FACTOID # 23: Wisconsin has more metal fabricators per capita than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Androgens" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Androgens

Androgen is the generic term for any natural or synthetic compound, usually a steroid hormone, that stimulates or controls the development and maintenance of masculine characteristics in vertebrates. This includes the activity of the accessory male sex organs and development of male secondary sex characteristics. Androgens, which were first discovered in 1936, are also called androgenic hormones or testoids. Androgens are also the original anabolic steroids. The primary, and most well-known, androgen is testosterone. All natural androgens are steroid derivatives of androstane (19-carbon tetracyclic hydrocarbon nucleus, C19H32). They are also the precursor of all estrogens, the female sex hormones.


A subset of androgens, adrenal androgens, includes any of the 19_carbon steroids synthesized by the adrenal cortex, an adrenal gland, that function as weak steroids or steroid precursors, including dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA_S), and androstenedione.


Besides testosterone, other androgens include:

  • Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA): a steroid hormone produced from cholesterol in the adrenal cortex, which is the primary precursor of natural estrogens. DHEA is also called dehydroisoandrosterone or dehydroandrosterone.
  • Androstanediol: the steroid metabolite that is thought to act as the main regulator of gonadotropin secretion.
  • Androsterone: a chemical by-product created during the breakdown of androgens, or derived from progesterone, that also exerts minor masculinising effects, but with one-seventh the intensity of testosterone. It is found in approximately equal amounts in the plasma and urine of both males and females.
  • Androstenolone: an androgenic steroid secreted by the adrenal cortex and testes, which is a major precursor of testosterone, but is even weaker than androsterone.
  • Dihydrotestosterone (DHT): a metabolite of testosterone that is actually a more potent androgen in that it binds more strongly to androgen receptors.

Reduced ability of a XY karyotype fetus to respond to androgens can result in one of several problems, including infertility and several forms of intersex conditions. See androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS).


See also: andrology, antiandrogen


External links

  • News story on the relationship between androgens and heart disease (http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/s946854.htm)



  Results from FactBites:
 
Androgen Fire Art (412 words)
Androgen is a hybridization project incorporating fire performance and art with elements of goth, punk and industrial styling.
As a performance group, we seek to achieve a state of expression through the use of fire and performance and ultimately break the stereotypical imagery associated with fire performance - to challenge the mold of mediocrity and the mundane that tends to plague society.
Rather than a loose group of performers coming together once in a while to put together a rough show, Androgen aims to be a tight knit and well trained performance group, catering for large scale events with a degree of professionalism not often found in fire performance.
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Androgen (381 words)
Androgen is the generic term for any natural or synthetic compound, usually a steroid hormone, that stimulates or controls the development and maintenance of masculine characteristics in vertebrates by binding to androgen receptors.
Androstenedione (Andro): an androgenic steroid, which is produced by the testes, adrenal cortex, and ovaries.
Androstenolone: an androgenic steroid secreted by the adrenal cortex and testes, which is a major precursor of testosterone, but is even weaker than androsterone.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m