anglican views of homosexuality - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2987 words)
In the Anglican Church of Canada, six parishes in the Diocese of New Westminster bless same sex unions, and Dean Peter Elliott of that diocese is a gay man in a committed relationship.
In February 2005, the Primates of the Anglican Communion held a regular meeting at Dromantine in Northern Ireland at which the issue of homosexuality was heavily discussed.
The Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil, notably Anglo-Evangelical (Low Church) is characterized by its somehow progressive theological views on homosexuality.
Quaker views of homosexuality - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1017 words)
The views of Quakers toward homosexuality has a dramatic range from complete acceptance and celebration of same-sex marriages, to viewing homosexuality as abhorrent and sinful.
In the end, the true "Quaker view" on homosexuality is probably best analysed meeting by meeting (or, better, Friend by Friend.) However, there are some general patterns, and for reasons of space and completeness this article deals mainly with the largest organizations on a country-by-country basis.
Quakers in the United States of America are divided on the issue of homosexuality, with some (mostly Friends affiliated with programmed meetings) not approving of either homosexuality or the legalisation of same sex union.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m