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Encyclopedia > Anfield
Anfield
UEFA


View from Anfield Road end. Anfield is a district of Liverpool, England and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... The UEFA Stadia List is a ranking of football stadia compiled by UEFAs Stadia and Security Committee. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links 76693565_b44605f726_2. ...

Location Liverpool, Merseyside, England
Coordinates 53°25′50.95″N 2°57′38.98″W / 53.4308194, -2.9608278
Opened 1884[1]
Owner Liverpool F.C.[2]
Operator Liverpool F.C.
Surface Grass
Tenants Everton F.C. (1884–1892)
Liverpool F.C. (1892–present)
Capacity 45,362[3]
Field dimensions 111 yards (101 m) x 74 yards (68 m)[4]

Anfield is an association football stadium in the district of Anfield, in Liverpool, England. The stadium was built in 1884, and was the originally the home of Everton F.C. until 1892, when they left following a rent dispute. Since then the stadium has been home to Liverpool F.C., who were formed as a result of Everton leaving Anfield. It is a UEFA 4-star rated stadium, and has hosted numerous international matches at the senior level, including England fixtures. The ground was also used as a venue during Euro 96. For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ... “Soccer” redirects here. ... This article is about the building type. ... Anfield is a district of Liverpool, England and a Liverpool City Council Ward. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... The UEFA Stadia List is a ranking of football stadia compiled by UEFAs Stadia and Security Committee. ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... -1...


The stadium currently comprises four stands; Spion Kop, Main Stand, Centenary Stand and Anfield Road. The record attendance of 61,905 was set in an FA Cup tie between Liverpool and Wolverhampton Wanderers in 1952 before the ground was converted to an all-seater stadium. Each of its four stands has since been converted to an all-seater layout following the recommendations of the Taylor Report. A new stadium in Stanley Park, which will replace Anfield and hold 25,000 more spectators, is scheduled to open in 2011. This article is about the English FA Cup. ... Wolverhampton Wanderers Football Club are an English professional football club based in Wolverhampton, West Midlands. ... All-seater is a terminology applied to sports stadiums in which every spectator must be seated. ... The Taylor Report is a document, whose development was overseen by Lord Justice Taylor, concerning the aftermath and causes of the Hillsborough disaster in 1989. ... Stanley Park Stadium is a proposed title of the planned football stadium to be built in Stanley Park, Liverpool, England. ...

Contents

History

Opened in 1884, Anfield was originally owned by John Orrell, a brewer and friend of John Houlding; the leaseholder of Anfield, Orrell decided to let Everton rent the land for a small fee. The first game played at Anfield was between Everton and Earlstown on September 28, 1884, which Everton won 5–0. During Everton's tenure at the stadium, a small stand was erected for some of the 8,000 spectators regularly attending games. Houlding purchased the ground outright from Orrell in 1891, and proposed increasing the rent from £100 to £250 per year. Everton refused to meet his demands, and moved to Goodison Park.[5] Houlding was left with an empty stadium, and decided to form a new club to occupy it. The team was called Liverpool Association Football Club, and their first match at Anfield was played on September 1, 1892 against Rotherham Town, which they won 7–0.[6] John Houlding was a self-made businessman in the tail end of the 19th century, owning a brewery that left him in a comfortable financial state for the rest of his life. ... Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Goodison Park is the home ground of Everton F.C. in Liverpool. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Rotherham Town F.C. were an English football club from Rotherham, South Yorkshire. ...


Liverpool's first league match at Anfield was played on September 9, 1893 against Lincoln City, with Liverpool winning 4–0 in front of 5,000 spectators. A new stand was constructed in 1895, capable of seating 3,000 spectators, and was built on the site of the present Main Stand. The stand had a distinctive red and white gable, and was similar to the main stand at Newcastle United's ground St James' Park.[6] Another stand was constructed at the Anfield Road end in 1903, built from timber and corrugated iron. After Liverpool had won their second League Championship in 1906, a new stand was built along the Walton Breck Road. Local journalist Ernest Jones, who was the sports editor of local newspapers the Liverpool Daily Post and Echo, christened it the Spion Kop. It was named after a famous hill in South Africa where a local regiment had suffered heavy losses during the Boer War in 1900. More than 300 men had died, many of them from Liverpool, as the British army attempted to capture the strategic hilltop. Around the same period a stand was also built along Kemlyn Road.[6] The Lancashire League has been the name of two separate football competitions for clubs based in northern England. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Lincoln City F.C. are an English football team currently playing in Football League Two (the fourth tier of the English football league system). ... The House of the Seven Gables, Salem, Massachusetts, showing four gables in this view. ... For the Australian club, see Newcastle United Jets. ... St James Park is an all-seater stadium in Newcastle upon Tyne, England, and is the home of Newcastle United Football Club. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Liverpool Echo and Liverpool Daily Post are two newspapers published by Trinity Mirror on Merseyside in the United Kingdom. ... The Liverpool Echo and Liverpool Daily Post are two newspapers published by Trinity Mirror on Merseyside in the United Kingdom. ... Spion Kop (or Kop for short) is the name for a number of terraces and stands at football stadia; so named due to their steep nature, resembling a hill in Natal, South Africa that was the scene of a battle in the Second Boer War where a majority of the... Combatants Great Britain Boers Commanders Charles Warren Alexander Thorneycroft Louis Botha Strength 11,000 infantry 2,200 cavalry 36 field guns 6,000 men Casualties 383 killed 1,000 wounded 300 captured 58 killed 140 wounded The Battle of Spion Kop (Afrikaans: Slag van Spioenkop) was fought about 38 km... Boers in combat (1881). ...


The ground remained much the same until 1928 when the Kop was redesigned and extended to seat 30,000 spectators, with a roof erected as well. Many stadiums in England had stands named after the Spion Kop, however Anfield's was the largest Kop in the country at the time. It was able to hold more supporters than some entire football grounds. The topmast of the SS Great Eastern, one of the first iron ships, was rescued from the breakers yard at nearby Rock Ferry, and was hauled up the Everton Valley by a team of horses to be erected alongside the new Kop where it still stands today, serving as a flag pole.[6] The SS Great Eastern was an iron sailing steam ship designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel. ... Rock Ferry is a suburb of Birkenhead on the Wirral Peninsula, England. ...

Shankly Gates
Shankly Gates

In 1957 floodlights were installed and on October 30 of that year they were switched on for the first time for a match against Everton, to commemorate the 75-year anniversary of the Liverpool County FA. In 1963 the old Kemlyn Road stand was replaced by a cantilevered stand, able to seat 6,700 spectators and built at a cost of £350,000. Two years later alterations were made at the Anfield Road end, turning it into a large covered standing area. The biggest redevelopment came in 1973, when the old Main Stand was ripped down and a new one was constructed. At the same time, the pylon floodlights were pulled down and new lights installed along the top of the Kemlyn Road and Main Stands. The new stand was officially opened on March 10, 1973 by the Duke of Kent. In the 1980s the paddock in front of the Main Stand was turned into seating, and in 1982 seats were introduced at the Anfield Road end. The Shankly gates were erected in 1982, a tribute to former manager Bill Shankly; Shankly's widow Nessie unlocked the gates for the first time on August 26, 1982.[6] Across the Gates are the words You'll Never Walk Alone, from the Gerry & The Pacemakers' hit song that Liverpool fans adopted as the Club's anthem.[7] Image File history File links Shankly_Gates. ... Image File history File links Shankly_Gates. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A schematic image of two cantilevers. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Duke of Kent is a title which has been created various times in the peerages of Great Britain and the United Kingdom, most recently as a royal dukedom for the fourth son of King George V of the United Kingdom. ... William Bill Shankly, OBE (September 2, 1913 – September 29, 1981) was one of Britains most successful and respected football managers. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Gerry & the Pacemakers were an English rock and roll group during the 1960s, and one of the few groups to initially challenge The Beatles in popularity. ... Youll Never Walk Alone is a song written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II for their 1945 musical, Carousel. ...

The statue of Bill Shankly outside Anfield.
The statue of Bill Shankly outside Anfield.

Coloured seats and a police-room were added to the Kemlyn Road stand in 1987. In 1989, after the Hillsborough disaster, the Taylor Report recommended that all grounds in the country should be converted into all-seater grounds by May 1994.[8] In 1992, a second tier was added to the Kemlyn Road stand, turning it into a double decker layout. It included executive boxes and function suites as well as 11,000 seating spaces. The plans to expand the stand had been made earlier, but two old ladies living in Kemlyn Road refused to move out of their house and the plans were put on hold. When one of the old ladies died the other finally moved out, the plans were put into action.[1] The stand was officially opened on September 1, 1992 by UEFA president Lennart Johansson and re-named the Centenary Stand. The Kop was rebuilt in 1994 after the recommendations of the Taylor Report and became all seated; although it is still a single tier, the capacity was significantly reduced to 12,390.[1] William Bill Shankly, OBE (September 2, 1913 – September 29, 1981) was one of Britains most successful and respected football managers. ... The Memorial at Hillsborough. ... The Taylor Report is a document, whose development was overseen by Lord Justice Taylor, concerning the aftermath and causes of the Hillsborough disaster in 1989. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Union Européenne de Football Association or Union of European Football Associations in English, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced (you-AY-fuh) or (oo-Ay-fuh) or ), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ... Lennart Johansson (born November 5, 1929) is the president of UEFA, the Union of European Football Associations since 1990. ...


On December 4, 1997, a statue of Bill Shankly, created from bronze, was unveiled at the visitor's centre in front of the Kop. Standing at over 8 feet (2.4 m) tall, the statue depicts Shankly wearing a fan's scarf around his neck and in a familiar pose he adopted when taking applause from fans.[9] The Hillsborough memorial is situated alongside the Shankly gates, and is always decorated with flowers and tributes to the 96 people who died at Hillsborough. At the centre of the memorial is an eternal flame, signifying that those who died will never be forgotten.[10] The most recent change to Anfield came in 1998 when the new two-tier Anfield Road end was opened. The stand has however encountered a number of problems since its redevelopment. At the beginning of the 1999–2000 season a series of support poles and stantions had to be brought in to give extra stability to the top tier of the stand. During Ronnie Moran's testimonial against Celtic many fans complained of movement of the top tier. At the same time that the stantions were inserted the executive seating area was increased down a couple of rows in the main stand to the detriment of fans seated in the paddock.[1] is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... William Bill Shankly, OBE (September 2, 1913 – September 29, 1981) was one of Britains most successful and respected football managers. ... This article is about the metal alloy. ... The 1999-2000 season was the 120th season of competitive football in England. ... Ronnie Moran is a former Liverpool captain and coach, who has twice served as caretaker manager (after the departures of Kenny Dalglish and Graeme Souness respectively). ... Current season Celtic Football Club are a football club from Glasgow, Scotland, who currently play in the Scottish Premier League, the highest form of competition in Scotland. ...


Structures and facilities

View from the Kop, with the Main Stand to the left, Anfield Road end opposite and the Centenary Stand to the right.
Outline of Anfield
Outline of Anfield

The pitch is surrounded by four all-seater stands, the Anfield Road end, the Centenary Stand, the Kop and the Main Stand, all of which are covered. The Anfield Road end and Centenary Stand are multi-tiered, whilst the Kop and Main Stand are single-tiered. Entry to the stadium is gained by RFID smart cards rather than the traditional manned turnstile. This system, used in all 80 turnstiles around Anfield, was introduced in 2005.[11] Image File history File links Anfield_wide_view. ... Said of a sports stadium, especially a football (soccer) ground which has no space for standing spectators. ... An EPC RFID tag used by Wal-Mart Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method, relying on storing and remotely retrieving data using devices called RFID tags or transponders. ... Smart card used for health insurance in France. ... This article is about the pedestrian gate. ...


The Centenary Stand was originally named the Kemlyn Road stand before the addition of a second tier. After the expansion was complete, the stand was renamed to mark the club's hundredth anniversary. The capacity of the stand is 11,762, with 4,600 spaces on the upper tier and 6,814 on the lower tier, while 348 spaces are also available in the executive boxes within the stand.[1] The Anfield Road stand is used to house the away fans during match-day. Originally a simple single-tier stand with multi-coloured seats, a second tier has been added to the original stand, increasing the capacity to 9,074, consisting of 2,654 spaces on the upper tier, 6,391 on the lower tier and 29 spaces for disabled persons.[1]


The Kop was originally built as an uncovered terrace capable of holding 30,000 spectators, although a roof was added in 1928. However, following the Hillsborough disaster and the subsequent Taylor Report, a new all-seater Kop was constructed with a capacity of 12,409, with nine disabled spaces. The Main stand houses the directors box and the players dressing rooms. The capacity of the stand is 12,277 seats consisting of 9,597 main stand seats, 2,409 available in the paddock, 177 in the directors box, 54 for the press box, and 40 disabled spaces.[12] The Press Box is a special section of a sports stadium or arena that is set up for the media to report about a given event. ...

Reminding the visitors where they are.

Above the stairs that lead down to the pitch hangs a sign stating "THIS IS ANFIELD". Its aims are to intimidate the opposition and to bring those who touch it good luck. Accordingly, Liverpool players reach up and place one or both hands on it as they pass underneath.[13]


There are 32 total spaces available to accommodate wheelchair users; 22 spaces are available for general sale, eight spaces are allocated to the away supporters, and another two spaces are kept unused for emergency circumstances. There are 36 spaces available for the visually impaired, which are situated in the paddock area of the Main stand, with space for one personal assistant. A headset with full commentary is also provided.[12]


The stadium also features tributes to two of the club's most successful managers: the Paisley Gates, in tribute of Bob Paisley, who guided Liverpool to three European Cups and six League Championships in the 1970s and 80s, and Shankly Gates, in tribute of Bill Shankly, Paisley's predecessor between 1959 and 1974.[14] There is another tribute to Shankly, a statue of him, created from bronze, and located at the visitor's centre in front of the Kop.[9] Robert Bob Paisley OBE (23 January 1919 — 14 February 1996) was an English football player who became best known for being one of the most successful managers in English football history whilst managing his only team Liverpool Football Club in the 1970s and 1980s. ... Champions League Logo The UEFA Champions League is an annual international inter-club football competition between Europes most successful clubs, regarded as the most prestigious club trophy in the sport. ... From 1889 until 1992, this was the highest division overall of organized football in England. ... William Bill Shankly, OBE (September 2, 1913 – September 29, 1981) was one of Britains most successful and respected football managers. ... This article is about the metal alloy. ...


The dimensions of the pitch at Anfield are 111 yards (101 m) x 74 yards (68 m),[15] which is just above the FA's recommended pitch dimensions of 110 yards (101 m) x 70 yards (64 m).[16] During the football season Anfield is cut two times a week, and four times a week during the close season. The grass is one inch during the season, and two inches high at any other time. Under-soil heating was introduced in 1982. During a matchday the groundsman are assisted by staff from the club's training ground—Melwood. They assist by filling in divots at half-time, and usually restore the pitch for two hours after full-time. There are 400 to 420 stewards in attendance during matchday, and 65 police officers, along with a doctor, two paramedic teams and 40 St. John Ambulance officers. Safety is paramount at the ground, as it features an in house police station, a fire warning system linked to Merseyside fire brigade, electronic exit gates, CCTV cameras in and outside the ground, four fully equipped first aid rooms and three ambulances.[15] Fa or FA may refer to: Federal Association, Federal Savings Bank Financial Adviser The Football Association, England First ascent, climbing Free agency Fallen Angels, a clan spanning many role-playing games In solfege, fa is the name of the fourth note of the scale Farm Aid Fame Academy Fiery Avenger... Under-soil heating is a method used in football stadiums which heats the underside of the pitch to avoid any bad weather, such as snow and ice, from building up and ultimately avoids the club from having to postpone any matches. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... In electronics (specifically, signal processing), half time usually refers to the time it takes for the amplitude of a pulse to drop from 100% to 50% of its peak value. ... A full time job usually has benefits (such as health insurance) and are often considered careers. ... St John Ambulance vehicle in a London street. ... This article refers to a surveillance system. ...


Future

See also: Stanley Park Stadium

Original plans to replace Anfield were initiated by Liverpool F.C. in May 2002.[17] At that time the proposed capacity was 55,000, but it was later revised to 61,000, with 1,000 seats given for segregation. There were several attempts by Liverpool City Council to instigate a groundshare of the stadium with local rivals Everton from 2003 to 2007, but this move was finally rejected as neither club was in favour of the move.[18] Stanley Park Stadium is a proposed title of the planned football stadium to be built in Stanley Park, Liverpool, England. ... See City of Liverpool for other meanings Liverpool City Council is the governing body for the city of Liverpool in Merseyside, England. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Liverpool were granted planning permission on July 30, 2004 to build a new stadium, just 300 yards (270 m) away from Anfield at Stanley Park,[19] and on September 8, 2006 Liverpool City Council agreed to grant Liverpool F.C. a 999-year lease of the land on the proposed site.[20] Following the takeover of Liverpool F.C. on February 6, 2007 by George Gillett and Tom Hicks, the proposed stadium was redesigned. In November 2007, the redesigned layout was approved by the council and construction is due to start in spring 2008.[21] The new stadium is being built by HKS, Inc. and is scheduled to open in August 2011, with a capacity of 71,000.[22][23] Once the new stadium is built Anfield will be demolished and become the centrepiece for the Anfield Plaza development, which will include a hotel, restaurants, and offices.[24] is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... George N. Gillett Jr. ... For the English cricketer, see Tom Hicks (cricketer). ... Stanley Park Stadium is a proposed title of the planned football stadium to be built in Stanley Park, Liverpool, England. ... HKS, Inc. ...


Other uses

Anfield has hosted numerous international matches, and was one of the venues used during Euro 96; the ground hosted four matches, which included three group games and a quarter-final.[25] The first international match to be hosted at Anfield was between England and Ireland, in 1889, with England winning 6–1. England have also played Wales on three occasions, in 1905, 1922 and 1931, with England winning all three matches.[6] The most recent international to be hosted at Anfield was England's 2–1 victory over Uruguay on March 1, 2006.[26] Anfield has also hosted five FA Cup semi-finals, with the last being in 1929.[6]-1... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... First international  Scotland 4 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 26 March 1876) Biggest win Wales 11 - 0 Ireland  (Wrexham, Wales; 3 March 1888) Biggest defeat  Scotland 9 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 March 1878) World Cup Appearances 1 (First in 1958) Best result Quarter-finals, 1958 The Wales national football team... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ...


Anfield has been the venue for many other events, and during the inter-war years boxing matches were regularly held there. A number of British championships were contested and on June 12, 1934, Nelson Tarleton fought for the World Featherweight title against Freddie Miller. Professional tennis was played at Anfield on boards on the pitch, with the US Open champion, Bill Tilden and Wimbledon champion, Fred Perry entertaining the crowds in an exhibition match. During the mid-twenties, Anfield was the finishing line for the city marathon. Liverpool also held an annual race starting from St George's plateau, in the centre of the city and finishing with a lap of Anfield. In July 1984, the American evangelist Billy Graham preached at Anfield for a week, attracting crowds of over 30,000 a night.[6] For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a chronological List of World Featherweight Boxing Champions, as recognized by four of the better-known sanctioning organizations: The World Boxing Association (WBA), founded in 1921 as the National Boxing Association (NBA), The World Boxing Council (WBC), founded in 1963, The International Boxing Federation (IBF), founded in 1983... Freddie Miller was one of the very best Featherweight boxers of the 1930s, and was named to Ring Magazines list of the 80 Best Fighters of the Last 80 Years. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see U.S. Open. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as Wimbledon, is the oldest major championship in tennis and is widely considered to be the most prestigious. ... For other persons named Fred Perry, see Fred Perry (disambiguation). ... For other senses of this word, see Marathon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Evangelist. ... For other persons named Billy Graham, see Billy Graham (disambiguation). ...


Records

Average attendance at Anfield since 1947.
Average attendance at Anfield since 1947.

The highest attendance recorded at Anfield is 61,905 for Liverpool's match against Wolverhampton Wanderers in the FA Cup fifth round on February 2, 1952.[3] The record modern (all-seated) attendance is 44,983 for a match against Tottenham Hotspur on January 14, 2006.[27] The lowest attendance recorded at Anfield was 1,000 for a match against Loughborough on December 7, 1895.[28] The highest average attendance at Anfield over a league season was 48,127, set in the 1972–73 season. The lowest average attendance at Anfield was 29,608, set in the 1960–61 season, whilst the team was in the Second Division. The highest total seasonal attendance was recorded during the 2000–01 season when the aggregate was 1,328,482 during a season in which Liverpool won a treble of the FA Cup, League Cup and UEFA Cup.[29] Wolverhampton Wanderers Football Club are an English professional football club based in Wolverhampton, West Midlands. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Current season Tottenham Hotspur Football Club is an English professional football club which currently plays in the Premier League. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Loughborough F.C. are an English football club based in Loughborough, Leicestershire. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Between the 1992-93 and 2004-05 season, the Football League Second Division was the second-highest division of The Football League and the third-highest division in the overall English football league system. ... The 2000-2001 season was the 121st season of competitive football in England. ... The Treble is a term in football that refers to a club winning their countrys top tier league and two cup competitions in the same season. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... The Football League Cup, commonly known as the League Cup, is an English football competition. ... For the current season, see UEFA Cup 2007-08. ...


Liverpool did not lose a home league match at Anfield during the 1893–94, 1970–71, 1976–77, 1978–79, 1979–80 and 1987–88 seasons. They also won all their home games during the 1893–94 season. From January 1978 to January 1981, Liverpool did not lose a match at Anfield, encompassing 85 games, in which Liverpool scored 212 goals and conceded 35.[3] The record gate receipts taken at Anfield is £496,000, for a match against Newcastle United, on April 3, 1996.[30] The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... // First Division Arsenal won the league championship at the end of a season which would soon be followed by their FA Cup final tie with Liverpool. ... // First Division Liverpool retained their league championship trophy and won their first European Cup to confirm Bob Paisley as a successful replacement for Bill Shankly in his third season at the helm. ... // First Division Bob Paisley won his third league title in Liverpool and his conquering side fought off competition from the likes of Nottingham Forest and West Bromwich Albion to achieve their triumph. ... The 1979-80 season was the 100th season of competitive football (soccer) in England. ... // First Division Liverpool won the league title with a comfortable nine-point margin and just two defeats all season. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... GBP redirects here. ... For the Australian club, see Newcastle United Jets. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


Liverpool also broke the Champions League scoring record at Anfield Road by beating Besiktas JK 8-0 on 6 November 2007.


Transport

The stadium is approximately 2 miles (3 km) from Lime Street Station,[31] which lies on a branch of the West Coast Main Line from London Euston. Kirkdale Station is the nearest station to Anfield, and is approximately a mile from the stadium.[32] The stadium has no parking facilities for supporters, and the streets around the ground are subject to a residents-only permit parking scheme.[32] The main entrance to Liverpool Lime Street Station Liverpool Lime Street railway station on Lime Street is the mainline railway station serving Liverpool, England. ... The WCML running alongside the M1 motorway at Watford Gap in Northamptonshire A Virgin Pendolino and freight train on the WCML The West Coast Main Line (WCML) is one of the most important intercity railway lines in the United Kingdom, part of the British railway system. ... Euston station, also known as London Euston, is a major railway station to the north of central London in the London Borough of Camden. ... Kirkdale railway station is a railway station in Kirkdale, Liverpool, England, located to the north of the city centre on the Northern Line of the Merseyrail network. ...


References

General
  • Official Liverpool website. liverpoolfc.tv. Retrieved on 2008-02-21.
Specific
  1. ^ a b c d e f Virtual Tour of Anfield. liverweb.org. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  2. ^ Board of Directors. liverpoolfc.tv. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  3. ^ a b c Anfield. LFChistory.net. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  4. ^ Anfield history. soccerbase.com. Retrieved on 2008-01-27.
  5. ^ John Houlding. spartacus.schoolnet. Retrieved on 2008-03-26.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h Kelly, Stephen F. (1987). You'll Never Walk Alone. Guild Publishing London, p187-188. 
  7. ^ Shankly Gates. lfconline.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-26.
  8. ^ Hillsborough. liv.ac.uk. Retrieved on 2008-03-26.
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  10. ^ Hillsborough memorial. liverpoolfc.tv. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  11. ^ A Sporting Chance for RFID. chronos.co.uk. Retrieved on 2008-01-28.
  12. ^ a b Accessibility. liverpoolfc.tv. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  13. ^ Anfield. 123.football.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-02.
  14. ^ Paisley Gateway. bobpaisley.com. Retrieved on 2008-01-28.
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  17. ^ Liverpool unveil new stadium. bbc sport.co.uk (2002-05-17). Retrieved on 2007-03-17.
  18. ^ Premiership: Ground Share. squarefootball.net (2004-12-01). Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  19. ^ Reds stadium gets go-ahead. Liverpool Echo (2004-07-31). Retrieved on 2006-09-12.
  20. ^ Liverpool get go-ahead on stadium. bbc.co.uk (2006-09-08). Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  21. ^ New stadium gets the green light. liverpoolfc.tv. Retrieved on 2007-12-17.
  22. ^ Liverpool's stadium move granted. BBC News (2007-06-11). Retrieved on 2007-12-17.
  23. ^ New Stadium. liverpoolfc.tv. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  24. ^ Public park plan for Anfield turf. icLiverpool.icnetwork.co.uk (2003-10-23). Retrieved on 2008-03-02.
  25. ^ Euro 96 Tournament Schedule. Independent.co.uk (1995-12-18). Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  26. ^ England v Uruguay. TheFA. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
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  28. ^ LFC Records. liverpoolfc.tv. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
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  30. ^ (1996) The official Liverpool Football Club Annual 1996. Grandeams Ltd, p55. ISBN 1-85830-391-5. 
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  32. ^ a b Liverpool Guide. fansfc.com. Retrieved on 2008-01-27.
2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... Michael Owen made 216 appearances for Liverpool between 1996 and 2004, scoring 118 goals. ... The following is a list of Liverpool managers from the founding of Liverpool F.C. in 1892 until the present. ... This page is a season-by-season record of Liverpool F.C.s league and cup performance. ... Liverpool F.C. in Europe is an article about Liverpool F.C. and their record in European football competitions. ... Liverpool Football Club, the most successful club in English football, has a long and detailed history. ... Stanley Park Stadium is a proposed title of the planned football stadium to be built in Stanley Park, Liverpool, England. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... The Merseyside Derby is the name of the football match played between the Everton and Liverpool football clubs, the two most successful clubs from the Merseyside area of England. ... The Liverpool - Manchester United fixture is one of the most significant sporting rivalries in the world. ... // Liverpool Reserves play in the Barclays Premiership Reserve League North,and play at the ground where Warrington Wolves play Rugby League. ... Main article: Anfield The famous Liverpool Boot Room was a room at Anfield, home of Liverpool F.C., during the 1960s - 1980s where the coaching staff would sit, drink tea and discuss the team, tactics and ways of defeating the next opposing side. ... LFC TV is the dedicated channel for English football club Liverpool Football Club which launched on 20 September 2007. ... Liverpool L.F.C. is the ladies football club affiliated with Liverpool Football Club. ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see List of professional sports leagues. ... The 2007–08 Premier League season (known as the Barclays Premier League for sponsorship reasons) is the sixteenth since its establishment. ... For the football team see Upton Park FC The Boleyn Ground is the official name of Upton Park, the football stadium of West Ham United. ... The City of Manchester Stadium (also known as COMS or Eastlands) is a sports venue in Manchester, England. ... Craven Cottage is the name of a sports stadium in the Hammersmith and Fulham area that has been the 6. ... The Emirates Stadium is a football stadium located on Ashburton Grove in Holloway, north London, and the home of Arsenal Football Club since it opened in July 2006. ... Ewood Park is a football stadium in Blackburn, Lancashire and the home of Blackburn Rovers football club. ... Fratton Park is the home stadium of Portsmouth F.C., and is situated in the English city-port of Portsmouth. ... Goodison Park is the home ground of Everton F.C. in Liverpool. ... The JJB Stadium is a sports stadium located within the Robin Park Complex in Newtown, Wigan, Greater Manchester. ... The Madejski Stadium is a football stadium in Reading, England. ... Old Trafford is an area of Trafford, Greater Manchester, England. ... // Pride Park Stadium is a football (soccer) stadium in the Pride Park business park on the outskirts of Derby city centre in the UK. It is owned by and is the home of Derby County F.C. The stadium holds 33,597 spectators. ... The Reebok Stadium is the home stadium of English Premier League football club Bolton Wanderers, and is located on the Middlebrook retail park in Horwich, near Bolton. ... The Riverside Stadium is a football stadium in Middlesbrough, England, which has been the home of Middlesbrough F.C. since it opened in 1995. ... St. ... St James Park is an all-seater stadium in Newcastle upon Tyne, England, and is the home of Newcastle United Football Club. ... This article is about the home stadium of Sunderland A.F.C.. For the home stadium of SL Benfica, see Estádio da Luz. ... Stamford Bridge is a football stadium on the border of Fulham and Chelsea, in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham that is home to Chelsea Football Club. ... For other uses, see Villa Park (disambiguation). ... For the railway station of the same name, see White Hart Lane railway station. ... The Union Européenne de Football Association or Union of European Football Associations in English, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced (you-AY-fuh) or (oo-Ay-fuh) or ), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ... The UEFA Stadia List is a ranking of football stadia compiled by UEFAs Stadia and Security Committee. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... This is one of the the biggest stadiums in Bulgaria at 43,384 people. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Parken Stadium (English: the Park) is a football stadium in the Indre Østerbro (Inner Østerbro) district of Copenhagen, Denmark, built from 1990-1992. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... The City of Manchester Stadium (also known as COMS or Eastlands) is a sports venue in Manchester, England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Goodison Park is the home ground of Everton F.C. in Liverpool. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... St Marys Stadium is the home stadium of Southampton F.C.. The Saints have been in residence since August 2001 when they moved from the The Dell, which for the final years of its life, held just over 15,000 spectators - less than half the size of the new... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... This article is about the home stadium of Sunderland A.F.C.. For the home stadium of SL Benfica, see Estádio da Luz. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... For other uses, see Villa Park (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Parc des Princes (translation: Princes Park) is a 48527 capacity stadium in the 16th arrondissement of Paris. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The stade de Gerland is the principal sporting hub of the city of Lyon. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... The Karaiskaki Stadium (in Greek: Γήπεδο Γεώργιος Καραϊσκάκης ; IPA: ) is in the Neo Faliro area of Piraeus, Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... The Gelredome is the home stadium of Vitesse in Arnhem. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... For the indoor arena in Atlanta, Georgia, see Philips Arena. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... RÃ¥sunda Stadium, located in the Stockholm suburb of Solna, is the home ground for football team AIK, the home of the Sweden mens national team and also hosts the headquarters of the headquarters of the Swedish Football Association. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Ullevi or Ullevi Stadium, formerly named Nya Ullevi, meaning New Ullevi, to distinguish it from Gamla Ullevi, is a stadium in Gothenburg, Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Switzerland. ... For the old stadium, see St. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
This Is Anfield: Liverpool FC Fan Site (385 words)
Keith profiles a player who could have been a huge success for club and country had it not been for injuries.
Written by This Is Anfield 4 days, 6 hours ago.
Keith Perkins has been paying tribute to some former players who don't always receive the praise they deserve for their impressive service to LFC.
Anfield - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1433 words)
Anfield (sometimes known as Anfield Road) is a football stadium in the district of Anfield, in Liverpool, England.
In 1906, Liverpool and Preston North End formally renamed the banked stand at one end of their ground Spion Kop, after a hill in Natal that was the site of a battle in the Second Boer War, where the British forces suffered heavy losses (many of the fallen were Scousers in the Lancashire Regiment).
Due to the difficulties of expanding Anfield beyond its current boundaries (an entire terraced street had to be demolished to make way for the Centenary Stand expansion), Liverpool are expected to leave the ground in the next few years.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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