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Encyclopedia > Andrew Lang
For the former National Basketball Association player, see Andrew Lang (basketball).

Andrew Lang (March 31, 1844, SelkirkJuly 20, 1912, Banchory, Kincardineshire) was a prolific Scots man of letters. He was a poet, novelist, and literary critic, and contributor to anthropology. He now is best known as the collector of folk and fairy tales. Andrew Lang (1844-1912) Original image: [1] File links The following pages link to this file: Andrew Lang Categories: Public domain images ... Andrew Lang (born June 28, 1966 in Pine Bluff, Arkansas) is a former professional basketball player in the NBA, who played with the Phoenix Suns, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Milwaukee Bucks, mainly in the role of backup center. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... Jan. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Banchory (Scottish Gaelic: Beannchar) is a burgh in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, where the Feugh River meets the River Dee The name is thought to be derived from Scottish Gaelic for horned or forked and also relates to by the bends, the bends being those of the River Dee. ... Kincardineshire, also known as The Mearns (from A Mhaoirne meaning The Stewartry) is a traditional county on the coast of Northeast Scotland. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II... An intellectual is a person who uses his or her intellect to study, reflect, and speculate on a variety of different ideas. ... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the comparative study of the physical and social characteristics of humanity through the examination of historical and present geographical distribution, cultural history, acculturation, and cultural relationships. ... Folkloristics is the formal academic study of folklore such as fairy tales and folk mythology in oral or non-literary traditions. ... Folklore is the body of expressive culture, including tales, music, dance, legends, oral history, proverbs, jokes, popular beliefs, customs, material culture, and so forth within a particular population comprising the traditions (including oral traditions) of that culture, subculture, or group. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ...


The Andrew Lang lectures at St Andrews University are named for him. The Andrew Lang Lecture series is held at the University of St. ... University of St Andrews The University of St Andrews was founded between 1410-1413 and is the oldest university in Scotland and the third oldest in the United Kingdom. ...

Contents

Biography

Lang was the eldest of the eight children of John Lang, town clerk of Selkirk, and his wife, Jane Plenderleath Sellar, daughter of Patrick Sellar, factor to the first duke of Sutherland. On April 17, 1875 he married Leonora Blanche Alleyne, youngest daughter of C. T. Alleyne of Clifton and Barbados. They had no children. April 17 is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


He was educated at Selkirk grammar school, and at the Edinburgh Academy, St Andrews University and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he took a first class in the final classical schools in 1868, becoming a fellow and subsequently honorary fellow of Merton College. As a journalist, poet, critic and historian, he soon made a reputation as one of the ablest and most versatile writers of the day. The Edinburgh Academy is an independent school. ... St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister College St Johns Master Andrew Graham JCR President Jack Hawkins Undergraduates 403 MCR President Chelsea Payne Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in... College name The House of Scholars of Merton Named after Walter de Merton Established 1264 Sister College Peterhouse Warden Prof. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... An historian is someone who writes history, a written accounting of the past. ...


He died of angina pectoris at the Tor-na-Coille Hotel in Banchory, survived by his wife. He was buried in the cathedral precincts at St Andrews.


Professions

Folklore and anthropology

"Rumpelstiltskin," from Lang's Fairy Tales.
"Rumpelstiltskin," from Lang's Fairy Tales.

Lang is now chiefly known for his publications on folklore, mythology, and religion. The earliest of his publications is Custom and Myth (1884). In Myth, Ritual and Religion (1887) he explained the "irrational" elements of mythology as survivals from more primitive forms. Lang's Making of Religion was heavily influenced by the 18th century idea of the "noble savage": in it, he maintained the existence of high spiritual ideas among so-called "savage" races, drawing parallels with the contemporary interest in occult phenomena in England. His Blue Fairy Book (1889) was a beautifully produced and illustrated edition of fairy tales that has become a classic. This was followed by many other collections of fairy tales, collectively known as Andrew Lang's Fairy Books. Lang examined the origins of totemism in Social Origins (1903). Image File history File links Rumpelstiltskin. ... Image File history File links Rumpelstiltskin. ... Folklore is the body of expressive culture, including tales, music, dance, legends, oral history, proverbs, jokes, popular beliefs, customs, material culture, and so forth within a particular population comprising the traditions (including oral traditions) of that culture, subculture, or group. ... The word mythology (from the Greek μυολογία mythología, from μυολογείν mythologein to relate myths, from μύος mythos, meaning a narrative, and λόγος logos, meaning speech or argument) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use the supernatural to interpret natural events and... A section of Benjamin Wests The Death of General Wolfe; Wests depiction of this Native American has been considered an idealization in the tradition of the Noble savage (Fryd, 75) In the 18th century culture of Primitivism the noble savage, uncorrupted by the influences of civilization was considered... Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ... Totemism (derived from the root -oode in the Ojibwe language, which referred to something kinship-related) is a religious belief that is frequently associated with shamanistic religions. ...


Psychic research

Lang's was one of the founders of the study of "Psychical Research," and his other writings on anthropology include The Book of Dreams and Ghosts (1897), Magic and Religion (1901) and The Secret of the Totem (1905). Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the comparative study of the physical and social characteristics of humanity through the examination of historical and present geographical distribution, cultural history, acculturation, and cultural relationships. ...


Classical scholarship

He collaborated with S.H. Butcher in a prose translation (1879) of the Homeric Odyssey, and with E. Myers and Walter Leaf in a prose version (1883) of the Iliad, both still noted for their archaic but attractive style. He was a Homeric scholar of conservative views. Other works include Homer and the Epic (1893); a prose translation of The Homeric Hymns (1899), with literary and mythological essays in which he draws parallels between Greek myths and other mythologies; and Homer and his Age (1906). Samuel Henry Butcher, MP (16 April 1850 – 29 December 1910) was a Dublin born classical scholar and, in his final years, an English politician. ... Homer (Greek: , ) was an early Greek poet and aoidos (rhapsode) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... Beginning of the Odyssey The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the Ionian poet Homer. ... Walter Leaf (1852 - 1927), English banker and scholar, was born at Norwood, London, on November 26, 1852 and educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge. ... It has been suggested that Deception of Zeus be merged into this article or section. ... Homeric scholarship is the study of Homeric epic, especially the two large surviving epics the Iliad and Odyssey. ...


Historian

Lang's writings on Scottish history are characterised by a scholarly care for detail, a piquant literary style, and a gift for disentangling complicated questions. The Mystery of Mary Stuart (1901) was a consideration of the fresh light thrown on Mary Queen of Scots by the Lennox manuscripts in the University Library, Cambridge, approving of her and criticising her accusers. Mary I of Scotland; known as Mary, Queen of Scots Mary I of Scotland (Mary Stuart or Stewart) (December 8, 1542 – February 8, 1587), better known as Mary, Queen of Scots, was the ruler of Scotland from December 14, 1542 – July 24, 1567. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ...


He also wrote monographs on The Portraits and Jewels of Mary Stuart (1906) and James VI and the Gowrie Mystery (1902). The somewhat unfavourable view of John Knox presented in his book John Knox and the Reformation (1905) aroused considerable controversy. He gave new information about the continental career of the Young Pretender in Pickle the Spy (1897), an account of Alestair Ruadh MacDonnell, whom he identified with Pickle, a notorious Hanoverian spy. This was followed by The Companions of Pickle (1898) and a monograph on Prince Charles Edward (1900). In 1900 he began a History of Scotland from the Roman occupation. The Valet's Tragedy (1903), which takes its title from an essay on Dumas's Man in the Iron Mask, collects twelve papers on historical mysteries, and A Monk of Fife (1896) is a fictitious narrative purporting to be written by a young Scot in France in 1429-1431. James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... For other persons named John Knox, see John Knox (disambiguation). ... Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Silvester Maria Stuart (December 31, 1720 – January 31, 1788), was the exiled claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and was commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. ... Alestair (i. ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Alexandre Dumas, père, born Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie (July 24, 1802 – December 5, 1870) was a French writer, best known for his numerous historical novels of high adventure which have made him one of the most widely read French authors in the world. ... The Vicomte de Bragelonne: Ten Years Later (Le Vicomte de Bragelonne ou Dix ans plus tard) is a novel by Alexandre Dumas, père. ...


Other writings

Andrew Lang at work.
Andrew Lang at work.

Lang's earliest publication was a volume of metrical experiments, The Ballads and Lyrics of Old France (1872), and this was followed at intervals by other volumes of dainty verse, Ballades in Blue China (1880, enlarged edition, 1888), Ballads and Verses Vain (1884), selected by Mr Austin Dobson; Rhymes à la Mode (1884), Grass of Parnassus (1888), Ban and Arrière Ban (1894), New Collected Rhymes (1905). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Lang was active as a journalist in various ways, ranging from sparkling "leaders" for the Daily News to miscellaneous articles for the Morning Post, and for many years he was literary editor of Longman's Magazine; no critic was in more request, whether for occasional articles and introductions to new editions or as editor of dainty reprints. Longmans Magazine was first published in November 1882 by C. J. Longman, publisher of Longmans, Green & Co. ...


He edited The Poems and Songs of Robert Burns (1896), and was responsible for the Life and Letters (1897) of JG Lockhart, and The Life, Letters and Diaries (1890) of Sir Stafford Northcote, 1st Earl of Iddesleigh. Lang discussed literary subjects with the same humour and acidity that marked his criticism of fellow folklorists, in Books and Bookmen (1886), Letters to Dead Authors (1886), Letters on Literature (1889), etc. Robert Burns, foremost Scottish poet Robert Burns (January 25, 1759 – July 21, 1796) was a poet and a lyricist. ... John Gibson Lockhart (July 14, 1794 - November 25, 1854), Scottish writer and editor, was born in the manse of Cambusnethan in Lanarkshire, where his father, Dr John Lockhart, transferred in 1796 to Glasgow, was minister. ... The Rt Hon. ...


Works

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
a review of Lang's works.

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...

To 1889

  • St Leonards Magazine. 1863. This was a reprint of several articles that appeared in the St Leonards Magazine that Lang edited at St Andrews University. Includes the following Lang contributions: Pages 10-13, Dawgley Manor; A sentimental burlesque; Pages 25-26, Nugae Catulus; Pages 27-30, Popular Philosophies; pages 43-50 are ‘Papers by Emminent Contributors’, seven short parodies of which six are by Lang.
  • The Ballads and Lyrics of Old France (1872)
  • The Odyssey Of Homer Rendered Into English Prose (1879) translator with Samuel Henry Butcher
  • Aristotles Politics Books I. III. IV. (VII.). The Text of Bekker. With an English translation by W. E. Bolland . Together with short introductory essays by A. Lang To page 106 are Lang's Essays, 107-305pp is the translation. Lang's essays without the translated text were later published as The politics of Aristotle. Introductory Essays. 1886.
  • The Folklore of France (1878)
  • Specimens of a Translation of Theocritus. 1879. This was an advance issue of extracts from ‘Theocritus, Bion and Moschus rendered into English prose’
  • XXII Ballades in Blue China (1880)
  • Oxford. Brief historical & descriptive notes (1880)
  • 'Theocritus Bion and Moschus. rendered into English Prose with an Introductory Essay. 1880.
  • Notes by Mr A. Lang on a collection of pictures by Mr J.E.Millais R.A. exhibited at the Fine Arts Society Rooms. 148 New Bond Street. 1881.
  • The Library: with a chapter on modern illustrated books. 1881.
  • The Black Thief. A new and original drama (Adapted from the Irish) in four acts.(1882)
  • Helen of Troy, her life and translation. Done into rhyme from the Greek books. 1882.
  • The Most Pleasant and Delectable Tale of the Marriage of Cupid and Psyche (1882) with William Aldington
  • The Iliad of Homer, a prose translation (1883) with Walter Leaf and Ernest Myers
  • Custom and Myth (1884)
  • The Princess Nobody: A Tale of Fairyland (1884)
  • Ballads and Verses Vain (1884) selected by Austin Dobson
  • Rhymes à la Mode (1884)
  • Much Darker Days. By A. Huge Longway. (1884)
  • Household tales; their origin, diffusion, and relations to the higher myths. [1884]. Separate pre-publication issue of the "introduction" to Bohn's edition of Grimm's Household tales.
  • That Very Mab (1885) with May Kendall
  • Books and Bookmen (1886)
  • Letters to Dead Authors (1886)
  • In the Wrong Paradise (1886) stories
  • The Mark of Cain (1886) novel
  • Lines on the inaugural meeting of the Shelley Society. Reprinted for private distribution from the Saturday Review of March 13th 1886 and edited by Thomas Wise (1886)
  • La Mythologie Traduit de L’Anglais par Leon Leon Parmentier. Avec une preface par Charles Michel et des Additions de l'auteur. (1886)Never published as a complete book in English, although there was a Polish translation. The first 170 pages is a translation of the article in the ‘Encyclopedia Britannica’. The rest is a combination of articles and material from ‘Custom and Myth’.
  • Almae matres (1887)
  • He (1887 with Walter Herries Pollock) parody
  • Aucassin and Nicolette (1887)
  • Myth, Ritual and Religion (2 vols., 1887)
  • Johnny Nut and the Golden Goose. Done into English from the French of Charles Deulin (1887)
  • Grass of Parnassus. Rhymes old and new. (1888)
  • Perrault's Popular Tales (1888)
  • Gold of Fairnilee (1888)
  • Pictures at Play or Dialogues of the Galleries (1888) with W. E. Henley
  • Prince Prigio (1889)
  • The Blue Fairy Book (1889) (illustrations by Henry J. Ford)
  • Letters on Literature (1889)
  • Lost Leaders (1889)
  • Ode to Golf. Contribution to On the Links; being Golfing Stories by various hands (1889)
  • Parson Kelly. 1899. Co-written with A.E.W.Mason.
  • The Dead Leman and other tales from the French (1889) translator with Paul Sylvester

Samuel Henry Butcher, MP (16 April 1850 – 29 December 1910) was a Dublin born classical scholar and, in his final years, an English politician. ... Walter Leaf (1852 - 1927), English banker and scholar, was born at Norwood, London, on November 26, 1852 and educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Henry Austin Dobson (January 18, 1840 _ September 2, 1921) was an English poet and essayist. ... Aucassin et Nicolette is a medieval French chantefable, or combination of prose and verse. ... William Ernest Henley (August 23, 1849 - July 11, 1903) was a British poet, critic and editor. ... Prince Prigio is a literary, and comic, fairy tale written by Andrew Lang and illustrated by Gordon Browne. ... Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ... Henry Justice Ford, also known as Henry J. Ford or H.J. Ford, was a British illustrator. ...

1890–1899

  • The Red Fairy Book (1890)
  • The World's Desire (1890) with H. Rider Haggard
  • Old Friends: Essays in Epistolary Parody (1890)
  • The Strife of Love in a Dream, Being the Elizabethan Version of the First Book of the Hypnerotomachia of Francesco Colonna (1890)
  • The Life, Letters and Diaries of Sir Stafford Northcote, 1st Earl of Iddesleigh. (1890)
  • Etudes traditionnists (1890)
  • How to Fail in Literature (1890)
  • The Blue Poetry Book (1891)
  • Essays in Little (1891)
  • On Calais Sands (1891)
  • The Green Fairy Book (1892)
  • The Library with a Chapter on Modern English Illustrated Books (1892) with Austin Dobson
  • William Young Sellar (1892)
  • The True Story Book (1893)
  • Homer and the Epic (1893)
  • Prince Ricardo of Pantouflia (1893)
  • Waverley Novels, 48 volumes (1893) editor
  • St. Andrews (1893)
  • Montezuma's Daughter (1893) with H. Rider Haggard
  • The Yellow Fairy Book (1894)
  • Kirk's Secret Commonwealth (1893)
  • St Andrews (1893)
  • The Tercentenary of Izaak Walton (1893)
  • Ban and Arrière Ban (1894)
  • Cock Lane and Common-Sense (1894)
  • Memoir of R. F. Murray (1894)
  • The Red True Story Book (1895)
  • My Own Fairy Book (1895)
  • Angling Sketches (1895)
  • A Monk of Fife (1895)
  • The Voices of Jeanne D'Arc (1895)
  • The Animal Story Book (1896)
  • The Poems and Songs of Robert Burns (1896) editor
  • The Life and Letters of John Gibson Lockhart (1896) two volumes
  • The Nursery Rhyme Book (1897)
  • The Miracles of Madame Saint Katherine of Fierbois (1897) translator
  • The Pink Fairy Book (1897)
  • A Book of Dreams and Ghosts (1897)
  • Pickle the Spy (1897)
  • Modern Mythology (1897)
  • The Companions of Pickle (1898)
  • The Arabian Nights Entertainments (1898)
  • The Making of Religion (1898)
  • Selections from Coleridge (1898)
  • Waiting on the Glesca Train (1898)
  • The Red Book of Animal Stories (1899)
  • The Homeric Hymns (1899) translator
  • The Works of Charles Dickens in Thirty-four Volumes (1899) editor

Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ... The Worlds Desire, written by H. Rider Haggard and Andrew Lang, is the story of the hero, Odysseus after his return from his untold second journey. ... H. Rider Haggard, author Sir Henry Rider Haggard (June 22, 1856 – May 14, 1925), born in Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in locations considered exotic by readers in his native England. ... Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ... Henry Austin Dobson (January 18, 1840 _ September 2, 1921) was an English poet and essayist. ... H. Rider Haggard, author Sir Henry Rider Haggard (June 22, 1856 – May 14, 1925), born in Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in locations considered exotic by readers in his native England. ... Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ... John Gibson Lockhart (July 14, 1794 - November 25, 1854), Scottish writer and editor, was born in the manse of Cambusnethan in Lanarkshire, where his father, Dr John Lockhart, transferred in 1796 to Glasgow, was minister. ... Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ...

1900–1909

  • The Grey Fairy Book (1900)
  • Prince Charles Edward (1900)
  • Parson Kelly (1900)
  • The Poems and Ballads of Sir Walter Scott, Bart. (1900) editor
  • A History of Scotland - From the Roman Occupation (1900 – 1907)) four volumes
  • Notes and Names in Books (1900)
  • Alfred Tennyson (1901)
  • Magic and Religion (1901)
  • Adventures Among Books (1901)
  • The Violet Fairy Book (1901)
  • The Mystery of Mary Stuart (1901, new and revised ed., 1904)
  • The Book of Romance (1902)
  • The Disentanglers (1902)
  • James VI and the Gowrie Mystery (1902)
  • Notre-Dame Of Paris (1902) translator
  • The Young Ruthvens (1902)
  • The Gowrie Conspiracy: the Confessions of Sprott (1902) editor
  • The Crimson Fairy Book (1903)
  • Lyrics (1903)
  • Social England Illustrated (1903) editor
  • The Story of the Golden Fleece (1903)
  • The Valet's Tragedy (1903)
  • Social Origins (1903) with Primal Law by James Jasper Atkinson
  • The Snowman and Other Fairy Stories (1903)
  • Stella Fregelius: A Tale of Three Destinies (1903) with H. Rider Haggard
  • The Brown Fairy Book (1904)
  • Historical Mysteries (1904)
  • The Secret of the Totem (1905)
  • New Collected Rhymes (1905)
  • John Knox and the Reformation (1905)
  • The Puzzle of Dickens's Last Plot (1905)
  • The Clyde Mystery. A Study in Forgeries and Folklore (1905)
  • Adventures among Books (1905)
  • Homer and His Age (1906)
  • The Red Romance Book (1906)
  • The Orange Fairy Book (1906)
  • The Portraits and Jewels of Mary Stuart (1906)
  • Life of Sir Walter Scott (1906)
  • The Story of Joan of Arc (1906)
  • New and Old Letters to Dead Authors (1906)
  • Tales of a Fairy Court (1907)
  • The Olive Fairy Book (1907)
  • Poets' Country (1907) editor, with Churton Collins, W. J. Loftie, E. Hartley Coleridge, Michael Macmillan
  • The King over the Water (1907)
  • Tales of Troy and Greece (1907)
  • The Origins of Religion (1908) essays
  • The Book of Princes and Princesses (1908)
  • Origins of Terms of Human Relationships (1908)
  • Select Poems of Joan Ingelow (1908) editor
  • Three Poets of French Bohemia (1908)
  • The Red Book of Heroes (1909)
  • The Marvellous Musician and Other Stories (1909)
  • Sir George Mackenzie King's Advocate, of Rosehaugh, His Life and Times (1909)

Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ... Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ... Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ... H. Rider Haggard, author Sir Henry Rider Haggard (June 22, 1856 – May 14, 1925), born in Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in locations considered exotic by readers in his native England. ... Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ... The Red Romance Book (or The Red Book of Romance) is a book of fairy tales. ... Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ... Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ... John Churton Collins (March 26, 1848 - September 25, 1908), English literary critic, was born at Bourton-on-the-Water, Gloucestershire. ... William John Loftie (1839 – 1911) was a British clergyman and writer, on the history of London, travel, art and architecture. ... Ernest Hartley Coleridge (1846 – 1920) was a British literary scholar and poet. ...

1910–1912

  • The Lilac Fairy Book (1910)
  • Does Ridicule Kill? (1910)
  • Sir Walter Scott and the Border Minstrelsy (1910)
  • The World of Homer (1910)
  • The All Sorts of Stories Book (1911)
  • Ballades and Rhymes (1911)
  • Method in the Study of Totemism (1911)
  • The Book of Saints and Heroes (1912)
  • Shakespeare, Bacon and the Great Unknown (1912)
  • A History of English Literature (1912)
  • In Praise of Frugality (1912)
  • Ode on a Distant Memory of Jane Eyre (1912)
  • Ode to the Opening Century (1912)

Rumpelstiltskin from The Blue Fairy Book, by Henry J. Ford Andrew Langs Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. ...

Posthumous

  • Highways and Byways in The Border (1913) with John Lang
  • The Strange Story Book (1913) with Mrs. Lang
  • The Poetical Works (1923) edited by Mrs. Lang, four volumes
  • Old Friends Among the Fairies: Puss in Boots and Other Stories. Chosen from the Fairy Books (1926)
  • Tartan Tales From Andrew Lang (1928) edited by Bertha L. Gunterman
  • From Omar Khayyam (1935)

References

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Roger (Gilbert) Lancelyn Green (2 November 1918 – 8 October 1987) was a British biographer and childrens writer. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Andrew Lang
  • http://www.mythfolklore.net/andrewlang/
  • Works by Andrew Lang at Project Gutenberg
  • Custom and Myth - full text HTML of original work.
  • Andrew Lang, Anthropology and Religion, The Making of Religion, (Chapter II), Longmans, Green, and C°, London, New York and Bombay, 1900, pp. 39–64.
  • Andrew Lang, Crystal visions, savage and civilised, The Making of Religion, Chapter V, Longmans, Green, and C°, London, New York and Bombay, 1900, pp. 83–104.
  • Andrew Lang, The Poltergeist and his explainers, The Making of Religion, (Appendix B), Longmans, Green, and C°, London, New York and Bombay, 1900, pp. 324–339.

  Results from FactBites:
 
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The Blue Fairy Book, a Large Collection is extensively enhanced with 4,299 annotations advancing emotional literacy education from the Encyclopedia of Self-Knowledge.
The Red Fairy Book, a large older kids collection is extensively enhanced with 3,443 annotations advancing emotional literacy education from the Encyclopedia of Self-Knowledge.
If available, a biography and picture of Andrew Lang have also been included.
Andrew Lang (618 words)
Andrew Lang (March 31, 1844 - July 20, 1912) was a prolific Scots poet, novelist, and literary critic but is best known as the collector of folk and fairy tales.
The Mystery of Mary Stuart (1901, new and revised ed., 1904) was a consideration of the fresh light thrown on Mary's history by the Lennox manuscripts in the University library, Cambridge, strengthening her case by restating the perfidy of her accusers.
Andrew Lang was also an NBA basketball player who played with the Phoenix Suns, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Milwaukee Bucks, mainly in the role of backup center.
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