FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Andrew Keir

Andrew Keir, born Andrew Buggy on April 3, 1926 in Lanarkshire, Scotland, was a British actor, well-known for his roles in several Hammer Films horror film productions during the 1960s. April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... 1926 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig in Gaelic) is a traditional county of Scotland. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Languages with Official Status1 English Scottish Gaelic Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Hammer horror refers to horror films produced in the late 1950s through the 1970s by the British film studio Hammer Films. ... The 1960s, or The Sixties, in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ...


Keir, the son of a coal-miner, initially worked in the coal mines of his home town himself, leaving school to become a miner at the age of fourteen. He worked the mines for six years, before in 1946, at the age of twenty, joining the Glasgow Citizen's Theatre to train as an actor. 1946 was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Glasgows location in Scotland Glasgow (or Glaschu in Gaelic) is Scotlands largest city, situated on the River Clyde in the countrys west central lowlands. ...


He made his film debut in the early Hammer film The Lady Craves Excitement in 1950. His film work then went on to include well-known pictures such as A Night to Remember (1958), Cleopatra (1963), The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964), Lord Jim (1965) and Daleks - Invasion Earth 2150 AD (1966). Probably his best-known role during this period, and his major starring role, was as Professor Bernard Quatermass in the 1967 Hammer Films adaptation of the BBC television serial Quatermass and the Pit. Later film roles included parts in the 1978 version of The Thirty-Nine Steps and Rob Roy (1995). 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... See also A Night to Remember (album) for the Cyndi Lauper album by this name. ... 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cleopatra is the name of several movies about the last Egyptian queen of the same name. ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Fall of the Roman Empire is a 1964 film starring Sophia Loren, Stephen Boyd, Alec Guinness, James Mason, and Christopher Plummer. ... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Lord Jim is a novel written by Joseph Conrad in 1900. ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... Daleks - Invasion Earth 2150 AD (1966) is the second of two Doctor Who films made during the 1960s to feature Peter Cushing as the time traveller Doctor Who (unlike the television series, where the character is simply called the Doctor). ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... Professor Bernard Quatermass is a fictional character, created by the writer Nigel Kneale originally for BBC Television, who appeared in three influential BBC science fiction serials of the 1950s, and made his swansong in a final serial for Thames Television in 1979. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national publicly funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... The 1967 advertising poster for the films UK release. ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... The Thirty-Nine Steps is an adventure novel by John Buchan, first published in 1915. ... Rob Roy is a movie that was released on April 7, 1995. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Keir also enjoyed an extensive television career, with guest starring roles in a variety of popular British television series, from Ivanhoe in 1958 to Hamish Macbeth in 1996. In between, he appeared in popular series such as The Avengers, The Saint, Taggart and Boon. He also starred in the popular 1976 Australian television series The Outsiders. Ivanhoe book cover Ivanhoe is a novel by Sir Walter Scott. ... 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hamish Macbeth is a BBC series about a policeman in a tiny costal village in the Scottish Highlands. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... The most famous incarnation of The Avengers, John Steed (Patrick Macnee) and Emma Peel (Diana Rigg) appear on the cover of a 1994 reprint of an Avengers novel co-written by Macnee. ... The Saint in a 1955 paperback edition. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Keir also worked on the radio, most notably when he returned to the role of Quatermass for the 1996 drama-documentary The Quatermass Memoirs, broadcast on BBC Radio 3. This made him one of only two actors - Brian Donlevy being the other - to play the part of the Professor twice. 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... The Quatermass Memoirs is a British radio drama documentary broadcast in five parts on BBC Radio 3 in the spring of 1996. ... BBC Radio 3 is a domestic UK BBC radio station, which devotes most of its schedule to classical music. ... Donlevy (right) with costar Ella Raines in Impact (1950) Brian Donlevy (born Waldo Bruce Donlevy on February 9, 1901 in Cleveland, Ohio, USA; died April 6, 1972 in Woodland Hills, California, USA) was an American actor, known for many film roles from the 1930s through to the 1960s. ...


Keir was married to Joyce Scott, and had five children: Andrew, Maureen, Sean, Deirdre and Julie. Sean, Deirdre and Julie [as Julie T. Wallace] all became actors, with Sean and Deirdre both later moving into producing.


He died on October 5, 1997 in London, England at the age of 71. October 5 is the 278th day of the year (279th in Leap years). ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ...


See also

Blood from the Mummys Tomb - August 28, 2001 release DVD cover Blood from the Mummys Tomb is a 1971 British film starring Andrew Keir, Valerie Leon, and James Villiers. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Andrew Keir - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (405 words)
Andrew Keir as Professor Bernard Quatermass in Quatermass and the Pit (1967)
Andrew Keir (3 April 1926 - 5 October 1997), born Andrew Buggy in Shotts, North Lanarkshire, was a Scottish actor, well-known for his roles in several Hammer Films horror film productions during the 1960s.
Keir, the son of a coal-miner, initially worked in the coal mines of his home town himself, leaving school to become a miner at the age of fourteen.
Appeal Court grants Thomas Keir retrial (482 words)
On 29 February 2000, Thomas Andrew Keir received a sentence of 24 years imprisonment, with a non-parole period of 18 years, for the murder of his first wife Jean Strachan Keir in 1988.
And, because the judge had invited the jury to view the DNA evidence as discrediting a key defence witness who claimed to have seen Jean eight months after her alleged murder, Keir was effectively deprived "of a chance that the jury might have looked at the sighting evidence as grounds to acquit," he said.
Keir was tried for her murder, but acquitted.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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