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Encyclopedia > Angers
Commune of Angers

The Château d'Angers overlooks Angers and the Maine River
Location
Coordinates 47°28′25″N, 00°33′15″W
Administration
Country France
Region Pays de la Loire
Department Maine-et-Loire (préfecture)
Arrondissement Angers
Canton Chief town of 8 cantons
Intercommunality Communauté
d'agglomération
d'Angers Loire Metropole
Mayor Jean-Claude Antonini
(2001-2008)
Statistics
Altitude 12 m–64 m
(avg. 20 m)
Land area¹ 42.70 km²
Population²
(1999)
151,279
 - Density (1999) 3,543/km²
Miscellaneous
INSEE/Postal code 49007/ 49000
¹ French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
² Population sans doubles comptes: single count of residents of multiple communes (e.g. students and military personnel).
France
Maison d'Adam, House of Adam, the oldest house of Angers.
Maison d'Adam, House of Adam, the oldest house of Angers.

Angers is a city in France in the département of Maine-et-Loire, 191 miles south-west of Paris. (Angers is located in the French region known by its pre-revolutionary, provincial name, Anjou.) Angers's inhabitants are called Angevins. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1360 KB) Summary Took the photo a while back while my husband and I were visting the city. ... The Château dAngers overlooks Angers and the Maine River. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1804x1689, 163 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This is an alphabetical list of countries of the world, including independent states (both those that are internationally recognised and generally unrecognised), inhabited dependent territories and areas of special sovereignty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Capital Nantes Land area¹ 32,082 km² Regional President Jacques Auxiette (PS) (since 2004) Population  - Jan. ... Departments (French: départements) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... Maine-et-Loire is a département in west-central France. ... In France, a préfecture is the capital city of a département. ... The 100 French départements are divided into 342 arrondissements. ... The arrondissement of Angers is an arrondissement of France, located in the Maine-et-Loire département, of the Pays de la Loire région. ... The cantons of France are administrative divisions subdividing arrondissements and départements. ... The commune is an administrative division of France. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... INSEE is the French abbreviation for the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (French: Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Économiques). ... Postal codes were introduced in France in 1972, when La Poste introduced automated sorting. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Rio de la Plata estuary Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Estuaries An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea[1]. Estuaries are often associated with high rates of... This page lists English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations, such as and . ... Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... Meteorite falls are those meteorites that were witnessed by people or automated devices as they transitted the atmosphere or impacted the Earth, and were subsequently collected. ... This article is about the emotion. ... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... Maine-et-Loire is a département in west-central France. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Anjou is a former county (c. ...


Angers is an urban city housing 150,000 people in the city and close to 270,000 for the metropolitan area. The city traces its roots to early Roman times. It occupies both banks of the Maine, which is spanned by six bridges. The district along the river is famous for its flourishing nurseries and market gardens. It is well known for its fresh produce and cut flowers. Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Maine (Fr: La Maine) is a river, a tributary of the Loire, 12 km (7 mi. ... A log bridge in the French Alps near Vallorcine. ...

Contents

History

The first sign of human presence on the site of Angers is a stone tool dated back to 400,000 BC (Lower Paleolithic). The earliest known inhabitants were the Andecavi, a Gallic tribe that was overrun by the Romans. The city, while under Roman rule, was called Juliomagus. The Lower Paleolithic (or Lower Palaeolithic) is the earliest subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age. ... List of peoples of Gaul (with their capitals): Aedui - Bibracte Allobroges - Vienne Ambiani - Amiens Andecavi - Angers Aquitani - Bordeaux Atrebates - Arras Arverni - Gergovia Baiocasses - Bayeux Boi - Bologna Bellovaci - Beauvais Bituriges - Bourges Carnutes - Chartres Catalauni - Chalons Cenomanes - Brescia Coriosilitae - Corseul Insubres - Milan Lexovii - Lisieux Mediomatrici - Metz Medulii - Medoc Menapii - Cassel Morinii - Boulogne... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus Roman provinces on the eve of the assassination of Julius Caesar, c. ...


The Council of Angers was held here in 453.


The city suffered severely from the invasions of the Normans (in 845 and succeeding years) Norman conquests in red. ... Events March 28 - Paris is sacked by Viking raiders, probably under Ragnar Lodbrok, who collect a huge ransom in exchange for leaving. ...


Angers was once the capital of the historic province of Anjou. Beginning in the ninth century, the region was controlled by a powerful family of feudal lords. It is the cradle of the House of Plantagenet who ruled England from the twelfth century and gave name to the Angevin Kings of England. During this time the Hospital of Saint-Jean was built in Angers by King Henry II of England. The edifice still stands to this day, now housing an important museum. In 1204 Angers was conquered by King Philippe II. Anjou is a former county (c. ... (8th century - 9th century - 10th century - other centuries) Events Beowulf might have been written down in this century, though it could also have been in the 8th century Viking attacks on Europe begin Oseberg ship burial The Magyars arrive in what is now Hungary, forcing the Serbs and Bulgars south... Angevin is the name applied to two distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland (see Angevin Empire). ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Angevin (IPA: ) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ... // Events February - Byzantine emperor Alexius IV is overthrown in a revolution, and Alexius V is proclaimed emperor. ... Philip II Augustus (French: Philippe II Auguste) (August 21, 1165 – July 14, 1223), was King of France from 1180 to 1223. ...


The Huguenots took it in 1585, and the Vendean royalists were defeated nearby in 1793. Till the French Revolution Angers was the seat of a celebrated university founded in the 14th century. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... 1585 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ...


Main sights

The site of a massive and ancient château, the city is also noted for the impressive twin spires of the twelfth century Cathedral of Saint-Maurice. Other noteworthy churches around Angers include St. Serge, an abbey-church of the 12th and 15th centuries, and the twelfth century La Trinité. [Cathedral:[1] The Château dAngers overlooks Angers and the Maine River. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ...


The famous abbey of [[ St. Aubin]] has a courtyard with elaborately sculptured arcades of the eleventh and twelfth centuries. The tower there is also splendid. [Eglise St. Aubin:[2] (10th century - 11th century - 12th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ...


Ruins of the old churches of Toussaint (thirteenth century) and Notre-Dame du Ronceray (eleventh century) are also nearby. The ancient hospital of St. Jean (twelfth century) is occupied by an archaeological museum. The Logis Barrault, a mansion built about 1500, houses the public library and the municipal museum, which has a large collection of paintings and sculptures. The mansion also contains the collection of Musée David consisting of works by the sculptor David d'Angers, who was a native of the town. Standing outside the museum is one of his masterpieces, a bronze statue of René of Anjou, a former duke of Anjou who was born in Angers' chateau. (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Saint-Jean (French for Saint John) is the name or part of the name of several places: Saint-Jean, Haute-Garonne, France Saint-Jean, Switzerland, in the Canton of Valais See also In Canada: Lac Saint-Jean Lac-Saint-Jean-Est County Regional Municipality, Quebec Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec... The decade of years from 1500 to 1509, inclusive. ... Pierre Jean David (1789-1856), usually called David dAngers, French sculptor, was born at Angers on the 12th of March 1789. ... Rene dAnjou, Count of Anjou, Duke of Bar, Duke of Anjou, called the Good, (died 1480), was a descendant of the kings of France and Sicily. ...


The Hôtel de Pincé or d'Anjou (1523-1530) is the finest of the stone mansions of Angers. There are also many curious wooden houses of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. The Palais de Justice, the Catholic Institute, a fine theatre, and a hospital with 1500 beds are the more remarkable of the modern buildings of the town. Angers is the seat of a bishopric, dating from the third century; a prefecture; a court of appeal; and a court of assizes (criminal courts). It has a tribunal of first instance, a tribunal of commerce, a board of trade-arbitrators, a chamber of commerce, a branch of the Bank of France, and several learned societies. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... (2nd century - 3rd century - 4th century - other centuries) Events The Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east. ... The Courts of Assize, or Assizes, is the name of criminal courts in several countries. ... One of the Banque de Frances offices in Paris. ...


Economy

The early prosperity of the town is largely due to the nearby quarries of slate, whose abundant use for the roofs of Angers led to the city's nickname, the "Black City" (or la ville noire in French). Other industries (noted in the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica) included the distillation of liqueurs from fruit (the orange liqueur Cointreau is only distilled in the town of Angers and the surrounding areas); cable, rope, and thread-making; the manufacture of boots, shoes, umbrellas, and parasols; weaving of sail-cloth and fabrics; machine construction; wire-drawing; and the manufacture of sparkling wines and preserved fruits. The chief articles of commerce, besides slate and manufactured goods, were hemp, early vegetables, fruit, flowers, and live-stock. Cointreau is an orange-flavored liqueur similar to triple sec and to Grand Marnier. ...


Many of these industries noted in 1911 have since disappeared. Nowadays industry consists of manufacturing lorries (Scania) and computers (Bull, Packard-Bell, NEC) as well as research in horticulture and biotechnologies.


Transport

  • Road: Motorway A11 to Paris ~295 km and to Nantes ~90 km
  • Railway: TGV from Angers-St Laud station to Paris 1h35
  • Airport: Angers-Marcé

City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Traditional city flag City coat of arms Motto: (Latin: Shall Neptune favour the traveller) Coordinates : , Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) Administration Département Loire-Atlantique (44) Région Pays-de-la-Loire Mayor Jean-Marc Ayrault (PS) (since 1989) Intercommunality Urban Community of Nantes City (commune) Characteristics Land Area 65. ... For the group of heart conditions referred to as TGV, see transposition of the great vessels. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ...

Culture

Angers has an orchestra ONPL shared with Nantes, a local theatre NTA (Nouveau Théatre d'Angers) and a dance school CNDC (Centre National de Danse Contemporaine).


Angers has a few important museum on the national level:

  • "Musée des Beaux Arts" (Art & Sculpture, the permanent collections: 14th till today) has just reopenned, after five years of work.
  • "Gallerie David d'Angers", which is consecrated to the 19th century sculptor David d'Angers.
  • "Musée Pincé", which holds a collection of Classical art, as well as egyptian, etruscan, japonnese and chinese.
  • "Musée Jean Lurçat et de la Tapisserie contemporaine", is a tapestry museum. The famous tapestries series "Le chant du Monde" by Jean Lurçat is in the ancient Hôpital St-Jean

(oldest hospital in France), while another modern building holds the contemporary collections, and also other works by Jean Lurçat.

  • "We should also notice that the tapestries "of the Acpocalypse", originally made for King René in the 14th century are today in Angers' castle after their restoration.

Angers is a imortant center for tapestrie, especially contemporary tapestry.


It calls itself the "most flowered city in Europe", and its displays of live and cut flowers are stunning indeed. It is also well-known for being the seat of important cultural events, like the film festival Premiers Plans, Tour de Scènes (free concerts in the streets) and Les Accroche-Coeurs (free street festival). The Premiers Plans festival takes place in Angers every year in January. ...


Sport

Angers has many sport teams playing at top level:

  • Angers SCO is Angers' football team. The club was created in 1919. In 2006, Angers SCO is playing in the National (third division) league.
  • Les Ducs d'Angers is Angers' ice hockey team. The club is playing in the Magnus League (first division).
  • Anjou BC is Angers' basketball team, playing in second division.

AM KINGSLEY FROM NIGERIA,A FOOTBALLER,I NEED YOUR HELP TO PLAY IN YOUR CLUB,PLEASE ASSIST ME.THANKS ...

Colleges and universities

A centre of learning, Angers boasts two renowned universities and several specialized institutions, altogether responsible for more than 40,000 students. The city is host of L'Université Catholique de l'Ouest (UCO), one of five Catholic universities in France. The Université Catholique de lOuest is one of five Catholic universities in France located at Angers. ...


UCO houses le Centre International Des Études Françaises,(CIDEF) a center of French language instruction for foreign students. Students from all over the world, including Americans primarily from the Universities of Auburn, Appalachian State, Notre Dame, Oregon, Clemson, Truman State, Kansas, and Randolph-Macon Woman's College come to Angers to spend time in the CIDEF program. The program provides immersion courses for foreign students, with subjects including literature, politics, theology, philosophy, and grammar (and an unofficial slang course!). CIDEF offers three summer sessions, each one month in length and two semesters (October-February and February-June) All courses are taught in French. Angers is considered an excellent location to learn French because the Angevin accent is said to retain the regal and aristocratic flavor of the royals who holidayed in the Loire Valley for centuries, and is said to be easily understood throughout the francophone world. Le Centre International Des Etudes Francaises (CIDEF) is an acedemic program of the Universite Catholique de LOuest in Angers, France that offers French language and culture courses to foriegn students. ...


Angers' other educational institutions include seminaries, lycées; a state university (Université d'Angers) with faculties of theology, law, economics, administration, letters, science, medicine and pharmacy; a higher school of agriculture, training colleges, an engineering school in manufacturing, and a school of fine art. Its education and research institutes are the driving force behind the city's science and technology industries.


Angers' Business School is ESSCA (Ecole Superieure des Sciences Commerciales d'Angers). Formerly part of the UCO, the school's program is of a duration of five years. ESSCA is one of the most prestigious business school in France, recruiting students after the Baccalaureat.


Miscellaneous

Births

The city is the birthplace of:

René dAnjou, René I of Naples (René I the Good, French Le bon roi René) (January 16, 1409 – July 10, 1480), was Duke of Anjou, Count of Provence (1434–1480), Count of Piedmont, Duke of Bar (1430–1480), Duke of Lorraine (1431–1453), King of Naples (1438–1442; titular... Events January 1 - The Welsh surrender Harlech Castle to the English. ... Events March 6 - Treaty of Toledo - Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain recognize African conquests of Afonso of Portugal and he cedes the Canary Islands to Spain Great standing on the Ugra river - Muscovy becomes independent from the Golden Horde. ... Jean Bodin (1530-1596) was a French jurist, member of the Parliament of Paris and professor of Law in Toulouse. ... Events April 22 - Treaty of Saragossa divides the eastern hemisphere between Spain and Portugal, stipulating that the dividing line should lie 297. ... Events February 5 - 26 catholics crucified in Nagasaki, Japan. ... Michel Eugène Chevreul (August 31, 1786 – April 9, 1889) was an important French chemist whose work with fatty acids led to early applications in the fields of art and science. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Joseph Louis Proust (September 26, 1754 - July 5, 1826) was a French chemist. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... One of the fundamental observations of modern chemistry made by Joseph Louis Proust, the law of definite proportions states that, in a pure compound, the elements combine in definite proportions to each other. ... Pierre Jean David (1789-1856), usually called David dAngers, French sculptor, was born at Angers on the 12th of March 1789. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Prosper Ménière (June 18, 1799 — February 7, 1862) was a French physician who in 1861 described the symptoms now known as Ménières disease. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Cointreau is an orange-flavored liqueur similar to triple sec and to Grand Marnier. ... René François Nicolas Marie Bazin (December 26, 1853 - July 20, 1932) was a French novelist. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... Octave Mirbeau Octave Mirbeau (February 16, 1848 in Trévières - February 16, 1917) was a French journalist, art critic, pamphleteer, novelist, and playwright, who achieved celebrity in Europe and great success among the public, while still appealing to the literary and artistic avant-garde. ... André Bazin on the cover of the third volume of the original edition of Quest-ce que le cinéma? André Bazin (April 18, 1918 – November 11, 1958) was a renowned and influential French film critic and film theorist. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... François Truffauts New Wave film Jules et Jim The New Wave (French: la Nouvelle Vague) was a blanket term coined by critics for a group of French filmmakers of the late 1950s and 1960s, influenced (in part) by Italian Neorealism. ... Hervé Bazin (Jean-Pierre Hervé-Bazin) (April 7, 1911, Angers - February 17, 1996, Angers) was a French writer, whose best-known novels (based on his own life) covered topics of teenage rebellion and dysfunctional families. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Henri Dutilleux (born January 22, 1916 in Angers, France) is one of the most important French composers of the second half of the 20th century, producing work in the tradition of Maurice Ravel, Claude Debussy, and Albert Roussel, but in a style distinctly his own. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Jacques Loussier (born 26 October 1934 in Angers, northwestern France) is a noted pianist and composer. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... A missionary is traditionally defined as a propagator of religion who works to convert those outside that community; someone who proselytizes. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35°12N...

Twin towns

Angers is twinned with:

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Coordinates: Country Netherlands Province North Holland Area (2006)  - Municipality 32. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Osnabrück is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany, some 80 km NNE of Dortmund, 45 km NE of Münster, and some 100 km due west of Hanover. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mali. ... View of Bamako Bamako district Bamako, population 1,690,471 (2006), is the capital of Mali, and is the biggest city in the country. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... This article discusses the Italian city. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Wigan is a town in Greater Manchester, North West England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Södertälje [søːdə˘ʈɛljÉ™] is a Municipality in Stockholm County, in central Sweden. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... NO8DO (I was not abandoned) Location Coordinates : ( ) Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Sevilla (Spanish) Spanish name Sevilla Founded 8th-9th century BC Postal code 41001-41080 Website http://www. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_China. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

Notes

  1. ^ (1963) Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Angers
  • Official website
  • ESSCA
  • Angers Airport
  • Angers SCO Officiel Website

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