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Encyclopedia > Angel
The Archangel Michael by Guido Reni wears a late Roman military outfit in this 17th century depiction
The Archangel Michael by Guido Reni wears a late Roman military outfit in this 17th century depiction

In written records the earliest concept of an angel as a supernatural being is found in Judaism (c.14th century BCE), and has been adopted by other religions, such as Zoroastrianism (c.5th century BCE), Christianity (c.1st century CE), and Islam (c.7th century CE). Look up angel in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 401 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1576 × 2358 pixels, file size: 313 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 401 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1576 × 2358 pixels, file size: 313 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Saint Michael redirects here. ... Autoportrait Abduction of Deianira, 1620-21 Guido Reni (November 4, 1575, Calvenzano di Vergato, near Bologna - August 18, 1642, Bologna) was a prominent Italian painter of high-Baroque style. ... For other uses, see Supernatural (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...

Contents

Etymology

In Hebrew the primary term for the word angel is Malakh, but others are used. Another word used is Hebrew כרוב kruv[1] described as young children, from which the English word cherub is derived. Yet another word for angels in Hebrew is Gil-Gulim, meaning revolving, because they are depicted as wheels with wings, and this is derived in meaning from Gal-Gal, "the rotation of fortune, change" [2], as in Hebrew ani-gal, (Eng. I have changed).[citation needed] A Malakh (plural Malakhim) is a messenger angel who appears throughout the Hebrew Bible, Rabbinic literature, and traditional Jewish liturgy. ... CHERUB is a series of childrens books written by the author Robert Muchamore about a group of children who are trained to be agents working for the British Government in the top secret organisation known as CHERUB. It is similar to the British security service MI5, and is based...


The word "angel" in English (from Old English engel), French (from Old French angele), German, Spanish, and many other Romance languages are derived from the Latin angelus, itself derived from Koine Greek: άγγελος, angelos, "messenger" (pl. άγγελοι).[3] The ultimate etymology of that word in Greek is uncertain.[4] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family that comprises all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Koine redirects here. ...


its is said as of today there is only one true angel walking the earth. His name is Alfred Zachariah White. he is thought to be the only modern day angel.


Tanakh (Hebrew Bible)

Jacob Wrestling with the Angel. Gustave Doré, 1855
Jacob Wrestling with the Angel. Gustave Doré, 1855

The Biblical name for angel, מלאך ("mal'ach"), obtained the further signification of "angel" only through the addition of God's name, as "angel of the Lord," or "angel of God" (Zechariah 12:8). Other appellations are "sons of God", (Genesis 6:4; Job 1:6 [R. V. v. 1]) and "the holy ones" (Psalm 89:6-8). Mal'ach can mean any sort of messenger, even a king's emissary. (Genesis 32:4) Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Ambox_emblem_question. ... Download high resolution version (795x1000, 157 KB)Jacob Wrestling with the Angel By Gustave Doré, 1855 Granger Collection, New York Source: http://www. ... Download high resolution version (795x1000, 157 KB)Jacob Wrestling with the Angel By Gustave Doré, 1855 Granger Collection, New York Source: http://www. ... Doré photographed by Felix Nadar. ... The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ...


According to Jewish interpretation, 'Elohim is only sometimes reserved for the one true God; but at times 'Elohim (powers), bnēi 'Elohim, bnēi Elim (sons of gods) were general terms for beings with great power (e.g. judges). See also: Names of God in Judaism This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the Hebrew word. ... At the bottom of the hands, the two letters on each hand combine to form יהוה (YHVH), the name of God. ...


Angels are referred to as "holy ones" Zechariah 14:5 and "watchers" Daniel 4:13. They are spoken of as the "host of heaven" Deuteronomy 17:3 or of "Adonai" Joshua 5:14. For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ...


According to historical scholars, in early Hebrew thought, God appears and speaks directly to individuals (Genesis 3:8, Exodus 12:1). He also intervenes in human affairs, often acting punitively and violently (Genesis 22ff.; Exodus 4:24, 14:4; 2 Samuel 24:1: Psalm 78:31ff.) God's nature reflects the mores of nomadic people. Under the influence of Zoroastrianism and by postexilic prophets and writers, these earlier conceptions were revised to reflect a new theodicy which explained evil without directly implicating God. As the result, God became both more distant and more merciful. Angels and demons replaced him in his encounters with men, and Satan assumed his destructive powers (cf. 2 Samuel 24:1 with 1 Chronicles 21:1).[5] The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... The Babylonian captivity, or Babylonian exile, is the name generally given to the deportation and exile of the Jews of the ancient Kingdom of Judah to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ...


Prior to the emergence of monotheism in Israel the idea of an angel was the Malach Adonai, Angel of the Lord, or Malach Elohim, Angel of God. The Malach Adonai is an appearance or manifestation of God in the form of a man, and the term Malach Adonai is used interchangeably with Adonai (God). (cf. Exodus 3:2, with 3:4; Exodus 13:21 with Exodus 14:19). Those who see the Malach Adonai say they have seen God (Genesis 32:30; Judges 13:22). The Malach Adonai (or Elohim) appears to Abraham, Hagar, Moses, Gideon, etc., and leads the Israelites in the Pillar of Cloud (Exodus 3:2). The phrase Malach Adonai may have been originally a courtly circumlocution for the Divine King; but it readily became a means of avoiding anthropomorphism, and later on, when angels were classified, the Malach Adonai meant an angel of distinguished rank. The identification of the Malach Adonai with the Logos, (said by Christians to be the Second Person of the Trinity), is not indicated by the references in the Hebrew scriptures; but the idea of a Being partly identified with God, and yet in some sense distinct from him, illustrates a tendency of Jewish religious thought to distinguish persons within the unity of the deity. Whilst some Christians say that this foreshadows the doctrine of the Trinity, Kabbalist Jews would show how it developed into kabbalistic theological thought and imagery. For the Celtic Frost album, see Monotheist (album) In theology, monotheism (from Greek one and god) is the belief in the existence of one deity, or in the oneness of God. ... Look up Cf. ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... Hagar can refer to: Hagar (Bible), in the Book of Genesis, the handmaiden of Sarah and wife of Abraham Hagarism: The Making of the Islamic World, title name taken from the above lady Hagar (company), an Icelandic retailer company, part of the Baugur Group Hägar the Horrible, the comic... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Gideon (גִּדְעוֹן, Standard Hebrew GidÊ»on, Tiberian Hebrew Giḏʻôn), also known as Jerubbaal, is a character that appears in the Book of Judges, in the Bible. ... 7th millennium BC anthropomorphized rocks, with slits for eyes, found in modern-day Israel. ... This article is about logos (logoi) in ancient Greek philosophy, mathematics, rhetoric, Theophilosophy, and Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Christology is a field of study... This article is about the Christian Trinity. ... This article is about the Christian Trinity. ... This article is about traditional Jewish Kabbalah. ...


Once the doctrine of monotheism was formally expressed, in the period immediately before and during the Exile (Deuteronomy 6:4-5 and Isaiah 43:10), we find angels prominent in the Book of Ezekiel. Ezekiel, as a prophet of the Exile, may have been influenced by the hierarchy of supernatural beings in the Babylonian religion, and perhaps even by the angelology of Zoroastrianism (it is not, however, certain that these doctrines of Zoroastrianism were developed at so early a date). Ezekiel 9 gives elaborate descriptions of cherubim (a class, or type of angels); and in one of his visions, he sees seven angels execute the judgment of God upon Jerusalem. As in Genesis, they are styled "men"; malach, for "angel", does not occur in Ezekiel. Somewhat later, in the visions of Zechariah, angels play a great part; they are sometimes spoken of as "men", sometimes as malach, and the Malach Adonai seems to hold a certain primacy among them Zechariah 1:11. The Satan also appears to prosecute (so to speak) the High Priest before the divine tribunal (Zechariah 3:1). Similarly in the Book of Job the bnei Elohim, sons of God, appear, and amongst them, Satan (Hebrew ha-satan), again in the role of public prosecutor, the defendant being Job (Job 1, HE. Cf. 1 Chronicles 21:1). Occasional references to "angels" occur in the Psalter (Psalms 91:11, 103:20 etc.); they appear as ministers of God. Book Of Ezekiel is rapper Freekey Zekeys debut album and debut on Diplomat Records/Asylum. ... Ezekiel, , IPA: , God will strengthen, from , chazaq, [ xazaq ], literally to fasten upon, figuratively strong, and , el, [ el ], literally strength, figuratively Almighty. He is a prophet and priest in the Bible who prophesied for 22 years sometime in the 500s BCE while in the form of visions exiled in... This diorite head is believed to represent king Hammurabi Babylonian and Assyrian religion was a series of belief systems in places in the early civilisations of the Euphrates valley. ... For other uses, see Angel (disambiguation). ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... Zechariah as depicted on Michelangelos ceiling of the Sistine Chapel Zechariah or Zecharya (זְכַרְיָה Renowned/Remembered of/is the LORD, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ) was a person in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ...


Psalm 78:49 speaks of "evil angels" (Authorized Version) or "angels of evil" (Judaica Press). "Evil" here is not meant in the moral sense, but in the sense of opposition. This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... Judaica Press was founded in 1963 by Jack Goldman in response to the growing demand for books of scholarship in the English-speaking Jewish world. ... For other uses, see Evil (disambiguation). ...


The seven angels of Ezekiel may be compared with the seven eyes of God in Zechariah 3:9, 4:10. The latter have been connected by Ewald and others with the later doctrine of seven chief angels (Tobit 12:15; Revelation 8:2), parallel to and influenced by the Ameshaspentas (Amesha Spenta), or seven great spirits of the Persian mythology. Tobias and the Angel, by Filippino Lippi The Book of Tobit (or Book of Tobias in older Catholic Bibles) is a book of scripture that is part of the Catholic and Orthodox and Anglican biblical canon, pronounced canonical by the Council of Carthage of 397 and confirmed for Roman Catholics... In Zoroastrianism, Amesha Spentas are the Holy Immortals, the equivalent of Archangels in Christian theology. ... The beliefs and practices of the culturally and linguistically related group of ancient peoples who inhabited the Iranian Plateau and its borderlands, as well as areas of Central Asia from the Black Sea to Khotan (modern Ho-tien, China), form Persian mythology. ...


During the Persian and Greek periods, the doctrine of angels underwent a great development, partly, at any rate, under foreign influences. In Daniel, c. [160 BC], 71 angels, usually spoken of as "men" or "Angel-princes", appear as guardians or champions of the individual nations, defending them as God sits in council with them over the world; grades are implied, there are "princes" and "chief" or "great princes"; and the names of some angels are known, Gabriel, Michael; the latter is pre-eminent (Daniel 8:16; Daniel 10:13, 20-21), he is the guardian of Israel's leading Kingdom of Judah. Again in Tobit a leading part is played by Raphael, "one of the seven holy angels" (Tobit 12:15). Persia redirects here. ... 12th-century icon of Archangel Gabriel from Novgorod. ... Saint Michael redirects here. ... Kingdom of Judah (Hebrew מַלְכוּת יְהוּדָה, Standard Hebrew Malḫut Yəhuda, Tiberian Hebrew Malḵûṯ Yəhûḏāh) in the times of the Hebrew Bible, was the nation formed from the territories of the tribes of Judah, Simeon, and Benjamin after the Kingdom of Israel was divided, and was named after Judah... Tobias and the Angel, by Filippino Lippi The Book of Tobit (or Book of Tobias in older Catholic Bibles) is a book of scripture that is part of the Catholic and Orthodox and Anglican biblical canon, pronounced canonical by the Council of Carthage of 397 and confirmed for Roman Catholics... The Archangel Raphael Raphael (Standard Hebrew רפאל, God has healed, God Heals, God, Please Heal, and many other combinations of the two words, Arabic: Israfil, اسرافيل) is the name of an archangel of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, who performs all manner of healing. ...


In Tobit, too, we find the idea of the demon or evil angel, although one should note that the Book of Tobit is not accepted into Jewish or Protestant canon.[6][7] In the canonical Hebrew/Aramaic scriptures, angels may inflict suffering as ministers of God; but they act as subordinates to God, and not as independent, morally evil agents. The statement (Job 4:18) that God "charged his angels with folly" applies to all angels. In Daniel, the princes, or guardian angels, of the heathen nations oppose Michael, the guardian angel of Judah. But in Tobit, we find Asmodeus the evil demon, τὸ πονηρὸν δαιμόνιον, who strangles Sarah's husbands, and also a general reference to "a devil or evil spirit", πνεῦμα (Tobit 3:8, 17; 6:7). “Fiend” redirects here. ... Aramaic is a Semitic language with a four-thousand year history. ... A guardian angel is a spirit who is believed to protect and to guide a particular person. ... Asmodeus (Asmodeus, Asmodaeus, pronounced Ashmed or Ashmedeus in Hebrew, also Chammadai, Sydonai) is a semi-Biblical demon mostly known thanks to the deuterocanonical Book of Tobit; he is also mentioned in some Talmudic legends and in demonology, as he is a leading figure in the construction efforts of the Temple... This is an overview of the Devil. ...


The Fall of the Angels is not properly a scriptural doctrine, though it is based on Genesis 6:2, as interpreted by the Book of Enoch, although there is no evidence that the bnē Elohim of that chapter are angels or superhuman beings, the only such assumption being made on the use of the Hebrew 'Elohim' . To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Appearance

In the Hebrew Bible, angels often appear to people in the shape of humans of extraordinary beauty, and often are not immediately recognized as angels (Genesis 18:2, Genesis 19:5; Judges 6:17, Judges 8:6; 2 Samuel 29:9). Some fly through the air, some become invisible, sacrifices touched by some are consumed by fire, and some may disappear in sacrificial fire. God, "the Angel of the Lord" appeared in the flames of the thorn bush (Genesis 16:13; Judges 6:21-22; 2 Kings 2:11; Exodus 3:2). They are described as pure and bright as Heaven; consequently, they are said to be formed of fire, and encompassed by light, as the Psalmist said (Psalm 104:4): "He makes winds His messengers, burning fire His ministers." Some verses in the Apocrypha/Deuterocanonical works depict angels wearing blue or red robes but no such reference occurs in the Protestant books. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 93 KB) A statue of an angel at a cemetary in Metairie Cemetery in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 93 KB) A statue of an angel at a cemetary in Metairie Cemetery in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Castle Ashby Graveyard Northamptonshire A cemetery is a place in which dead bodies and cremated remains are buried. ... , Metairie (local pronunciations , ) is a suburb of New Orleans. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Jewish scriptures see Tanakh. ... Burning bush at St. ... Apocrypha (from the Greek word , meaning those having been hidden away[1]) are texts of uncertain authenticity or writings where the authorship is questioned. ...


Though superhuman, angels can be perceived in human form; this is the earliest conception. Gradually, and especially in post-Biblical times, angels came to be imagined in a form corresponding to the nature of the mission to be fulfilled—generally, however, the human form. Angels have commonly been depicted as human who, as the same nature of typical angels, have "wings" and can fly. Angels can be depicted bearing drawn swords or other weapons in their hands—one carries an ink-horn by his side—and ride on horses (Numbers 22:23, Joshua 5:13, Ezekiel 9;2, Zechariah 1:8 et seq.). A terrible angel mentioned in 1 Chronicles 21:16,30, as standing "between the earth and the heaven, having a drawn sword in his hand". In the Book of Daniel, reference is made to an angel "clothed in linen, whose loins were girded with fine gold of Uphaz: his body also was like the beryl, and his face as the appearance of lightning, and his eyes as lamps of fire, and his arms and his feet like in color to polished brass, and the voice of his words like the voice of a multitude" (Daniel 10:5-6). This imagery is very similar to a description in the book of Revelation. Angels are thought by many to possess wings. This has arisen from references to their ability to fly (Daniel 9:21). Both cherubim and seraphim are depicted with wings in the Bible, and they are both traditionally associated within both the Jewish and Christian hierarchy of angels. They are commonly depicted with halos. Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Book of Daniel (disambiguation). ... Three varieties of beryl: Morganite, Aquamarine, and Heliodor The mineral beryl is a beryllium aluminium cyclosilicate with the chemical formula Be3Al2(SiO3)6. ... Not to be confused with lighting. ... Brazen redirects here. ... A cherub (Hebrew כרוב; plural cherubim, כרובים) is an angelic creature mentioned several times in the Tanakh, or Old Testament, and in the Book of Revelation. ... 六翼天使 Seraphim(六翼天使) is a Taiwanese symphonic metal band similar to Nightwish and Therion. ... According to medieval Christian theologians, the Angels are organized into several orders, or Angelic Choirs. ... Jesus is usually depicted with a round halo bearing a cross, as in this dome mosaic from the Church of Daphni in Athens. ...

Detail of angel from nativity windows at Trinity Church, Boston, designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris, 1882
Detail of angel from nativity windows at Trinity Church, Boston, designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris, 1882

In Christian iconography, the use of wings is a convention used to denote the figure as a spirit. Depictions of angels in Christian art as winged human forms, unlike classical pagan depictions of the major deities, follow the iconic conventions of lesser winged gods, such as Eos, Eros, Thanatos and Nike. Image File history File links USA_Massachusetts_Boston_Trinity_Nativity-detail-1. ... Image File history File links USA_Massachusetts_Boston_Trinity_Nativity-detail-1. ... Trinity Church in Boston. ... Love Among the Ruins, by Edward Burne-Jones. ... This page is about William Morris, the writer, designer and socialist. ... Look up Iconography in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Spirit (disambiguation). ... Eos, by Evelyn De Morgan (1850 - 1919), 1895 (Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC): for a Pre-Raphaelite painter, Eos was still the classical pagan equivalent of an angel Eos (dawn) was, in Greek Mythology, the Titan goddess of the dawn, who rose from her home at the edge of... This article is about the Greek god Eros. ... In Greek mythology, Thanatos (in Ancient Greek, θάνατος – Death) was the Daimon personification of Death and Mortality. ... This article discusses the Greek Goddess. ...


Angels are portrayed as powerful and dreadful, endowed with wisdom and with knowledge of all earthly events, correct in their judgment, holy, but not infallible: they strive against each other, and God has to make peace between them. When their duties are not punitive, angels are beneficent to man (Psalms 103:20, 78:25; 2 Samuel 14:17,20, 19:28; Zechariah 14:5; Job 4:18, 25:2).


The number of angels is enormous. Jacob meets a host of angels; Joshua sees the "captain of the host of the Lord"; God sits on His throne, "all the host of heaven standing by Him on His right hand and on his left"; the sons of God come "to present themselves before the Lord" (Genesis 32:2; Joshua 5:14-15; 1 Kings 22:19; Job 1:6, 2:1; Psalm 89:6; Job 33:23). The general conception is the one of Job 25:3: "Is there any number of his armies?" In the Book of Revelation, the number is "a thousand thousands, and many tens of thousands". This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Joshua, Jehoshuah or Yehoshua. ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ...


Though the older writings usually mention one angel of the Lord, embassies to men as a rule comprised several messengers. The inference, however, is not to be drawn that God Himself or one particular angel was designated: the expression was given simply to God's power to accomplish through but one angel any deed, however wonderful.


Angels are referred to in connection with their special missions as, for instance, the "angel which hath redeemed" (Genesis 48:16); "an interpreter" (Job 33:23);"the angel that destroyed" (2 Samuel 24:16); "messenger of the covenant" (Malachi 3:1); "angel of his presence" (Isaiah 43:9); and "a band of angels of evil" (Psalm 78:49).[8]


When, however, the heavenly host is regarded in its most comprehensive aspect, a distinction may be made between cherubim, seraphim, chayot ("living creatures"), Ofanim ("wheels"), and Arelim (another name for Thrones). God is described as riding on the cherubim and as "the Lord of hosts, who dwelleth between the cherubim"; while the latter guard the way of the Tree of Life (1 Samuel, Psalm 80:2, Genesis 3:24). The seraphim are described by Isaiah 6:2) as having six wings; and Ezekiel describes the ḥayyot (Ezekiel 1:5 et seq.) and ofanim as heavenly beings who carry God's throne. CHERUB is a series of childrens books written by the author Robert Muchamore about a group of children who are trained to be agents working for the British Government in the top secret organisation known as CHERUB. It is similar to the British security service MI5, and is based... For other uses, see Seraph (disambiguation). ... The Chayot or Hayyoth (Hebrew חַיּוֹת living beings) are a class of Merkabah, or Jewish Mystical Angels, on the same level as the Christian cherubim, and residing in the seventh heaven. ... ... It has been suggested that Ophan be merged into this article or section. ... The Tree of Life as represented in Kabbalah, containing the Sephiroth. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... Ezekiel, , IPA: , God will strengthen, from , chazaq, [ xazaq ], literally to fasten upon, figuratively strong, and , el, [ el ], literally strength, figuratively Almighty. He is a prophet and priest in the Bible who prophesied for 22 years sometime in the 500s BCE while in the form of visions exiled in...


In post-Biblical times, the heavenly hosts became more highly organized (possibly as early as Zecharaiah 3:9, 4:10; certainly in Daniel), and there came to be various kinds of angels; some even being provided with names, as will be shown below.


Purpose

In the Bible, angels are a medium of God's power; they exist to execute God's will. Angels reveal themselves to individuals as well as to the whole nation, to announce events, either bad or good, affecting humans. Angels foretold to Abraham the birth of Isaac, to Manoah the birth of Samson, and to Abraham the destruction of Sodom. Guardian angels were mentioned, but not, as was later the case, as guardian spirits of individuals and nations. God sent an angel to protect the Hebrew people after their exodus from Egypt, to lead them to the promised land, and to destroy the hostile tribes in their way (Exodus 23:20, Numbers 20:16). For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... Manoah and his barren wife sacrifice a ram to the angel of the Lord (above); the wife wears a wimple in this miniature painted in Paris, ca 1250 (the Maciejowski Bible). ... Samson and Delilah, by Anthony van Dyck (1599-1641) This article is about Biblical figure. ... Sodom can refer to: Sodom and Gomorrah, Biblical cities Sodom (band), a German thrash metal band Sodom, an album by the band Sodom Sodom (Final Fight), a character from Street Fighter and Final Fight Il Sodoma, an Italian Mannerist painter (1477-1549) Sodom, South Georgia, a song by Iron & Wine... This article is about the Hebrew people. ... This article is about the second book in the Torah. ... Map of the Land of Israel as defined in the Bible The Promised Land (Hebrew: הארץ המובטחת, translit. ...


In Judges 2:1 an angel of the Lord—unless here and in the preceding instances (compare Isaiah 42:19, Hagai 1:13, Malachi 3:1), a human messenger of God is meant—addressed the whole people, swearing to bring them to the promised land. An angel brought Elijah meat and drink (1 Kings 19:5); and as God watched over Jacob, so is a pious person protected by an angel, who cares for him in all his ways (Psalm 34:7, HE). There are militant angels, one of whom smites in one night the whole Assyrian army of 185,000 men (2 Kings 19:35); messengers go forth from God "in ships to make the careless Ethiopians afraid" (Ezekiel 30:9; the enemy is scattered before the angel like chaff (Psalm 35:5-6). This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... In spiritual terminology, piety is a virtue. ... For other uses, see Assyria (disambiguation). ...

A Christian putto; angel from the Melbourne General Cemetery
A Christian putto; angel from the Melbourne General Cemetery

Avenging angels are mentioned, such as the one in 2 Samuel 24:15, who annihilates thousands. It would seem that the pestilence was personified, and that the "evil angels" mentioned in Psalm 78:49 are to be regarded as personifications of this kind. "Evil" is here to be taken in the causative sense, as "producing evil"; for, as stated above, angels are generally considered to be by nature beneficent to man. They glorify God, whence the term "glorifying angels" comes (Psalms 29:1, HE, HE; compare Isaiah 6:2 et seq.). Image File history File linksMetadata IMG_2752smalledit. ... Image File history File linksMetadata IMG_2752smalledit. ... sculpted putto The putto is a figure of a pudgy baby, almost always male, often naked and having wings, found especially in Italian Renaissance art. ... Melbourne General Cemetery The Melbourne General Cemetery is a large (43 hectare) necropolis located 2 km (1. ...


They constitute God's heavenly court, sitting in council with him (1 Kings 22:19; Job 1:6, 2:1); hence they are called His "council of the holy ones" (Psalm 89:7, R.V.; A.V.: "assembly of the saints"). They accompany God as his attendants, when he appears to man (Deuteronomy 33:2; Job 38:7). This conception was developed after the Exile; and in the Book of Zechariah, angels of various shapes are delegated "to walk to and fro through the earth" in order to find out and report what happens (Zechariah 6:7). Royal court (as distinguished from a court of law) may refer to a number of institutions: A noble court - the household or entourage of a monarch or other ruler The Royal Court of Jersey - the main court of justice of Jersey The Royal Court of Guernsey - the main court of... The Revised Version (or English Revised Version) of the Bible is a late 19th-century British revision of the King James Version of 1611. ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... The Book of Zechariah is a book of the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh attributed to the prophet Zechariah. ...


In the prophetic books, angels appear as representatives of the prophetic spirit, and bring to the prophets God's word. Thus the prophet Haggai was called God's messenger (angel); and it is known that "Malachi" is not a real name, but means "messenger" or "angel". In 1 Kings 13:18, an angel brought the divine word to the prophet. For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... An 18th century Russian icon of the prophet Haggai For the prophetic book, see Book of Haggai. ...


In some places, it is implied that angels existed before the physical creation (Genesis 1:26; Job 38:7). The earlier Biblical writings did not speculate about them; simply regarding them, in their relations to man, as God's agents. Consequently, they did not individualize or denominate them; and in Judges 13:18 HE, and Genesis 32:29, the angels, when questioned, refuse to give their names. In Daniel, however, there occur the names Michael and Gabriel. Michael is Israel's representative in Heaven, where other nations—the Persians, for instance—were also represented by angelic princes. More than three hundred years before the Book of Daniel was written, Zechariah graded the angels according to their rank, but did not name them. The notion of the seven eyes (Zechariah 3:45, HE) may have been affected by the representation of the seven archangels and also possibly by the seven Amesha Spenta of Zoroastrianism (compare Ezekiel 9:2). Look up creation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Anthem SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān Â² Capital (and largest city) Tehran Official languages Persian Demonym Iranian Government Islamic Republic  -  Supreme Leader  -  President Unification  -  Unified by Cyrus the Great 559 BCE   -  Parthian (Arsacid) dynastic empire (first reunification) 248 BCE-224 CE   -  Sassanid dynastic empire 224–651 CE   -  Safavid dynasty... In Zoroastrianism, Amesha Spentas are the Holy Immortals, the equivalent of Archangels in Christian theology. ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ...


Jewish beliefs

The Bible, Oral Law, Midrash and various mystical texts present angels as heavenly beings created by God who are not endowed with free will. They occasionally appear on earth in furtherance of God's will, often as messengers. They are frequently encountered in mystical texts, particularly those of the Merkabah tradition. Jewish angelology is far from systematic, and the purpose, nature and personalities of individual angels and the heavenly host as a whole varies greatly across historical eras, texts, genres and traditions.[9] The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... Free-Will is a Japanese independent record label founded in 1986. ... For a series of Israeli main battle tanks, see Merkava. ...


The Bible uses the terms מלאך אלהים (messenger of God), מלאך יהוה (messenger of the Lord), בני אלוהים (sons of God) and הקדושים (the holy ones) to refer to beings traditionally interpreted as angels. Other terms are used in later texts, such as העוליונים (the upper ones). Daniel is the first biblical figure to refer to individual angels by name.[10]


In post-Biblical Judaism, certain angels came to take on a particular significance and developed unique personalities and roles. Though these archangels were believed to have rank amongst the heavenly host, no systematic hierarchy ever developed. Metatron is considered one of the highest of the angels in Merkabah and Kabbalist mysticism and often serves as a scribe. He is briefly mentioned in the Talmud,[11] and figures prominently in Merkabah mystical texts. Michael, who serves as a warrior and advocate for Israel (Daniel 10:13) is looked upon particularly fondly. Gabriel is mentioned in the Book of Daniel (Daniel 8:15-17) and briefly in the Talmud,[12] as well as many Merkabah mystical texts. An archangel is a supernatural being of Zoroastrian Persian, Judaic, Christian, and Islamic theology, counted among the angels. ... For the Darkwell album, see Metatron (album). ... This article is about traditional Jewish Kabbalah. ... This article is about the given name. ... For other uses, see Book of Daniel (disambiguation). ...


Maimonides and rationalism

In the Middle Ages, some Jews presented a rationalist view of angels that is accepted by many Jews. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... In epistemology and in its broadest sense, rationalism is any view appealing to reason as a source of knowledge or justification (Lacey 286). ...


The rationalist view of angels, as held by Maimonides, Gersonides, Samuel Ibn Tibbon, etc., states that God's actions are never mediated by a violation of the laws of nature. Rather, all such interactions are by way of angels. Even this can be highly misleading: Maimonides harshly states that the average person's understanding of the term "angel" is ignorant in the extreme. Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135 or 1138–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... Levi ben Gershon (Levi son of Gerson), better known as Gersonides or the Ralbag (1288-1344), was a famous rabbi, philosopher, mathematician and Talmudic commentator. ...


Rather, according to Maimonides, the wise man understands that what the Bible and Talmud refer to as "angels" are actually metaphors for laws of nature, or the principles by which the universe operates. This is explained in his Guide of the Perplexed II:4 and II:6, and differs from the more widespread perception of angels in the Torah. For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ...

II:4[cite this quote]

...This leads Aristotle in turn to the demonstrated fact that God, glory and majesty to Him, does not do things by direct contact. God burns things by means of fire; fire is moved by the motion of the sphere; the sphere is moved by means of a disembodied intellect, these intellects being the 'angels which are near to Him', through whose mediation the spheres [planets] move....thus totally disembodied minds exist which emanate from God and are the intermediaries between God and all the bodies [objects] here in this world. For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ...

Zoroastrianism

In Zoroastrianism there are different angel-like animals. For example, each person has one guardian angel, called Fravashi. They patronize human beings and other creatures, and also manifest God’s energy. The Amesha Spentas have often been regarded as angels, although they don't convey messages,[13] but are rather emanations of Ahura Mazda ("Wise Lord", God); they initially appear in an abstract fashion and then later became personalized, associated with diverse aspects of the divine creation.[14] Zoroastrian angelology is branch of Zoroastrian doctrine that deals with the hierarchical system of divinities introduced by the reforms of Zarathustra (Zoroaster). ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... Faravahar, believed to be a depiction of a Fravashi. ... In Zoroastrianism, Amesha Spentas are the Holy Immortals, the equivalent of Archangels in Christian theology. ... Ahura Mazda () is the Avestan language name for a divinity exalted by Zoroaster as the one uncreated Creator, hence God. ...


Christian beliefs

Raphael and Tobias, after Adam Elsheimer, c1610. The Archangel appears in nearly normal clothes; there is even the suggestion of trousers
Raphael and Tobias, after Adam Elsheimer, c1610. The Archangel appears in nearly normal clothes; there is even the suggestion of trousers

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Archangel Raphael Raphael (Standard Hebrew רפאל, God has healed, God Heals, God, Please Heal, and many other combinations of the two words, Arabic: Israfil, اسرافيل) is the name of an archangel of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, who performs all manner of healing. ... Adam Elsheimer (b. ...

New Testament references

In the New Testament angels appear frequently as the ministers of God and the agents of revelation (e.g. Matthew 1:20 (to Joseph), 4:11. (to Jesus), Luke 1:26 (to Mary), Acts 12:7 (to Peter)); and Jesus speaks of angels as fulfilling such functions (e.g. Mark 8:38, 13:27), implying in one saying that they neither marry nor are given in marriage (Mark 12:25). Angels are most prominent at the birth of Jesus and at Jesus' resurrection. The New Testament takes little interest in the idea of the angelic hierarchy, but there are traces of the doctrine. The distinction of good and bad angels is recognized. Good angels mentioned by name are Gabriel and Michael (Luke 1:19; Daniel 12:1). Scripture also mentions a tempter Satan, the scribes name the ruler of demons as Beelzebub, and the angel of the abyss Apollyon (Mark 1:13, 3:22; Rev. 9:11). Apollyon, (Hebrew Abaddon) a name for an angel mentioned in Revelation 9:11, is believed by some to be a good angel that guards the gates to the traditionally known hell. Revelation 10:1 describes another angel, although unnamed, some say it is Metatron. The Christian Greek scriptures also imply an angelic hierarchy; archangels (namely Michael, mentioned in both Daniel 10:13 and Jude 9, Gabriel, and Raphael), principalities and powers (Rom. 8:38; Col. 2:10), thrones and dominions (Col 1:16). The hierarchies of principalities, powers, thrones, and dominions are questionable by some Christian denominations due to the ambiguity of the context. Romans 8:38 may refer to other things besides angels if the context includes opposition beyond spirits themselves. The scope of Col. 1:16 covering "all things created" also extends far beyond angels by themselves. Other hierarchies accepted from the Old Testament include seraphim and cherubim. This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The Gospel of Luke (literally, according to Luke; Greek, Κατά Λουκαν, Kata Loukan) is a synoptic Gospel, and the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament. ... For the literature genre, see Acts of the Apostles (genre). ... The Gospel of Mark, anonymous[1] but traditionally ascribed to Mark the Evangelist, is a synoptic gospel of the New Testament. ... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the archangel Gabriel. ... Saint Michael redirects here. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... “Belzebub” redirects here. ... Apollyon (top) battling Christian in John Bunyans The Pilgrims Progress. ... Apollyon (top) battling Christian in John Bunyans The Pilgrims Progress. ... Abaddon (Hebrew אבדון Avadon, meaning destruction). In Biblical poetry (Job 26:6; Proverbs 15:11), it comes to mean place of destruction, or the realm of the dead, and is associated with Sheol. ... For the Darkwell album, see Metatron (album). ... 六翼天使 Seraphim(六翼天使) is a Taiwanese symphonic metal band similar to Nightwish and Therion. ... A cherub (Hebrew כרוב; plural cherubim, כרובים) is an angelic creature mentioned several times in the Tanakh, or Old Testament, and in the Book of Revelation. ...


Theological development

Angels of about 1400, in the Wilton diptych
Angels of about 1400, in the Wilton diptych

Since Saint Gregory and the Pseudo-Dionysian Celestial Hierarchy (5th century), Catholic theology has assumed nine orders of angelic beings; Angels, Virtues, Powers (called Lords), Principalities, Dominions (also called Kings), Thrones (Ophanim), Cherubim, Seraphim and Archangels, endorsed by medieval scholasticism (Summa Theologica). This is not official Church doctrine or dogma, however, and in general the faithful are not required to adhere to this categorization. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (677x1000, 184 KB) The Wilton Diptych (c. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (677x1000, 184 KB) The Wilton Diptych (c. ... Pope Saint Gregory I or Gregory the Great (c. ... Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, also known as pseudo-Denys, is the anonymous theologian and philosopher of the 5th century whose Corpus Areopagiticum (body of works by the Areopagite) was pseudonymously ascribed to Dionysius the Areopagite of Acts 17:34. ... De Coelesti Hierarchia (Celestial Hierarchy) is a Pseudo-Dionysian work on angelology (dated to ca. ... An Ophan (plural Ophanin, Ophannin or Ophanim) is one of a class of celestial beings described in the Book of Enoch along side the Cherubim and Seraphim as never sleeping, but watching (or guarding) the throne of God. ... A cherub (Hebrew כרוב; plural cherubim, כרובים) is an angelic creature mentioned several times in the Tanakh, or Old Testament, and in the Book of Revelation. ... 六翼天使 Seraphim(六翼天使) is a Taiwanese symphonic metal band similar to Nightwish and Therion. ... An archangel is a supernatural being of Zoroastrian Persian, Judaic, Christian, and Islamic theology, counted among the angels. ... Scholasticism comes from the Latin word scholasticus, which means that [which] belongs to the school, and is the school of philosophy taught by the academics (or schoolmen) of medieval universities circa 1100–1500. ... Summa theologiae, Pars secunda, prima pars. ...


Angels occur in groups of four or seven (Rev 7:1). The Angels of the Seven Churches of Asia Minor are described in Rev. 1-3; the angels are the representative angels of the seven congregations. Daniel 10:12,13 also appears to depict angels in opposition (presumably fallen angels) to other angels, taking on the roles of prince-angels (of the order of Principalities) for nations, in this case the "prince of the kingdom of Persia." It is well-known that there are angels for nations, organizations, parishes, families, and individuals (angels presiding over individuals are called guardian angels.)


The angel Gabriel appeared to Mary in the traditional role of messenger to inform her that her child would be the Messiah, and other angels were present to herald his birth. In Matt. 28:2, an angel appeared at Jesus' tomb, frightened the Roman guards, rolled away the stone from the tomb, and later told the myrrh-bearing women of Jesus' resurrection. Alternately, in Mark 16:5, the angel is not seen until the women enter the already-opened tomb, and he is described simply as "a young man." In Luke's version of the resurrection tale (Luke 24:4), two angels suddenly appear next to the women within the tomb; they are described as being clothed in "shining apparel." This is most similar to the version in John 20:12, where Mary alone speaks to "two angels in white" within the tomb of Jesus. Gabriel delivering the Annunciation to Mary. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Eastern Orthodox icon of Mary Magdalene as a Myrrhbearer The term Myrrhbearers (Greek: Μυροθόραε, Myrophorae; Slavonic: Святых Жен Мироносиц) refers to the women who came to the tomb of Christ early in the morning and were the first witnesses of the Resurrection of Jesus. ... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Two angels witnessed Jesus' ascent into Heaven and prophesied his return. When Peter was imprisoned, an angel put his guards to sleep, released him from his chains, and led him out of the prison. Angels fill a number of different roles in the Book of Revelation. Among other things, they are seen gathered around the Throne of God saying the thrice-holy hymn. For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... St Peter redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hymn (disambiguation). ...


Depiction in art

A Gothic angel in ivory, c1250, Louvre
A Gothic angel in ivory, c1250, Louvre

While angels and demons alike are generally regarded as invisible to human sight, they are frequently depicted as human-like creatures with wings, though many theologians have argued that they have no physical existence, but can take on human form (the traditional Eastern Orthodox term for angels is asomata, "bodiless [ones]"). Descriptions of angels in their angelic form mention wings (as in Isaiah, Zachariah, etc.) however, when appearing in human form, they look like men, or as young men. Seraphim are shown in art as having six wings (in accordance with Isaiah 6:1-3), and Cherubim four, having a quadruple face of lion, ox, eagle, and man. Putto are often confused with Cherubim, although they are completely different. This confusion only occurs among English-speaking persons[citation needed]. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 338 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1150 × 2040 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 338 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1150 × 2040 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Western (Royal) Portal at Chartres Cathedral ( 1145). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the museum. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... 六翼天使 Seraphim(六翼天使) is a Taiwanese symphonic metal band similar to Nightwish and Therion. ... A cherub (Hebrew כרוב; plural cherubim, כרובים) is an angelic creature mentioned several times in the Tanakh, or Old Testament, and in the Book of Revelation. ... sculpted putto The putto is a figure of a pudgy baby, almost always male, often naked and having wings, found especially in Italian Renaissance art. ... A cherub (Hebrew כרוב; plural cherubim, כרובים) is an angelic creature mentioned several times in the Tanakh, or Old Testament, and in the Book of Revelation. ...


Most theologians agree that angels have no gender (see more extended discussion below). Therefore, they usually appear as androgynous, although guardian angels appear more feminine and maternal. Their exceptional beauty was well attested in Scripture. The long plain dress or tunic traditionally given to most angels comes hardly altered from the Byzantine tradition, where it had, if anything, a male connotation. In the Renaissance these were shown often bright-coloured, but before and after were mostly plain white. The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ...


Byzantine angels were also often shown in military outfits, and, transmitted by icons from Crete in particular, this tradition was transferred to Western art, especially for Gabriel and Michael, who wear versions of Byzantine officer's armour and clothing into the Baroque period and later. The same archangels, when in attendance on Christ or the Virgin, wear the loros, a jeweled strip of cloth hanging vertically down the front of the body. This was worn only by the Imperial family and their bodyguard; the archangels were seen as God's bodyguard. They also often carry long white staves of office. Hence, when a high-ranking Byzantine in a visionary dream in 586 saw two men he took to be bodyguards of the Emperor, they subsequently turned out to be angels.[15] For other scenes, the same angels must appear incognito to accord with, for example, their appearance to Abraham. However artists are very reluctant to depict them in normal clothes, or without wings. The wings represent the angels' role as messengers of God (cf. Hermes). Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the archangel Gabriel. ... Saint Michael redirects here. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... // Overview Byzantine Dress changed vastly over the centuries. ... A royal family is the extended family of a monarch. ... Bodyguards of Viktor Yushchenko (far left) after leaving Gdansk city hall. ... A staff of office is a staff and carrying it often denotes social rank or prestige. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ...


Angels are often shown making music in heaven, sometimes in bands of a fair size, or in depictions of the Book of Revelation, blowing trumpets in accordance with the text. In the 15th century West in particular, angels are sometimes shown wearing versions of contemporary clerical vestments, especially the alb and crossed stole. There was a theological comparison developed between the role of Gabriel in the Annunciation and that of the priest saying Mass. Trumpeter redirects here. ... Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Methodists, Lutheran and Anglican Churches. ... ALB is a three-letter abbreviation may refer to: Albumin Albania, from its ISO code Albanian language, from its ISO 639 code Albany International Airport, from its IATA code Albrighton railway station, from its National Rail code Asian long-horned beetle Abraham Lincoln Brigade All-weather Life Boat Category: ... The stole (a liturgical vestment of various Christian denominations) is an embroidered band of cloth, formerly usually of silk, about two and one-half to three metres long and seven to ten centimetres wide, whose ends are usually broadened out. ...


In the Renaissance, the classical putto, usually naked, was first revived in secular and mythological subjects, but they soon appeared, often in great quantity, as newly-created angels, becoming almost the norm in compositions with a number of angels merely in attendance. sculpted putto The putto is a figure of a pudgy baby, almost always male, often naked and having wings, found especially in Italian Renaissance art. ...


Islamic beliefs

Main article: Angels in Islam

In the Qur'an, angels are referred to as "Malaaikah" (Arabic). The belief in angels is central to the religion of Islam, which articles of faith includes Belief in God, Belief in Angels, Belief in Books (Holy Scripture), Belief in Prophets and Messengers, Belief in Qiyamah (Resurrection/Doomsday) and finally Belief in Qada and Qadar (Arabic القضاء و القدر) (predestination) beginning with the belief that the Qur'an was dictated to Muhammad by the chief of all angels, the archangel Jibril (Gabriel). Angels are thus the ministers of God, as well as the agents of revelation in Islam. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Angels in Islam are light-based creatures, created by Allah to serve and worship him. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Prophets may refer to: The Prophets (Neviim), which is the second of the three major sections in the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible). ... Yawm al-QÄ«yāmah (Arabic: literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Last Judgement in Islam. ... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up doomsday in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Qadar in Arabic means fate or divine destiny. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Gabriel delivering the Annunciation. ... This article is about the archangel Gabriel. ...


In Islamic tradition, angels are benevolent beings created from a Divine Light. They do not possess free will, thus are incapable of doing evil or disobeying God. Unlike the Christian tradition, the Islamic tradition considers Satan (Iblis) to be a jinn, not an angel. Jinn, like humans, have free will. With rationality this Islamic actuality affords Satan (Iblis) the opportunity to forego a command by God, causing his eventual fall from Grace. This article is about the concept of Satan. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Behold! We said to the angels, "Bow down to Adam": They bowed down except Iblis. He was one of the Jinns, and he broke the Command of his Lord. Will ye then take him and his progeny as protectors rather than Me? And they are enemies to you! Evil would be the exchange for the wrong-doers!
(Qur'an, [Qur'an 18:50]) The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

Angels are wholly devoted to the worship of God. They are regarded as messengers of God, carrying out specific duties on His command. Angels are ranked and vary in their abilities and duties. Duties may include recording every human being's actions, placing a soul in a newborn child, maintaining certain environmental conditions of the planet (such as nurturing vegetation and distributing the rain), taking the soul at the time of death and more.


Angels are described as preternaturally beautiful. Having varying sizes and counts of wings.

Praise be to Allah, Who created (out of nothing) the heavens and the earth, Who made the angels, messengers with wings,- two, or three, or four (pairs): He adds to Creation as He pleases: for Allah has power over all things.
(Qur'an, [Qur'an 35:1]) The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

Angels are considered genderless, however they only possess male names.

Those who believe not in the Hereafter, name the angels with female names.
(Qur'an, [Qur'an 53:27]) The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

Angels can take on human form, but only in appearance. As such, angels do not eat, procreate nor commit sin as humans do. Humans cannot become angels upon death or otherwise, nor can angels become human.


Unlike a Christian tradition, angels and not Satan guard the gates of Hell. Instead, Satan resides on earth, waylaying man until the Day of Resurrection, after which he will be cast into hell along with the unbelievers.

And We have set none but angels as Guardians of the Fire; and We have fixed their number only as a trial for Unbelievers,- in order that the People of the Book may arrive at certainty, and the Believers may increase in Faith,- and that no doubts may be left for the People of the Book and the Believers, and that those in whose hearts is a disease and the Unbelievers may say, "What symbol doth Allah intend by this ?" Thus doth Allah leave to stray whom He pleaseth, and guide whom He pleaseth: and none can know the forces of thy Lord, except He and this is no other than a warning to mankind.
(Qur'an, [Qur'an 74:31]) The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

The archangel Gabriel[16] is attributed with sending the message of God to all the Prophets, including the Psalms, Torah, Bible and Qur'an (as opposed to the Christian view that Gabriel is the angel of good news).[not in citation given] Other angels include Mikail (Michael) who discharges control of vegetation and rain,[not in citation given] Israfeel who will blow the trumpet at the Day of Resurrection,[16] and Izra'il (Azrael), the angel of death[16] . The angels Munkar and Nakir are assigned to interrogate the dead before Judgment Day,[16] Ridwan ( Arabic : رضوان), is the angel guarding the Heaven's Gate while Maalik (Arabic :مالك) is the chief angel in charge of Hell[16] (as opposed to the Christian view that Satan rules hell). A pair of angels known as Raqib and A'tid (called the Kirama Katibin (Arabic: كراما كاتبين) in the Quran) have the job of recording the daily actions of human beings, one assigned to good deeds and the other to transgressions.[citation needed] There are nineteen angels overseeing the punishments of hell (Surat Al-Muddaththir, 74:30).[16] There are eight angels that support the Throne of God (Surat Al-Haaqqa, 69:17).[16] Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Saint Michael redirects here. ... Angels in Islam are light-based creatures, created from light, by God to serve and worship Him. ... Yawm al-QÄ«yāmah (Arabic: literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Last Judgement in Islam. ... This article is about the angel of death. ... Munkar and Nakeer, in Islamic eschatology, are two malaikah (angels) who test the faith of the dead in their graves. ... Ridwan (Arabic: رضوان),also (Rizwan, Rezwan), according to Islamic Tradition, is the angel in charge of maintaining Jannah or Paradise,[1] and is said to have spoken to the prophet Muhammad at his birth. ... In Islamic belief, Maalik (مالك) denotes an angel who guards the Hellfire, assisted by 19 zabaniya or guardians. ... Kirama Katibin (Arabic: كراما كاتبين), or honourable recorders, are two angels in Islam who record a persons good and bad deeds. ... Surat Al-Muddaththir (The Cloaked One, The Man Wearing A Cloak) is the 74th sura of the Quran with 56 ayat. ... Surat Al-Haaqqa (The Reality) is the 69th sura of the Quran with 52 ayat. ...


Imam `Ali explained the creation of Angels in the following words: For other uses, see Ali (disambiguation). ...

"Then He created the openings between high skies and filled them with all classes of His angels. Some of them are in prostration and do not kneel up. Others in kneeling position and do not stand up. Some of them are in array and do not leave their position. Others are extolling God and do not get tired. The sleep of the eye or the slip of wit, or languor of the body or the effect of forgetfulness does not affect them. Among them are those who work as trusted bearers of His message, those who serve as speaking tongues for His prophets and those who carry to and fro His orders and injunctions. Among them are the protectors of His creatures and guards of the doors of the gardens of Paradise. Among them are those also whose steps are fixed on earth but their necks are protruding into the skies, their limbs are getting out on all sides, their shoulders are in accord with the columns of the Divine Throne, their eyes are downcast before it, they have spread down their wings under it and they have rendered between themselves and all else curtains of honour and screens of power. They do not think of their Creator through image, do not impute to Him attributes of the created, do not confine Him within abodes and do not point at Him through illustrations."[17]

Latter-day Saint beliefs

Further information: Translation (LDS Church)
Bern Switzerland Temple statue of the angel Moroni
Bern Switzerland Temple statue of the angel Moroni

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (generally called "Mormons") views angels as the messengers of God sent to mankind to deliver messages, minister to humanity, teach doctrines of salvation, call mankind to repentance, give priesthood keys, save individuals in perilous times, and guide mankind.[18] Among members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, translation refers to being physically changed by God from a mortal human being to an immortal human being. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (301x609, 17 KB) Beschreibung Description: Die Engel-Moroni-Statue kurz vor der Montage auf den Bern-Tempel Source: Fotografiert von Philipp Spinnler Date: 7. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (301x609, 17 KB) Beschreibung Description: Die Engel-Moroni-Statue kurz vor der Montage auf den Bern-Tempel Source: Fotografiert von Philipp Spinnler Date: 7. ... For other uses, see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Joseph Smith, Jr. described his first angelic encounter thus (Joseph Smith History 1:30-33): Joseph Smith redirects here. ...

"While I was thus in the act of calling upon God, I discovered a light appearing in my room, which continued to increase until the room was lighter than at noonday, when immediately a personage appeared at my bedside, standing in the air, for his feet did not touch the floor. "He had on a loose robe of most exquisite whiteness. It was a whiteness beyond anything earthly I had ever seen; nor do I believe that any earthly thing could be made to appear so exceedingly white and brilliant. His hands were naked, and his arms also, a little above the wrist; so, also, were his feet naked, as were his legs, a little above the ankles. His head and neck were also bare. I could discover that he had no other clothing on but this robe, as it was open, so that I could see into his bosom. "Not only was his robe exceedingly white, but his whole person was glorious beyond description, and his countenance truly like lightning. The room was exceedingly light, but not so very bright as immediately around his person. When I first looked upon him, I was afraid; but the fear soon left me."

People who claimed to have received a visit by an angel include Joseph Smith, Jr., and the Three Witnesses of the Book of Mormon: Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer, and Martin Harris. Although Cowdery, Whitmer, and Harris all eventually became disaffected with Smith and left the church, none of them retracted their statement that they had seen and conversed with an angel of the Lord, and indeed, even defended their claim of angelic visitation to their deaths. Countless other Latter-day Saints, both in the early movement and modern church, claimed or have claimed to have seen angels. Joseph Smith redirects here. ... A monument to the Three Witnesses at Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... // The Book of Mormon [1] is one of the sacred texts of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... Photograph of Oliver Cowdery found in the Library of Congress, taken in the 1840s Oliver Hervy Pliny Cowdery[1] (3 October 1806 – 3 March 1850) was the primary participant with Joseph Smith, Jr. ... David Whitmer (January 7, 1805–January 25, 1888) was an early adherent of the Latter Day Saint movement who eventually became the most interviewed of the Three Witnesses to the Book of Mormons Golden Plates. ... Martin Harris (1783–1875) was the first financier of The Book of Mormon. ...


The majority of the angelic visitations in the early Latter Day Saint movement were witnessed by Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery, who, prior to the establishment of the Church, both claimed to have been ministered to by the prophet-historian Moroni, the Book of Mormon prophet Nephi, John the Baptist, and the Apostles Peter, James, and John. Later, at the dedication of the Kirtland Temple, Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery claimed to have been visited by Jesus, and subsequently by Moses, Elias, and Elijah (see D&C 110). The Latter Day Saint movement (a subset of Restorationism) is a group of religious denominations and adherents who follow at least some of the teachings and revelations of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Bern Switzerland Temple Statue of Angel Moroni Moroni [mɔrounai], according to the Book of Mormon, was the last Nephite prophet and military commander who lived in North America in the late fourth and early fifth centuries. ... In The Book of Mormon, Nephi, the son of Lehi, is a prophet and founder of the Nephite people. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ... St Peter redirects here. ... James, son of Alphaeus was one of the Twelve Apostles. ... John the Apostle (Greek Ιωάννης, see names of John) was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus. ... The Kirtland Temple is a registered National Historic Landmark in Kirtland, Ohio, USA, on the eastern edge of the Cleveland metropolitan area. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Look up Elias in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ...


Latter-day Saints also believe that Michael the Archangel was Adam (the first man) when he was mortal, and that Gabriel lived on the earth as Noah. Saint Michael redirects here. ... Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ... 12th-century icon of Archangel Gabriel from Novgorod. ... This article is about the biblical Noah. ...


Gender of angels

Although in the Jewish Tanakh the Hebrew form of the words used to denote angels, of which there are several, malakh being the most commonly encountered, are always masculine, and their described roles are usually masculine, Judaism does not assign gender to supernatural and incorporeal entities. The examples of the angelic roles in the Tanakh are those of a warrior[citation needed], herald[citation needed], guard (at the gates of Eden)[citation needed], wrestler (of Jacob; "a man", according to Genesis 32:24, or "the angel", according to Hosea 12:4). The few canonical names of angels (e.g., Michael, Raphael and Gabriel are recognized in Judaism as masculine names, and have been widely adopted by other cultures. A complication to the above is that the the Hebrew word for foot, רגל (regel), can also be used to refer to both a type of angel and the male sexual organ (see Ezekiel 16:25 for an example). This has been used to suggest[citation needed] that based on the Isaiah 6:2 it indicates that angels have a male geneder. In addition, traditionally the origin of the Nephilim is understood to be that they are the offspring of human women and Samyaza, another possible interpretation of which is angels. For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... A Malakh (plural Malakhim) is a messenger angel who appears throughout the Hebrew Bible, Rabbinic literature, and traditional Jewish liturgy. ... For other uses, see Warrior (disambiguation). ... Heralds, wearing tabards, in procession to St. ... A Guard may be a person or an organisation. ... For other uses, see Garden of Eden (disambiguation). ... Wrestling can be: Sport wrestling Professional wrestling Another term for grappling This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Saint Michael redirects here. ... This article is about the Renaissance artist. ... This article is about the archangel Gabriel. ... This article is about the Book of Isaiah. ... For other uses, see Nephilim (disambiguation). ... Samyaza (Aramaic: שמיחזה, Greek: Σεμιαζά) also Shemyazaz, Sêmîazâz, Semjâzâ, Shemyaza, Samyaza, Shemhazai, and Amezarak (Ethiopic corruption) is a fallen angel of Christian tradition that ranked in the heavenly hierarchy as one of the Grigori (meaning Watchers in Greek). ...


In Christian and other religions the masculine identity of the angels is also adopted as in the story of the mover of large stones (at the tomb of Christ), the suggestion being that in traditional societies these would all have been tasks typically performed by men.[citation needed] The Koine Greek term is άγγελος, a masculine noun, and the Latin derivation angelus is also masculine, both terms used in texts referred to above. The word "angel" in English (from Old English engel), French (from Old French angele), German, Spanish, and many other European languages are derived from the Latin. However, in Turkish, the word Melek—derived from Arabic—is used as a girl's name although Melek's are considered genderless in accordance with the Islamic belief.[citation needed] Traditionally in Christianity the origin of the Nephilim is understood to be that they are the offspring of human women and Samyaza, the 200 fallen angels (See the Book of Enoch), which would imply that these fallen angels have male sexual organs, and they are functional at least for the purposes of reproduction, or alternatively, that they can assume a form of men. This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... Koine redirects here. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... European languages are the object of Eurolinguistics. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... For other uses, see Nephilim (disambiguation). ... Samyaza (Aramaic: שמיחזה, Greek: Σεμιαζά) also Shemyazaz, Sêmîazâz, Semjâzâ, Shemyaza, Samyaza, Shemhazai, and Amezarak (Ethiopic corruption) is a fallen angel of Christian tradition that ranked in the heavenly hierarchy as one of the Grigori (meaning Watchers in Greek). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In Islam "fallen angels" are analogous with spirits or Jinn. Jinn with their free will have the ability to procreate amongst themselves and amongst humans, while angels do not. Genie is the anglicized word for the Arabic jinni. In Semitic mythology and Islamic religion, a jinni (also djinni or djini) is a member of the jinn (or djinn), a race of spirits. ...


Depiction in Christian art

In art, however, angels are always beautiful, which tends to mean their features are often androgynous—even for warrior archangels, their hair is usually long, and their figures somewhat delicate. In European medieval and Renaissance paintings of the Annunciation. Angels in art become more sexually differentiated from the nineteenth century, after which breasts and masculine figures and haircuts appear. In modern Western culture, guardian angels are depicted as having female figures, facial features and names, while the archangels and major angelic beings are shown with masculine features. For other uses, see Annunciation (disambiguation). ... For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ...


Other religions

The Etruscans depicted winged beings - benevolent psychopompian personal guardians with wings- called "Vanths". In Etruscan mythology, Vanth was a demoness who lived in the underworld. ...


Angel-like beings called Tennin and Tenshi appear in Japanese mythology. Tennin (天人) including the female tennyo (天女) (Sanskrit: apsara) are spirits found in Japanese Buddhism that are similar to Western angels or fairies. ... Japanese mythology is a very complex system of beliefs that embraces Shinto and Buddhist traditions as well as agriculture-based folk religion. ...


There are a number of New Age -type books describing various ordinary people's encounters with angels or angel-like beings. New Age describes a broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture. ...


Bahá'í

An angel, often termed a "Maiden of Heaven", also appears in Bahá'í literature. Bahá'ís generally see her as a symbol of the holy spirit, the spirit of Bahá'u'lláh's revelation, or even as his "higher self". Bahá'u'lláh taught that his ministry began when he was visited by a Maiden of Heaven while incarcerated in a dungeon of Tehran. While always depicted as desirable and attractive, she also appears as a transcendent spiritual figure, and sexual desire is understood to be a metaphor for spiritual longing. While other angels appear in Bahá'u'lláh's works, they are generally depicted as the personification of a divine virtue, such as trustworthiness. Women as theological figures, have played a significant role in the development of various religions and religious hierarchies. ... This article is about the generally recognized global religious community. ... Shrine of Baháulláh Baháulláh (ba-haa-ol-laa Arabic: Glory of God) (November 12, 1817 – May 29, 1892), born Mírzá usayn-`Alí Nuri (Persian: ), was the founder of the Baháí Faith. ... For other uses, see Tehran (disambiguation). ...


'Abdu'l-Bahá also defined angels as "those holy souls who have severed attachment to the earthly world, who are free from the fetters of self and passion and who have attached their hearts to the divine realm and the merciful kingdom".[19]


Furthermore, he said that people can be angels in this world:

"Ye are the angels, if your feet be firm, your spirits rejoiced, your secret thoughts pure, your eyes consoled, your ears opened, your breasts dilated with joy, and your souls gladdened, and if you arise to assist the Covenant, to resist dissension and to be attracted to the Effulgence!"[20]

Hinduism

In English, the Sanskrit word Deva is usually translated as "shining being or god" (though sometimes left as "Deva"), which certainly gives a polytheistic appearance to Hinduism. Many Hindus say that this is a poor practice, because the best word for God in Sanskrit is Ishvara (the Supreme Lord). The Devas may be better translated as angels or demigods. They are celestial beings with supernatural powers, but also weaknesses. They grant material benefits to humans upon praying and sacrificing to them, though they don't carry the message of Ishvara to the humans as in Abrahamic religions (a category of such beings also exist, called "devaduta" or "duta"). Examples of Devas are Indra and Surya. Buddhism and Jainism also use the word "deva", but in different senses. For other uses, see Deva (disambiguation). ... Ishvara (Sanskrit lord, master, from an adjective capable) is a philosophical concept in Hinduism, similar to the Abrahamic concept of God. ... For other uses, see Indra (disambiguation). ... For the intercontinental ballistic missile, see Surya (missile). ... This article is about Buddhist deities. ...


Thelema

Aleister Crowley tried to teach people to attain what he called "the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel". Within the system of Thelema, the Holy Guardian Angel is representative of one’s truest divine nature. Citing Crowley, people have linked the term with the Genius of the Golden Dawn, the Augoeides of Iamblichus, the Atman of Hinduism, and the Daemon of the gnostics. Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947, pronounced ) was a British occultist, writer, mountaineer, philosopher, poet, and mystic. ... Within the system of Thelema founded by Aleister Crowley in 1904, the Holy Guardian Angel is the Silent Self, representative of ones truest divine nature. ... Thelema is the English transliteration of the Ancient Greek noun : will, from the verb θέλω: to will, wish, purpose. ... Within the system of Thelema founded by Aleister Crowley in 1904, the Holy Guardian Angel is the Silent Self, representative of ones truest divine nature. ... The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn (or, more commonly, the Golden Dawn) was a magical order of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, practicing a form of theurgy and spiritual development. ... Augoeides can be translated as luminous body. ... Iamblichus (ca. ... The Atman or Atma (IAST: Ä€tmā, sanskrit: आत्म‍ ) is a philosophical term used within Hinduism and Vedanta to identify the soul. ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge) that only a few possess. ...


According to most Thelemites, the single most important goal is to consciously connect with one’s HGA, a process termed "Knowledge and Conversation." By doing so, the magician becomes fully aware of his own True Will. For Crowley, this event was the single most important goal of any adept: The phrase True Will does not appear in the Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema. ...

It should never be forgotten for a single moment that the central and essential work of the Magician is the attainment of the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel. Once he has achieved this he must of course be left entirely in the hands of that Angel, who can be invariably and inevitably relied upon to lead him to the further great step—crossing of the Abyss and the attainment of the grade of Master of the Temple. (Magick Without Tears, Ch.83)

Crowley felt that attaining Knowledge and Conversation was so important, that he staked the claim that any other magical operation was, in a sense, evil.


Development step of the soul

Some mystics[citation needed] believe that a soul grows in steps from a mineral, to a plant, then an animal, and then to a human. When the human resolves to die, a soul could become an angel. The Persian Sufi mystic poet Jalal al-Din Muhammad Rumi wrote in his poem Masnavi: Mysticism (ancient Greek mysticon = secret) is meditation, prayer, or theology focused on the direct experience of union with divinity, God, or Ultimate Reality, or the belief that such experience is a genuine and important source of knowledge. ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to Divine love and the cultivation of the elements of the Divine within the individual human being. ... Mawlana Rumi Mawlānā Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī[1] (Arabic:مولانا جلال الدين محمد رومي) ‎ (1207 – 1273 CE), also known as Muhammad Balkhī (Persian: محمد بلخى) or Celâladin Mehmet Rumi (Turkish), was a Persian poet, jurist, theologian and teacher of Sufism. ... The Masnavi or Masnavi-I Manavi (Persian: مثنوی معنوی), also written Mathnawi or Mesnevi, written in Persian by Jalal al-Din Muhammad Rumi, the celebrated Persian Sufi saint and poet, is one of the best known and most influential works of both Sufism and Persian literature. ...

I died as inanimate matter and arose a plant,
I died as a plant and rose again an animal.
I died as an animal and arose a man.
Why then should I fear to become less by dying?
I shall die once again as a man
To rise an angel perfect from head to foot!
Again when I suffer dissolution as an angel,
I shall become what passes the conception of man!
Let me then become non-existent, for non-existence
Sings to me in organ tones, 'To him shall we return.'
(Translation from Wikisource, Masnavi I Ma'navi, Book III, Story XVII)’’

The Christian (Swedish) writer Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772) wrote in his book Conjugial Love that a soul of a man and a soul of a woman who are (happily) united by marriage enter heaven and become an angel. This could be a married couple on earth or a couple that met after their earthly deaths. Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ...


Occult author Samael Aun Weor argues that a soul cannot evolve to become an angel through mechanical evolution — the Buddhist Wheel of Life has involution of nature as well as evolution - as such the steps would be mineral, plant, animal, human, animal, plant, mineral. To evolve to become an angel involves conscious work and voluntary suffering: marriage is treated as a sacrament, and is the means which Swedenborg was referring to. The mystics were not referring to the death of the human body, but to the "dissolution of the ego"; the psychological death; the Buddhistic annihilation; the death of "myself"; the method of the removal of all our sins which Jesus Christ so wisely pointed out, and which was emulated by innumerable Saints. Samael Aun Weor Samael Aun Weor (March 16, 1917 - December 24, 1977) was a prolific writer, lecturer and teacher of occultism. ...


References

  1. ^ p.664, Jastrow
  2. ^ Bava Batra 16b
  3. ^ http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=angel&searchmode=none angel in Online Etymological Dictionary
  4. ^ Frisk, Griechisches Etymologisches Woerterbuch "Da das ganz unsicher ist, bleibt diese Etymologie sehr fraglich." [1]
  5. ^ The Encyclopedia of Religion, volume 1, page 283., New York (1986) ISBN 0-02-909700-2 (retrieved 18 Feb. 2007)
  6. ^ Tobit, Book of at JewishEncyclopedia.com
  7. ^ Tobit, or The Book of Tobias (biblical literature) at Britannica Online Encyclopedia
  8. ^ "Evil" here does not have the sense of moral evil, but of opposition.
  9. ^ Jewish Encylopedia, accessed Feb. 15, 2008
  10. ^ Jewish Encylopedia, accessed Feb. 15, 2008
  11. ^ Sanhedrin 38b and Avodah Zerah 3b.
  12. ^ cf. Sanhedrin 95b
  13. ^ Lewis, James R., Oliver, Evelyn Dorothy, Sisung Kelle S. (Editor) (1996), Angels A to Z, Entry: Zoroastrianism, pp. 425-427, Visible Ink Press, ISBN 0-7876-0652-9
  14. ^ Darmesteter, James (1880)(translator), The Zend Avesta, Part I: Sacred Books of the East, Vol. 4, pp. lx-lxxii, Oxford University Press, 1880, at sacred-texts.com
  15. ^ Robin Cormack, "Writing in Gold, Byzantine Society and its Icons", p. 67, 1985, George Philip, London, ISBN 054001085-5
  16. ^ a b c d e f g JewishEncyclopedia.com - ANGELOLOGY
  17. ^ "The Creation of the Angels," excerpt from "Imam Ali's First Sermon in His Peak of Eloquence," translated by Askari Jafri, hosted at Wikisource
  18. ^ page 36. , Deseret (1966) God's messengers, those individuals whom he sends (often from his personal presence in the eternal worlds), to deliver his messages (Luke 1:11-38); to minister to his children (Acts 10:1-8, 30-32); to teach them the doctrines of salvation (Mosiah 3); to call them to repentance (Moro. 7:31); to give them priesthood and keys (D. & C. 13; 128:20-21); to save them in perilous circumstances (1 Ne. 3:29-31; Dan. 6:22); to guide them in the performance of his work (Gen. 24: 7); to gather his elect in the last days (Matt. 24:31); to perform all needful things relative to his work (Moro. 7:29-33) — such messengers are called angels.
  19. ^ 'Abdu'l-Bahá (1976). THE SPIRITUAL ASSEMBLY. US Bahá’í Publishing Trust. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  20. ^ 'Abdu'l-Bahá. Ye Are The Angels. bcca.org. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

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  • Driver, Samuel Rolles (Ed.) (1901) The book of Daniel. Cambridge UP.
  • Hastings, James (ed.) (1898). Angel. A dictionary of the Bible. New York: C. Scribner's sons.
  • Oosterzee, Johannes Jacobus van. Christian dogmatics: a text-book for academical instruction and private study. Trans. John Watson Watson and Maurice J. Evans. (1874) New York, Scribner, Armstrong.
  • Smith, George Adam (1898) The book of the twelve prophets, commonly called the minor. London, Hodder and Stoughton.
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  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition article "Angel", a publication now in the public domain.
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  • Bunson, Matthew, (1996). Angels A to Z : A Who's Who of the Heavenly Host. Three Rivers Press. ISBN 0-517-88537-9.
  • Cruz, Joan Carroll, OCDS, 1999. Angels and Devils. TAN Books and Publishers, Inc. ISBN 0-89555-638-3
  • Davidson, Gustav. A Dictionary of Angels: Including the Fallen Angels. Free Press. ISBN 0-02-907052-X
  • Graham, Billy, 1994. Angels: God's Secret Agents. W Pub Group; Minibook edition. ISBN 0-8499-5074-0
  • Guiley, Rosemary, 1996. Encyclopedia of Angels. ISBN 0-8160-2988-1
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  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

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First Sphere
(liberated)

Seraphim • Cherubim • Ophanim (Thrones/Wheels) Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... According to medieval Christian theologians, the Angels are organized into several orders, or Angelic Choirs. ... For other uses, see Seraph (disambiguation). ... CHERUB is a series of childrens books written by the author Robert Muchamore about a group of children who are trained to be agents working for the British Government in the top secret organisation known as CHERUB. It is similar to the British security service MI5, and is based... An Ophan (plural Ophanin) is one of a class of celestial beings described in the Book of Enoch along side the Cherubim and Seraphim as never sleeping, but watching the throne of God. ...

Second Sphere
(active)

Virtues • Dominions  • Principalities Image File history File links Download high resolution version (858x952, 205 KB) Dante and Beatrice gaze upon the highest Heaven (The Empyrean); from Gustave Dorés illustrations to the Divine Comedy, Paradiso Canto 31. ... Virtue (Greek αρετη; Latin virtus) is the habitual, well-established, readiness or diposition of mans powers directing them to some goodness of act. ... According to medieval Christian theologians, the Angels are organized into several orders, or Angelic Choirs. ... According to medieval Christian theologians, the Angels are organized into several orders, or Angelic Choirs. ...

Third Sphere
(active)

Powers • Archangels • Angels According to medieval Christian theologians, the Angels are organized into several orders, or Angelic Choirs. ... Archangels are superior or higher-ranking angels. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Angels (6002 words)
Such appearances of angels generally last only so long as the delivery of their message requires, but frequently their mission is prolonged, and they are represented as the constituted guardians of the nations at some particular crisis, e.g.
Though the angels who appear in the earlier works of the Old Testament are strangely impersonal and are overshadowed by the importance of the message they bring or the work they do, there are not wanting hints regarding the existence of certain ranks in the heavenly army.
We have already seen how (Daniel 10:12-21) various districts are allotted to various angels who are termed their princes, and the same feature reappears still more markedly in the Apocalyptic "angels of the seven churches", though it is impossible to decide what is the precise signification of the term.
Angel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6778 words)
Angels are referred to in connection with their special missions as, for instance, the "angel which hath redeemed," "an interpreter," "the angel that destroyed," "messenger of the covenant," "angel of his presence," and "a band of angels of evil" (Gen. xlviii.
Angels foretold to Abraham the birth of Isaac, to Manoah the birth of Samson, and to Abraham the destruction of Sodom.
The belief in angels is central to the religion of Islam, beginning with the belief that the Qur'an was dictated to the Prophet Muhammad by the chief of all angels, the archangel Jibril (Gabriel).
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