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Encyclopedia > Andy Warhol
Andy Warhol

Warhol in 1977.
Birth name Andrew Warhola
Born August 6, 1928(1928-08-06)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Died February 22, 1987 (aged 58)
New York City, New York
Nationality American (United States)
Field Painting, Cinema
Training Carnegie Mellon University
Movement Pop art
Famous works Campbell's Soup Can (1968), Chelsea Girls (1966), Exploding Plastic Inevitable (1966)

Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who was a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. After a successful career as a commercial illustrator, Warhol became famous worldwide for his work as a painter, an avant-garde filmmaker, a record producer, an author and a public figure known for his presence in wildly diverse social circles that included bohemian street people, distinguished intellectuals, Hollywood celebrities and wealthy aristocrats. A controversial figure during his lifetime (his work was often derided by critics as a hoax or "put-on"), Warhol has been the subject of numerous retrospective exhibitions, books and documentary films since his death in 1987. He is generally acknowledged as one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century. Image File history File links Andy_Warhol_1977. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ... Carnegie Mellon University is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956) is one of the earliest works to be considered pop art. ... In the art world, Campbells Soup Cans at first referred to 32 small 20x16 canvases of portrait paintings of Campbell’s Soup cans that Andy Warhol produced in 1962 for his first gallery exhibition of the then 32 varieties of soups made by the Campbell Soup Company. ... Chelsea Girls is a 1966 film directed by Paul Morrissey and Andy Warhol. ... Exploding. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956) is one of the earliest works to be considered pop art. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... For other uses, see Celebrity (disambiguation). ... ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ...

Contents

Biography

Childhood and early career

Andy Warhol was born in Pittsburgh,[1] Pennsylvania. His parents, Ondrej (Andrew) Warhola (the surname was spelled Varchola in Europe, and was modified after immigrating to America) and Julia Warhola, née Ulja (Julia) Justyna Zavacka,[citation needed] were working-class immigrants of Rusyn (Ruthenian) ethnicity from Miková, Austria-Hungary (now in northeast Slovakia).Warhol's father worked in a coal mine, and the family lived at 55 Beelen Street and later at 3252 Dawson Street in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh.[2] The family was Byzantine Catholic and attended St. John Chrysostom Byzantine Catholic Church. Andy Warhol has two brothers John and Paul. City nickname: The Steel City Location in the state of Pennsylvania Founded 1758 Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Julia Warhola, née Ulja (Julia) Justyna Zavacka, (November 17, 1892—November 22, 1972) was the mother of the American artist Andy Warhol. ... Rusyns, also called Ruthenians, Ruthenes, Rusins, Carpatho-Rusins, and Russniaks, are a modern group of ethnic groups that speak the Rusyn language and are descended from the minority of Ruthenians who did not adopt a Ukrainian national identity and become Ukrainians in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. ... Location of Stropkov District in the PreÅ¡ov Region. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... The Cathedral of Learning dominates the Oakland skyline Oakland is the academic center of Pittsburgh and the third largest downtown area in the state of Pennsylvania, behind only Center City Philadelphia and the Central Business District (Downtown Pittsburgh). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... St. ...


In third grade, Warhol came down with St. Vitus' dance, an affliction of the nervous system causing involuntary movements which is believed to be a complication of scarlet fever. This disease led to a blotchiness in pigmentation of his skin and, as a child, he became somewhat of a hypochondriac, developing a fear of hospitals and medical doctors. Because he was at times bed-ridden as a child, he became an outcast among his school-mates and bonded with his mother very strongly (Guiles, 1989). When in bed he used to draw, listen to the radio and collect pictures of movie stars around his bed. Looking back later, Warhol described the period of his sickness as very important in the development of his personality and in the forming of his skill-set and preferences. In the United States, Third grade (called Grade 3 in some regions) is a year of primary education. ... // Chorea sancti viti (Latin for St. ... For the anatomical term, see hypochondrium. ...


Warhol showed an early artistic talent and studied commercial art at the School of Fine Arts at Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh (now Carnegie Mellon University). In 1949, he moved to New York City and began a successful career in magazine illustration and advertising. He became well-known mainly for his whimsical ink drawings of shoes done in a loose, blotted ink style. These figured in some of his earliest showings in New York at the Bodley Gallery Commercial art refers to art created for commercial purposes, primarily advertising. ... The College of Fine Arts at Carnegie Mellon University oversees the Schools of Architecture, Art, Design, Drama, and Music; along with its associated centers, studios, and galleries. ... The Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Tech), the predecessor to Carnegie Mellon University, was founded in 1900 by Andrew Carnegie as the Carnegie Technical Schools. ... Carnegie Mellon University is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Advert redirects here. ...


The 1960s

Campbell's Soup I (1968)
Campbell's Soup I (1968)

It was during the 1960s that Warhol began to make paintings of famous American products such as Campbell's Soup Cans from the Campbell Soup Company and Coca-Cola, as well as paintings of celebrities like Marilyn Monroe, Troy Donahue, and Elizabeth Taylor. He founded "The Factory", his studio, during these years, and gathered around himself a wide range of artists, writers, musicians and underground celebrities. He switched to silkscreen prints, which he produced serially, seeking not only to make art of mass-produced items but to mass produce the art itself. In declaring that he wanted to be "a machine", and in minimizing the role of his own hand in the production of his work, Warhol sparked a revolution in art - his work quickly became very controversial, and popular. Image File history File links Warhol-Campbell_Soup-1-screenprint-1968. ... Image File history File links Warhol-Campbell_Soup-1-screenprint-1968. ... For other uses, see Campbells Soup Cans (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson; June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe award winning American actress, model and sex symbol. ... Troy Donahue Troy Donahue (January 27, 1936 – September 2, 2001) was an American actor, known for being a teen idol. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... The Factory was Andy Warhols original New York City studio from 1963 to 1968, although his later studios were known as The Factory as well. ... For the illustrated magazine, see Studio Magazine. ... Screen-printing, also known as silkscreening or serigraphy, is a printmaking technique that creates a sharp-edged single-color image using a stencil and a porous fabric. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... Mass production is the production of large amounts of standardised products on production lines. ...


Warhol's work from this period revolves around American Pop (Popular) Culture. He painted dollar bills, celebrities, brand name products, and images from newspaper clippings - many of the latter were iconic images from headline stories of the decade (e.g. photographs of mushroom clouds, and police dogs attacking civil rights protesters). His subjects were instantly recognizable, and often had a mass appeal - this aspect interested him most, and it unifies his paintings from this period. Take, for example, Warhol's comments on the appeal of Coke: The atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan on August 9, 1945 A mushroom cloud is a distinctive mushroom-shaped cloud of smoke, flame, or debris resulting from a very large explosion. ... Historically, various popular movements struggling for social justice and democratic rights since the Second World War were known as civil rights movement, most famously the American civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, which struggled for equal rights for African-Americans. ...

What's great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca Cola, and you know that the President drinks Coca Cola, Liz Taylor drinks Coca Cola, and just think, you can drink Coca Cola, too. A coke is a coke and no amount of money can get you a better coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the cokes are the same and all the cokes are good. Liz Taylor knows it, the President knows it, the bum knows it, and you know it. This article is about the beverage. ...

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol: (From A to B and Back Again), 1975, ISBN 0-15-671720-4

This quotation both expresses his affection for popular culture, and evidences an ambiguity of perspective that cuts across nearly all of the artist's statements about his own work.


New York's Museum of Modern Art hosted a Symposium on pop art in December 1962, during which artists like Warhol were attacked for "capitulating" to consumerism. Critics were scandalized by Warhol's open embrace of market culture. This symposium set the tone for Warhol's reception - though throughout the decade it became more and more clear that there had been a profound change in the culture of the art world, and that Warhol was at the center of that shift. This article is about the museum in New York City. ... Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956) is one of the earliest works to be considered pop art. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A pivotal event was the 1964 exhibit "The American Supermarket", a show held in Paul Bianchini's Upper East Side gallery. The show was presented as a typical small supermarket environment, except that everything in it—the produce, canned goods, meat, posters on the wall, etc.—was created by six prominent pop artists of the time, including the controversial (and like-minded) Billy Apple, Mary Inman, and Robert Watts. Warhol's painting of a can of Campbell's soup cost $1,500, while each autographed can sold for $6. The exhibit was one of the first mass events that directly confronted the general public with both Pop Art and the perennial question of what is art. Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... American Supermarket Exhibition 1964. ... Campbell Soup Company ( NYSE: CPB) (also known as Campbells) is undeniably the most well-known producer of canned soups and related products in the United States (and possibly the world). ... Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956) is one of the earliest works to be considered pop art. ...

Andy Warhol and fellow pop artist Billy Apple show their "products" during the 1964 show The American Supermarket. His Brillo boxes sold for $350 each.
Andy Warhol and fellow pop artist Billy Apple show their "products" during the 1964 show The American Supermarket. His Brillo boxes sold for $350 each.

As an advertisement illustrator in the 1950s Warhol used assistants to increase his productivity. Collaboration would remain a defining (and controversial) aspect of his working methods throughout his career - in the 1960s, however, this was particularly true. One of the most important collaborators during this period was Gerard Malanga. Malanga assisted the artist with producing silkscreens, films, sculpture, and other works at "The Factory", Warhol's aluminum foil-and-silver-paint lined studio on 47th Street (later moved to Broadway). Other members of Warhol's Factory crowd included Freddie Herko, Ondine, Ronald Tavel, Mary Woronov, Pietro Psaier, Billy Name, and Brigid Berlin (from whom he apparently got the idea to tape record his phone conversations). During this decade, Warhol also groomed a retinue of bohemian eccentrics upon whom he bestowed the designation "Superstars", including Edie Sedgwick, Viva, and Ultra Violet. These people all participated in the Factory films, and some, like Berlin, remained friends with Warhol until his death. Important figures in the New York underground art/cinema world (e.g. writer John Giorno, film-maker Jack Smith) also appear in Warhol films of the 1960s, revealing Warhol's connections to a diverse range of artistic scenes during this period. By the end of the decade, Andy Warhol was himself a celebrity, appearing frequently in newspapers and magazines alongside Factory cohorts like Sedgwick. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... American Supermarket Exhibition 1964. ... Gerard Joseph Malanga (born March 20, 1943) is a North American poet, photographer, filmmaker, curator and archivist. ... The Factory was Andy Warhols original New York City studio from 1963 to 1968, although his later studios were known as The Factory as well. ... Aluminium foil (aluminum foil in North American English) is aluminium prepared in thin sheets (on the order of . ... Freddie (Fred) Herko was an avant-garde dancer and choreographer trained at Juilliard. ... Ondine (June 16, 1937 - January 1, 1989) was an American actor, probably best known for appearing in a series of Warhol-directed films in the mid-1960s. ... Ronald Tavel (b. ... Mary Woronov (b. ... Pietro Psaier (1936 — 2004) was born in Italy. ... Billy Name (born 22 February 1940 in Poughkeepsie, New York, USA. Original name: William Billy Linich) is an American artist, photographer, film-maker and was a close friend to Andy Warhol and one of the Warhol superstars. ... Brigid Berlin (also known as Brigid Polk,The Duchess,The 250 Pound Hippotamus of Sin, born September 6, 1939) is an artist and former Warhol superstar. ... The Warhol Superstars refers to a coterie of New York personalities promoted by Andy Warhol during the 1960s and early 1970s. ... Sedgwick in 1966, by Jerry Schatzberg/Corbis Edith Minturn Edie Sedgwick (April 20, 1943 – November 16, 1971)[1] was an American actress, socialite, and heiress who starred in many of Andy Warhols short films in the 1960s. ... Viva (born Janet Susan Mary Hoffmann on August 23, 1938 in Syracuse, New York) is an actress, writer and a former Warhol superstar. ... Isabelle Collin Dufresne (born 6 September 1935 in La Tronche, Grenoble, France; stage name Ultra Violet) is an French-American artist, author, and former colleague of Andy Warhol. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Jack Smith (14 November 1932 in Columbus, Ohio - 25 September 1989 in New York) was a US-American film director and one of the pioneers of American underground cinema. ...


Shooting

On June 3, 1968, Valerie Solanas shot Warhol and art critic and curator Mario Amaya at Warhol's studio. is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Valerie Jean Solanas (April 9, 1936 – April 26, 1988) was an American radical feminist writer who struggled to be recognized for her writing but became famous for shooting the artist Andy Warhol in 1968. ... Mario Amaya (1933-1986) Mario Amaya was an art critic, museum director, magazine editor and former director of the New York Cultural Center (1972-1976) and the Chrysler museum in Norfolk, Virginia (1976-1979). ...


Before the shooting, Solanas had been a marginal figure in the Factory scene. She founded a "group" called S.C.U.M. and authored the scabrous S.C.U.M. Manifesto, a separatist feminist attack on patriarchy.[3] Solanas appears in the 1968 Warhol film, "I, A Man." Earlier on the day of the attack, Solanas had been turned away from the Factory after asking for the return of a script she had given to Warhol. The script, apparently, had been misplaced.[4] Cover of the SCUM Manifesto The SCUM Manifesto (Society for Cutting Up Men Manifesto) is a misandrous tract written in 1968 by Valerie Solanas which advocated a violent anarchic revolution to create an all-female society. ... Separatist feminism is a form of feminism that does not support heterosexual relationships due to a belief that sexual disparities between men and women are unresolvable. ...


Warhol was seriously wounded by the attack and barely survived (doctors opened his chest and massaged his heart to help stimulate its movement again). He suffered physical effects for the rest of his life. The shooting had a profound effect on Warhol's life and art.[5]


Solanas was arrested the day after the assault. By way of explanation, she said that "He had too much control over my life." After the shooting, the Factory scene became much more tightly controlled, and for many this event brought the "Factory 60s" to an end.[6]


The 1970s

Compared to the success and scandal of Warhol's work in the 1960s, the 1970s would prove a much quieter decade. This period, however, saw Warhol becoming more entrepreneurial. According to Bob Colacello, Warhol devoted much of his time to rounding up new, rich patrons for portrait commissions — including Mick Jagger, Liza Minnelli, John Lennon, Diana Ross, Brigitte Bardot, and Michael Jackson. Warhol's famous portrait of Chinese Communist dictator Mao Zedong was created in 1973. He also founded, with Gerard Malanga, Interview magazine, and published The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (1975). In this book, he presents his ideas on the nature of art: "Making money is art, and working is art and good business is the best art." Bob Colacello is one of the most prolific biographical writers in the United States. ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is an English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... Liza Minnelli (born March 12, 1946 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actress and singer. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... For the author-illustrator, see Diana Ross (author). ... Brigitte Bardot (French IPA: ) (born September 28, 1934) is a BAFTA Awards-nominated French actress, former fashion model, singer, known nationalist, animal rights activist, and considered the embodiment of the 1950s and 1960s sex kitten. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... Mao redirects here. ... Gerard Joseph Malanga (born March 20, 1943) is a North American poet, photographer, filmmaker, curator and archivist. ... Interview is a magazine founded by artist Andy Warhol and Gerard Malanga in 1969. ...


Warhol used to socialize at Serendipity 3 and, later in the 70s, Studio 54, nightspots in New York City. He was generally regarded as quiet, shy, and as a meticulous observer. Art critic Robert Hughes called him "the white mole of Union Square".[7] Serendipity 3, often written Serendipity III, is a nightspot in Manhattan known for its foot-long hot dogs and frozen drinks, particularly frozen hot chocolate. ... The original Studio 54 logo. ... Robert Studley Forrest Hughes AO, (born July 28, 1938), who is usually known as Robert Hughes, is an art critic, writer and television documentary maker. ... Union Square Park (also known as Union Square) is an important and historic intersection in New York City, located where Broadway and the Bowery came together in the early 19th century. ...


The 1980s

Warhol had a re-emergence of critical and financial success in the 1980s, partially due to his affiliation and friendships with a number of prolific younger artists, who were dominating the "bull market" of '80s New York art: Jean-Michel Basquiat, Julian Schnabel, David Salle and the so-called Neo-Expressionists, as well as Francesco Clemente, Enzo Cucchi and members of the Transavantguardia movement, which had become influential. A bull market is a prolonged period of time when prices are rising in a financial market faster than their historical average. ... Publicity photo of Jean-Michel Basquiat by photographer William Coupon Jean-Michel Basquiat (IPA: ) (December 22, 1960, Brooklyn - August 12, 1988, New York, New York) was an American artist. ... Julian Schnabel (b. ... David Salle (born 1952 in Norman, Oklahoma) is an American painter. ... Neo-expressionism was a style of modern painting that emerged in the late 1970s and dominated the art market until the mid-1980s. ... Francesco Clemente (born in Naples in 1952) is an Italian painter. ... Enzo Cucchi (born 1950) is an Italian painter. ...


Warhol also had an appreciation for intense Hollywood glamour. He once said: "I love Los Angeles. I love Hollywood. They're so beautiful. Everything's plastic, but I love plastic. I want to be plastic." [citation needed]


Sexuality

Many people think of Warhol as "asexual" and merely a "voyeur", but these notions have been debunked by biographers (such as Victor Bockris), explored by other members of the factory scene such as Bob Colacello (in his book Holy Terror: Andy Warhol Close Up), and by scholars like art historian Richard Meyer (in his book Outlaw Representation). The question of how his sexuality influenced Warhol's work and shaped his relationship to the art world is a major subject of scholarship on the artist, and is an issue that Warhol himself addressed in interviews, in conversation with his contemporaries, and in his publications (e.g. Popism: The Warhol Sixties). This article is about the sexual orientation in humans. ... Voyeurism is a practice in which an individual derives sexual pleasure from observing other people. ... Victor Bockris is an England-born, U.S.-based author, primarily of biographies of artists, writers, and musicians. ... Bob Colacello is one of the most prolific biographical writers in the United States. ...


Throughout his career, Warhol produced erotic photography and drawings of male nudes. Many of his most famous works (portraits of Liza Minnelli, Judy Garland, Elizabeth Taylor, and films like Blow Job, My Hustler, and Lonesome Cowboys) draw from gay underground culture and/or openly explore the complexity of sexuality and desire. Many of his films premiered in gay porn theaters. That said, some stories about Warhol's development as an artist revolved around the obstacle his sexuality initially presented as he tried to launch his career. The first works that he submitted to a gallery in the pursuit of a career as an artist were homoerotic drawings of male nudes. They were rejected for being too openly gay.[1] In Popism, furthermore, the artist recalls a conversation with the film maker Emile de Antonio about the difficulty Warhol had being accepted socially by the then more famous (but closeted) gay artists Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. De Antonio explained that Warhol was "too swish and that upsets them." In response to this, Warhol writes, "There was nothing I could say to that. It was all too true. So I decided I just wasn't going to care, because those were all the things that I didn't want to change anyway, that I didn't think I 'should' want to change ... Other people could change their attitudes but not me".[6] In exploring Warhol's biography, many turn to this period - the late 1950s and early 1960s - as a key moment in the development of his persona. Some have suggested that his frequent refusal to comment on his work, to speak about himself (confining himself in interviews to responses like "Uhm, No" and "Uhm, Yes", and often allowing others to speak for him), and even the evolution of his Pop style can be traced to the years when Warhol was first dismissed by the inner circles of the New York art world.[8] Liza Minnelli (born March 12, 1946 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actress and singer. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Blow Job is a 1963 short film directed by Andy Warhol. ... Lonesome Cowboys (1968), is a raunchy pseudo-western about horny cowboys directed by Andy Warhol. ... An example of lesbian erotica by Édouard-Henri Avril. ... Emile de Antonio Emile de Antonio (1919-December 16, 1989) was a director and producer of documentary films, usually detailing political or social events circa 1960s - 1980s. ... Jasper Johnss Map, 1961 Jasper Johnss Flag, Encaustic, oil and collage on fabric mounted on plywood,1954-55 Detail of Flag (1954-55). ... Robert Rauschenberg, Canyon, 1959. ...


Religious beliefs

Warhol was a practicing Byzantine Rite Catholic. He regularly volunteered at homeless shelters in New York, particularly during the busier times of the year, and described himself as a religious person. Many of his later works contain almost-hidden religious themes or subjects, and a body of religious-themed works was found posthumously in his estate. Warhol also regularly attended Mass during his life, and the priest at Warhol's church, Saint Vincent's, said that the artist went there almost daily. His art is noticeably influenced by the eastern Christian iconographic tradition which was so evident in his places of worship. The Byzantine Rite, sometimes called Constantinopolitan, is the liturgical rite used (in various languages) by all the Eastern Orthodox Churches and by several Eastern Rite particular Churches within the Catholic Church. ... Homeless shelters are residences for people, the homeless, in urban neighborhoods to stay temporarily when they otherwise would have to sleep on the street, similar to emergency shelters. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... It has been said “A picture is worth a thousand words”, and so it is that iconography is the traditional art of portraying figures in pigment that symbolically mean more than a simple depiction of the person involved. ...


Warhol's brother has described the artist as "really religious, but he didn't want people to know about that because [it was] private". Despite the private nature of his faith, in Warhol's eulogy John Richardson depicted it as devout: "To my certain knowledge, he was responsible for at least one conversion. He took considerable pride in financing his nephew's studies for the priesthood". [9]


Death

Warhol died in New York City at 6:32 a.m. on February 22, 1987. According to news reports, he had been making good recovery from a routine gallbladder surgery at New York Hospital before dying in his sleep from a sudden heart attack. The hospital staff had failed to adequately monitor his condition and overloaded him with fluids after his operation, causing him to suffer from a fatal case of water intoxication, which prompted Warhol's lawyers to sue the hospital for negligence. Prior to his diagnosis and operation, Warhol delayed having his recurring gallbladder problems checked, as he was afraid to enter hospitals and see doctors. is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The gallbladder (or cholecyst, sometimes gall bladder) is a pear-shaped organ that stores about 50 ml of bile (or gall) until the body needs it for digestion. ... New York-Presbyterian Hospital is a prominent university hospital in New York City, composed of two medical centers, Columbia University Medical Center and New York Weill Cornell Medical Center, each affiliated with an Ivy League University. ... Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), more commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... Water intoxication (also known as hyperhydration or water poisoning) is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain function that results when the normal balance of electrolytes in the body is pushed outside of safe limits, ironically by that which makes up the majority of it - common water. ... Negligence is a legal concept usually used to achieve compensation for accidents and injuries. ...


Warhol's body was taken back to Pittsburgh by his brothers for burial. The wake was at Thomas P. Kunsak Funeral Home and was an open-coffin ceremony. The coffin was a solid bronze casket with gold plated rails and white upholstery. Warhol wore a black cashmere suit, a paisley tie, a platinum wig, and sunglasses. He was holding a small prayer book and a red rose.


The funeral liturgy was held at the Holy Ghost Byzantine Catholic Church on Pittsburgh's North Side. The eulogy was given by Monsignor Peter Tay. Fellow artist Yoko Ono also made an appearance. The coffin was covered with white roses and asparagus ferns. Holy Ghost Byzantine Catholic Church is an Eastern Catholic church in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... North Shore is a neighborhood on Pittsburgh, Pennsylvanias north city area. ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ...

After the liturgy, the coffin was driven to St. John the Baptist Byzantine Catholic Cemetery in Bethel Park, a south suburb of Pittsburgh. At the grave, the priest said a brief prayer and sprinkled holy water on the casket. Before the coffin was lowered, Paige Powell dropped a copy of Interview magazine, an Interview t-shirt, and a bottle of the Estee Lauder perfume "Beautiful" into the grave. Warhol was buried next to his mother and father. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 758 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1204 × 952 pixel, file size: 905 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Chad Snoke, Andy Warhol tombstone, St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 758 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1204 × 952 pixel, file size: 905 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Chad Snoke, Andy Warhol tombstone, St. ... Connor Road cemetery entrance St. ... Connor Road cemetery entrance St. ... Bethel Park is a borough located in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. ... Estée Lauder Companies Inc. ...


Weeks later a memorial service was held in Manhattan for Warhol on April 1, 1987 at St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York. is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... St. ...


Warhol had so many possessions that it took Sotheby's nine days to auction his estate after his death; the auction grossed more than US$20 million. His total estate was worth considerably more, in no small part due to shrewd investments over the years. Sothebys (NYSE: BID) is the worlds second oldest international auction house in continuous operation. ...


On the twentieth anniversary of his death The Gershwin Hotel in New York City held a week-long series of events commemorating Warhol's art and his superstars. There was an award ceremony, a fashion show, and Blondie performed at the closing party. At the same time, The Carrozzini von Buhler Gallery in New York City held an exhibit titled, Andy Warhol: In His Wake. The exhibit featured the art of Warhol's superstars Ultra Violet, Billy Name, Taylor Mead, and Ivy Nicholson as well as art by a younger generation of artists who have been inspired by Warhol. One interactive sculpture in the exhibit, The Great Warhola, by Cynthia von Buhler, depicted Warhol as an arcade fortune-telling machine. The gallery was transformed to look like Warhol's silver factory. Factory Girl, a film about the life of Edie Sedgwick, starring Sienna Miller and Hayden Christensen, was also released one week before the anniversary of Warhol's death. Blondie is the name of an American rock band that first gained fame in the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... Isabelle Dufresne Isabelle Collin Dufresne (born 6 September 1935 in La Tronche, Grenoble, France; stage name Ultra Violet) is a French-American artist, author and former colleague of Andy Warhol. ... Billy Name (born 22 February 1940 in Poughkeepsie, New York, USA. Original name: William Billy Linich) is an American artist, photographer, film-maker and was a close friend to Andy Warhol and one of the Warhol superstars. ... Promotional poster for Excavating Taylor Mead (2005) Taylor Mead (born December 31, 1924 in Grosse Pointe, Michigan) is a writer and performer who starred as Tarzan in Andy Warhols Tarzan, and in Ron Rices beat classic The Flower Thief, in which he traipses with an elfin glee through... Self-Portrait with Cockroaches by Cynthia von Buhler Cynthia von Buhler is an internationally exhibiting visual artist, illustrator, childrens book author, and performer living in New York City. ... This article is about the film Factory Girl. ... Sedgwick in 1966, by Jerry Schatzberg/Corbis Edith Minturn Edie Sedgwick (April 20, 1943 – November 16, 1971)[1] was an American actress, socialite, and heiress who starred in many of Andy Warhols short films in the 1960s. ... Sienna Rose Miller (born December 28, 1981) is an American-born English[1] actress and model. ... Hayden Christensen (born April 19, 1981) is a Canadian actor. ...


Works

Paintings

By the beginning of the 1960s, Warhol was a very successful commercial illustrator. His detailed and elegant drawings for I. Miller shoes were particularly popular. These illustrations consisted mainly of "blotted ink" drawings ( or monoprints), a technique which he applied in much of his early art. Although many artists of this period worked in commercial art, most did so discreetly. Warhol was so successful, however, that his profile as an illustrator seemed to undermine his efforts to be taken seriously as an artist. Monoprinting (not to be confused with monotyping) is a print that has images or lines that cannot exactly be reproduced. ...


In the early 1960s, Warhol tried to exhibit some of his drawings using these techniques in a gallery, only to be turned down. He began to rethink the relationship between his commercial work and the rest of his art. Instead of treating these things as opposites, he merged them, and began to take commercial and popular culture more explicitly as his topic.


Pop Art was an experimental form that several artists were independently adopting; some of these pioneers, such as Roy Lichtenstein, would later become synonymous with the movement. Warhol, who would become famous as the "Pope of Pop", turned to this new style, where popular subjects could be part of the artist's palette. His early paintings show images taken from cartoons and advertisements, hand-painted with paint drips. Those drips emulated the style of successful abstract expressionists (such as Robert Rauschenberg). Eventually, Warhol pared his image vocabulary down to the icon itself—to brand names, celebrities, dollar signs—and removed all traces of the artist's "hand" in the production of his paintings. Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956) is one of the earliest works to be considered pop art. ... Roy Fox Lichtenstein (27 October 1923–29 September 1997) was a prominent American pop artist, whose work borrowed heavily from popular advertising and comic book styles, which he himself described as being as artificial as possible. // Roy Lichtenstein was born on 27 October 1923 into an upper-middle-class family... Cartoons started in the 1930s and 40s. ... Robert Rauschenberg, Canyon, 1959. ...


To him, part of defining a niche was defining his subject matter. Cartoons were already being used by Lichtenstein, typography by Jasper Johns, and so on; Warhol wanted a distinguishing subject. His friends suggested he should paint the things he loved the most. In his signature way of taking things literally, for his first major exhibition he painted his famous cans of Campbell's Soup, which he claimed to have had for lunch for most of his life. A specimen of roman typefaces by William Caslon Typography is the art and techniques of type design, modifying type glyphs, and arranging type. ... Jasper Johnss Map, 1961 Jasper Johnss Flag, Encaustic, oil and collage on fabric mounted on plywood,1954-55 Detail of Flag (1954-55). ... Art exhibitions are traditionally the space in which art objects (in the most general sense) meet an audience. ... Campbell Soup Company (NYSE: CPB) (also known as Campbells) is undeniably the most well-known producer of canned soups and related products in the United States (and possibly the world). ...


He loved celebrities, so he painted them as well. From these beginnings he developed his later style and subjects. Instead of working on a signature subject matter, as he started out to do, he worked more and more on a signature style, slowly eliminating the hand-made from the artistic process. Warhol frequently used silk-screening; his later drawings were traced from slide projections. Warhol went from being a painter to being a designer of paintings. At the height of his fame as a painter, Warhol had several assistants who produced his silk-screen multiples, following his directions to make different versions and variations. For other uses, see Celebrity (disambiguation). ... Screen-printing, also known as silkscreening or serigraphy, is a printmaking technique that creates a sharp-edged single-color image using a stencil and a porous fabric. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Designer is a broad term for a person who designs any of a variety of things. ...


Warhol produced both comic and serious works; his subject could be a soup can or an electric chair. Warhol used the same techniques—silkscreens, reproduced serially, and often painted with bright colors—whether he painted celebrities, everyday objects, or images of suicide, car crashes, and disasters (as part of a 1962-1963 series called "Death and Disaster"). The "Death and Disaster" paintings (such as "Red Car Crash", "Purple Jumping Man", "Orange Disaster") transform personal tragedies into public spectacles, and signal the use of images of disaster in the then evolving media.


The unifying element in Warhol's work is his deadpan Keatonesque style—artistically and personally affectless. This was mirrored by Warhol's own demeanor, as he often played "dumb" to the media, and refused to explain his work. The artist was famous for having said that all you need to know about him and his works is already there, "on the surface." Buster Keaton (born Joseph Frank Keaton, October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966) was an American silent film comic actor and filmmaker. ...


Warhol's work as a Pop Artist has always had conceptual aspects. His series of do it yourself paintings and Rorschach blots are intended as pop comments on art and what art could be. His cow wallpaper (literally, wallpaper with a cow motif) and his oxidation paintings (canvases prepared with copper paint that was then oxidized with urine) are also noteworthy in this context. Equally noteworthy is the way these works—and their means of production—mirrored the atmosphere at Andy's New York "Factory." Biographer Bob Colacello provides some details on Andy's "piss paintings": Joseph Kosuth, One and Three Chairs (1965) Conceptual art is art in which the concept(s) or idea(s) involved in the work take precedence over traditional aesthetic and material concerns. ... See also: DIY Network, a cable TV network. ... Hermann Rorschach Hermann Rorschach (8 November 1884 Zurich - 2 April 1922 Herisau) was a Swiss Freudian psychiatrist, best known for developing the projective test known as the Rorschach Inkblot Test. ... Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956) is one of the earliest works to be considered pop art. ... Look up motif in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Illustration of a redox reaction Redox (shorthand for oxidation/reduction reaction) describes all chemical reactions in which atoms have their oxidation number (oxidation state) changed. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Means of production (abbreviated MoP; German: Produktionsmittel), also called means of labour are the materials, tools and other instruments used by workers to make products. ... This article needs cleanup. ...

Victor... was Andy's ghost pisser on the Oxidations. He would come to the Factory to urinate on canvases that had already been primed with copper-based paint by Andy or Ronnie Cutrone, who was a second ghost pisser, much appreciated by Andy, who said that the vitamin B that Ronnie took made a prettier color when the acid in the urine turned the copper green. Did Andy ever use his own urine? My diary shows that when he first began the series, in December 1977, he did, and there were many others: boys who'd come to lunch and drink too much wine, and find it funny or even flattering to be asked to help Andy 'paint.' Andy always had a little extra bounce in his walk as he led them to his studio...

Holy Terror—Andy Warhol Close Up, New York, Harper/Collins, 1990, p. 343

Films

Warhol worked across a wide range of media — painting, photography, drawing, and sculpture. In addition, he was a highly prolific filmmaker. Between 1963 and 1968, he made more than sixty films. One of his most famous films, Sleep, monitors poet John Giorno sleeping for six hours. The 35-minute film Blow Job, is one continuous shot of the face of DeVeren Bookwalter supposedly receiving oral sex from filmmaker Willard Maas, although the camera never tilts down to see this. Another, 1964's Empire, consists of eight hours of footage of the Empire State Building in New York City at dusk. The 45-minute film Eat consists of a man eating a mushroom for 45 minutes. Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sleep is a 1963 film by Andy Warhol which consists of long take footage of John Giorno sleeping for over five hours. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... DeVeren Bookwalter (September 8, 1939 in Brookville, Pennsylvania - July 23, 1987 in New York, New York) was a theatre actor and director who became the first person to win three Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards for his production, direction and performance in Cyrano de Bergerac at the Globe Playhouse... Oral sex consists of all sexual activities that involve the use of the mouth, which may include use of the tongue, teeth, and throat, to stimulate genitalia. ... Willard Maas was an American experimental filmmaker. ... // Events January 29 - The film Dr. Strangelove is released. ... Empire was a silent, black and white film made in 1964 by Andy Warhol. ... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York on the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ...


Batman Dracula is a 1964 film that was produced and directed by Warhol, without the permission of DC Comics. It was screened only at his art exhibits. A fan of the Batman series, Warhol's movie was an "homage" to the series, and is considered the first appearance of a blatantly campy Batman. The film was until recently thought to have been lost, until scenes from the picture were shown at some length in the 2006 documentary Jack Smith and the Destruction of Atlantis. Batman Dracula is a 1964 American film that was produced and directed by Andy Warhol, without the permission of DC Comics. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ... Jack Smith and the Destruction of Atlantis is a documentary film that premiered in the 2006 Tribeca Film Festival. ...


Warhol's 1965 film Vinyl is an adaptation of Anthony Burgess' popular dystopian novel A Clockwork Orange. Others record improvised encounters between Factory regulars such as Brigid Berlin, Viva, Edie Sedgwick, Candy Darling, Holly Woodlawn, Ondine, Nico, and Jackie Curtis. Legendary underground artist Jack Smith appears in the film Camp. A short black-and-white experimental film directed by Andy Warhol. ... Anthony Burgess (February 25, 1917 – November 22, 1993) was a British novelist, critic and composer. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ... Clockwork Orange redirects here. ... Brigid Berlin (also known as Brigid Polk,The Duchess,The 250 Pound Hippotamus of Sin, born September 6, 1939) is an artist and former Warhol superstar. ... Viva (born Janet Susan Mary Hoffmann on August 23, 1938 in Syracuse, New York) is an actress, writer and a former Warhol superstar. ... Sedgwick in 1966, by Jerry Schatzberg/Corbis Edith Minturn Edie Sedgwick (April 20, 1943 – November 16, 1971)[1] was an American actress, socialite, and heiress who starred in many of Andy Warhols short films in the 1960s. ... Candy Darling Candy Darling (November 24, 1944 - March 21, 1974) was a pre-op transsexual Warhol superstar who starred in Andy Warhols films Flesh (1968) and Women in Revolt (1971). ... Holly Woodlawn Holly Woodlawn (born October 26, 1946) was a Warhol superstar, who appeared in his movies Trash (1970) and Women in Revolt (1972). ... Ondine (June 16, 1937 - January 1, 1989) was an American actor, probably best known for appearing in a series of Warhol-directed films in the mid-1960s. ... For the prequel to Ico, see Shadow of the Colossus. ... John Holder Jr. ... Jack Smith (14 November 1932 in Columbus, Ohio - 25 September 1989 in New York) was a US-American film director and one of the pioneers of American underground cinema. ...


His most popular and critically successful film was 1966's Chelsea Girls. The film was highly innovative in that it consisted of two 16 mm films being projected simultaneously, with two different stories being shown in tandem. From the projection booth, the sound would be raised for one film to elucidate that "story" while it was lowered for the other. The multiplication of images evoked Warhol's seminal silk-screen works of the early 1960s. The influence of the film's split-screen, multi-narrative style could be felt in such modern work as Mike Figgis' Timecode and, however indirectly, the early seasons of 24. // Events Top grossing films North America Thunderball Dr. Zhivago Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? That Darn Cat! The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming Academy Awards Best Picture: A Man for All Seasons - Highland, Columbia Best Actor: Paul Scofield - A Man for All Seasons Best Actress: Elizabeth Taylor... Chelsea Girls is a 1966 film directed by Paul Morrissey and Andy Warhol. ... Super 16 redirects here. ... Mike Figgis (born February 28, 1948) is an English film director, writer, and composer. ... Timecode poster Timecode is a 2000 comedy, directed by Mike Figgis. ... For other uses, see 24 (disambiguation). ...


Other important films include Bike Boy, My Hustler, and Lonesome Cowboys, a raunchy pseudo-western. These and other titles document gay underground and camp culture, and continue to feature prominently in scholarship about sexuality and art - see, for example, Mathew Tinkom's Working Like a Homosexual (Duke University Press, 2002) or Juan Suarez's Bike Boys, Drag Queens, and Superstars (Indiana University Press, 1996). Blue Movie, a film in which Warhol superstar Viva makes love and fools around in bed with a man for 33 minutes of the film's playing-time, was Warhol's last film as director. The film was at the time scandalous for its frank approach to a sexual encounter. For many years Viva refused to allow it to be screened. It was publicly screened in New York in 2005 for the first time in over thirty years. Lonesome Cowboys (1968), is a raunchy pseudo-western about horny cowboys directed by Andy Warhol. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about a film by Andy Warhol. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After his June 3, 1968 shooting, a reclusive Warhol relinquished his personal involvement in filmmaking. His acolyte and assistant director, Paul Morrissey, took over the film-making chores for the Factory collective, steering Warhol-branded cinema towards more mainstream, narrative-based, B-movie exploitation fare with Flesh, Trash, and Heat. All of these films, including the later Andy Warhol's Dracula and Andy Warhol's Frankenstein, were far more mainstream than anything Warhol as a director had attempted. These latter "Warhol" films starred Joe Dallesandro, who was more of a Morrissey star than a true Warhol superstar. is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paul Morrissey (born on February 23, 1938 in New York City) is a film director. ... The Factory was Andy Warhols original New York City studio from 1963 to 1968, although his later studios were known as The Factory as well. ... Look up mainstream in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The term B-movie originally referred to a film designed to be distributed as the lower half of a double feature, often a genre film featuring cowboys, gangsters or vampires. ... Grindhouse redirects here. ... Flesh or Andy Warhols Flesh is a 1968 film directed by Paul Morrissey. ... Trash (a. ... Heat, also known as Andy Warhols Heat, is an american film released in 1972. ... http://www. ... Flesh for Frankenstein is a 1973 Andy Warhol horror film directed by Paul Morrissey, starring Udo Kier, Joe Dallesandro, Monique van Vooren and Arno Juerging. ... Andy Warhol presents: Joe Dallesandro in Paul Morrisseys Flesh 1968 Joseph Angelo (Joe) Dallesandro (born December 31, 1948 in Pensacola, Florida) is an Italian American actor known for his voluptuous physical beauty, on-screen nudity and openly stated bisexuality. ... The Warhol Superstars refers to a coterie of New York personalities promoted by Andy Warhol during the 1960s and early 1970s. ...


In order to facilitate the success of these Warhol-branded, Morrissey-directed movies in the marketplace, all of Warhol's earlier avant-garde films were removed from distribution and exhibition by 1972. Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Another film, Andy Warhol's Bad, made significant impact as a "Warhol" film yet was directed by Jed Johnson. Bad starred the infamous Carroll Baker, Susan Blond and a young Perry King. Andy Warhols Bad is the title of a 1977 film by Jed Johnson, starring Susan Tyrrell. ... Carroll Baker, born on May 28, 1931, is a Golden Globe Award winning and Oscar nominated American actress who has enjoyed popularity as both a serious dramatic actress and, particularly in the sixties, a movie sex symbol. ... Susan Blond, the quintessential New York insider publicist, is the owner of entertainment and lifestyle publicity agency Susan Blond, Inc. ... Perry King (born on April 30, 1948, in Alliance, Ohio) has a number of TV shows to his resume: his best-known role was Cody Allen on the detective series Riptide from 1984 to 1986. ...


The first volume of a catalogue raisonne for the Factory film archive, edited by Callie Angell, was published in the spring of 2006. Catalogue Raisonné is the name of a special type of book. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Factory in New York

  • Factory: 1342 Lexington Avenue (the first Factory)
  • Factory: 231 East 47th street 1963-1967
  • Factory: 33 Union Square 1967-1973 (Decker Building)
  • Factory: 860 Broadway (near 33 Union Square) 1973-1984 (the building has now been completely remodeled and was for a time (2000-2001) the headquarters of the dotcom consultancy Scient)
  • Factory: 22 East 33rd Street 1984-1987 (the building no longer exists)
  • Home: 242 Lexington Avenue
  • Home: 57 East 66th street (Warhol's last home)
  • Last personal studio: 158 Madison Avenue

Dot-com (also dotcom or redundantly dot. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Filmography

  • Sleep (1963)
  • Andy Warhol Films Jack Smith Filming Normal Love (1963)
  • Sarah-Soap (1963)
  • Denis Deegan (1963)
  • Kiss (1963)
  • Naomi and Rufus Kiss (1964)
  • Rollerskate/Dance Movie (1963)
  • Jill and Freddy Dancing (1963)
  • Elvis at Ferus (1963)
  • Taylor and Me (1963)
  • Tarzan and Jane Regained... Sort of (1963)
  • Duchamp Opening (1963)
  • Salome and Delilah (1963)
  • Haircut No. 1 (1963)
  • Haircut No. 2 (1963)
  • Haircut No. 3 (1963)
  • Henry in Bathroom (1963)
  • Taylor and John (1963)
  • Bob Indiana, Etc. (1963)
  • Billy Klüver (1963)
  • John Washing (1963)
  • Naomi and John, F U to steele (1963)
  • Screen Test (1964-66)
  • Jill Johnston Dancing (1964)
  • Shoulder (1964)
  • Eat (1964)
  • Dinner At Daley's (1964)
  • Soap Opera aka The Lester Persky Story (1964)
  • Batman Dracula (1964)
  • Three (1964)
  • Jane and Darius (1964)
  • Couch (1964)
  • Empire (1964)
  • Henry Geldzahler (1964)
  • Taylor Mead's Ass (1964)
  • Six Months (1964)
  • Mario Banana (1964)
  • Harlot (1964)
  • Mario Montez Dances (1964)
  • Isabel Wrist (1964)
  • Imu and Son (1964)
  • Allen (1964)
  • Philip and Gerard (1964)
  • 13 Most Beautiful Women (1964)
  • 13 Most Beautiful Boys (1964)
  • 50 Fantastics and 50 Personalities (1964-66)
  • Pause (1964)
  • Messy Lives (1964)
  • Lips (1964)
  • Apple (1964)
  • The End of Dawn (1964)
  • John and Ivy (1965)
  • Screen Test #1 (1965)
  • Screen Test #2 (1965)
  • The Life of Juanita Castro (1965)
  • Drink aka Drunk (1965)
  • Suicide aka Screen Test #3 (1965)
  • Horse (1965)
  • Vinyl (1965)
  • Bitch (1965)
  • Poor Little Rich Girl (1965)
  • Face (1965)
  • Restaurant (1965)
  • Kitchen (1965)
  • Afternoon (1965)
  • Beauty No. 1 (1965)
  • Beauty No. 2 (1965)
  • Space (1965)
  • Factory Diaries (1965)
  • Outer and Inner Space (1965)
  • Prison (1965)
  • The Fugs and The Holy Modal Rounders (1965)
  • Paul Swan (1965)
  • My Hustler (1965)
  • My Hustler II (1965)
  • Camp (1965)
  • More Milk, Yvette aka Lana Turner (1965)
  • Lupe (1965)
  • The Closet (1965)
  • Ari and Mario (1966)
  • 3 Min. Mary Might (1966)
  • Eating Too Fast aka Blow Job #2 (1966)
  • The Velvet Underground and Nico: A Symphony of Sound (1966)
  • Hedy (1966)
  • Rick (Unreleased, 1966)
  • Withering Heights (Unreleased, 1966)
  • Paraphernalia (1966)
  • Whips (1966)
  • Salvador Dalí (1966)
  • The Beard (1966)
  • Superboy (1966)
  • Patrick (Unreleased, 1966)
  • Chelsea Girls (1966)
  • Bufferin aka Gerard Malanga Reads Poetry (1966)
  • Bufferin Commercial (1966)
  • Susan-Space (1966)
  • The Velvet Underground Tarot Cards (1966)
  • Nico/Antoine (1966)
  • Marcel Duchamp (1966)
  • Dentist: Nico (1966)
  • Ivy (1966)
  • Denis (1966)
  • Ivy and Denis I (1966)
  • Ivy and Denis II (1966)
  • Tiger Hop (1966)
  • The Andy Warhol Story (1966)
  • Since aka The Kennedy Assassination (1966)
  • The Bob Dylan Story (1966)
  • Mrs. Warhol aka The George Hamilton Story (1966)
  • Kiss the Boot (1966)
  • Nancy Fish and Rodney (1966)
  • Courtroom (1966)
  • Jail (1966)
  • Alien in Jail (1966)
  • A Christmas Carol (1966)
  • **** aka Four Stars or The 25 Hour Movie or The 24 Hour Movie (1966)
  • Imitation of Christ (1967)
  • Ed Hood (1967)
  • Donyale Luna (1967)
  • I, a Man (1967)
  • The Loves of Ondine (1967)
  • Bike Boy (1967)
  • Tub Girls (1967)
  • The Nude Restaurant (1967)
  • Construction-Destruction-Construction (1967)
  • Sunset (1967)
  • Withering Sighs (1967)
  • Vibrations (1967)
  • Lonesome Cowboys (1968)
  • San Diego Surf (1968)
  • Flesh (film) (1968)
  • Blue Movie (1969)
  • Trash (1969)
  • Women in Revolt aka P.I.G.S (1970-71)
  • L'Amour aka Beauties (1970)
  • Heat (1972)
  • Factory Diaries (1971-78)
  • Water (1971)
  • Flesh for Frankenstein aka Andy Warhol's Frankenstein (1973)
  • Blood for Dracula aka Andy Warhol's Dracula (1974)
  • Vivian's Girls (1973)
  • Phoney aka Phonies (Undated)
  • Nothing Special footage (1975)
  • Fight (1975)
  • Andy Warhol's Bad (1976)

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Sleep is a 1963 film by Andy Warhol which consists of long take footage of John Giorno sleeping for over five hours. ... Eat was a movie created in 1963 by Andy Warhol. ... Batman Dracula is a 1964 American film that was produced and directed by Andy Warhol, without the permission of DC Comics. ... Empire was a silent, black and white film made in 1964 by Andy Warhol. ... Taylor Meads Ass is a 1965 film by Andy Warhol, which features Taylor Mead doing odd things with his ass. ... A short black-and-white experimental film directed by Andy Warhol. ... Poor Little Rich Girl is a 1965 Andy Warhol film starring Edie Sedgwick. ... Beauty No. ... More Milk, Yvette (1966) is probably Andy Warhols best known film from the days at The Factory. ... Salvador Dalí is a Warhol film from The Factory about Salvador Dalí visiting the Factory meeting The Velvet Underground. ... Chelsea Girls is a 1966 film directed by Paul Morrissey and Andy Warhol. ... I, a Man is an Andy Warhol film from 1967. ... Lonesome Cowboys (1968), is a raunchy pseudo-western about horny cowboys directed by Andy Warhol. ... Flesh or Andy Warhols Flesh is a 1968 film directed by Paul Morrissey. ... This article is about a film by Andy Warhol. ... Trash (a. ... DVD cover Women In Revolt is a film produced by Andy Warhol and directed by Paul Morrisey. ... Heat, also known as Andy Warhols Heat, is an american film released in 1972. ... Flesh for Frankenstein is a 1973 Andy Warhol horror film directed by Paul Morrissey, starring Udo Kier, Joe Dallesandro, Monique van Vooren and Arno Juerging. ... http://www. ... Andy Warhols Bad is the title of a 1977 film by Jed Johnson, starring Susan Tyrrell. ...

Music

The album cover to The Velvet Underground's 1967 debut, The Velvet Underground and Nico. The cover is so iconic that the album is often referred to as "The Banana LP".
The album cover to The Velvet Underground's 1967 debut, The Velvet Underground and Nico. The cover is so iconic that the album is often referred to as "The Banana LP".

In the mid 1960s, Warhol adopted the band The Velvet Underground, making them a crucial element of the Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia performance art show. Warhol, with Paul Morrissey, acted as the band's manager, introducing them to Nico (who would perform with the band at Warhol's request). In 1966 he "produced" their first album The Velvet Underground and Nico, as well as providing its album art. His actual participation in the album's production amounted to simply paying for the studio time. After the band's first album, Warhol and band leader Lou Reed started to disagree more about the direction the band should take, and the contact between them faded. Image File history File links Album cover of the Velvet Undergrounds Velvet Underground and Nico This image is the cover of an album or single. ... Image File history File links Album cover of the Velvet Undergrounds Velvet Underground and Nico This image is the cover of an album or single. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Alternate covers The early LP edition with the banana sticker peeled off. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Exploding. ... Paul Morrissey (born on February 23, 1938 in New York City) is a film director. ... For the prequel to Ico, see Shadow of the Colossus. ... Alternate covers The early LP edition with the banana sticker peeled off. ... Lou Reed, born Lewis Allen Reed[1] March 2, 1942, is an American rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. ...


In 1990, Reed recorded the album Songs for Drella with fellow Velvet Underground alumnus John Cale. "Drella" was the Factory-era nickname —, a portmanteau of Dracula and Cinderella — bestowed upon Warhol. On Drella, Reed apologizes and comes to terms with his part in their conflict. See also: 1990 in music (UK) Musical groups established in 1990 Record labels established in 1990 list of years in music // January 21 - MTVs Unplugged premieres on cable television with musical guest, Squeeze February 6 - Billy Idol is involved in a serious motorcycle accident, resulting in several broken bones. ... Songs for Drella, released in 1990, is a concept album by Velvet Underground alumni Lou Reed and John Cale. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Not to be confused with J.J. Cale. ...


Warhol designed many album covers for various artists starting with the photographic cover of John Wallowitch's debut album, This Is John Wallowitch!!! (1964). Warhol designed the cover art for The Rolling Stones albums Sticky Fingers (1971) and Love You Live (1977). In 1975, Warhol was commissioned to do several portraits of the band's frontman Mick Jagger. John Wallowitch is an American composer, songwriter and cabaret performer. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Love You Live is a double live album by The Rolling Stones and was released in 1977. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is an English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ...


Warhol was also friendly with many musicians, including Bob Dylan, Deborah Harry and John Lennon - he designed the cover to Lennon's 1986 posthumously released Menlove Ave.. Warhol also appeared as a bartender in The Cars' music video for their single "Hello Again", and Curiosity Killed The Cat's video for their "Misfit" single (both videos, and others, were produced by Warhol's video production company). This article is about the recording artist. ... Debbie Harry on the cover of her collection Most of All: Best Of Deborah Harry (born July 1, 1945) is a Miami-born American rock and roll musician who originally gained fame as the frontwoman for New Wave band Blondie, which originated in the late 1970s and achieved commercial success... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Menlove Avenue is a long road in South Liverpool, part of the Liverpool ring road. ... The Cars were an American rock band, fronted by Ric Ocasek, that emerged from the early punk scene in the late 1970s. ... A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... Curiosity killed the cat is also a well-known proverb. ...


Warhol strongly influenced the New Wave/punk rock band Devo, as well as David Bowie. Bowie recorded a song called "Andy Warhol" for his 1971 album Hunky Dory. Lou Reed wrote the song "Andy's Chest", about Valerie Solanas, the woman who shot Warhol, in 1969. He recorded it with the Velvet Underground, but this version wasn't officially released until the VU album appeared in 1985. He recorded a new version for his 1972 solo album Transformer, produced by Bowie and Mick Ronson. The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Devo (pronounced DEE-vo or dee-VO, often spelled DEVO or DEV-O) is an American New Wave group formed in Akron, Ohio in 1972. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 1947 January 8) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... Andy Warhol is a song written by David Bowie in 1971 for the album Hunky Dory. ... // February 8 - Bob Dylans hour-long documentary film, Eat the Document, premieres at New Yorks Academy of Music. ... Hunky Dory is David Bowies fourth album, released by RCA in 1971. ... Valerie Jean Solanas (April 9, 1936 – April 26, 1988) was an American radical feminist writer who struggled to be recognized for her writing but became famous for shooting the artist Andy Warhol in 1968. ... The two-letter abbreviation VU has several different meanings: VU is the country code of Vanuatu; .vu is its ccTLD. Air Ivoire, IATA airline designator Vivendi Universal, now Vivendi SA, a French company active in media and communications with activities in music, television and film, publishing, telecommunications and the Internet. ... // January 17 - Highway 51 South in Memphis, Tennessee is renamed Elvis Presley Blvd January 20 - Pink Floyd debuts Dark Side of the Moon during a performance at The Dome, in Brighton, but due to technical difficulties, is halted during the song Money. ... Transformer is Lou Reeds breakthrough second solo album, released in December 1972. ... Mick Ronson (May 26, 1946 – April 29, 1993) born in Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire was an English guitarist, composer, multi-instrumentalist, arranger and producer. ...

Cover of copy no. 18 of 25 Cats Name [sic] Sam and One Blue Pussy by Andy Warhol given in 1954 to Edgar de Evia and Robert Denning when the author was a guest in their home in the Rhinelander Mansion.
Cover of copy no. 18 of 25 Cats Name [sic] Sam and One Blue Pussy by Andy Warhol given in 1954 to Edgar de Evia and Robert Denning when the author was a guest in their home in the Rhinelander Mansion.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1071x1504, 99 KB) Summary Cover of the privately printed book 25 Cats Name (sic) Sam and One Blue Pussy by Andy Warhol Photograph taken by D C McJonathan of copy number 18 which had been given to Edgar de Evia and... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1071x1504, 99 KB) Summary Cover of the privately printed book 25 Cats Name (sic) Sam and One Blue Pussy by Andy Warhol Photograph taken by D C McJonathan of copy number 18 which had been given to Edgar de Evia and... (1910-2003) photographer partner of Robert Denning He is best know for his Tissot-like effects using soft focus and diffusion. ... Robert Denning (March 13, 1927 – August 26, 2005) was an American interior designer whose lush interpretations of French Victorian decor became an emblem of corporate raider tastes in the 1980s. ... The Rhinelander Mansion sometimes called The Gertrude Rhinelander Waldo Mansion was named a National Historic Landmark in 1980. ...

Books and print

Beginning in the early 1950s, Warhol produced several unbound portfolios of his work.


The first of several bound self-published books by Warhol was 25 Cats Name Sam and One Blue Pussy, printed in 1954 by Seymour Berlin on Arches brand watermarked paper using his blotted line technique for the lithographs. The original edition was limited to 190 numbered, hand colored copies, using Dr. Martin's ink washes. Most of these were given by Warhol as gifts to clients and friends. Copy #4, inscribed "Jerry" on the front cover, was given to Geraldine Stutz, who at the time was with I. Miller Shoes. Later the president of Henri Bendel and then while head of Panache Press an imprint of Random House she used this copy for a facsimile printing in 1987.[10] Her estate consigned the original limited edition to Doyle New York where it sold in May 2006 for US $35,000.[11] Cover of copy no. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Geraldine Stutz (August 5, 1924 – April 8, 2005) was an American retail groundbreaker. ... Henri Bendel is an upscale womens specialty store, established in New York City in 1896. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... Entrance to Doyle New York at the time of the Estate of Robert Denning auction. ...


Other self-published books by Warhol include:

  • Gold Book
  • Wild Raspberries
  • Holy Cats

Later Warhol "wrote" several books that were commercially printed.

  • a, A Novel (1968, ISBN 0-8021-3553-6) is a literal transcription - containing spelling errors and phonetically written background noise and mumbling - of audio recordings of Ondine and several of Andy Warhol's friends hanging out at the Factory, talking, going out.
  • The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (From A to B & Back Again) (1975, ISBN 0-15-671720-4) - according to Pat Hackett's introduction to The Andy Warhol Diaries, Pat Hackett did the transcriptions and text for the book based on daily phone conversations, sometimes (when Warhol was traveling) using audio cassettes that Andy Warhol gave her. Said cassettes contained conversations with Brigid Berlin (also known as Brigid Polk) and former Interview magazine editor Bob Colacello.
  • Popism: The Warhol Sixties (1980, ISBN 0-15-672960-1), authored by Warhol and Pat Hackett is a retrospective view of the sixties and the role of Pop Art.
  • The Andy Warhol Diaries (1989, ISBN 0-446-39138-7, edited by Pat Hackett) is an edited diary that was dictated by Warhol to Hackett in daily phone conversations. Warhol started keeping a diary to keep track of his expenses after being audited, although it soon evolved to include his personal and cultural observations.

Warhol created the fashion magazine Interview that is still published today. The loopy title script on the cover is thought to be either his own handwriting or that of his mother, Julia Warhola, who would often do text work for his early commercial pieces. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ondine (June 16, 1937 - January 1, 1989) was an American actor, probably best known for appearing in a series of Warhol-directed films in the mid-1960s. ... The Philosophy of Andy Warhol The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (From A to B & Back Again) is a 1975 book by the American artist Andy Warhol (1928-1987). ... Brigid Berlin (also known as Brigid Polk,The Duchess,The 250 Pound Hippotamus of Sin, born September 6, 1939) is an artist and former Warhol superstar. ... Bob Colacello is one of the most prolific biographical writers in the United States. ... The Andy Warhol Diaries The Andy Warhol Diaries is a posthumous work by the American artist Andy Warhol (1928-1987) and was edited by his secretary Pat Hackett. ... Interview is a magazine founded by artist Andy Warhol and Gerard Malanga in 1969. ...


Other media

As stated, although Andy Warhol is most known for his paintings and films, he has authored works in many different media.

  • Drawing: Warhol started his career drawing commercial illustrations in "blotted-ink" style for warehouses and magazines. Most well known are his pictures of shoes. Some of his drawings were published in little booklets, like "Yum, Yum, Yum" (about food), "Ho, Ho, Ho" (about Christmas) and (of course) "Shoes, Shoes, Shoes." His most artistically acclaimed book of drawings is probably "The Gold Book", compiled of sensitive, personal drawings of young men. "The Gold Book" is thus dubbed because of the gold leaf that decorates the pages.
  • Sculpture: Warhol's most famous sculpture is probably his "Brillo Boxes", silkscreened bronze replicas of Brillo soap boxes. Other famous works include the "Silver Floating Pillows"; gas-filled, silver mylar, pillow-shaped balloons that were floated out of the window during the presentation. A "Silver Floating Pillow" was included in the traveling exhibition "Air Art" (1968-1969) curated by Willoughby Sharp.
  • Audio: At one point Warhol carried a portable recorder with him wherever he went, taping everything everybody said and did. He referred to this device as his "wife." Some of these tapes were the basis for his literary work. Another audio-work of Warhol's was his "Invisible Sculpture", a presentation in which burglar alarms would go off when entering the room. Warhol's cooperation with the musicians of The Velvet Underground was driven by an expressed desire to become a music producer.
  • Time capsules: Throughout his life, Warhol saved many of his correspondences, articles about himself and those which fascinated him, and numerous other items (everything from food to gay porn). Several of these items were boxed up and, progressively, numbered. They eventually totaled in the dozens. Today the Warhol Museum houses them and is in the process of opening and sorting them. As of 2007 there remain boxes which, while cataloged, have not been re-opened since their original sealing. (see external links below for more info).
  • Television: Andy Warhol dreamed of a television show that he wanted to call "The Nothing Special", a special about his favorite subject: Nothing. Later in his career he did create two cable television shows, "Andy Warhol's TV" in 1982 and "Andy Warhol's Fifteen Minutes" (based on his famous "fifteen minutes of fame" quotation) for MTV in 1986. Besides his own shows he regularly made guest appearances in shows, including a notable appearance on "The Love Boat" wherein a Midwestern wife (Marion Ross) fears Andy Warhol will reveal to her husband (Tom Bosley, who starred alongside Ross in sitcom Happy Days) her secret past as a Warhol superstar named Marina del Rey. Andy also produced a TV commercial for Schrafft's Restaurants in New York City, for an ice cream dessert appropriately titled the "Underground Sundae"
  • Fashion: Warhol is quoted for having said: "I'd rather buy a dress and put it up on the wall, than put a painting, wouldn't you?" One of his most well-known Superstars, Edie Sedgwick, aspired to be a fashion designer, and his good friend Halston was a famous one. Warhol's work in fashion includes silkscreened dresses, a short sub-career as a catwalk-model and books on fashion as well as paintings with fashion (shoes) as a subject.
  • Performance Art: Warhol and his friends staged happenings; theatrical multimedia presentations during parties, containing music, film, slide projections and Gerard Malanga in an S&M outfit cracking a whip. The Exploding Plastic Inevitable is the culmination of this area of his work.
  • Photography: To produce his silkscreens, Warhol made photographs or had them made by his friends and assistants. These pictures were mostly taken with a specific model of Polaroid camera that Polaroid kept in production especially for Warhol. This photographic approach to painting and his snapshot method of taking pictures has had a great effect on artistic photography. Warhol was an accomplished photographer, and took an enormous amount of photographs of Factory visitors, friends - given the importance of this medium to both his paintings and to film, one might say that an interest in photography lies at the center of his artistic practice.
  • Computer: Warhol used Amiga computers to generate digital art.

For scale drawings or plans, see Plans (drawings). ... A booklet is a small book. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Metal leaf. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Brillo soap pads Brillo Pad is a trade name for a scouring pad, used for cleaning dishes, and made from steel wool impregnated with soap. ... For other uses, see Balloon (disambiguation). ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... “Sound recorder” redirects here. ... Literature is literally an acquaintance with letters as in the first sense given in the Oxford English Dictionary (from the Latin littera meaning an individual written character (letter)). The term has, however, generally come to identify a collection of texts. ... For other uses, see Time capsule (disambiguation). ... In popular culture, 15 minutes of fame refers to a sudden state of celebrity that is believed unlikely to continue long enough to affect the new celebritys life for the better. ... The Love Boat was an American television series set on a cruise ship, which aired on the ABC Television Network from 1977 until 1986. ... Marion Ross (born October 25, 1928) is an American actress. ... Thomas Edward Bosley (born October 1, 1927) is an American actor. ... For other uses, see Happy Days (disambiguation). ... Schraffts was a candy and chocolate company based in Sullivan Square, Charlestown, Massachusetts. ... For other uses, see Fashion (disambiguation). ... Sedgwick in 1966, by Jerry Schatzberg/Corbis Edith Minturn Edie Sedgwick (April 20, 1943 – November 16, 1971)[1] was an American actress, socialite, and heiress who starred in many of Andy Warhols short films in the 1960s. ... Roy Halston Frowick, also known as Halston (April 23, 1932–March 26, 1990) was an iconic clothing designer of the 1970s. ... This article is about Performance art. ... Exploding. ... Photography [fәtɑgrәfi:],[foʊtɑgrәfi:] is the process of recording pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a film or electronic sensor. ... Polaroid Corporation was founded in 1937 by Edwin H. Land. ... This article is about the machine. ... This article is about the family of home computers. ...

Producer and product

In many ways Warhol refined and expanded the idea of what it means to be an artist. Warhol frequently took on the position of a producer, rather than a creator - this is true not only of his work as a painter (he had assistants do much of the work of producing his paintings), it is true of his film-making and commercial enterprises as well. He liked to coin an idea and then oversee or delegate its execution. As he refined this element of his work The Factory evolved from an atelier into an office. He became (and still is) the public face of a company, and a brand. The Factory was Andy Warhols original New York City studio from 1963 to 1968, although his later studios were known as The Factory as well. ...


He founded the gossip magazine Interview, a stage for celebrities he "endorsed" and a business staffed by his friends. He collaborated with others on all of his books (some of which were written with Pat Hackett.) He adopted the young painter Jean-Michel Basquiat, and the band The Velvet Underground, presenting them to the public as his latest interest, and collaborating with them. One might even say that he produced people (as in the Warholian "Superstar" and the Warholian portrait). He endorsed products, appeared in commercials, and made frequent celebrity guest appearances on television shows and in films (he appeared in everything from Love Boat to Saturday Night Live and the Richard Pryor movie, Dynamite Chicken). Interview is a magazine founded by artist Andy Warhol and Gerard Malanga in 1969. ... Publicity photo of Jean-Michel Basquiat by photographer William Coupon Jean-Michel Basquiat (IPA: ) (December 22, 1960, Brooklyn - August 12, 1988, New York, New York) was an American artist. ... This article is about the rock band. ... For the television show, see The Love Boat The Overseas Chinese Youth Language Training and Study Tour to the Republic of China is a three month summer program for about 500 college-age overseas Chinese, which is much more commonly known among its participants as the Love Boat. ... This article is about the American television series. ... Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III (December 1, 1940 – December 10, 2005) was an American comedian, actor, and writer. ...


In this respect Warhol was a fan of "Art Business" and "Business Art" - he, in fact, wrote about his interest in thinking about art as business in The Philosophy of Andy Warhol from A to B and Back Again. This was a radical new stance, as artists traditionally positioned themselves against commercialism. Warhol and other pop-artists helped redefine the artist's position as professional, commercial, and popular. He did this using methods, imagery and talents that were (or at least seemed to be) available to everyone. In this respect Pop Art has contributed to a philosophical and practical incorporation of art into popular culture and society, and art offered to us as a product of that society.


Museums

Two museums are dedicated to Andy Warhol. The Andy Warhol Museum, one of the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, is located at 117 Sandusky Street in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is the largest American art museum dedicated to a single artist, holding more than 12,000 works by the artist himself. The Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh are operated by the Carnegie Institute and are located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ...


The other museum is the Andy Warhol Museum of Modern Art, established in 1991 by Andy's brother John Warhola, the Slovak Ministry of Culture, and the Warhol Foundation in New York. It is located in the small town of Medzilaborce, Slovakia. Andy's parents were born 15 kilometers away in the village of Miková. The museum houses several originals donated mainly by the Andy Warhol Foundation in New York and also personal items donated by Warhol's relatives. The Andy Warhol Museum of Modern Art (Slovak: Múzeum Andyho Warhola Medzilaborce) in Medzilaborce, Slovakia was established in 1991 by the American family of the artist Andy Warhol and the Slovak Ministry of Culture. ... See also: 1991 in art, other events of 1992, 1993 in art, list of years in art, List of art events. ... Medzilaborce is a town in eastern Slovakia close to the border with Poland. ...


Films portraying Warhol

Andy Warhol is portrayed by Crispin Glover in Oliver Stone's film The Doors (1991). He is also played by David Bowie in Basquiat, a film by Julian Schnabel. In the film I Shot Andy Warhol, directed by Mary Harron (1996), the actor Jared Harris portrayed Warhol. Actor Mark Bringleson makes a brief cameo as Warhol in Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, painting a supine woman's outfit to match the pattern on the floor of the Electric Psychadelic Pussycat Swingers' Club while looking at a Campbell's Soup can. Also, many films by Jonas Mekas have the moments of Andy's life caught (for example "Super 8 films"; "Scenes From The Life Of Andy Warhol" and many more). Sean Gregory Sullivan depicted Warhol in the 1998 film 54. The latest film actor to portray the artist is Guy Pearce in the 2007 film, Factory Girl. For the Scarling. ... William Oliver Stone (born September 15, 1946), known simply as Oliver Stone, is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director and screenwriter. ... The Doors is a 1991 film about Jim Morrison and The Doors. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 1947 January 8) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... Basquiat (pronounced ) is a 1996 film directed by Julian Schnabel which is loosely based on the life of American postmodernist/neo expressionist artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. ... Julian Schnabel (b. ... I Shot Andy Warhol is a 1996 movie about the life of Valerie Solanas and her relationship with Andy Warhol. ... Mary Harron (born 1953) is a Canadian film director and screenwriter most well known for her films I Shot Andy Warhol, American Psycho and The Notorious Bettie Page. ... Jared Harris (born 24 August 1961, in London, UK) is a British actor of Irish and Welsh descent. ... Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, directed by Jay Roach, is the first film of the Austin Powers series. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Template:Infobox Film Fuckyou wikipedia, you are gay 54 is a 1998 film starring Salma Hayek, Ryan Phillippe, and Neve Campbell. ... Guy Pearce in Memento (2000). ... 2007 has been referred to, by film and media critics, as the year of the threequels, a nickname referring to the large amount of third installment films released this year, including Spider-Man 3, Shrek the Third, Oceans Thirteen, Resident Evil: Extinction, The Bourne Ultimatum, Pirates of the Caribbean... This article is about the film Factory Girl. ...


Andy Warhol: A Documentary Film is a reverential four-hour 2006 movie by Ric Burns. Eric D. Burns is a documentary filmmaker and writer. ...


The 2001 documentary, Absolut Warhola, was produced by German director Stanislaw Mucha, featuring Warhol's parents' family and hometown in Slovakia. Absolut Warhola is a 2001 film directed by Stanislaw Mucha about the family that Andy Warhol never met in rural Slovakia. ...


Gus Van Sant was planning a version of Warhol's life with River Phoenix in the lead role just before the Phoenix's death in 1993 (as discussed in an interview with the two, included in the published My Own Private Idaho script book). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... River Jude Phoenix (August 23, 1970 – October 31, 1993) was an Academy Award- and Golden Globe-nominated American film actor. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... My Own Private Idaho is a 1991 gay-themed independent film written and directed by Gus Van Sant, loosely based on Shakespeares Henry IV, part 1. ...


Notes

  1. ^ http://www.warholfoundation.org/biograph.htm, Warhol Foundation.
  2. ^ Bockris, Victor, The Life and Death of Andy Warhol (New York: Bantam Books, 1989), pp. 4-5
  3. ^ Over the years, Solanas' manifesto has found a following. The most recent edition of this work includes an introduction by the philosopher Avital Ronell. See Valerie Solanas, The S.C.U.M. (Society for Cutting Up Men) Manifesto (New York: Verso, new edition 2004).
  4. ^ Jobey, Liz, "Solanas and Son", The Guardian (Manchester, England) August 24, 1996: page T10 and following. This article contains the most detailed and reliable account of Solanas' life.
  5. ^ Harding, James, "The Simplest Surrealist Act: Valerie Solanas and the (Re)Assertion of Avantgarde Priorities" TDR: The Drama Review, Volume 45, Number 4, Winter 2001, pp. 142-162. This essay, which explores the shooting in relation to anarchist art action of the decade, gives a detailed overview of the shooting. See also the discussion of the shooting in Warhol's book, Popism: The Warhol Sixties (cited below).
  6. ^ a b Warhol, Andy and Pat Hacket, Popism: The Warhol Sixties (New York: Harvest Books, 1980), pp. 287-295.
  7. ^ Hughes, Robert, Things I Didn't Know: A Memoir" (New York: Alfred A Knopf, 2006)
  8. ^ For more on this period in Warhol's work and on the development of his style, see Fairbrother, Trevor, "Tomorrow's Man" in Success Is a Job in New York: the Early Art and Business of Andy Warhol, Donna De Salvo, ed. (New York: Grey Art Gallery and Study Center, 1989), pp. 55-74.
  9. ^ Romaine, James Transubstantiating The Culture: Andy Warhol's Secret Godspy, Nov. 12, 2003 (Accessed April 27, 2007)
  10. ^ "Art", by John Russell, December 6, 1987, New York Times
  11. ^ Auction on May 3, 2006, at Doyle New York; retrieved August 14, 2006

is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Entrance to Doyle New York at the time of the Estate of Robert Denning auction. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • "A symposium on Pop Art." Arts Magazine, April 1963, pp.36-45. The symposium was held in 1962, at The Museum of Modern Art, and published in this issue the following year.
  • Angell, Callie (2006). Andy Warhol Screen Tests: The Films of Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonne, Volume One (Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonnee). New York: Henry Abrams. 
  • Bockris, Victor (1997). Warhol: The Biography. New York: Da Capo Press. 
  • Butt, Gavin (2006). Between You and Me: Queer Disclosure in the New York Art World, 1948-1963. Durham: Duke University Press.
  • Colacello, Bob (1990). Holy Terror: Andy Warhol Close Up. New York: HarperCollins. 
  • Daggett Dillenberger, Jane (2001). The Religious Art of Andy Warhol. New York: Continuum International Publishing Group. 
  • Doyle, Jennifer, Jonathan Flatley, and José Esteban Muñoz eds. (1996). Pop Out: Queer Warhol. Durham: Duke University Press.
  • Guiles, Fred Lawrence (1989). Loner at the Ball: The Life of Andy Warhol. New York: Bantam. 
  • James, James, "Andy Warhol: The Producer as Author", in Allegories of Cinema: American Film in the Sixties (1989), pp. 58-84. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Koestenbaum, Wayne (2003). Andy Warhol. New York: Penguin. 
  • Lobel, Michael. We're Here: Gay and Lesbian Presence in Art and Art History, Art Journal (Winter 1996).
  • Meyer, Richard (2003). Outlaw Representation. New York: Beacon. 
  • Suarez, Juan Antonio (1996). Bike Boys, Drag Queens, & Superstars: Avant-Garde, Mass Culture, and Gay Identities in the 1960s Underground Cinema. Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.
  • Watson, Steven (2003). Factory Made: Warhol and the Sixties. New York: Pantheon. 
  • Yau, John (1993). In the Realm of Appearances: The Art of Andy Warhol. 

General Electric GE90-115B fanblade, on display at MOMA. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... José Esteban Muñoz (born 1967) is an American theorist in the fields of Performance Studies, visual culture, queer theory, cultural studies, and critical theory. ... Wayne Koestenbaum is an American poet and cultural critic. ... John Yau (born 1950) is an American poet and critic who lives in New York City. ...

See also

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board, Inc. ... Thomas E. Ammann (1950-1993) was a leading Swiss art dealer in Impressionist and Twentieth Century Art and major collector of Post-war and Contemporary Art. ... For other uses, see Campbells Soup Cans (disambiguation). ... Painting The Century 101 Portrait Masterpieces 1900-2000 was a major international exhibition held at the National Portrait Gallery in London in 2000-2001 that exhibited a work for each year of the Twentieth Century. ... The Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh are operated by the Carnegie Institute and are located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Andy Warhol Bridge is the official name of the Seventh Street Bridge over the Allegheny River in downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and is the only bridge in the United States named for a visual artist. ... The Bodley Gallery was a prominent art gallery in New York City from the 1940s through the 1980s. ...

External links

Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... Medzilaborce is a town in eastern Slovakia close to the border with Poland. ...

Listening

  • "Warhol, Soup Cans, Cowboys" (Studio 360 radio program, December 10, 2005)
Persondata
NAME Warhol, Andy
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Andrew Warhola
SHORT DESCRIPTION American artist, avant-garde filmmaker, writer and social figure
DATE OF BIRTH August 6, 1928(1928-08-06)
PLACE OF BIRTH Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
DATE OF DEATH February 22, 1987
PLACE OF DEATH New York City

  Results from FactBites:
 
Andy Warhol - Wikipedia (5386 words)
Andy Warhol kokettierte gern mit seinem Geburtsdatum und „verjüngte“ sich gelegentlich auf den Jahrgang 1930, manchmal sogar auf 1933, weshalb in Biografien oft unterschiedlichste Angaben zu finden sind; er bekannte sich jedoch zu seinem Geburtsort Pittsburgh.
Warhols Beitrag zur Etablierung der Pop-Art in der bildnerischen, darstellenden wie kinematografischen Kunst in den 1960er Jahren ist bedeutend.
Warhols Bildwerke leben von einer experimentellen und luminiszenten Farbgebung (meist mittels Acrylfarben), bei der er bewusst auf generativ bedingte Verfremdung setzte und auch stoisch Fehler beim Kopieren von Vorlagen akzeptierte oder die Herstellung der Siebdrucke seinen Mitarbeitern überließ.
Andy Warhol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4737 words)
Warhol was gay in an era when America was much less informed about homosexual culture, and gay men such as Liberace and Paul Lynde were generally accepted as simply being dandies.
Warhol died on February 22, 1987, in New York City from a routine gallbladder surgery at the age of 58.
Warhol was also friendly with many musicians, including Bob Dylan and John Lennon, and he appeared as a bartender in The Cars' music video for their single "Hello Again," and Curiosity Killed The Cat's video for their "Misfit" single (both videos, and others, were produced by Warhol's video production company).
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