FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Andrea Gabrieli

Andrea Gabrieli (c. 1510 – late 1586) was an Italian composer and organist of the late Renaissance. The uncle of the somewhat more famous Giovanni Gabrieli, he was the first internationally renowned member of the Venetian School of composers, and was extremely influential in spreading the Venetian style in Italy as well as in Germany. Events Conquest of Pskov by Grand Prince Vasili III of Muscovy. ... 1586 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... An organist is a musician who plays the organ, whether pipe or electronic. ... Renaissance music is classical music written during the Renaissance, approximately 1450 to 1600. ... Giovanni Gabrieli Giovanni Gabrieli (1553–1556? – August 12, 1612) was an Italian composer and organist. ... In music history, the Venetian School is a term used to describe the composers working in Venice from about 1550 to around 1610; it also describes the music they produced. ...


Life

Details on Gabrieli's early life are sketchy. He was probably a native of Venice, and may have been a pupil of Adrian Willaert at St. Mark's there. He is known to have been organist in Cannaregio in 1557, at which time he competed unsuccessfully for the post of organist at St. Mark's. In 1562 he went to Germany, where he visited Frankfurt am Main and Munich; while there he met and became friends with Orlando di Lasso. In 1566 he was chosen for the post of organist at St. Mark's, one of the most prestigious musical posts in northern Italy; he retained this position for the rest of his life. Around this time he acquired, and maintained, a reputation as one of the finest current composers. Working in the unique acoustical space of St. Mark's, he was able to develop his unique, grand ceremonial style, which was enormously influential in the development of the polychoral style and the concertato idiom, which partially defined the beginning of the Baroque era in music. Location within Italy Venice (Italian: Venezia), the city of canals, is the capital of the region of Veneto and of the province of Venice, 45°26′ N 12°19′ E, population 271,663 (census estimate 2004-01-01). ... Adrian Willaert (c. ... San Marco di Venezia, as seen from the Piazza San Marco St Marks Basilica (Italian: Basilica di San Marco) is the most famous of the churches of Venice and one of the best known examples of Byzantine architecture. ... The Cannaregio Canal, the main artery of Cannaregio, seen from the Tre Archi Bridge. ... Events Spain is effectively bankrupt. ... Events Earliest English slave-trading expedition under John Hawkins. ... Frankfurt am Main [ˈfraŋkfʊrt] is the largest city in the German state of Hessen and the fifth largest city of Germany. ... For the 2005 Steven Spielberg film, see Munich (film). ... Orlande de Lassus, a. ... Events January 7 - Pius V becomes Pope Selim II succeeds Suleiman I as Sultan of the Ottoman Empire Religious rioting in the Netherlands signifies the beginning of the Eighty Years War in the Netherlands. ... The Venetian polychoral style was a type of music of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras which involved spatially separate choirs singing in alternation. ... Concertato (sometimes called stile concertato) is a term in early Baroque music referring to either a genre or a style of music in which groups of instruments or voices share a melody, usually in alternation, and almost always over a basso continuo. ... Baroque music is European classical music written during the Baroque era, approximately 1600 to 1750. ...


His duties at St. Mark's clearly included composition, for he wrote a lot of music for ceremonial affairs, some of considerable historical interest. He provided the music for the festivities accompanying the celebration of the victory over the Turks in the Battle of Lepanto (1571); he also composed music for the visit of several princes from Japan (1586). The naval Battle of Lepanto took place on 7 October 1571, at the northern edge of the entrance to the Gulf of Corinth (then the Gulf of Lepanto), off western Greece. ... Events January 11 - Austrian nobility is granted Freedom of religion. ... 1586 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ...


Late in his career he also became famous as a teacher. Prominent among his students were his nephew Giovanni Gabrieli; the music theorist Lodovico Zacconi; Hans Leo Hassler, who carried the concertato style to Germany; and many others. Lodovico Zacconi (1555 - 1627) was an Italian composer and music theorist of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. ... Hans Leo Hassler (baptized October 26, 1564 – June 8, 1612) was a German composer and organist of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. ...


The date and circumstances of his death are not known, but since his position at St. Mark's was filled at the end of 1586, and a large amount of his music was published posthumously in 1587, it is presumed that he died in 1586. 1587 was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. ...


Works

Gabrieli was a prolific and versatile composer, and wrote a large amount of music, including sacred and secular vocal music, music for mixed groups of voices and instruments, and purely instrumental music, much of it for the huge, resonant space of St. Mark's. His works include over a hundred motets and madrigals, as well as a smaller number of instrumental works. In Western music, motet is a word that is applied to a number of highly varied choral musical compositions. ... A madrigal is a setting for 4–6 voices of a secular text, often in Italian. ...


His early style is indebted to Cipriano de Rore, and his madrigals are representative of mid-century trends. Even in his earliest music, however, he had a liking for homophonic textures at climaxes, foreshadowing the grand style of his later years. After his meeting with Lassus in 1562, his style changed considerably, and the Netherlander became the strongest influence on him. Cypriano de Rore or Cipriano de Rore (1515 or 1516 – September 1565) was a Franco-Flemish composer and teacher. ... Orlande de Lassus, a. ... Events Earliest English slave-trading expedition under John Hawkins. ...


Once Gabrieli was working at St. Mark's, he began to turn away from the Franco-Flemish contrapuntal style which had dominated the music of the 16th century, instead exploiting the sonorous grandeur of mixed instrumental and vocal groups playing antiphonally in the great cathedral. His music of this time uses repetition of phrases with different combinations of voices at different pitch levels; although instrumentation is not specifically indicated, it can be inferred; he carefully contrasts texture and sonority to shape sections of music in a way which was unique, and which defined the Venetian style for the next generation. In music, the Dutch School refers, somewhat imprecisely, to the style of polyphonic vocal music composition in Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... This article is about the musical term. ... The Venetian polychoral style was a type of music of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras which involved spatially separate choirs singing in alternation. ...


Not everything Gabrieli wrote was for St. Mark's, though. He provided the music for one of the earliest revivals of an ancient Greek drama in Italian translation: Oedipus tyrannus, by Sophocles, for which he wrote the music for the choruses, setting separate lines for different groupings of voices. It was produced at Vicenza in 1585. Oedipus the King (also known as Oedipus Rex and Oedipus Tyrannos) is a Greek tragedy, written by Sophocles around 427 BC. The play was the second of Sophocles three Theban plays to be produced, but its events occur before those of Oedipus at Colonus or Antigone. ... A Roman bust of Sophocles. ... Vicenza (population 107,223) is the capital of the province of Vicenza in the Veneto region, northern Italy at the northern base of the Monti Berici, straddling the Bacchiglione. ... 1585 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. ...


Evidently Andrea Gabrieli was reluctant to publish a lot of his own music, and his nephew Giovanni Gabrieli published a good deal of the music after his uncle's death. Giovanni Gabrieli Giovanni Gabrieli (1553–1556? – August 12, 1612) was an Italian composer and organist. ...


Sources

  • Article "Andrea Gabrieli," in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, ed. Stanley Sadie. 20 vol. London, Macmillan Publishers Ltd., 1980. ISBN 1561591742
  • Gustave Reese, Music in the Renaissance. New York, W.W. Norton & Co., 1954. ISBN 0393095304

  Results from FactBites:
 
Andrea Gabrieli - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (687 words)
Gabrieli was a prolific and versatile composer, and wrote a large amount of music, including sacred and secular vocal music, music for mixed groups of voices and instruments, and purely instrumental music, much of it for the huge, resonant space of St. Mark's.
Once Gabrieli was working at St. Mark's, he began to turn away from the Franco-Flemish contrapuntal style which had dominated the music of the 16th century, instead exploiting the sonorous grandeur of mixed instrumental and vocal groups playing antiphonally in the great cathedral.
Evidently Andrea Gabrieli was reluctant to publish a lot of his own music, and his nephew Giovanni Gabrieli published a good deal his music after his death.
Andrea Gabrieli (128 words)
Mark's in Venice, where Gabrieli was himself organist from 1566 to his death.
Gabrieli wrote over a hundred motets and madrigals and a smaller number of instrumental works.
He was also a teacher, with his most notable pupil being his nephew, Giovanni Gabrieli who as well as being a notable composer himself, published a good deal of Andrea's music.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m