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Encyclopedia > Andrew Higgins

Andrew Jackson Higgins (28 August 18861 August 1952) was the founder and owner of Higgins Industries, the New Orleans-based manufacturer of "Higgins boats" (LCVPs) during World War II. General Dwight Eisenhower is quoted as saying, "Andrew Higgins ... is the man who won the war for us. ... If Higgins had not designed and built those LCVPs, we never could have landed over an open beach. The whole strategy of the war would have been different.". August 28 is the 240th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (241st in leap years), with 125 days remaining. ... 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) Events January 18 _ Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... August 1st is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... 1952 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... City nickname: The Crescent City, The Big Easy, The City that Care Forgot Location of New Orleans Country   State     Parish United States   Louisiana     Orleans Parish Mayor C. Ray Nagin Area  - Land  - Water 350. ... The Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel (LCVP) or Higgins boat was a landing craft used extensively in World War II. The craft was designed by Andrew Higgins of Louisiana, based on boats made for operating in swamps and marshes. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ...


Higgins was born on 28 August 1886 in Columbus, Nebraska. He left his native town in 1906 to enter the lumber business in Mobile, Alabama. Four years later, Higgins became manager of a German-owned lumber-importing firm in New Orleans. In 1922, he formed his own company, the Higgins Lumber and Export Co., importing hardwood from the Philippines, Central America, and Africa and exporting cypress and southern pine. In pursuing these ends he acquired a fleet of sailing ships—said to have been the largest under American registry at that time. To service this fleet, he established his own shipyard which built and repaired his cargomen as well as the tugs and barges needed to support them. August 28 is the 240th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (241st in leap years), with 125 days remaining. ... Columbus is a city located in Platte County, Nebraska. ... 1906 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Mobile and Mobile Bay from space, June 1991 Mobile is a city located in Mobile County, Alabama, United States. ... 1922 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Central America is the region of North America located between the southern border of Mexico and the northwest border of Colombia, in South America. ... A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Cypress is the name applied to many plants in the conifer family Cupressaceae (cypress family). ... See Tug (disambiguation) for alternative meanings of tug. ... Self propelled barge carrying bulk crushed stone Note that Barge is the NATO reporting name for the Soviet Tupolev Tu-85 bomber. ...


In 1926, four years after founding the Higgins Lumber and Export Co., the industrialist and shipbuilder designed the Eureka boat, a shallow-draft craft for use by oil drillers and trappers in operations along the Gulf coast and in lower Mississippi River. With a propeller recessed into a semi-tunnel in the hull, the boat could be operated in shallow waters where flotsam and submerged obstacles would render more usual types of propellers almost useless. Higgins also designed a "spoonbill" bow for his craft, allowing it to be run up onto riverbanks and then to back off with ease. His boats proved to be record-beaters; and, within a decade, he had so perfected the design that they could attain high speed in shallow water and turn practically in their own length. 1926 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Gulf of Mexico is a major body of water bordered and nearly landlocked by North America. ... Length 6,270 km Elevation of the source 450 m Average discharge Saint Louis¹: 5,500 m³/s Vicksburg²: 16,800 m³/s Baton Rouge³: 12,800 m³/s Area watershed 2,980,000 km² Origin Lake Itasca Mouth Gulf of Mexico Basin countries United States (98. ... Categories: Stub ...


Stiff competition, declining world trade, and the employment of tramp steamers to carry lumber cargoes combined to put Higgins' Lumber and Export Co. out of business. Nevertheless, the indefatigable Higgins kept his boatbuilding firm (established in 1930 as Higgins Industries) in business, constructing motorboats, tugs and barges, not only for private firms and individuals but also for the Coast Guard. 1930 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Coast Guard shield The United States Coast Guard is the coast guard of the United States. ...


Fortuitously, the Marine Corps—always interested in finding better ways to get men across a beach in an amphibious landing and frustrated that the Bureau of Construction and Repair could not meet its requirements—began to express interest in Higgins' boat. When tested in 1938 by the Navy and Marine Corps, Higgins' Eureka boat surpassed the performance of the Navy-designed boat and was tested by the services during fleet landing exercises in February 1939. Satisfactory in most respects, the boat's major drawback appeared to be that equipment had to be unloaded, and men disembarked, over the sides—thus exposing them to enemy fire in a combat situation. United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces. ... 1938 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... 1939 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The Japanese, however, had been using ramp-bowed landing boats in the Sino-Japanese War since the summer of 1937—boats that had come under intense scrutiny by the Navy and Marine Corps observers at Shanghai in particular. When shown a picture of one of those craft, Higgins soon thereafter got in touch with his chief engineer, and, after describing the Japanese design over the telephone, told the engineer to have a mock-up built for his inspection upon his return to New Orleans. See: Sino-Japanese War (1894-1895) Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1937 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Shanghai (Chinese: 上海; pinyin: ; Shanghainese IPA: ) is Chinas largest city and is situated on the banks of the Yangtze River Delta. ...


Within one month, tests of the ramp-bow Eureka boat in Lake Pontchartrain showed conclusively that successful operation of such a boat was feasible. From these humble beginnings came what became known as the LCVP (Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel), or simply, the "Higgins Boat". A larger version, originally classified as a "tank lighter" came on its heels, the precursor of the LCM (Landing Craft, Mechanized). Lake Pontchartrain is the second largest salt-water lake in the United States, and the largest lake in southeastern Louisiana. ... The Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel (LCVP) or Higgins boat was a landing craft used extensively in World War II. The craft was designed by Andrew Higgins of Louisiana, based on boats made for operating in swamps and marshes. ... In arithmetic and number theory the least common multiple or lowest common multiple (lcm) or smallest common multiple of two integers a and b is the smallest positive integer that is a multiple of both a and b. ...


During World War II, Higgins' industrial plants turned out a variety of equipment for the Navy: landing craft, motor torpedo boats (PT boats), torpedo tubes, gun turrets, and smoke generators. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Landing craft Rapière A landing craft is a type of boat used to convey infantry and vehicles on to a shore during an assault from sea to land. ... Motor Torpedo Boats (MTB) was the name given to fast torpedo boats by the US and Royal Navies. ... A modern torpedo, historically called a self propelled torpedo, is a self-propelled guided projectile that (after being launched above or below the water surface) operates underwater and is designed to detonate on contact or in proximity to a target. ...


The inventor and holder of some 30 patents pertinent to amphibious landing craft and vehicles, Andrew J. Higgins died in New Orleans on 1 August 1952. August 1st is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ...


In 1987, the Fleet Oiler, USNS Andrew J. Higgins (T-AO-190) was named in his honor. 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For alternate meanings see Edmonton Oilers and Houston Oilers An oiler is a ship, also called a tanker, that can carry a liquid cargo of petroleum, or a naval support vessel that carries fuel to naval ships at sea, and can transfer the fuel during underway operations. ...


See Also

Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... The Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel (LCVP) or Higgins boat was a landing craft used extensively in World War II. The craft was designed by Andrew Higgins of Louisiana, based on boats made for operating in swamps and marshes. ...

External links

  • history.navy.mil: Biography of Andrew J. Higgins (http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/a8/andrew_j_higgins.htm)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Andrew Higgins at AllExperts (843 words)
Andrew Jackson Higgins (28 August 1886 – 1 August 1952) was the founder and owner of Higgins Industries, the New Orleans-based manufacturer of "Higgins boats" (LCVPs) during World War II.
Higgins was born on 28 August 1886 in Columbus, Nebraska.
In 1926, four years after founding the Higgins Lumber and Export Co., the industrialist and shipbuilder designed the Eureka boat, a shallow-draft craft for use by oil drillers and trappers in operations along the Gulf coast and in lower Mississippi River.
Andrew Higgins - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (801 words)
Andrew Jackson Higgins (28 August 1886 1 August 1952) was the founder and owner of Higgins Industries, the New Orleans-based manufacturer of "Higgins boats" (LCVPs) during World War II.
When tested in 1938 by the Navy and Marine Corps, Higgins' Eureka boat surpassed the performance of the Navy-designed boat and was tested by the services during fleet landing exercises in February 1939.
There is a memorial to Andrew Higgins in Columbus, Nebraska; a seven-mile segment of U.S. Route 81 south of Columbus is designated as the "Andrew Jackson Higgins Expressway".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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