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Encyclopedia > Andrew Bonar Law
The Rt Hon Andrew Bonar Law


In office
23 October 1922 – 22 May 1923
Monarch George V
Preceded by David Lloyd George
Succeeded by Stanley Baldwin

In office
December 10, 1916 – January 10, 1919
Prime Minister David Lloyd George
Preceded by Reginald McKenna
Succeeded by Austen Chamberlain

Born September 16, 1858
Rexton, New Brunswick, Canada
Died 30 October 1923 (age 65)
London, England
Political party Conservative
Spouse Annie Pitcairn Robley
Alma mater University of Glasgow (night classes)
Religion Presbyterian

Andrew Bonar Law (16 September 185830 October 1923) was a British Conservative Party statesman and Prime Minister. Andrew Bonar Law File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who guided Britain and the British Empire through World War I and the postwar settlement as the Liberal Party Prime Minister, 1916-1922. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who guided Britain and the British Empire through World War I and the postwar settlement as the Liberal Party Prime Minister, 1916-1922. ... Cover of Time Magazine (March 3, 1924) Reginald McKenna (1863-1943) was a Liberal British statesman who has recently achieved a limmited amount of noteriety following a recent biography by disgraced heart-throb and former Tory MP Martin Farr. ... The Rt. ... // 1400 - Owain Glyndŵr declared Prince of Wales by his followers. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Rexton is a village of about 800 people (per the 2001 census) on the Richibucto River in Kent County, eastern New Brunswick. ... Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope restored) Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Official languages English, French (the only constitutionally bilingual province in the country) Government - Lieutenant-Governor Herménégilde Chiasson - Premier Shawn Graham (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 10 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Annie Bonar Law, née Annie Pitcairn Robley (18?? – 1909) was the wife of British Prime Minister Andrew Bonar Law. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group, Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... // 1400 - Owain Glyndŵr declared Prince of Wales by his followers. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...

Contents

Early life

Of Ulster Scots and Scottish descent, Andrew Bonar Law was born in Rexton, a small village in eastern New Brunswick, Canada. He was the son of the Reverend James Law of Portrush, County Antrim and Elizabeth Kidston, descended from early merchant settlers of Canada.. A flag occasionally used to represent Ulster-Scots. ... This article is about the country. ... Rexton is a village of about 800 people (per the 2001 census) on the Richibucto River in Kent County, eastern New Brunswick. ... Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope restored) Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Official languages English, French (the only constitutionally bilingual province in the country) Government - Lieutenant-Governor Herménégilde Chiasson - Premier Shawn Graham (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 10 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st... The Reverend is an honorary prefix added to the names of Christian clergy and ministers. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Antrim Area: 2,844 km² Population (est. ...


In 1860, Law's mother died in childbirth. He worked as a boy on his father's smallholding and for some years after his mother’s death he was in the care of his maternal aunt, Janet Kidston, who lived in her brother-in-law's household until his remarriage, when she decided to return to her native Scotland. She suggested that it might be to her nephew's advantage if she were to take him back to Scotland with her, where he would receive a good education, as the Kidstons were a much wealthier and better connected family than the Laws. This article is about the country. ...


At the age of 12, Law left to live with his late mother's three male cousins, who were rich merchant bankers in Glasgow. As they were all either unmarried or childless, they saw him as a substitute son and heir. He was educated at Gilbertfield School in Hamilton and then at Glasgow High School. “Glaswegian” redirects here. ... The Mausoleum of the Dukes of Hamilton, in the grounds of the old Hamilton Palace Hamilton (Hamaltan, in Scottish Gaelic) is a town in Central Scotland. ... The High School of Glasgow is a co-educational Independent School now located in the Anniesland area of Glasgow, Scotland, with a role of just over 1,000 pupils between the ages of 3 and 18. ...


Surprisingly, in view of Law's marked academic success, the Kidstons did not wish him to continue to university, and so at the age of 16 he was employed in the offices of their bank. He did later attend night classes at the University of Glasgow, which gave him an interest in politics and debating. At sometime during his life time he lived in the presbyterian Manse on Abbey Street in Coleraine, County Londonderry, belonging to 1st Coleraine Presbyterian Church Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group, Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... The rectory is the title usually given to the building inhabited, or formerly inhabited, by the vicar of a parish. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Coleraine Borough UK Parliament: East Londonderry European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Coleraine Postal District(s): BT51, BT52 Population (2001) 24,042 Coleraine (from the Irish: Cúil Raithin meaning Ferny corner) is a large town... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Derry Area: 2,074 km² Population (est. ... Modern logo of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland The Presbyterian Church in Ireland (or PCI) has a membership of 300,000 people in 650 congregations across both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, though the bulk of the membership is in Northern Ireland. ...


He read voraciously, but had a particular fondness for Dickens, Carlyle, Disraeli and Gibbon. He also became a very able chess player. “Dickens” redirects here. ... The most familiar view of Carlyle is as the bearded sage with a penetrating gaze. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (December 21, 1804 - April 24, British Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and author. ... Edward Gibbon (1737–1794). ... Chess is a recreational and competitive game for two players. ...


Bonar Law's business career went from strength to strength, and well before he was thirty, he had acquired the reputation of a shrewd man of business, who drove others hard but himself far harder. In 1885, he purchased a partnership in William Jacks & Co., a Glasgow firm concerned in the financing of the iron trade. In 1890, at the age of thirty-two, Bonar Law, already a settled and successful man, became engaged to Annie Robley, whom he married in Helensburgh, Dunbartonshire on 24 March 1891. Annie Bonar Law, née Annie Pitcairn Robley (18?? – 1909) was the wife of British Prime Minister Andrew Bonar Law. ... Helensburghs Rhu Road, looking west towards Rhu, Rosneath and the Gare Loch. ... Dunbartonshire is one of the Traditional counties of Scotland, in that part of the country formerly called Lennox (which was a title of nobility). ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The marriage was to prove very happy and they had seven children, although the first was stillborn. Law’s interest in politics had grown stronger as the 1890s went by, and after he inherited a very large sum on the death of one of the Kidstons, he was able to consider running for Parliament. One of Law's children, Isabel H. Law, married Major General Sir Frederick Sykes, the military commander, politician and statesman. Two of his sons were killed in World War I - Charles Law with the King's Own Scottish Borderers at the Battle of Gaza on 1917 and James Law with the Royal Flying Corps, shot down over the Western Front also in 1917. His youngest son was Richard Law, 1st Baron Coleraine. Major-General Right Honourable Sir Frederick Hugh Sykes (1877–1954) was an English statesman and politician. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Kings Own Scottish Borderers cap badge and tartan The Kings Own Scottish Borderers was an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Scottish Division. ... Several battles have been fought near Gaza in Palestine: The Battle of Gaza (312 BC) was fought between Ptolemy I of Egypt and Demetrius I of Macedon The Battle of Raphia in 217 BC, also known as the Battle of Gaza, was fought between Ptolemy IV of Egypt and Antiochus... The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the over-land air arm of the British military during most of World War I. // Formed by Royal Warrant on 13 May 1912, the RFC superseded the Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers. ... Richard Kidston Law, 1st Baron Coleraine (27 February, 1901 - 15 November, 1980) was a British Conservative politician. ...


Parliament

He was elected to Parliament for Glasgow Blackfriars and Hutchesontown as a Conservative in 1900. He associated himself with the Protectionist wing of the party led by Joseph Chamberlain, (more correctly until 1912 the associated but separate Liberal Unionist Party), and after Chamberlain withdrew from politics in 1906, Law came to lead that wing of the party along with Chamberlain's son, Austen. He had a reputation for honesty and fearlessness, and was well regarded as an effective speaker. These qualities helped him to be appointed as Parliamentary Secretary to the Board of Trade in 1902. Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... Glasgow Blackfriars and Hutchesontown was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1885 until 1918. ... The Rt. ... For the Canadian party see Liberal-Unionist The Liberal Unionists were a British political party that split away from the Liberals in 1886, and had effectively merged with the Conservatives by the turn of the century. ... The Rt. ... The Parliamentary Secretary to the Board of Trade in the United Kingdom was a member of Parliament assigned to assist the Board of Trade and its President with administration and liaison with Parliament. ...


He lost his seat to future Labour leader George Nicoll Barnes in the anti-Conservative landslide 1906 General Election, but he returned to represent Dulwich at a by-election later that year. Though hit hard by the death of his wife, he continued his political career; after leaving the House of Commons at the December 1910 election, he returned as MP for Bootle at a by-election in 1911. The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... George Nicoll Barnes (January 2, 1859 - April 21, 1940) was a Scottish politician. ... The UK general election of 1906 was from 12th January – 8th February 1906. ... Dulwich is a former UK Parlimentary constituency in Greater London, which was redrawn by the Boundary Commission in 1997 and now forms part of Dulwich and West Norwood. ... The Dulwich by-election, 1906 was a by-election held on 15 May 1906 for the British House of Commons constituency of Dulwich in South London. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... The UK general election of December 1910 was the last held over several days, from 3rd – 19th December 1910. ... Bootle is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Bootle by-election, 1911 was a by-election held for the British House of Commons constituency of Bootle in Merseyside on 27 March 1911. ...


Conservative Leader

Arthur Balfour resigned the leadership of the Conservative Party (known at that time, following the formal merger with the Liberal Unionists, and until Irish Independence in the early 1920s, as "the Unionist Party") in 1911 amid widespread dissatisfaction with his actions over the Parliament Act, which had eliminated the veto of the House of Lords. Following a deadlock between Austen Chamberlain and Walter Long, the two candidates agreed to stand down in favour of Bonar Law, who became Leader as a compromise candidate. Law's closest associate was his fellow Canadian (and New Brunswicker), newspaper mogul William Maxwell Aitken (later Lord Beaverbrook). In the years prior to the outbreak of the First World War, Law focused most of his attention on the tariff issue and on Irish Home Rule. Now that the House of Lords had lost its power to veto legislation, the latter had become inevitable, but along with much of his party Bonar Law furiously opposed the Liberals' plans to coerce the Ulster Protestants into a Home Rule Ireland; at a time when the latter were moving towards armed resistance, Bonar Law said that "there were no lengths" to which Ulster could go and not receive his support. In the United Kingdom, Parliament Act refers to each of two Acts of Parliament, passed in 1911 and 1949 respectively. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ... The Rt. ... Walter Hume Long, 1st Viscount Long (13 July 1854 - 26 September 1924 was a British Unionist politician. ... Sir William Maxwell Max Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook (May 25, 1879 - June 9, 1964) was a Canadian–British business tycoon and politician. ... Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ...


The Great War

He entered the coalition government as Colonial Secretary in 1915, his first senior Cabinet post, and, following the resignation of Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader Herbert Asquith, was invited by King George V to form a government, but he deferred to the new Liberal leader Lloyd George, who he believed was better placed to lead a coalition ministry. He served in Lloyd George's War Cabinet, first as Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons. His promotion reflected the great mutual trust between both leaders and made for a well co-ordinated political partnership; their coalition was re-elected by a landslide following the Armistice. Law's two eldest sons were both killed whilst fighting in the war. In the 1918 General Election, Law returned to Glasgow and was elected as member for Glasgow Central. Asquiths British coalition government of 1915 came about in the aftermath of the Gallipoli disaster, when it was felt it was necessary to bring the Conservatives into the government to shore it up. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... The name Herbert Asquith normally refers to: Herbert Henry Asquith, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1908–1916), but may also refer to his son: Herbert Asquith, a poet. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who guided Britain and the British Empire through World War I and the postwar settlement as the Liberal Party Prime Minister, 1916-1922. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... Glasgow Central is a constituency of the House of Commons of the UK Parliament. ...


Post War and Prime Minister

At war's end, he gave up the Exchequer for the less demanding sinecure office of Lord Privy Seal, but remained Leader of the Commons. In 1921, ill health forced his resignation as Tory leader and Leader of the Commons in favour of Austen Chamberlain. His departure weakened the hardliners in the cabinet who were opposed to negotiating with the IRA, and the Anglo-Irish War ended in the summer. A sinecure (from Latin sine, without, and cura, care) means an office which requires or involves little or no responsibility, labour, or active service. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... The Rt. ... This article is about the historical army of the Irish Republic (1919–1922) which fought in the Irish War of Independence 1919–21, and the Irish Civil War 1922–23. ... An Irish War of Independence memorial in Dublin The Anglo-Irish War (also known as the Irish War of Independence) was a guerrilla campaign mounted against the British government in Ireland by the Irish Republican Army under the proclaimed legitimacy of the First Dáil, the extra-legal Irish parliament...


By 1921-2 the coalition had become embroiled in an air of moral and financial (eg. the sale of honours) corruption. Besides the recent Irish Treaty and Edwin Montagu's moves towards greater self-government for India, both of which dismayed rank-and-file Tory opinion, the government's willingness to intervene against the Bolshevik regime in Russia also seemed out of step with the new and more pacific mood. A sharp slump in 1921 and a wave of strikes in the coal and railway industries also added to the government's unpopularity, as did the apparent failure of the Genoa Conference which ended in an apparent rapprochement between Germany and Soviet Russia. In other words, it was no longer the case that Lloyd George was an electoral asset to the Conservative Party.


Lloyd George and his chief cronies Birkenhead and Churchill (still distrusted by many Conservatives) wished to use armed force against Turkey (the Chanak Crisis), but had to back down when offered support only by New Zealand, but not Canada, Australia or South Africa; an anonymous letter appeared in "The Times" supporting the government but stating that Britain could not "act as the policeman for the world", and it was an open secret that the author, "A Colonial", was in fact Bonar Law. At a famous meeting at the Carlton Club Tory backbenchers, led by the President of the Board of Trade Stanley Baldwin and influenced by the recent Newport by-election which was won by an independent Conservative , voted to end the Lloyd George Coalition and fight the next election as an independent party. Austen Chamberlain resigned as Party Leader, Lloyd George resigned as Prime Minister and Bonar Law returned on 23 October 1922 in both jobs. The Chanak Crisis (also called the Chanak Affair) occurred in September 1922, when British and French troops stationed near Çanakkale (also called Chanak) to guard the neutral zone of the Dardanelles were threatened with attack by Turkish troops after the recapture of İzmir (Smyrna) following the Greek defeat. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ...


Many leading Conservatives (eg. Birkenhead, Arthur Balfour, Austen Chamberlain, Robert Horne) were not members of the new Cabinet, which was contemptuously referred to as "the Second Eleven". Although the Coalition Conservatives numbered no more than thirty, they hoped to dominate any future Coalition government in the same way that the similarly-sized Peelite group had dominated the Coalition Government of 1852-5 - an analogy much used at the time.


Parliament was immediately dissolved, and a General Election ensued. Besides the two Conservative factions, Labour were fighting as a major national party for the first time and indeed became the main Opposition after the election; the Liberals were still split into Asquith and Lloyd George factions, with many Lloyd George Liberals still unopposed by Conservative candidates (including Churchill, who was defeated at Dundee nonetheless). Despite the confused political arena the Conservatives were re-elected with a comfortable majority.


Questions were raised about whether the elderly Conservative Party Treasurer, Lord Farquar, had passed on to Lloyd George (who during his premiership had amassed a large fund, largely from the sale of honours) any money intended for the Conservative Party. The Coalition Conservatives also hoped to obtain Conservative Party money from Farquar. Bonar Law found Farquar too "gaga" to properly explain what had happened, and dismissed him.


One of the questions which taxed Bonar Law's brief government was that of inter-Allied war debts. Britain owed money to the USA, and in turn was owed four times as much money by France, Italy and the other Allied powers, although under the Lloyd George government Balfour had promised that Britain would collect no more money from other Allies than she was required to repay the USA; the debt was hard to repay as trade (exports were needed to earn foreign currency) had not returned to prewar levels. On a trip to the USA Stanley Baldwin, the inexperienced Chancellor of the Exchequer, agreed to repay £40 million per annum to the USA rather than the £25 million which the British government had thought feasible, and on his return announced the deal to the press when his ship docked at Southampton, before the Cabinet had had a chance to consider it. Bonar Law contemplated resignation, and after being talked out of it by senior ministers once again vented his feelings in an anonymous letter to "The Times".


Bonar Law was soon diagnosed with terminal throat cancer and, no longer physically able to speak in Parliament, resigned on 22 May 1923. George V sent for Baldwin, whom Bonar Law is rumoured to have favoured over Lord Curzon. Howaver Law did not offer any advice to the King.[1] Bonar Law died later that same year in London at the age of 65. Throat cancer is a common way of referring to some head and neck cancers, usually squamous cell carcinomas. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Bonar Law's estate was probated at £35,736.


Bonar Law is often referred to as "the unknown Prime Minister", not least because of a biography of that title by Robert Blake; the name comes from a remark by Asquith at Bonar Law's funeral, that they were burying the Unknown Prime Minister next to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. He was certainly the shortest serving PM of the twentieth century, but this should not undermine the legacy of his policies or his various judgements in office. Robert Norman William Blake, Baron Blake (December 23, 1916 - September 20, 2003) was an English historian, best known for his 1966 biography of Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield. ...


He is also the only British Prime Minister to have been born outside the British Isles.


A tiny hamlet (unincorporated village) named Bonarlaw is named after the British Prime Minister. It was formerly known as "Big Springs" and then "Bellview" and is located in the municipality of Stirling-Rawdon, Ontario, Canada. Stirling-Rawdon is a township in the Canadian province of Ontario, located in Hastings County. ...


Bonar Law's Government, October 1922 - May 1923

For a full list of Ministerial office holders, see Conservative Government 1922-1924 Members of the Cabinet are shown in bold face. ...

The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... George Cave, 1st Viscount Cave, GCMG, KC (February 23, 1856) - (March 29, 1928) was a British lawyer and Conservative politician who became Lord Chancellor of Great Britain. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... James Edward Hubert Gascoyne-Cecil, 4th Marquess of Salisbury (October 23, 1861 - April 4, 1947) was the eldest son and heir of the Victorian statesman Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... Edgar Algernon Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood Edgar Algernon Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood, previously known as Lord Robert Cecil (September 14, 1864 – November 24, 1958) was a lawyer, politician and diplomat. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... William Clive Bridgeman, 1st Viscount Bridgeman (31 December 1864 - 14 August 1935) was a British Conservative politician. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, British statesman The Most Honourable George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston (January 11, 1859 – March 20, 1925), was a conservative British statesman who served as Viceroy of India. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... The Duke of Devonshire As Governor General The Most Noble Victor Christian William Cavendish, 9th Duke of Devonshire (London May 31, 1868–May 6, 1938 Chatsworth House), was a Liberal Unionist Member of Parliament for West Derbyshire (1891-1908), Governor General of Canada (1916-1921), and Colonial Secretary (1922-1924). ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... Edward George Villiers Stanley, 17th Earl of Derby (4 April 1865 - 4 February 1948) was an English politician around the turn of the 20th century. ... The secretary of war in cabinet position was Henry Knox. ... William Robert Wellesley Peel, 1st Earl Peel (1867-1937) was a British politician who served as Secretary of State for India twice in the 1920s and as Lord Privy Seal in 1931. ... The office of Secretary of State for India or India Secretary was created in 1858 when India was brought under direct British rule (British Raj). ... Sir Ronald Munro-Ferguson The Right Honourable Sir Ronald Munro-Ferguson, 1st Viscount Novar of Raith, KBE, PC (6 March 1860 - 30 March 1934), sixth Governor-General of Australia, was probably the most politically influential holder of this post. ... The Secretary for Scotland was the former title of the chief minister in charge of the Scotland Office in the United Kingdom government. ... Leopold Charles Maurice Stennett Amery was a British Conservative Party politician and journalist, noted for his interest in military preparedness, India and the British Empire. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... Philip Cunliffe-Lister, 1st Earl of Swinton, (1884-1972), known as Sir Philip Lloyd-Greame until 1924 and as The Viscount Swinton from 1935 until 1955, was a prominent British Conservative politician from the 1920s until the 1950s. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... Robert Arthur Sanders, 1st Baron Bayford PC Bt JP (20 June 1867 – 24 February 1940) The son of Arthur Sanders, Fernhill, Isle of Wight, he was educated at Harrow and Balliol College, Oxford where he graduated with 1st class honours in Law. ... The Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food was a UK cabinet position, responsible for the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. ... Cover of Time Magazine April 12, 1926 Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax, known as Lord Irwin from 1926 until 1934, (1881-1959) was a British Conservative politician. ... The Secretary of State for Education and Skills is the chief minister of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom government. ... Sir Montague Barlow Andrew Bonar Law 1922 in the United Kingdom Full Name: Sir Clement Anderson Montague BARLOW. Of Westminster, London. ... Minister of Labour re-directs here. ... Sir Arthur Sackville Trevor Griffith-Boscawen (1865-1946) was a British Conservative politician whose career was cut short by repeatedly losing a string of Parliamentary elections. ... Minister of Health redirects here. ...

Changes

  • April 1923 - Griffith-Boscawen resigns as Minister of Health after losing his seat and is succeeded by Neville Chamberlain.

Arthur Neville Chamberlain (18 March 1869 – 9 November 1940), known as Neville Chamberlain, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1937 to 1940. ...

References

  1. ^ Alan Clark, The Tories: Conservatives and the Nation State 1922-1997 (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1998) page 25 ISBN 0-75380-765-3

Alan Kenneth Mackenzie Clark (13 April 1928 - 5 September 1999) was a British Conservative politician, historian and diarist. ... Weidenfeld & Nicholson is a British publisher of fiction, an imprint of the larger Orion Publishing Group ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...

Bibliography

  • Adams, R. J. Q. Bonar Law, London: John Murray, 1999. ISBN 0-7195-5422-5
  • Blake, Robert The Unknown Prime Minister: The Life and Times of Andrew Bonar Law, 1858-1923, London: 1955.
  • Smith, Jeremy "Bluff, Bluster and Brinkmanship: Andrew Bonar Law and the Third Home Rule Bill" pages 161-178 from Historical Journal, Volume 36, Issue #1, 1993.
  • Deane, Ciarán The Guinness Book of Irish Facts & Feats. Guinness Publishing 1994 ISBN 0-85112-793-2

External links

  • More about Andrew Bonar Law on the Downing Street website.
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Andrew Bonar Law
Parliament of the United Kingdom (1801–present)
Preceded by
Andrew Dryburgh Provand
Member of Parliament for Glasgow Blackfriars and Hutchesontown
19001906
Succeeded by
George Nicoll Barnes
Preceded by
Frederick Rutherfoord Harris
Member of Parliament for Dulwich
1906–1910
Succeeded by
Frederick Hall
Preceded by
Thomas Myles Sandys
Member of Parliament for Bootle
1911–1918
Succeeded by
Thomas Royden
Preceded by
John Mackintosh McLeod
Member of Parliament for Glasgow Central
19181923
Succeeded by
William Alexander
Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Dudley
Parliamentary Secretary to the Board of Trade
1902–1905
Succeeded by
Hudson Kearley
Preceded by
Arthur Balfour
Conservative Leader in the Commons
1911–1921
Succeeded by
Austen Chamberlain
Leader of the British Conservative Party
1911–1921
with The Marquess of Lansdowne to 1916
Succeeded by
Austen Chamberlain
and Lord Curzon
Leader of the Opposition
1911–1915
Succeeded by
none
Preceded by
Lewis Harcourt
Secretary of State for the Colonies
1915–1916
Succeeded by
Walter Long
Preceded by
Reginald McKenna
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1916–1919
Succeeded by
Austen Chamberlain
Preceded by
Herbert Henry Asquith
Leader of the House of Commons
1916–1921
Succeeded by
Austen Chamberlain
Preceded by
The Earl of Crawford and Balcarres
Lord Privy Seal
1919–1921
Preceded by
David Lloyd George
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
1922–1923
Succeeded by
Stanley Baldwin
Preceded by
Austen Chamberlain
Leader of the House of Commons
1922–1923
Preceded by
Austen Chamberlain
and Lord Curzon
Leader of the British Conservative Party
1922–1923
Persondata
NAME Law, Andrew Bonar
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
DATE OF BIRTH 16 September 1858
PLACE OF BIRTH Rexton, New Brunswick, Canada
DATE OF DEATH 30 October 1923
PLACE OF DEATH London, England

 
 

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