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Encyclopedia > Angevin

Angevin (IPA: [ˈæn.dʒə.vɪn]) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers. It is also applied to three distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Ireland, Hungary, Croatia, Poland, Naples and Sicily, and Jerusalem (see Angevin Empire). The first of these Angevin dynasties ruled England in some form or another from the reign of Henry II, beginning in 1154, until the House of Tudor came to power when Richard III fell at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ... Anjou is a former county (c. ... The borders of modern France closely align with those of the ancient territory of Gaul, inhabited by Celts known as Gauls. ... Angers is a city in France in the département of Maine-et-Loire, 191 miles south-west of Paris. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... This page is about the European nobility; for the baseball term, see count (baseball). ... Events October 24 - The Treaty of Brétigny is ratified at Calais, marking the end of the first phase of the Hundred Years War. ... The Kingdom of France was organized into provinces until March 4, 1790, when the establishment of the département system superseded provinces. ... Anjou is a former county (c. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right)1 Capital Winchester, then London from 11th century. ... The following is a list of monarchs of Naples and Sicily: See also: List of Counts of Apulia and Calabria Hauteville Counts of Sicily, 1071-1130 Roger I 1071-1101 Simon 1101-1105 Roger II 1105-1130 Hauteville Kings of Sicily, 1130-1198 Roger II 1130-1154 William I 1154... Official language Latin, French, Italian, and other western languages; Greek and Arabic also widely spoken Capital Jerusalem, later Acre Constitution Various laws, so-called Assizes of Jerusalem The Kingdom of Jerusalem was a Christian kingdom established in the Levant in 1099 by the First Crusade. ... The Angevin Empire is a modern term applied retrospectively to the lands of the Plantagenets: Henry II, Richard I and John Lackland. ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133-6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland[], eastern Ireland, and western France. ... The Tudor dynasty or House of Tudor (Welsh Twdwr) is a series of five monarchs of Welsh origin who ruled England from 1485 until 1603. ... Richard III (2 October 1452–22 August 1485) was King of England from 1483 until his death. ... Combatants King Richard III of England, Yorkist Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, Lancastrian Commanders Richard III of England† Nominally, Richmond in practice, the Earl of Oxford Strength 6,000 (king had 15,500 but Lord Thomas Stanley with 4,000 and his brother, Sir William Stanley with 2,500 betrayed...

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Plantagenet

The original House of Anjou was the dynasty established by the viscounts and counts of Angers at the beginning of the 10th century. It became extinct in the male line in 1060, but was inherited through a daughter by the House of Gâtinais, which came to rule both Anjou and Maine by the early 12th century. This became the first royal Angevin dynasty, known from the 12th century as the Plantagenet (IPA: [planˈtadʒɪnɪt]) dynasty in England. It came (with its Lancastrian and Yorkist branches) to rule Jerusalem (1131–1205), England (11541485), Normandy (11441204 and 14151450), and Gascony and Guyenne (11531453), but lost Anjou itself to the French crown in 1206. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Maine is one of the traditional provinces of France. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ... The House of Lancaster is a dynasty of English kings. ... The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ... Official language Latin, French, Italian, and other western languages; Greek and Arabic also widely spoken Capital Jerusalem, later Acre Constitution Various laws, so-called Assizes of Jerusalem The Kingdom of Jerusalem was a Christian kingdom established in the Levant in 1099 by the First Crusade. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... King Stephen of England dies at Dover, and is succeeded by his adopted son Henry Plantagenet who becomes King Henry II of England, aged 21. ... // Events August 5-7 - First outbreak of sweating sickness in England begins August 22 - Battle of Bosworth Field is fought between the armies of King Richard III of England and rival claimant to the throne of England Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. ... Flag of Normandy Normandy (in French: Normandie, and in Norman: Normaundie) is a geographical region in northern France. ... Events Louis VII capitulates to Pope Celestine II and so earns the popes absolution Pope Celestine II is succeeded by Pope Lucius II December 24 - Edessa falls to Zengi Montauban, France, is founded First recorded example of an anti-Semitic blood libel in England Normandy comes under Angevin control... // Events February - Byzantine emperor Alexius IV is overthrown in a revolution, and Alexius V is proclaimed emperor. ... Events Friedrich I Hohenzollern (b. ... // March - French troops under Guy de Richemont besiege the English commander in France, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, in Caen. ... Map of the historical and cultural area of Gascony. ... Aquitaine (or Guyenne or Guienne) now forms a région in south-western France along the Atlantic Ocean and the Pyrenees mountain range on the border with Spain. ... Events January 6 - Henry of Anjou arrives in England. ... April 2 - Mehmed II begins his siege of Constantinople (Ä°stanbul). ... Events Temujin is proclaimed Genghis Khan of the Mongol people, founding the Mongol Empire Qutb ud-Din proclaims the Mameluk dynasty in India, the first dynasty of the Delhi Sultanate. ...


The name "Plantagenet" was originally spelled Plante Genest or Plantegenest or Plantaginet.[1] It is derived from the broom plant (planta genesta). It originated with Geoffrey of Anjou, father of King Henry II of England; it is most commonly claimed that it arose because he wore a sprig of it in his bonnet[2] though perhaps otherwise that he planted broom to improve his hunting covers.[3]. Its significance has been said to relate either to its golden flower[4] or to contemporary belief in the vegetable soul.[5] Genera Argyrocytisus:1 species Cytisus: about 30-35 species Genista: about 90 species Petteria: 1 species Podocytisus: 1 species Retama: 4 species Spartium: 1 species Ref: ILDIS Version 6. ... Geoffrey V (August 24, 1113 – September 7, 1151), Count of Anjou and Maine, and later Duke of Normandy, called Le Bel (The Fair) or Geoffrey Plantagenet, was the father of King Henry II of England, and thus the forefather of the Plantagenet dynasty of English kings. ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133-6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland[], eastern Ireland, and western France. ...


The surname "Plantagenêt" has been retroactively applied to the descendants of Geoffrey of Anjou as they had used no surname. The first descendant of Geoffrey to use the surname was Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York, father of both Edward IV and Richard III, who apparently assumed it about 1448. That said, it has been traditional when referring to the Plantagenets to call all descendants of Geoffrey by this surname.[6] This article is about Richard, Duke of York, father of King Edward IV. For the article about Edward IVs son who was imprisoned in the Tower of London see: Richard, Duke of York (Prince in the Tower). ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... Richard III (2 October 1452–22 August 1485) was King of England from 1483 until his death. ... Events January 5/ 6 - Christopher of Bavaria, King of Denmark, Norway and Sweden dies with no designated heir leaving all three kingdoms with vacant thrones. ...


The family became extinct in the legitimate male line with the execution of Edward, Earl of Warwick, the nephew of Edward IV and Richard III, in 1499. The last legitimate female Plantagenêt was his sister, Margaret Pole, 8th Countess of Salisbury, who was executed by Henry VIII in 1541. Edward (Plantagenet), Earl of Warwick, (February 25, 1475-November 28, 1499) was the son of George, Duke of Clarence, and a potential claimant to the throne during the reigns of both King Richard III of England (1483 - 1485) and his successor, Henry VII of England (1485 - 1509). ... 1499 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Margaret Pole (August 14, 1473 – May 27, 1541), Countess of Salisbury, was the daughter of George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence and Isabella Neville. ... Silver groat of Henry VIII, minted c. ... Events The first official translation of the entire Bible in Swedish February 12 - Pedro de Valdivia founds Santiago de Chile. ...


A notable illegitimate line of the family were the Beauforts, descendants of John of Gaunt by his mistress, Katherine Swynford. The Beauforts held the title of Duke of Somerset and were one of the prominent Lancastrian families in the Wars of the Roses. Although the Beauforts became extinct in the male line in 1471, it was through them, on his mother's side, that Henry Tudor claimed the English throne. In Colonial America Anne Brent, the wife of Leonard Calvert, also descended from this line (Plantagenêt - Beaufort - Neville - Willoughby - Greville - Reed - Brent). Beaufort is: The name of some places in the United States of America: Beaufort, North Carolina Beaufort, South Carolina Beaufort County, North Carolina Beaufort County, South Carolina The name of a place in Australia: Beaufort, Victoria The name of several communes in France: Beaufort, in the Haute-Garonne département... John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (June 24, 1340 - February 3, 1399), the third surviving son of King Edward III of England, gained his name because he was born at Ghent in 1340. ... Coat of arms designed for Katherine Swynford: three gold Catherine wheels (roet means wheel) on a red background. ... The Duke of Somerset is a title in the peerage of England that has been created several times. ... Lancastrian is an adjective describing: A resident of one of the many places named Lancaster. ... Lancaster York For other uses see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation) The Wars of the Roses (1455 - 1485) were a series of civil wars fought over the throne of England between adherents of the House of Lancaster and the House of York. ... This article is about the year 1471, not the BT caller ID service accessible by dialling 1-4-7-1. ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), was the founder and first patriarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... Leonard Calvert (1606 - 1647) was the younger son of George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore. ... Angevin is the name applied to two distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland (see Angevin Empire). ... Beaufort is: The name of some places in the United States of America: Beaufort, North Carolina Beaufort, South Carolina Beaufort County, North Carolina Beaufort County, South Carolina The name of a place in Australia: Beaufort, Victoria The name of several communes in France: Beaufort, in the Haute-Garonne département...


An illegitimate branch of the Beauforts, descended from an illegitimate son of Henry Beaufort, 3rd Duke of Somerset, survives to the present day, bearing the surname "Somerset" and the titles Duke of Beaufort and Lord Raglan. Henry Beaufort, 3rd Duke of Somerset (1436 - 1464) was an important Lancastrian military commander during the English Wars of the Roses. ... The title Duke of Beaufort in the Peerage of England was created by Charles II in 1682 for Henry Somerset, 3rd Marquess of Worcester, a descendant of Charles Somerset, 1st Earl of Worcester, illegitimate son of Henry Beaufort, 3rd Duke of Somerset, a Lancastrian leader in the Wars of the... Field Marshal Lord Raglan during the Crimean War, portrait by Roger Fenton, ca. ...


References:

  1. ^ J.S.Plant (2007) "The tardy adoption of the Plantagenet surname", to appear in Nomina, Vol. 30
  2. ^ e.g. The Complete Peerage, vol. 11 ed. G.H. White (London, 1949), Appendix G, pp. 140-41, note(e)
  3. ^ Encylopedia Britannica, editions from 1974 onwards
  4. ^ J. Bradbury in Studies in Medieval History presented to R. Allen Brown (Boydell Press, 1989), pp. 27-41, esp. p. 40
  5. ^ J.S. Plant (2005) Nomina, 28, pp. 115-33, esp. pp. 120-21, 128
  6. ^ The Complete Peerage, 2nd edn., vol. 1, p. 183, note (c)

Capet-Anjou (senior)

The second Angevin dynasty, known also as the house of Capet-Anjou, began with Charles, made count (from 1360 the family were dukes) of the western French province of Anjou by his elder brother king Louis IX of France in 1246; they were members of the Capetian dynasty, members of which also ruled France. Charles I (March 1227 - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous son of King Louis VIII of France, created Count of Anjou by his elder brother King Louis IX in 1246, thus founding the second Angevin dynasty. ... Events October 24 - The Treaty of Brétigny is ratified at Calais, marking the end of the first phase of the Hundred Years War. ... Anjou is a former county (c. ... Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215 – August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Saga, emperor of Japan. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with House of Capet. ...


In 1266 Charles was granted the crown of Naples and Sicily by the Pope in return for overthrowing the territories' Hohenstaufen rulers. Charles was driven out of Sicily in 1282, but his successors ruled Naples until 1435. This House of Anjou included the branches of Anjou-Hungary, which ruled Hungary (1308–1385, 1386–1395) and Poland (1370–1399); Anjou-Taranto, which ruled the remnants of the Latin Empire (1313–1374); and Anjou-Durazzo, which ruled Naples (1382–1435) and Hungary (1385–1386). The line became extinct in the male line with the death of King Ladislas of Naples in 1414, and totally extinct with the death of his sister Joan II in 1435. For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... The Kingdom of Naples was born out of the division of the Kingdom of Sicily after the Sicilian Vespers rebellion of 1282. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Arms of the Hohenstaufen Dynasty The Hohenstaufen (or the Staufer(s)) were a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... For other uses, see number 1435. ... Taranto is a coastal city in Apulia, southern Italy. ... The Latin Empire, Empire of Nicaea, Empire of Trebizond and the Despotate of Epirus. ... Durrës (Photo by Marc Morell) Durrës (Albanian: Durrës or Durrësi) is the most ancient city of Albania and one of the most economically important as the biggest port city. ... King Ladislas of Naples, the Magnanimous (February 11, 1377–August 6, 1414), was King of Naples and titular King of Jerusalem and Sicily, titular Count of Provence and Forcalquier 1386–1414, and titular King of Hungary 1390–1414. ... // Events Council of Constance begins. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... For other uses, see number 1435. ...


Valois-Anjou or Capet-Anjou (junior)

In the 1350s, a junior branch of the Capet-Anjou was originated when King John II of France, of the Valois line of Capetians, whose grandmother had been a princess of the senior Angevin line (eldest daughter of King Charles II of Naples), gave the County, and then Duchy of Anjou to his second son, Louis. John II the Good (French: Jean II le Bon) (April 16, 1319 – April 8, 1364), was King of France 1350–1364, Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou and Maine 1332–1350, Count of Poitiers 1344–1350, and Duke of Guienne 1345–1350. ... The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328- 1589. ... Charles II, known as the Lame (Fr. ... Counts of Anjou, c. ... Louis I of Anjou (July 23, 1339, Château de Vincennes, – September 20, 1384, Biselia) was the second son of King John II of France and Bonne of Luxembourg. ...


Within a couple of decades, Queen Joan I of Naples (of the senior Angevin line) realized that she would remain childless. Although there were extant heirs of the senior branch (for example, the Durazzo cadet line), she decided to adopt Louis as her final heir. Thus, in addition to the struggle of the Angevins with the Aragonese in Southern Italy, the two Angevin lines now began to contest with each other for the possession of the Kingdom of Naples. The Durazzo line was initially successful in securing control of Naples, but the Valois Angevins managed to secure Provence and continued to contest the throne, with Louis II actually in control of the city of Naples from 1389 to 1399. The extinction of the line of Anjou-Durazzo in 1435 temporarily secured Naples for the Valois-Anjou, but they were driven from Naples by Alfonso V of Aragon in 1442. René, the last duke of this line, died in 1480, and Anjou reverted to the French crown. With the death of his nephew the Duke of Maine in 1481 all Angevin possessions (including Provence) reverted to the crown. Queen Joan I (1327 – May 12, 1382) was born Joanna of Anjou. ... In noble families, the title of nobility is usually passed to the first-born son, although more recently it has often passed to the eldest offspring regardless of gender, e. ... Coat of arms of Provence Provence (Provençal Occitan: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm) is a former Roman province and is now a region of southeastern France, located on the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to the Italian border. ... The Angevin French prince, Louis II of Anjou (1377–1417) was the rival of Ladislas as King of Naples. ... Events February 24 - Margaret I defeats Albert in battle, thus becoming ruler of Denmark, Norway and Sweden June 28 - Battle of Kosovo between Serbs and Ottomans. ... Events September 30 - Accession of Henry IV of England October 13 - Coronation of Henry IV of England November 1 - Accession of John VI, Duke of Brittany Births William Canynge, English merchant (approximate date; died 1474) Zara Yaqob, Emperor of Ethiopia (died 1468) Deaths January 4 - Nicolau Aymerich, Catalan theologian and... For other uses, see number 1435. ... Alfonso V of Aragon (also Alfonso I of Naples) (1396 – June 27, 1458), surnamed the Magnanimous, was the King of Aragon and Naples and count of Barcelona from 1416 to 1458. ... Events The community of Rauma, Finland was granted its town rights. ... René dAnjou, René I of Naples (René I the Good, French Le bon roi René) (January 16, 1409 – July 10, 1480), was Duke of Anjou, Count of Provence (1434–1480), Count of Piedmont, Duke of Bar (1430–1480), Duke of Lorraine (1431–1453), King of Naples (1438–1442; titular... Events March 6 - Treaty of Toledo - Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain recognize African conquests of Afonso of Portugal and he cedes the Canary Islands to Spain Great standing on the Ugra river - Muscovy becomes independent from the Golden Horde. ... Coat of arms of Provence Provence (Provençal Occitan: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm) is a former Roman province and is now a region of southeastern France, located on the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to the Italian border. ...


The Angevin pretensions to Naples were continued intermittently by the House of Lorraine, which descended from René's eldest daughter, particularly during the Valois-Habsburg War of 1551 to 1559, when François, Duke of Guise, a member of a cadet branch of the family, led an unsuccessful French expedition against Naples. The Duchy of Lorraine was an independent state for most of the period of time between 843 to 1739. ... Year 1551 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... Francis, Duke of Guise Francis II, Prince of Joinville, Duke of Guise, Duke of Aumale (February 17, 1519 – February 24, 1563), called Balafré (the scarred), was a French soldier and politician. ... The House of Guise was a French ducal family, primarily responsible for the French Wars of Religion. ...


Trivia

Portrait of Wolfram from the Codex Manesse. ... Parzival is one of the two great epic poems in Middle High German. ... A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15th century) by Peter Vischer, typical of later anachronistic depictions of Arthur. ... Uther Pendragon (pen-dragon = head of the dragons) is the legendary father of King Arthur in the Arthurian legend. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Angevin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (898 words)
Angevin (IPA: [ˈæn.dʒɛ.vɪn]) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers.
The original House of Anjou was the dynasty established by the viscounts and counts of Angers at the beginning of the 10th century.
The second Angevin dynasty, known also as the house of Capet-Anjou, began with Charles, made count (from 1360 the family were dukes) of the western French province of Anjou by his elder brother king Louis IX of France in 1246; they were members of the French ruling house of Capet.
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