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Encyclopedia > Andrew Young
Andrew Young
Andrew Young

In office
1977 – 1979
President Jimmy Carter
Preceded by William Scranton
Succeeded by Donald McHenry

Born March 12, 1932 (1932-03-12) (age 76)
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Political party Democratic
Spouse Carolyn M. Young
Profession Pastor and Politician
Religion United Church of Christ

Andrew Jackson Young, Jr. (born March 12, 1932) is an American civil rights activist, former U.S. congressman and mayor of Atlanta, Georgia, and was the United States' first African-American ambassador to the United Nations. The Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University in Atlanta was named after him. International Boulevard, near the Centennial Olympic Park, has been re-named Andrew Young International Boulevard, in honor of his efforts to secure the Olympic bid for Atlanta. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1628x2527, 205 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Andrew Young ... United States Ambassador to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Nations. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Scranton made the cover of Time in 1962 William Warren Scranton (born July 19, 1917) is a former U.S. Republican Party politician. ... Donald F. McHenry (October 13, 1936 (unconfirmed)-- ) was the Ambassador and U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations from September 1979 until January 20, 1981. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A pastor is an... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... United States Ambasadors to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... Georgia State University (GSU) is an urban research university in the heart of downtown Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Founded in 1913, it serves over 28,000[2] students, and is one of the University System of Georgias four research universities. ... Fountain of Rings Centennial Olympic Park is a 21 acre (85,000 m²) public park located in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. ...

Contents

Background

Early life

Andrew Young's mother, Daisy Fuller Young, was a school teacher, and his father, Andrew Jackson Young, Sr., was a dentist.


Education

After beginning his higher education at Dillard University, Young transferred to Howard University in Washington, D.C., in 1947, and received his Bachelor of Science and pre-medical degrees there in 1951. He originally had planned to follow his father's career of dentistry, but then felt a religious calling. He entered the ministry and received a Bachelor of Divinity degree from Hartford Seminary in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1955. Dillard University is a private, faith-based liberal arts college in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. A historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Hartford Seminary is a theological college in Hartford, Connecticut, USA. Hartford Seminarys origins date from 1833, when the Pastoral Union of Connecticut was formed by a group of Congregational ministers for pastoral training. ... Hartford redirects here. ...


Young is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha, the first inter-collegiate Greek-letter organization established for African Americans. Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... This page contains special characters. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


On Tuesday April 1, 2008, Young was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters, honoris causa from Bridgewater College during the 11 a.m. convocation in the Carter Center for Worship and Music led by Bridgewater President Phillip C. Stone.[1] is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Bridgewater College, located in Bridgewater, Virginia, is the oldest co-educational four-year college in Virginia. ...


Civil rights

Young was appointed to serve as pastor of a church in Marion, Alabama. It was there in Marion that he met Jean Childs, who later became his wife. Also while in Marion, Young began to study the writings of Mohandas Gandhi. Young became interested in Gandhi's concept of non-violent resistance as a tactic for social change. He encouraged African-Americans to register to vote in Alabama, and sometimes faced death threats while doing so. He became a friend and ally of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., at this time. In 1957, Young moved to New York City to accept a job with the National Council of Churches. However, as the Civil Rights Movement gained momentum, Young decided that his place was back in the South. He moved to Atlanta, Georgia, and again worked on drives to register black voters. In 1960 he joined the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Young was jailed for his participation in civil rights demonstrations, both in Selma, Alabama, and in St. Augustine, Florida. Young played a key role in the events in Birmingham, Alabama, serving as a mediator between the white and black communities. In 1964 Young was named executive director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), becoming, in that capacity, one of Dr. King's principal lieutenants. He was with King in Memphis, Tennessee, when King was assassinated in 1968. Marion is a city located in Perry County, Alabama. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948) (Devanagari: मोहनदास करमचन्द गांधी), called Mahatma Gandhi, was the charismatic leader who brought the cause of Indias independence from British colonial rule to world attention. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... “Martin Luther King” redirects here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (usually identified as National Council of Churches, or NCC) is an association of 35 Christian faith groups in the United States with 100,000 local congregations and more than 45,000,000 adherents. ... Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Logo. ... Selma is a city in Alabama located on the banks of the Alabama River in Dallas County, Alabama, of which it is the county seat. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... St. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Logo. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ...


Career in Congress

In 1970 Andrew Young ran as a Democrat for Congress from Georgia, but was unsuccessful. After his defeat, Rev. Fred C. Bennette, Jr., introduced him to Murray M. Silver, Esq., Atlanta, Georgia, Attorney, who served as his campaign finance chairman, promoted concerts featuring top entertainers including Harry Belafonte and Bill Withers. He ran again in 1972 and won. He later was re-elected in 1974 and in 1976. During his four-plus years in Congress he was a member of the Congressional Black Caucus, and he was involved in several debates regarding foreign relations including the decision to stop supporting the Portuguese attempts to hold on to their colonies in southern Africa. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The Congressional Black Caucus is an organization representing African American members of the Congress of the United States. ...


Diplomatic career

Ambassador Young, calling from New York City on an STU-I secure phone during the Israel-Egypt peace talks. (NSA museum)
Ambassador Young, calling from New York City on an STU-I secure phone during the Israel-Egypt peace talks. (NSA museum)

In 1977 President Jimmy Carter appointed Young Ambassador to the U.N. His controversial statements made headlines almost from the start. He played a leading role in advancing a settlement in Zimbabwe, which Robert Mugabe, a Marxist, turned Zimbabwe into a one-party dictatorship. He was criticized for many of his statements, such as his suggestion that Cuban troops brought stability to Angola[citation needed]. In the book, "Pied Piper", by Dr Richard Cummings (who later joined the CIA), it is recorded that Andrew Young fought with Allard Lowenstein (US representative to the UN Human Rights Commission) over installing Mugabe. Lowenstein did not want Mugabe in, but Young disagreed. Young said to Lowenstein they must "get rid of the whites" and "worry about the consequences later"! Young displayed willful naiveté when he told the London Times that Mr. Mugabe was a "very gentle man" whom he "can't imagine...ever pulling the trigger on a gun to kill anyone."[citation needed] Mr. Mugabe already had pulled the trigger on many innocent people, though. However, President Carter continued to support his ambassador until 1979 when, contrary to U.S. policy and statute, he met with a representative of the Palestine Liberation Organization. When the occurrence of that meeting was revealed, Young's public statements were perceived as evasive by Administration critics. Ultimately, Young resigned. Image File history File links STU-I.Young. ... Image File history File links STU-I.Young. ... STU-I secure telephone desk set. ... The Israel-Egypt peace treaty (Arabic: معاهدة السلام المصرية الإسرائيلية; transliterated: Muahadat as-Salam al-Masriyah al-Israyliyah) (Hebrew: הסכם שלום ישראל-מצרים; transliterated: Heskem Shalom Yisrael-Mizraim) was signed in Washington, DC, United States, on March 26, 1979, following the Camp David Accords (1978). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... United States Ambasadors to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... PLO redirects here. ...


During the 1980 presidential race there was some controversy about a statement made by Young, according to the New York Times edition of October 16, 1980, page B-6: is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


"Speaking to a crowd made up almost entirely of whites, Mr. Reagan said, 'I believe in state's rights. I believe in people doing as much as they can at the private level.' The Republican Presidential nominee added that, if elected, he would re-order priorities and 'restore to states and local governments the power that properly belongs to them."


Commenting on the remark at The Ohio State University, Young said, "If he had gone to Biloxi, and talked about state's rights, if he had gone to New Orleans, or Birmingham, I would not have gotten upset. But when you go to Philadelphia, Mississippi, where James Chaney, Andy Goodman, and Michael Schwerner were killed--murdered--by the sheriff and the deputy sheriff and a government posse protecting state's rights, and you go down there and start talking about state's rights, that looks like a code word to me that it's going to be all right to kill niggers when he's President." Biloxi redirects here. ... NOLA redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State Counties Jefferson, Shelby Incorporated December 19, 1871 Government  - Type Mayor - Council  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (Current) Larry Langford (Mayor-Elect) Area  - City 151. ... Philadelphia is a city located in Neshoba County, Mississippi. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


These remarks were denounced by the Reagan campaign and repudiated by the Carter campaign.


Atlanta mayor

In 1981, Young was elected mayor of Atlanta, succeeding Maynard Jackson. He was re-elected in 1985. As mayor, Young brought the city to national prominence by encouraging international investment which, in turn, improved the Atlanta economy after it was hit hard by recession. He was instrumental in bringing the 1988 Democratic National Convention to Atlanta. A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Maynard Jackson, Jr. ... In macroeconomics, a recession is a decline in a countrys real gross domestic product (GDP), or negative real economic growth, for two or more successive quarters of a year. ... The 1988 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party was held at The Omni in Atlanta, Georgia from July 18–21, 1988 to select a candidate for the 1988 United States presidential election. ...


Private citizen

Young ran unsuccessfully for Governor of Georgia in 1990, losing in the Democratic primary run-off to future Governor Zell Miller. However, while running for the Statehouse, he simultaneously was serving as a co-chairman of a committee which, at the time, was attempting to bring the 1996 Summer Olympics to Atlanta. Though his successor, Maynard Jackson, was able to enjoy the spotlight when the announcement came that Atlanta had won the right to host the Summer Games, Young almost certainly was more instrumental in the success of the Atlanta bid. Also in 1996 he wrote his auto-biography. This is a list of Governors of the state of Georgia, including governors of the British colony of Georgia. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Zell Bryan Miller (born February 24, 1932) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Maynard Jackson, Jr. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ...


Today, Young is co-chairman of Good Works International, a consulting firm "offering international market access and political risk analysis in key emerging markets within Africa and the Caribbean." The company's Web site also notes that "GWI principals have backgrounds in human rights and public service. The concept of enhancing the greater good is intrinsic to our business endeavors." Nike is one of Good Works' most visible corporate clients. In the late 1990s, at the height of controversy over the company's labor practices, Young led a delegation to report on Nike operations in Vietnam. Anti-sweatshop activists derided the report as a whitewash and raised concerns that Nike was trading on Young's background as a civil-rights activist to improve Nike's corporate image. Young also has been a director of the Drum Major Institute, and also is the chairman of the board for the Global Initiative for the Advancement of Nutritional Therapy.[2] Nike, Inc. ... The Drum Major Institute for Public Policy is a non-partisan, non-profit policy institute founded during the civil rights movement. ...


In 2004 Young briefly considered running for U.S. Senate after the incumbent, Zell Miller, announced his retirement, but decided not to re-enter public life. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Zell Bryan Miller (born February 24, 1932) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ...


In February, 2006 Young accepted a position as chairman of Working Families for Wal-Mart, a grass-roots public relations campaign sponsored by the corporate giant as a public response to widespread criticism that many of the company's American employees and their children are on public assistance, that the company uses child labor, that the company discriminates against female and African-American employees, and that workers manufacturing Wal-Mart products are subjected to abusive conditions and sub-poverty wages. Working Families for Wal-Mart, a national non-profit organization which announced its formation on December 20, 2005 to counter crticism from groups, such as Wake Up Wal-Mart and Wal-Mart Watch. ... This article is about financial assistance paid by government organizations. ... A twelve year old American uneducated child laborer, Furman Owens, who stated Yes I want to learn but cant when I work all the time. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ...


In an interview in 2006 a Los Angeles Sentinel correspondent asked Young whether he worried that Wal-Mart causes smaller, mom-and-pop stores to close. He replied with comments that were criticized as racist: The Los Angeles Sentinel is a weekly African American-owned newspaper published in Los Angeles, California. ... A small business may be defined as a business with a small number of employees. ...

Well, I think they should; they ran the 'mom and pop' stores out of my neighborhood, ... But you see, those are the people who have been overcharging us selling us stale bread and bad meat and wilted vegetables. And they sold out and moved to Florida. I think they've ripped off our communities enough. First it was Jews, then it was Koreans, and now it's Arabs; very few black people own these stores.

Following the wide-spread publication of these comments, Young announced on August 17, 2006, that he had ended his involvement with Working Families for Wal-Mart.[3] Arab Americans constitute an ethnicity made up of several waves of immigrants from 22 Morocco in the west to Oman in the east. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Benton County Daily Record of August 26, 2006, reports: is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

"I was giving a rational explanation of a historic phenomenon," Young said later. He added that he also had discussed black merchants who over-charged the poor.

"The way this came out it makes me sound like I'm refuting everything I've done over almost 70 years, frankly," Young said.[4]

In an interview in 2007, Young commented that Barack Obama was too young to be president, saying: "I want Barack Obama to be president," Young said, pausing for effect, "in 2016." Also adding about Bill Clinton, "Bill is every bit as black as Barack. He’s probably gone with more black women than Barack." Young quickly followed that comment with the disclaimer, "I’m clowning."[5]


Also in 2007, Young appeared as a guest on the Comedy Central talk show parody The Colbert Report. Host Stephen Colbert invited Young to appear during the writer's strike, because, many years earlier, Young and Colbert's father had worked together, but on opposite sides, to mediate a hospital workers' strike in Charleston, South Carolina. The Colbert Report (IPA ) is an American satirical television program that airs from 11:30 p. ... This article is about Stephen Colbert, the actor. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ...


Documentary producer

"Rwanda Rising" premiered as the opening night selection at the Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles in 2007. Produced, narrated and financed by Young, this ambitious documentary told of a remarkable transformation taking place in the small African nation just over a dozen years after one of the worst genocides in history. Although the story had been all but overlooked by the mainstream media -- which Young believes has systemically failed to report positive stories from Africa -- he found the people of Rwanda no longer identified themselves by ethnic group, but, rather, had forgiven one another and joined forces as Rwandans to rebuild their country.


A number of prominent African American actors supported Young's project with voiceovers, including Danny Glover, Forrest Whitaker, Louis Gossett Jr., Levar Burton, Cicely Tyson, Phylicia Rashad, Jasmine Guy, Jimmy Jean-Louis, Lorraine Toussaint, and Elisabeth Omilami.


An edited version of "Rwanda Rising" served as the pilot episode of "Andrew Young Presents," a series of quarterly, hour long specials airing on nationally syndicated television. Each program expands on Young's optimism with regard to Africa and the world.


Young has said he is working on documentaries in Nigeria and Tanzania and has completed major videotaping.


References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ Goldman, Abigail. "Young to Quit Wal-Mart Group After Racial Remarks", Los Angeles Times, August 18, 2006. 
  4. ^ Dewan, Shaila. "Good will for Young May Ease Wal-Mart Split", Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Inc., August 26, 2006. 
  5. ^ Dorning, Mike. "Andrew Young: Obama too young for White House", Baltimore Sun., December 9, 2007. 
  • Andrew Young, An Easy Burden: The Civil Rights Movement and the Transformation of America New York: HarperCollins, 1996.
  • Bartlett Jones, Flawed Triumphs: Andy Young at the United Nations Lanham: University Press of America, 1996.
  • Andrew DeRoche, Andrew Young: Civil Rights Ambassador Wilmington: Scholarly Resources, 2003.
  • Oral History Interview by Dr. Mel Steely, May 1997 (Georgia's Political Heritage Project,University of West Georgia)
  • Young's Presidential Medal of Freedom
  • Transcript, Andrew J. Young, Jr., Oral History Interview I, 1970-06-18, by Thomas H. Baker, Internet Copy, LBJ Library. Accessed 2005-04-03.
  • Oral history interview by Jack Bass and Walter DeVries, January 1974 (Southern Oral History Program, UNC-Chapel Hill)
  • Biography (entry in the New Georgia Encyclopedia)
  • Andrew Young Global Health Institute, a project of the Global Initiative for the Advancement of Nutritional Therapy
  • Andrew Young School of Policy Studies
  • Andrew Young biography and video interview excerpts by The National Visionary Leadership Project
  • Good Works International, founder
  • Andrew Young's federal campaign contribution report
  • Andrew Young at the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Fletcher Thompson
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia's 5th congressional district

1973 – 1977
Succeeded by
Wyche Fowler
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
William Scranton
U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations
1977 – 1979
Succeeded by
Donald McHenry
Political offices
Preceded by
Maynard Jackson
Mayor of Atlanta
1982 – 1990
Succeeded by
Maynard Jackson
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The 5th Congressional District of Georgia is currently represented by John Lewis. ... William Wyche Fowler, Jr. ... Scranton made the cover of Time in 1962 William Warren Scranton (born July 19, 1917) is a former U.S. Republican Party politician. ... United States Ambasadors to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... Donald F. McHenry (October 13, 1936 (unconfirmed)-- ) was the Ambassador and U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations from September 1979 until January 20, 1981. ... Maynard Jackson, Jr. ... This is the list of mayors of Atlanta — former mayors of the city of Atlanta. ... Maynard Jackson, Jr. ... United States Ambassador to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Edward R. Stettinius, Jr. ... Warren Robinson Austin (November 12, 1877–December 25, 1962) was an American politician and statesman; among other roles, he served as Senator from Vermont. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ... James Jeremiah Wadsworth (often called Jerry Wadsworth) (born 1905) was a U.S. diplomat. ... This is about the mid-20th-century politician and diplomat; for other American politicians so named, see Adlai Stevenson (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... George Wildman Ball (1909 - 1994) was born in Des Moines, Iowa. ... James Russell Wiggins (December 4, 1903 in Luverne, Minnesota – November 19, 2000 in Brooklin, Maine) was the managing editor of The Washington Post from 1947 to 1966 and the United States ambassador to the United Nations from 1968 to 1969 during the Lyndon Johnson presidency. ... Charles W. Yost (born in Watertown, NY in 1907 – died in Washington, DC in 1981), educated at Hotchkiss School and Princeton University, was a Career U.S. Ambassador and ambassador to the United Nations from 1967 to 1971. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... John A. Scali (US Ambassador to the United Nations) ... Daniel Patrick “Pat” Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was a United States Senator, Ambassador, and eminent sociologist. ... Scranton made the cover of Time in 1962 William Warren Scranton (born July 19, 1917) is a former U.S. Republican Party politician. ... Donald F. McHenry (October 13, 1936 (unconfirmed)-- ) was the Ambassador and U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations from September 1979 until January 20, 1981. ... Jeane Kirkpatrick Jeane Jordan Kirkpatrick (November 19, 1926 â€“ December 7, 2006) was an American ambassador and an ardent anticommunist. ... Vernon Walters is the smiling man in the center of the picture. ... Thomas Reeve Tom Pickering (born November 5, 1931), is a retired United States Ambassador. ... Edward J. Perkins (born 1928), U.S. diplomat, U.S. ambassador to United Nations 1992-1993. ... Madeleine Korbel Albright (born Marie Jana Korbelová, IPA: , on May 15, 1937) was the first woman to become United States Secretary of State. ... For other persons named William Richardson, see William Richardson (disambiguation). ... Richard Charles Albert Holbrooke (born April 24, 1941) is an American diplomat, magazine editor, author, Peace Corps official, and investment banker. ... John Dimitri Negroponte (born July 21, 1939 in the United Kingdom) (IPA ) is an American (of Greek origin) career diplomat. ... John Danforth John Claggett Danforth (born September 5, 1936), also referred to as Jack Danforth, is a former United States Ambassador to the United Nations and former Republican United States Senator from Missouri. ... John Robert Bolton (born November 20, 1948), is an jewish American diplomat in several Republican administrations, who served as the Permanent US Representative to the UN from August 2005 until December 2006, on a recess appointment. ... Zalmay Mamozy Khalilzad (Pashto/Persian: ) (born: 22 March 1951) is the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Nations. ... This is the list of mayors of Atlanta — former mayors of the city of Atlanta. ... Moses W. Formwalt (1820 - May,1852) was the first mayor of the city of Atlanta then in DeKalb County, Georgia. ... Benjamin Franklin Bomar (August 9, 1816 - February 1, 1868) was the second mayor of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Willis Buell (1790 - November,1851) native of Connecticut and third mayor of Atlanta. ... Jonathan Norcross in his 80s Jonathan Norcross (April 7, 1808 - 1898) was the fourth mayor of Atlanta and an important citizen in its history. ... Thomas Fortson Gibbs (1798 - unknown) left Atlanta fairly soon after finishing his term as its fifth mayor. ... John F. Mims (November 10, 1815–April 30, 1856) sixth mayor of Atlanta and agent of the Georgia Railroad & Banking Company. ... William Markham (October 9, 1811 - November 9, 1890) was a prominent hotel owner in Atlanta and filled in as mayor following the illness of John Mims in October 1853. ... William M. Butt ( ? - 1864) arrived in Atlanta in 1851 from Campbell County, Georgia and served as a councilman in 1853. ... Allison Nelson (March 11, 1822 - 1862) was the ninth mayor of Atlanta. ... John Glen (1809–1895) was born in Laurens, South Carolina and moved to Decatur, Georgia in 1826 where he worked as a clerk in the Superior Court of DeKalb County. ... William Ezzard (1799 – March 24, 1887) was born in Georgia and settled in Decatur in 1822. ... Luther J. Glenn (November 26, 1818 – June 9, 1886) was a prominent Georgia lawyer, politician, Confederate officer during the American Civil War, and antebellum Mayor of Atlanta. ... William Ezzard (1799 – March 24, 1887) was born in Georgia and settled in Decatur in 1822. ... Jared Irwin Whitaker (May 4, 1818 – May 3, 1884) was the mayor of Atlanta, Georgia after a contentious election defeating William Ezzard, he didnt finish his term as mayor being appointed Commissary-General of Georgias Civil War troops. ... Thomas F. Lowe (1812 – November, 1875) took over as Atlantas mayor after Jared Whitaker was brought in for the Confederate cause at the start of the American Civil War. ... James M. Calhoun (February 12, 1811–October 1, 1875) was mayor of Atlanta, Georgia during the Civil War. ... James Etheldred Williams (January 16, 1826 – April 10, 1900) was an American politician. ... William Hulsey (October 1, 1838 – 1909) was born in DeKalb County, Georgia and passed the Georgia bar in 1859 but didnt practice much until after the American Civil War. ... William Ezzard (1799 – March 24, 1887) was born in Georgia and settled in Decatur in 1822. ... Dennis Hammond (December 15, 1819 – October 31, 1891) was born in the Edgefield District of South Carolina. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cicero C. Hammock (1823 - 1890) born in Walton County was a mayor of Atlanta. ... gravesite at Oakland Cemetery Samuel B. Spencer (December 26, 1827 – October 16, 1901) was the last Atlanta mayor to serve a one year term. ... Cicero C. Hammock (1823 - 1890) born in Walton County was a mayor of Atlanta. ... gravesite at Oakland Cemetery Nedom L. Angier (November 10, 1814 – February 3, 1882) was mayor of Atlanta during the Rutherford B. Hayes visit of 22 September 1877. ... William Lowndes Calhoun Categories: American politician stubs | Mayors of Atlanta ... James Warren English (October 28, 1837 – February, 1925) was an American politician born in Orleans Parish,Louisiana. ... John Benjamin Goodwin (1850 – 1921) was born in Cobb County, Georgia and attended school in Powder Springs. ... George Hillyer (March 17, 1835 – October 2, 1927) was an American politician born in Athens, Georgia. ... John Tyler Cooper (March 26, 1844 – 1912) was an American politician. ... John Thomas Glenn (1844 – 1899) was the mayor of Atlanta from 1889 to 1891, and the son of another Atlanta mayor, Luther Glenn. ... William Arnold Hemphill (March 5, 1842–August 17, 1902) was an American businessman and politician. ... John Benjamin Goodwin (1850 – 1921) was born in Cobb County, Georgia and attended school in Powder Springs. ... Porter King (November 24, 1857 – October 24, 1901) was born in Marion County, Alabama and came to Atlanta as a lawyer in 1882. ... Charles A. Collier Categories: American politician stubs | Mayors of Atlanta ... Livingston Mims (January,1830 – March 5, 1906) was an American politician who served as mayor of Atlanta, Georgia during the early 20th century. ... Evan P. Howell Categories: American politician stubs | Mayors of Atlanta ... Walthall Robertson Cap Joyner (June 30, 1854 – 1925) was a mayor of Atlanta. ... Robert Foster Maddox (April 4, 1870 – 1965) was a mayor of Atlanta, Georgia. ... Portrait of Winn from 1913 Courtland S. Winn (1863–1940) was an American polititian. ... Asa Griggs Candler (December 30, 1851 - March 12, 1929) was a business tycoon who made most of his money selling Coca-Cola. ... James L. Key (1866–1939) lawyer who served two terms as mayor of Atlanta. ... Walter A. Sims was an American politician. ... Isaac Newton Ragsdale (1859–1937) came to Atlanta in 1880 from Dallas, Georgia. ... James L. Key (1866–1939) lawyer who served two terms as mayor of Atlanta. ... William Berry Hartsfield Categories: American politician stubs | Mayors of Atlanta ... Roy LeCraw (1895–1985) served part of one term as mayor of Atlanta, Georgia before resigning to join the U.S. Army at the beginning of World War II. He was a self-confident insurance man and an officer in the National Guard. ... William Berry Hartsfield Categories: American politician stubs | Mayors of Atlanta ... Ivan Jr. ... Sam Massell (born August 26, 1927) is an American politician and served eight years as Atlantas vice mayor under Ivan Allen until being elected as that citys first Jewish mayor in the October 1969 election. ... Maynard Jackson, Jr. ... Maynard Jackson, Jr. ... Bill Campbell (born 1953 in Raleigh, North Carolina), served as mayor of Atlanta, Georgia from 1994 to 2002. ... Shirley Clarke Franklin (born May 10, 1945) is an American politician, a member of the Democratic Party, and the current mayor of Atlanta, Georgia since January 7, 2002. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Atlanta,_Georgia. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Andrew Young (b. 1932) (1065 words)
Andrew Young's lifelong work as a politician, human rights activist, and businessman has been in great measure responsible for the development of Atlanta's reputation as an international city.
Young graduated from Howard University in Washington, D.C., in 1951 with a bachelor of science degree in biology.
Young's election was momentous: he and Barbara Jordan, a Democrat who was also elected to the House (from Texas) in 1972, became two of the first fl southerners in Congress in the twentieth century.
King Encyclopedia (486 words)
Andrew Young’s work as a pastor, administrator, and voting rights advocate led him to join Martin Luther King, Jr.
Young recalled how King relied on him ‘to ask the hard questions” during their discussions: “He would want somebody to express as radical a view as possible and somebody to express as conservative a view as possible.
Young served as mayor of Atlanta from 1982 to 1990 before launching an unsuccessful bid for governor of Georgia in 1990.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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