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Encyclopedia > Andrew Sullivan
Andrew Sullivan
Born August 10, 1963 (1963-08-10) (age 44)
South Godstone, Surrey, England
Occupation author, activist
Religious beliefs Roman Catholic
Spouse Aaron Tone (2007-Present)
Website www.AndrewSullivan.com

Andrew Michael Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is English, a self-described libertarian conservative author and political commentator, known for his often personal style of political analysis. is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English county. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Libertarianism is a political philosophy that holds that individuals should be allowed complete freedom of action as long as they do not infringe on the freedom of others. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


His political blogs are among the most widely read on the Web.[1] Sullivan is considered and credited by many as a pioneer in political weblog journalism, as he is one of the first prominent political journalists in the United States to start his own personal blog. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Andrew Michael Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is English, a self-described libertarian conservative author and political commentator, known for his often personal style of political analysis. ...


Sullivan is a speaker at universities, colleges, and civic organizations in the United States, and a guest on national news and political commentary television shows in the United States and Europe. Born and raised in England, he has lived in the United States since 1984 and currently resides in Washington, D.C. and Provincetown, Massachusetts. A modern day speaker addressing an audience through microphones Public speaking is the process of speaking to a group of people in a structured, deliberate manner intended to inform, influence, or entertain the listeners. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Provincetown is a town located at the tip of Cape Cod in Barnstable County, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Sullivan is known for his unusual personal-political identity (HIV-positive, gay, self-described conservative often at odds with other conservatives, practicing Roman Catholic, and a non-U.S. citizen who focuses on American political life). He has said that he would like to become a US citizen but is barred because of his HIV-positive status.[2][3] Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ...


After producing his blog for a year at Time Magazine, on 1 February 2007 Sullivan moved to the Atlantic Monthly, where his blog received approximately 40 million page views in the first year.[4] [5] He is the former editor of The New Republic and the author of four books. (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Atlantic Monthly (also known as The Atlantic) is an American literary/cultural magazine that was founded in November 1857. ... For other uses, see New Republic. ...

Contents

Early life

Sullivan was born in South Godstone, Surrey, England, to a Roman Catholic family of Irish descent, and received a B.A. in modern history from Oxford University (Magdalen College), where in his second year he was elected president of the Oxford Union. He went on to earn a master's degree in public administration and a Ph.D. in government at Harvard University, where he wrote his dissertation on conservative British philosopher Michael Oakeshott. His adviser at Harvard University was the political philosopher Harvey Mansfield. This article is about the English county. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... College name Magdalen College Latin name Collegium Beatae Mariae Magdalenae Named after Mary Magdalene Established 1458 Sister college Magdalene College, Cambridge President Professor David Clary FRS JCR President Jessica Jones Undergraduates 395 MCR President Eloise Scotford Graduates 230 Location of Magdalen College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Magdalen College (pronounced... The Oxford Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Oxford Union, is a private debating society in the city of Oxford, England, whose membership is drawn primarily but not exclusively from the University of Oxford. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Michael Joseph Oakeshott (11 December 1901 – 19 December 1990) was an English philosopher with particular interests in political thought, the philosophy of history, education, and religion, and aesthetics. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Harvey C. Mansfield, Jr. ...


General political beliefs

Sullivan is a libertarian-inclined conservative who has argued that the Republican Party has abandoned true conservative principles.[6] After supporting George W. Bush in the 2000 Presidential election, he endorsed Senator John Kerry for President in 2004. In 2006, he supported the Democratic Party's takeover of Congress. His political philosophy includes a broad range of traditional conservative positions: He favors a flat tax, limited government, privatization of social security, and a strong military, and he opposes welfare state programs such as socialized medicine. However, on a number of controversial public issues—for instance, same-sex marriage and the death penalty—he takes a position typically shared by those on the left of the U.S. political spectrum. His position on abortion is more nuanced; saying that he personally finds it immoral and favors overturning Roe v. Wade, but he can accept legalized abortions in the first trimester. Sullivan has endorsed Barack Obama for the Democratic Nomination in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election. If Obama wins the nomination, Sullivan says he will wait and see whether to endorse Obama or Senator John McCain. See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... GOP redirects here. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... (Redirected from 2000 Presidential Election) Map The U.S. presidential election of 2000 took place on Election Day, Tuesday, November 7. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... A flat tax, also called a proportional tax, is a system that taxes all entities in a class (typically either citizens or corporations) at the same rate (as a proportion on income), as opposed to a graduated, or progressive, scheme. ... Limited government is a government structure where any more than minimal governmental intervention in personal liberties and the economy is prohibited by law, usually in a written constitution. ... Social Security, in the United States, currently refers to the Federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... Socialized medicine or state medicine or Universal Health Care is a term used in the United States to describe health care systems which operate by means of government regulation and subsidies derived from taxation. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Holding Texas law making it a crime to assist a woman to get an abortion violated her due process rights. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Presidential electoral votes by state The 2008 United States Presidential election will occur on November 4, 2008. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ...


Professional work

In 1986, he began his career with The New Republic magazine, serving as its editor from 1991 to 1996.[7] In that position, he expanded the magazine from its traditional roots in political coverage to cultural politics and the issues around them. During this time, the magazine produced some groundbreaking journalism but also courted several high-profile controversies. For other uses, see New Republic. ...


Some longtime subscribers, who had never forgiven Sullivan for firing veteran political writer Morton Kondracke when he took over, regularly took umbrage at the articles written by libertarian social critic Camille Paglia that Sullivan published.[citation needed] Morton M. Kondracke (born April 28, 1939) is an American political commentator and journalist. ... Camille Anna Paglia (born April 2, 1947 in Endicott, New York) is an American social critic, author and teacher. ...


In 1994, Sullivan decided to publish excerpts on race and intelligence from Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray's controversial The Bell Curve, which argued that some of the measured difference in IQ scores between racially defined groups was the result of genetic inheritance. Almost the entire staff of the magazine threatened to resign if material that they considered racist was allowed to be published[citation needed]; when the issue did come out, it included lengthy rebuttals from more than a dozen writers and contributors. The study of race and intelligence is the controversial study of how human intellectual capacities may vary among the different population groups commonly known as races. ... Richard Herrnstein (1930-1994) was a prominent researcher in comparative psychology who did pioneering work on pigeon intelligence employing the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. ... Charles Murray Charles Alan Murray (born 1943) is a controversial libertarian American political scientist. ... The Bell Curve is a controversial, best-selling 1994 book by Richard J. Herrnstein and Charles Murray exploring the role of genes in American life. ... IQ redirects here; for other uses of that term, see IQ (disambiguation). ...


Sullivan's departure as editor of The New Republic is also not without controversy. Even among those who wrote for The New Republic at the time, opinions differ about whether he was fired for plagiarism or quit after losing a bitter power struggle with Leon Wieseltier, the magazine's literary editor and a longtime friend of editor-in-chief and co-owner Martin Peretz. Leon Wieseltier is a Jewish-American writer, critic, and magazine editor. ... Martin H. Peretz, also known as Marty Peretz, (born December 6, 1938), is an American publisher and former Harvard University lecturer. ...


Sullivan wrote for The New York Times Magazine briefly. He was fired from the magazine in 2002.[citation needed] The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


A self-identified member of the gay "bear community," in 2003 Sullivan wrote a whimsical and oft-cited Salon essay on the subject.[8] The International Bear Brotherhood Flag designed by Paul Witzkoske for Bear Manufacturing The Bear community is a subculture in the gay community. ... Screenshot of Salon. ...


Sullivan is often compared to female bisexual academic Camille Paglia, an intellectual who argues from a non-leftist perspective.[citation needed] In human sexuality, bisexuality describes a man or woman having a sexual orientation to persons of either or both sexes (a man or woman who sexually likes both sexes; people who are sexually and/or romantically attracted to both males and females). ... Camille Anna Paglia (born April 2, 1947 in Endicott, New York) is an American social critic, author and teacher. ...


Religion

Andrew Sullivan's Catholicism and view of Catholicism have been accused by critics of being confusing and unclear.[citation needed]


His books have at times dealt with this issue. For example, in Virtually Normal (ISBN 0-679-42382-6), he argues that the Bible forbids same-sex sexual activity only when it is linked to prostitution or pagan ritual. His ideas are perhaps influenced by the writing of gay Roman Catholic John Boswell. (Both Sullivan and Boswell's views are generally not supported by official and traditional magisterial Catholic teaching. Boswell remained a Catholic until his death in 1994.) John Eastburn Boswell (March 20, 1947 - December 24, 1994), was a prominant gay historian and a professor at Yale University. ...


His views led him to have concerns about the election of Pope Benedict XVI. In Time Magazine for April 24, 2005 in an article entitled, "The Vicar of Orthodoxy,"[9] Sullivan stated his criticisms of the new pope. He expressed his view that the current pope is opposed to the modern world and women's rights, and deems gays and lesbians to be innately disposed to evil. His interpretation of the current pope's beliefs has been disputed by Michael Novak and criticized by many other Catholics. He has, however, agreed with Benedict's assertion that reason is an integral element of faith. Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... April 25, 2005 (Sunday) About 1 million people march silently through Mexico City in support of the capitals embattled mayor, Andrés Manuel López Obrador. ... Vicariate redirects here. ... Michael Novak (born September 9, 1933) is a conservative Roman Catholic American philosopher and diplomat. ...


Sullivan takes a moderate approach to religion: as such he vocally rejects fundamentalism of any kind. He defended religious moderates in a series of exchanges with atheist Sam Harris, who maintains that religious moderates provide cover for fundamentalists and make it impossible for anyone to effectively oppose them.[citation needed] Atheist redirects here. ... For other persons named Sam Harris, see Sam Harris (disambiguation). ...


Blogging

In late 2000, Sullivan began his blog, The Daily Dish. In the wake of September 11, 2001, attacks, it became one of the most popular political blogs on the Internet. By the middle of 2003, it was receiving about 300,000 unique visits per month. Between starting his blog and ending his New Republic editorship, Sullivan wrote two works on homosexuality, arguing for its social acceptance on libertarian grounds. His writing appears in a number of widely-read publications. He currently serves as a columnist for The Sunday Times of London. The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... For other uses, see New Republic. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ...


The core principles of Sullivan's blog have been have been fiscal conservatism, limited government, and libertarianism on social issues. Sullivan opposes government involvement with respect to sexual and consensual matters between adults (such as the use of marijuana). Sullivan believes recognition of same-sex marriage is a civil-rights issue but is willing to promote it on a state-by-state legislative federalism basis, rather than trying to judicially impose the change.[10] Most of Sullivan's disputes with other conservatives have been over social issues, such as these, and the handling of postwar Iraq. Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ... For theological federalism, see Covenant Theology. ...


Sullivan reluctantly decided to support John Kerry's presidential campaign, due to his dissatisfaction with the handling of the postwar situation in Iraq by the Bush administration, their views on gay rights, and their fiscal policy. Sullivan is a supporter of John McCain and Arnold Schwarzenegger[11] and other like-minded Republicans. Sullivan has also blogged sympathetically about Republican candidate Ron Paul, endorsing him for the 2008 republican presidential nomination.[12] John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German pronunciation IPA: ) (born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-born American bodybuilder, actor, and politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... Ronald Ernest Ron Paul (b. ...


Sullivan gives out "awards" each year on various public statements that parody those of people the awards are named after. Throughout the year, "nominees" for these awards are mentioned in various blog posts. The readers of his blog vote the "winner" at the end of the year. These awards include:[13]

  • the Michael Moore Award is named after film-maker Michael Moore. It is for divisive, bitter and intemperate left-wing rhetoric.
  • the John Derbyshire Award is for egregious and outlandish comments on gays, women, and minorities.
  • the Paul Begala Award is for extreme liberal hyperbole.
  • the Michelle Malkin Award is named after blogger, Michelle Malkin. It is for shrill, hyperbolic, divisive and intemperate right-wing rhetoric. Ann Coulter is ineligible for this award so that, in Sullivan's own words, "Other people will have a chance.")
  • the Matt Yglesias Award is for writers, politicians, columnists or pundits who actually criticize their own side, make enemies among political allies, and generally risk something for the sake of saying what they believe.
  • the "Poseur Alert" is awarded for passages of prose that stand out for pretension, vanity and really bad writing designed to look like profundity.
  • the "Von Hoffmann Award" is for stunningly wrong cultural, political and social predictions.

In February 2005, Sullivan decided to go on "hiatus for a few months" after nearly five years of continuous blogging.[14] By this time his blog was receiving over 50,000 visitors a day and was among the most linked-to blogs in the world. Sullivan planned to work on a book, do some traveling, and focus on other projects. His plan was to return to blogging "full steam" in roughly nine months. In response to readers who asked whether his continuing blogging meant that he had given up on his "hiatus," he wrote: Michael Francis Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an American political-activist, a film director, author, social commentator, and political humorist. ... John Derbyshire (born June 3, 1945) is a British-born author who lives in the United States and became a naturalized citizen in 2002. ... Paul Begala (born May 12, 1961) is a political consultant, a commentator, and a former advisor to President Bill Clinton. ... Michelle Malkin (née Maglalang) (born October 20, 1970) is a socially and politically conservative American columnist, blogger, author and political commentator. ... Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961)[1] is an American best-selling author, columnist and political commentator. ... Matt Yglesias (born May 18, 1981) is a popular American gay political blogger and a prominent voice in the liberal blogosphere. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

In deference to my relationship (and my sanity), I'm not blogging in the early hours any more… I blog when I feel like it… The pressure to promise something every day first thing no longer haunts me… But I'm making progress on the book and writing longer stuff. It's all about balance, no?[15]

He attributes his ability to "blog, write my usual columns and work on my book" simultaneously to an increase in energy after being fitted with a CPAP machine to help him sleep.[16] This has allowed him to return to blogging full time. His blog has remained very popular since then. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


In February 2007, Sullivan took his blog from Time to the Atlantic Monthly magazine, where he had accepted an editorial post. Since then, his presence has increased traffic by 30% for Atlantic's website.[17] Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Atlantic Monthly (also known as The Atlantic) is an American literary/cultural magazine that was founded in November 1857. ...


Same-sex marriage


For the LGBT rights article for a particular country, see LGBT rights by country. ... Image File history File links Gay_flag. ...


Around the world World laws on homosexuality Legality of same-sex unions in the US. Legality of same-sex unions in Europe. ...


By country This list indexes the articles on LGBT rights in each country and significant non-country region (e. ...


History · Groups · Activists LGBT history refers to the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender cultures around the world, dating back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality within ancient civilizations. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      Here is a list of gay-rights organizations around the world. ... A list of LGBT rights activists by country, in alphabetical order. ...


Declaration of Montreal Martina Navrátilová and Mark Tewksbury read the Declaration of Montreal at the opening ceremonies of the World Outgames. ...


Same-sex relationships Same-sex union can refer to: same-sex marriage -- the civil or religious rites of marriage that make it equivalent to opposite-sex marriages in all aspects. ...


Marriage · Adoption One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ... LGBT adoption refers to the adoption of children by lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered people. ...


Opposition · Discrimination LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      LGBT rights opposition refers to various movements or attitudes which oppose the extension of certain rights to lesbian and gay people, and by extension to bisexuals, and... Heterosexism is the presumption that everyone is straight or heterosexual (i. ...


Violence It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Gay bashing. ...


Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

This box: view  talk  edit

Sullivan made a case for same-sex marriage in the 1980s, before the idea had become a major political goal of people in the LGBT community (and indeed, was and is the topic of some hostility). Andrew has argued the case for same-sex marriage on the basis that marriage is a unique institution that can codify love and commitment. Sullivan laid out his argument for same-sex marriage in his book Virtually Normal. In response, Michael Warner, a Rutgers University English professor and gay activist wrote The Trouble with Normal, which argued that Sullivan's desire to normalize gay men and lesbians through marriage was a dangerous move that would leave those individuals—straight, gay, or otherwise—who did not want to marry without appropriate governmental and societal respect or protection. One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ... The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... Michael Warner Michael Warner is a literary critic and social theorist. ...


Sullivan has been very critical of civil unions, which he has dubbed "marriage lite." He has argued that civil unions will only serve to weaken the unique status of marriage, both for gays and lesbians and heterosexuals. As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law...


Andrew Sullivan, being gay himself, felt morally obligated to pursue same-sex marriage. He and his then-partner were leading activists for same-sex marriage in the early 1980s.


In the 2004 election, Sullivan criticized the Republican Party for what he saw as political exploitation of a despised minority: GOP redirects here. ...

I've been trying to think of what to say about what appears to be the enormous success the Republicans had in using gay couples' rights to gain critical votes in key states. In eight more states now, gay couples have no relationship rights at all. Their legal ability to visit a spouse in hospital, to pass on property, to have legal protections for their children has been gutted. If you are a gay couple living in Alabama, you know one thing: your family has no standing under the law; and it can and will be violated by strangers. I'm not surprised by this. When you put a tiny and despised minority up for a popular vote, the minority usually loses.[18]

While he has long advocated same-sex marriage, Sullivan has drawn criticism[19][20] for his 2006 dismissal of monogamy:

For me the interesting point came when Dan and I agreed that moderate hypocrisy—especially in marriages—is often the best policy. Momogamy (sic) is very hard for men, straight or gay, and if one partner falters occasionally (and I don't mean regularly), sometimes discretion is perfectly acceptable. You could see Jong bridle at the thought of such dishonesty. But I think the post-seventies generation—those of us who grew up while our parents were having a sexual revolution—both appreciate the gains for sexual and emotional freedom, while being a little more aware of their potential hazards.[21]

On 27 August 2007, in Provincetown, Massachusetts, Sullivan married Aaron Tone, an artist and actor who had been his companion for three years.[22][23][24] Dan Savage speaking at Bradley University Daniel Keenan Savage (born October 7, 1964[1] near Chicago, Illinois, United States) is an openly gay American sex advice columnist, author, media pundit, journalist, and newspaper editor. ... Erica Jong (née Mann, born March 26, 1942, in New York City, New York) is an American author and educator. ... Nickname: Location in Barnstable County in Massachusetts U.S. Census Map Coordinates: , Country State County Barnstable Settled 1700 Incorporated 1727 Government  - Type Open town meeting  - Town    Manager Sharon Lynn Area  - Total 17. ...


War on terrorism

Sullivan strongly supported the decision to go to war in Iraq, and he has generally been hawkish in the war on terror, arguing that weakness would embolden terrorists. In an October 14, 2001, posting that has been cited critically by Justin Raimondo,[25] Sullivan announced that recent anthrax attacks had sealed his support for war on Iraq, including the possible use of nuclear weaponry by the United States: This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11, 2001. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The 2001 anthrax attacks in the United States, also known as Amerithrax from its FBI case name, occurred over the course of several weeks beginning on September 18, 2001. ...

The sophisticated form of anthrax delivered to Tom Daschle's office forces us to ask a simple question. What are these people trying to do? I think they're testing the waters. They want to know how we will respond to what is still a minor biological threat, as a softener to a major biological threat in the coming weeks. ...At this point, it seems to me that a refusal to extend the war to Iraq is not even an option. We have to extend it to Iraq. It is by far the most likely source of this weapon; it is clearly willing to use such weapons in the future; and no war against terrorism of this kind can be won without dealing decisively with the Iraqi threat. We no longer have any choice in the matter. Slowly, incrementally, a Rubicon has been crossed. The terrorists have launched a biological weapon against the United States. They have therefore made biological warfare thinkable and thus repeatable. We once had a doctrine that such a Rubicon would be answered with a nuclear response. We backed down on that threat in the Gulf War but Saddam didn't dare use biological weapons then. Someone has dared to use them now. Our response must be as grave as this new threat.[26]

Sullivan has harshly criticized the Bush administration for its postwar efforts, however, especially regarding the numbers of troops, protection of munitions, and treatment of prisoners. Sullivan strongly opposes the use of torture against detainees in U.S. custody and has had heated disputes with Heather MacDonald[27] and fellow British-American John Derbyshire, among others, on that issue. Though Sullivan believes that enemy combatants in the war on terror should not be given status as prisoners of war because "terrorists are not soldiers,"[28] he also believes that the U.S. government must abide by the rules of war—in particular, Article 3 of the Geneva Conventions—when dealing with such detainees.[29] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Heather Lynn Mac Donald is a conservative author (a fellow at the Manhattan Institute and contributing editor to the New York City Journal) and former lawyer. ... John Derbyshire (born June 3, 1945) is a British-born author who lives in the United States and became a naturalized citizen in 2002. ... An enemy combatant has historically referred to members of the armed forces of the state with which another state is at war. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... The laws of war (Jus in bello) define the conduct and responsibilities of belligerent nations, neutral nations and individuals engaged in warfare, in relation to each other and to protected persons, usually meaning civilians. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Third Geneva Convention The Third Geneva Convention (or GCIII) of 1949, one of the Geneva Conventions, is a treaty agreement that primarily concerns the treatment of prisoners of war (POWs), and also touched on other topics. ...


In recent times, Andrew Sullivan has changed his position on the Iraq war and described it as a mistake. On the October 27, 2006 edition of Real Time with Bill Maher, he described conservatives and Republicans who refused to admit they had been wrong to support the Iraq War as "cowards." On February 26, 2008 he wrote on his blog: "After 9/11, I was clearly blinded by fear of al Qaeda and deluded by the overwhelming military superiority of the US and the ease of democratic transitions in Eastern Europe into thinking we could simply fight our way to victory against Islamist terror. I wasn't alone. But I was surely wrong."[30] For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Real Time with Bill Maher is a talk show that airs weekly on HBO, hosted by comedian and political satirist Bill Maher. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...


Disputes with conservatives and media figures

Sullivan has caused controversy for his heterodox conservative views and his strident attacks against fellow conservatives. He did not support the re-election of George W. Bush and has repeatedly suggested that much of the Republican Party has abandoned its conservative principles and has stated that much of the party has been co-opted either by those he refers to as Christianists or, at other times, by a "Cult of Bush." In one recent post he described the ideology of many Republicans as "Christianist socialism".[31] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Socialism is a broad array of ideologies and political movements with the goal of a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community for the purposes of increasing social and economic equality and cooperation. ...


James Lileks in response stated: "Of course, 'Christianist' is a term of Mr. Sullivan’s invention, and is infinitely applicable; I am probably a Christianist myself if I vote for someone who gives off that Christianist whiff, just as people who vote for Democrats are really closeted Communists, and Libertarians secretly want poor people to be heaped into graves and hosed with napalm."[32] James Lileks (born August 9, 1958 in Fargo, North Dakota) and educated at the University of Minnesota, is an American journalist, columnist, and blogger living in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Christianism may refer to: Christianity, or its theory and practice The term Christianist is referred to as early as 1992 in a book by Rémi Brague. ...


In three days, he wrote in three different places that "[c]onservatism is a philosophy without a party in America any more. It has been hijacked by zealots and statists",[33] that "[w]e're getting to the point when conservatism has become a political philosophy that believes that government—at the most distant level—has the right to intervene in almost anything to achieve the right solution. Today's conservatism is becoming yesterday's liberalism",[34] and that "the only real difference between the Democrats and Republicans at this point is that the Democrats believe in big, solvent government and the Republicans believe in an even bigger, insolvent government."[35]


He has been particularly critical of some conservatives' defense of the administration's actions involved in the Abu Ghraib and other prison scandals. Sullivan criticized Glenn Reynolds, NRO, Ramesh Ponnuru, and other conservative groups for not speaking out on the issue more quickly and more forcefully. Sullivan was especially critical of Power Line, Michelle Malkin, Jeff Goldstein, and John Derbyshire—whom he has accused of active support of such tactics. Sullivan accuses Power Line and Hugh Hewitt of completely partisan and unconditional support for the Republican Party (which has hurt conservative principles). See Abu Ghraib prison and Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse. ... Glenn Reynolds (author photo). ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... Ramesh Ponnuru (born August 16, 1974) is a Washington, D.C.-based Indian American columnist and a senior editor for National Review magazine. ... Power Line is a neoconservative blog run by three lawyers: John H. Hinderaker (Hindrocket), Scott W. Johnson (The Big Trunk) and Paul Mirengoff (Deacon). Power Line covers political and social issues from a conservative viewpoint. ... Michelle Malkin (née Maglalang) (born October 20, 1970) is a socially and politically conservative American columnist, blogger, author and political commentator. ... Jeff Goldstein is a writer living in Colorado. ... John Derbyshire (born June 3, 1945) is a British-born author who lives in the United States and became a naturalized citizen in 2002. ... Hugh Hewitt (born February 22, 1956) is a conservative American radio talk show host, author, and blogger. ...


Sullivan frequently chides Slate blogger Mickey Kaus for his perceived anti-homosexual bias; the back-and-forth between the Daily Dish and Kausfiles has become an ongoing feud. Categories: Magazines stubs | Microsoft subsidiaries | Websites | The Washington Post ... Mickey Kaus is a journalist and author best known form writing Kausfiles, a mostly political blog featured on Slate. ...


In 2006 Sullivan expressed interest (at the suggestion of a reader) in creating a new award "honoring" Nancy Grace.[36] The Nancy Grace Award would be bestowed on those evincing "lack of grace and empathy," a "misplaced self-regard," "unflappable self-assurance that [the nominee's] outrage represents the true moral high ground on any issue," and a "nauseating level of absolutist self-righteousness on the part of the Nominee." Kaus suggested[37] that this description perfectly fit Sullivan himself; Sullivan hasn't mentioned the Grace Award since. Nancy Ann Grace (born October 23, 1959) is an American talk show host and former prosecutor. ...


Though Sullivan was very strong in his praise of George W. Bush immediately after 9/11, he has recently called such views "stupid and premature" in retrospect. He has similarly since characterized the president as a "shallow, monstrous, weak, and petty man."[38] In response to suggestions by Sullivan that Dick Cheney and Don Rumsfeld may have intentionally refused to support the Iraq War effort (during occupation), conservative warblog Ace of Spades did a parody of Sullivan's Daily Dish site.[39] Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Donald Rumsfeld Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is the current Secretary of Defense of the United States, since January 20, 2001, under President George W. Bush. ... A warblog is a weblog devoted mostly or wholly to covering news events concerning an ongoing war. ... Ace of Spades HQ, Ace of Spades, or AoS is a conservative and libertarian weblog and warblog created in 2003. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ...


Sullivan aligned himself with commentators such as Glenn Greenwald, Jack Balkin, and Marty Lederman. Glenn Greenwald (born 1967 in New York City) is an American attorney, best-selling author of How Would a Patriot Act?, political and legal blogger, and columnist at Salon Magazine. ... Jack M. Balkin (born August 13, 1956 in Kansas City, Missouri) is the Knight Professor of Constitutional Law and the First Amendment at Yale Law School. ... Martin Marty S. Lederman is an attorney in private practice specializing in constitutional and appellate litigation. ...


Andrew Sullivan is especially critical of Mel Gibson, considering the actor to be a misogynist, homophobe, and anti-Semite. Sullivan was outspoken against The Passion of the Christ, believing it to be an anti-Semitic work that would inflame such prejudices, especially in the Arab world. Sullivan is also critical of Gibson's ultra-conservative pre-Vatican II Catholic beliefs. Sullivan has argued that Gibson's statements during his July 2006 DUI arrest only confirm what he has been saying all along. Sullivan has been outspoken in attacking commentators on the right whom he contends are apologists for supporting Gibson after his arrest;[40] also those whom he believes have not been forceful enough in condemning Gibson.[41] Sullivan was especially critical of Hugh Hewitt.[42] James Lileks, in defense of Hewitt, accused Sullivan of "intellectual shabbiness" and an unfair attack.[43] Mel Columcille Gerard Gibson (born January 3, 1956) is an American-born actor, director and producer. ... This article is about the film. ... The Second Vatican Council, or Vatican II, was an Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ... For other uses, see Under the influence. ... Hugh Hewitt (born February 22, 1956) is a conservative American radio talk show host, author, and blogger. ... James Lileks (born August 9, 1958 in Fargo, North Dakota) and educated at the University of Minnesota, is an American journalist, columnist, and blogger living in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ...


War on Drugs

Sullivan has written blog entries criticizing the excesses of the War on Drugs. He argued that studies showed alcohol is more dangerous than cannabis, yet the former is legal and the latter is illegal.[44][45] He gave examples purporting to show that the government has used torture in the War on Drugs.[46] Regarding the cannabis prohibition, he wrote, Massive mark-ups for drugs, areas/drugs/index. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the plant genus Cannabis. ... For other uses, see Torture (disambiguation). ... World laws on cannabis possession (small amount). ...

For my part, I find the attempt to ban any naturally growing plant to be an attack on reality, and a denial of some of the most basic freedoms. I guess that's why today's GOP is so in favor of it.[47]

Consistency

One of the most common charges Sullivan addresses is that he is inconsistent, that his views on certain policies (such as the desirability of invading Iraq) and people (such as George W. Bush) change considerably over time. A typical defense of his changing views follows:

If you want to read a blog that will always take the position of the Bush administration on the war, there are plenty out there. Ditto if you want to read a relentlessly anti-Bush blog, like Kos. But this blog is a little different. It's an attempt to think out loud, which means there will be shifts over time in argument and emphasis. It may appear wishy-washy or excitable or whatever. But it's my best attempt to figure things out as I go along. If you don't like it, read someone else.... I try and read as much criticism of my fallible work as I can.[48]

Controversies

In May 2001, Village Voice columnist Michael Musto said that Sullivan had anonymously posted advertisements for bareback sex (anal sex without a condom) on America Online and the now-defunct website barebackcity.com.[49] Subsequently, the American journalist and activist Michelangelo Signorile wrote about the advertisement in a front-page article in the New York gay magazine LGNY, igniting a storm of controversy.[50] Later, in a defiant blog post titled Sexual McCarthyism: An article no-one should have to write, Sullivan confirmed the allegations while arguing that the matters covered by the controversy were private and should not have been put into the public domain by his critics.[51] The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ... Michael Musto Michael Musto is an American Manhattan-based writer who began his career at The Village Voice, where he writes the weekly ([1]) La Dolce Musto celebrity and gossip column. ... The act of anal sex and/or oral sex without a condom. ... Roman men having anal sex. ... This article is about the male contraceptive device. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Michelangelo Signorile Michelangelo Signorile (born December 19, 1960), is a gay American writer and a national radio host whose program is aired each weekday across the United States and Canada. ... This article is about the state. ...


Sullivan's critics[52] have argued that it was hypocritical of Sullivan to engage in this kind of sexual activity while arguing for greater monogamy among gay men. They claim that the vision of gay sexuality presented in Sullivan's writing is at odds with the activities he was said to be engaging in. They also charge that because Sullivan is HIV-positive, it is unsafe for him to engage in sex without a condom. Sullivan's critics[53] also contend that it is unfair for Sullivan to criticize Bill Clinton's sexual indiscretions as "reckless" while engaging in unprotected sex himself. This scandal was parodied in the popular gay television show, Queer as Folk. In one episode, a well-known gay political commentator condemns a 30-year-old gay man for dating an 18-year-old, only to be later caught attending a bareback sex party. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... // Queer As Folk (US) Based on the British series of the same name, Showtimes Queer as Folk presents the American version. ... Brian is one of the, if not the, main character(s), and while his best friend, Michael Novotny, could be the considered the protagonist (Michael narrates the pilot episode as well as the series finale), Brian is definitely the hero. ... Justin Taylor is a central character on the American television series Queer As Folk. ...


Sullivan responded that his advertisement stated that he was HIV-positive and he intended to have bareback sex only with consenting adults who were also HIV-positive. According to Sullivan, limiting unprotected sex to other HIV-positive men reduces the risk inherent in the behavior. Moreover, he criticized what he called a "thin reed of evidence" of the existence of "reinfection" which, according to some medical professionals, heightens the destruction caused by the virus.[54] His supporters have also argued that it was a violation of his privacy to publish information about his sex life.[55] Sullivan has argued that those who revealed the details about his sex life were motivated by a desire for payback because they disagreed with his pro-marriage politics .[56] In Sullivan's book Love Undetectable (pub. 1999), he writes:

"Although I never publicly defended promiscuity, I never publicly attacked it. I attempted to avoid the subject, in part because I felt, and often still feel, unable to live up to the ideals I really hold."[57]

Sullivan's journalistic ethics were called into question when he announced that he would be accepting a sponsorship to write his blog The Daily Dish from the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, the lobby for the industry that he credited with saving his life, but which has also been criticized for its practices in AIDS-affected areas of the Third World.[58] The controversy lay in Sullivan's initial refusal to disclose the relationship in writing outside his blog, even though much of that often touches on drug manufacturers and their policies in poor countries. He dropped the sponsorship in the ensuing uproar. Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) is a trade group representing the pharmaceutical research and biotechnology companies in the United States. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... For the Jamaican reggae band, see Third World (band). ...


Endorsements

Sullivan makes reference to his presidential endorsements. They are:

In the case of Kerry, he stated that his endorsement was primarily against Bush. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... “Barack” redirects here. ...


The Clinton campaign has considered Sullivan to be anti-Clinton. The Clinton campaign, according to Sullivan, went so far as to request that Sullivan's perspective be 'balanced' with pro-Clinton pundits on talk shows.[60]


Selected bibliography

Other notable projects and interviews

A Union in Wait is the name of a documentary film about same-sex marriage, directed by Ryan Butler. ... The Colbert Report (IPA ) is an American satirical television program that airs from 11:30 p. ...

References

. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...

  1. ^ Technorati Popular: Top 100 blogs
  2. ^ The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
  3. ^ Roehr, Bob (17 January 2008). DP Benefits and Immigration Bills Introduced in Congress. Between The Lines News. Retrieved on 2008-01-29.
  4. ^ The Daily Dish
  5. ^ Sullivan, Andrew (1 February 2008). The Dish At The Atlantic. Associated Press. Retrieved on 2008-02-01.
  6. ^ The Daily Dish
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ Salon.com | I am bear, hear me roar!
  9. ^ Andrew Sullivan: The Vicar of Orthodoxy - TIME Magazine
  10. ^ The Stranger, Seattle's Only Newspaper
  11. ^ [2]
  12. ^ The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
  13. ^ The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
  14. ^ [3]
  15. ^ [4]
  16. ^ [5]
  17. ^ A Venerable Magazine Energizes Its Web Site - New York Times
  18. ^ [6]
  19. ^ Gay Patriot » Is Andrew Sullivan Serious about Gay Marriage?
  20. ^ Althouse: Gen-Xers for hypocrisy
  21. ^ The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
  22. ^ Independent Gay Forum - The Poltroon and the Groom
  23. ^ [7]
  24. ^ [8]
  25. ^ Covering the Tracks of the Anthrax Attacks- by Justin Raimondo
  26. ^ www.AndrewSullivan.com - Daily Dish
  27. ^ [9]
  28. ^ [10]
  29. ^ The Daily Dish
  30. ^ The Daily Dish
  31. ^ [11]
  32. ^ [12]
  33. ^ [13]
  34. ^ [14]
  35. ^ Comment: Andrew Sullivan: Bush’s triumph conceals the great conservative crack-up - Sunday Times - Times Online
  36. ^ The Daily Dish
  37. ^ Move over, Lonelygirl ... - By Mickey Kaus - Slate Magazine
  38. ^ The Daily Dish
  39. ^ Ace of Spades HQ
  40. ^ The Daily Dish
  41. ^ The Daily Dish
  42. ^ Bird of Paradise: Andrew Sullivan & Hugh Hewitt Go Toe-To-Toe
  43. ^ [15]
  44. ^ Drugs and Toxicity Andrew Sullivan
  45. ^ Dangers of Drugs Andrew Sullivan
  46. ^ Torture and the War on Drugs
  47. ^ The Trouble With Pot Andrew Sullivan
  48. ^ [16]
  49. ^ Andrew Sullivan, Overexposed
  50. ^ Salon.com Politics | My story was ethical
  51. ^ [17]
  52. ^ Salon.com Politics | My story was ethical
  53. ^ Salon.com News | Andrew Sullivan's jihad
  54. ^ Beliefs About HIV Reinfection (Superinfection) and Sexual Behavior Among a Diverse Sample of HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men
  55. ^ Salon.com News | In defense of Andrew Sullivan
  56. ^ [18]
  57. ^ Love Undectectable; Essay One: When Plagues End, page 53
  58. ^ ZNet |Economy | How Low Can You go?
  59. ^ Goodbye to All That: Why Obama Matters | By Andrew Sullivan
  60. ^ Post-Stephanopoulos Clinton Nugget

is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank headquartered in Washington, D.C. The Institutes stated mission is to broaden the parameters of public policy debate to allow consideration of the traditional American principles of limited government, individual liberty, free markets, and peace by striving to achieve greater involvement... C-SPAN (the Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network) is an American cable television network dedicated to airing non-stop coverage of government proceedings and public affairs programming. ... Book TV is a weekend program on upcoming and established authors broadcast by C_SPAN on the C_SPAN 2 channel. ... For other uses, see Video (disambiguation). ... Beliefnet or Beliefnet. ... For other persons named Sam Harris, see Sam Harris (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Andrew Sullivan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2979 words)
Andrew Sullivan, Ph.D. (born August 10, 1963) is an English-American journalist, author, blogger, and former editor of The New Republic, known both for his heterodox personal-political identity (HIV-positive, gay, conservative, and practicing Roman Catholic) and for his efforts in the field of blog journalism.
Andrew Sullivan is also a popular speaker at major universities and civic organizations in the United States and a frequent guest on many national news and political commentary television shows in the United States and Europe.
Andrew Sullivan is especially critical of Mel Gibson, considering the actor to be a misogynist, homophobe, and anti-Semite.
Salon.com News | Andrew Sullivan's jihad (1221 words)
Sullivan was as incensed by Sontag's remarks as he was by my introductory comments about the efforts of Sullivan's conservative colleagues to banish her from the world of acceptable intellectual discourse.
Earlier this year, Sullivan was exposed by the gay press for advertising for "bareback" sex (unprotected by condoms) in an AOL chat room and denounced as a hypocrite by his liberal gay critics for engaging in risky sexual practices after attacking President Clinton for his own incautious behavior.
Sullivan's Taliban style of argument and his rigid habit of separating the world into the blessed and the damned turns American politics into a free-fire zone where any deviation from his view of the national program is immediately leveled.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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