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Encyclopedia > Andover, Hampshire
Andover
Statistics
Population: 52,000
Ordnance Survey
OS grid reference: SU3645
Administration
District: Test Valley
Region: South East England
Constituent country: England
Sovereign state: United Kingdom
Other
Ceremonial county: Hampshire
Historic county: Hampshire
Services
Police force: Hampshire Constabulary
Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}}
Ambulance: South Central
Post office and telephone
Post town: Andover
Postal district: SP10
Dialling code: 01264
Politics
UK Parliament: North West Hampshire
European Parliament: South East England

Andover is a town in the English county of Hampshire. The town is situated on the River Anton some 30 km west of the town of Basingstoke, 30 km north-west of the city of Winchester and 40 km north of the city of Southampton.[1] Image File history File links Dot4gb. ... Image File history File links Gb4dot. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Test Valley is a local government district and borough in Hampshire, England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... Constituent country is an official term used to describe three of the four principal component parts of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK): England; Scotland; Wales. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Hampshire, sometimes historically Southamptonshire or Hamptonshire, (abbr. ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... Hampshire, sometimes historically Southamptonshire or Hamptonshire, (abbr. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Hampshire Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing Hampshire and the Isle of Wight in southern England. ... A fire engine belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... This is a list of ambulance services in the United Kingdom: Ambulance services in England, after July 1, 2006 are A few deviations from the above have been made for operational reasons. ... The South Central Ambulance Service NHS Trust is the authority responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire, Milton Keynes, Oxfordshire, Portsmouth, and Southampton, in the South East England region. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... North West Hampshire is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Sign in the entrance of the European Parliament building in Brussels, written in all the official languages used in the European Union as of July 2006 The European Parliament building in Strasbourg The debating chamber, or hemicycle, in Strasbourg The European Parliament building in Brussels The European Parliament (formerly European... South East England is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England_(bordered). ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... Hampshire, sometimes historically Southamptonshire or Hamptonshire, (abbr. ... The River Anton is a river in the English county of Hampshire. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude this page lists lengths between 10 and 100 km (104 to 105 m). ... Statistics Population: 152,573 (Borough, 2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SU637523 Administration Borough: Basingstoke and Deane Shire county: Hampshire Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Hampshire Historic county: Hampshire Services Police force: Hampshire Constabulary Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Central... To help compare different orders of magnitude this page lists lengths between 10 and 100 km (104 to 105 m). ... Statistics Population: 40,000 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SU485295 Administration District: City of Winchester Shire county: Hampshire Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Hampshire Historic county: Hampshire Services Police force: Hampshire Constabulary Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Central Post office... To help compare different orders of magnitude this page lists lengths between 10 and 100 km (104 to 105 m). ... Southampton is a city and major port situated on the south coast of England. ...


The town has a population of about 52,000 people and is part of Test Valley administrative district. Test Valley is a local government district and borough in Hampshire, England. ...

Contents

History

Andover’s first mention in history is in 950 when King Edred is recording as having built a royal hunting lodge there. In 962 King Edgar called a meeting of the Saxon 'parliament' at his hunting lodge near Andover. Events World Population: 250 Million. ... King Edred (c923 - 23 November 955), a son of King Edward the Elder by his third marriage. ... Events February 2 - Pope John XII crowns Otto I the Great Holy Roman Emperor. ... EDGAR, the Electronic Data-Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval system, performs automated collection, validation, indexing, acceptance, and forwarding of submissions by companies and others who are required by law to file forms with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the SEC). Not all documents filed with the SEC by public...


Of more importance was the baptism, in 994 of the Viking leader Olaf Trygvason. This was part of a deal with King Ethelred II of England (“The Unready”) whereby he stopped ravaging England and returned home. Olaf became king of Norway in 995 and tried to convert his country to Christianity before his death in battle in 1000. Events Otto III reaches his majority and begins to rule Germany in his own right. ... Olaf Tryggvason (Old Norse: Óláfr Tryggvason, Norwegian: Olav Tryggvason), (960s - September 9? 1000), was King of Norway from 995 to 1000. ... Ethelred II or Æþelræd Unræd (c. ... Events (Erik Segersäll) is succeeded by (Olof Skötkonung), the first baptized ruler of Sweden. ... This article is becoming very long. ... // Events World Population 300 million. ...


At the time of the Domesday Book (1086) Andover had 107 male inhabitants and probably had a total population of about 500. It was quite a large settlement by the standards of the time. (Most villages had only 100 to 150 people). Andover also had 6 watermills which ground grain to flour. A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... Events Domesday Book is completed in England Emperor Shirakawa of Japan starts his cloistered rule Imam Ali Mosque is rebuilt by the Seljuk Malik Shah I after being destroyed by fire. ...


In 1175 King Richard I sold Andover a charter granting the townspeople certain rights, forming a merchant guild which took over the government of the town. The members elected two officials called bailiffs who ran the town. In 1201 King John gave the merchants the right to collect royal taxes in Andover themselves. In 1256 Henry III gave the townspeople the right to hold a court and try criminals for offences committed in Andover. Andover also sent MPs to the parliaments of 1295 and 1302-1307. The town was ravaged by two serious fires, one in 1141 and another in 1435. Events Ruaidri Ua Conchobair (Rory OConner), last High King of Ireland, submits to Henry II as vassal of Ireland with the Treaty of Windsor Ly Cao Ton becomes ruler of Vietnam William of Tyre becomes archbishop of Tyre Massacre of Abergavenny ends with several noblemen dead at the hands... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... // Events The town of Riga was chartered as a city. ... John (French: Jean) (24 December c. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was crowned King of England in 1216, despite being less than ten years of age. ... Events Mongol leader Ghazan Khan is converted to Islam, ending a line of Tantric Buddhist leaders. ... Events July 11 - Battle of the Golden Spurs (Guldensporenslag in Dutch), major victory of Flanders over the French occupier. ... Events July - The Knights Hospitaller begin their conquest of Rhodes. ... Events February 2 - Battle of Lincoln. ... For other uses, see number 1435. ...


Andover remained a small market town. Processing wool appears to have been the main industry and street names in the area of the town known as “Sheep Fair” commemorate this. A weekly market, and an annual fair were held.


As well as the Church of St Mary the town had a priory and a hospital run by monks, dedicated to St John the Baptist, and also a lepers hostel to St Mary Magdalene. In 1538 during the Reformation Henry VIII closed the priory and the hospital. In 1571 a free school for the boys of Andover was established. This in time became Andover Grammar School, and is now John Hanson Community School. (Which has since been demolished and rebuilt not far from two primary schools in the town. The site which was once John Hanson, now acts as a housing district.) John the Baptist (also called John the Baptizer or John the Dipper) is regarded as a prophet by at least three religions: Christianity, Islam, and Mandaeanism. ... Mary Magdalene, which probably means Mary of Magdala, a town on the western shore of the Lake of Tiberias, is described in the New Testament as a follower of Jesus both in the canon and in the apocrypha. ... Events Treaty of Nagyvarad. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... For the play, see Henry VIII (play). ... Events January 11 - Austrian nobility is granted Freedom of religion. ...


In 1599 the town received a new charter from Elizabeth I. The merchants guild was made a corporation and the number of annual fairs was increased from one to three. Like other towns Andover suffered from outbreaks of plague. There were outbreaks in 1603-5, 1625-6 and 1636. Events The Jesuit educational plan known as the Ratio Studiorum is issued (January 8). ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England, Queen of France (in name only), and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... Bubonic plague is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease plague, which is caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis. ...


During the 18th century, being situated on the main ExeterSalisburyLondon road Andover became a major stopping point on the stagecoach routes, more than 30 stagecoaches passing through the town each day. In 1789 a canal to Southampton was opened, though this was never a commercial success and closed in 1859. It was replaced by a railway in the 19th century, which was closed down in 1964. The land, together with the adjacent gasworks and P. M. Coombes woodyards, were then sold to the TSB Bank who later built their headquarters there. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this articles infobox may require cleanup. ... Salisbury Cathedral by Constable. ... London (pronounced ) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and the largest city of England (strangely, England has no constitutional existence within the United Kingdom, and therefore cannot be said to have a capital). ... Buffalo soldiers guard a Concord style stagecoach somewhere in the American West, ca. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Channel (geography). ... Southampton is a city and major port situated on the south coast of England. ... 1859 (MDCCCLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...


During the 19th century the town acquired all the usual additions, a theatre in 1803, gas street lighting in 1838, a fire station and cottage hospital in 1877, a swimming opened in 1885 and a recreation ground opened by Common Acre in 1887. A water company was formed in 1875 to provide piped water to the town and a system of sewers and drains was built in 1899-1902. The public library opened in 1897. Despite this burgeoning of the amenities of the town in 1845 a notorious scandal involving the hardships endured by the inmates of the workhouse led indirectly to reform of the Poor Law Act. The town was one of the boroughs reformed by the Municipal Reform Act 1835. 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Librarians and patrons in a typical larger urban public library. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Former workhouse at Nantwich, dating from 1780 A workhouse was a place where people who were unable to support themselves could go to live and work. ... Former workhouse at Nantwich, dating from 1780 The Poor Law was the system for the provision of social security in operation in England and the rest of the United Kingdom from the 16th century until the establishment of the Welfare State in the 20th century. ... The Municipal Reform Act 1835 required members of town councils to be elected by ratepayers and councils to publish their financial accounts. ...


In 1846, the town came to public attention after an enquiry exposed the conditions in its workhouse. The Andover workhouse scandal brought to light evidence of beatings, sexual abuse and general mistreatment of workhouse inmates by the overseers. The Andover workhouse scandal occurred following events at the workhouse in Andover, United Kingdom, in the 19th century. ...


The woollen industry had declined but new industries took it place. Taskers Iron Works opened at Anna Valley in 1809 and flourished. 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


RAF Andover was opened on Andover Airfield during the First World War and became the site of the RAF Staff College. During the Second World War it was the headquarters of RAF Maintenance Command, and gained a unique place in British history, as the first British military helicopter unit, the Helicopter Training School, was fromed in January 1945 at RAF Andover. The airfield in still in use by the Army Air Corps and the Defence Logistics Organisation and retains an RAF link through the presence of 1213 (Andover) Squadron, Air Training Corps. The Armed Forces Chaplaincy Centre is based locally at Amport House, as is the Army Air Corps Centre and the Museum of Army Flying at Middle Wallop. Andover Airfield is a former Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force station now used by the Army Air Corps. ... Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russia United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Commanders Ferdinand Foch Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Paul... The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Andover Airfield is a former Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force station now used by the Army Air Corps. ... The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ... Andover Airfield is a former Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force station now used by the Army Air Corps. ... ATC Crest The Air Training Corps (ATC) is a cadet organisation based in the United Kingdom. ... Amport House is a manor house near Andover, Hampshire used by the British military. ... The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ... The Museum of Army Flying is an award-winning British military aviation museum about the history of flying in the British Army. ...


In 1932 Andover gained a new industry when the printers for Kelly’s street directories moved to the town. Slowly the town grew and by 1960 had a population of about 17,000. 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ...


In 1955 the Town Council decided it would be a good idea to add fluoride to the drinking water to improve dental health. This provoked a furious public response, and a strong anti-fluoridation campaign started. In the 1958 local elections anti-fluoridation candidates swept the board, turning out many established members, and the idea was dropped. 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1960 the Borough Council was approached by the Greater London Council to become an overspill town, to build houses and take people and industry relocated from the overcrowded capital. Some contend that had the old Borough Council still been in charge this would never have been agreed. But it was, and in 1961 the plan was drawn up to expand to a population of some 47,000 by 1982, with 9,000 new homes to be built. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Arms of the Greater London Council The Greater London Council (GLC) was the top-tier local government administrative body for Greater London from 1965 to 1986. ... London overspill is the term given to the communities created - largely consisting of council houses - as a result of the policy of moving residents out of London, England into other towns. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first new council houses were ready by 1964 and by 1981 the population had risen to 51,000. A bypass, industrial estates and a new shopping centre were all built. and the town’s character changed completely. Major industries who moved there included Twinings the tea and coffee firm, Ducal Pine Furniture (until they closed in 2003) and Thompson International Publishers, who produce the Pitkin Guides to be found in many churches and other notable buildings. The Town Museum, based in the old grammar school, had a Museum of the Iron Age added in 1986 which houses the finds from excavations at nearby Danebury Hill Fort. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Twinings is a brand of tea, primarily operating in the United Kingdom. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Danebury is a an Iron Age hill fort in Hampshire in the United Kingdom, around 12 miles north west of Winchester. ...


The new council houses proved to be very badly built. It seemed that the local council would have to foot the enormous bill for reconstruction, but after starting legal action against the Greater London Council a settlement was achieved, in which the GLC paid a large sum of money to the local council, who started a programme of refurbishment which finished in 1995. Arms of the Greater London Council The Greater London Council (GLC) was the top-tier local government administrative body for Greater London from 1965 to 1986. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Today the population of Andover is over 52,000 and has grown in large part by Army soldiers based in one of the many surrounding bases permanently relocating to the area with their families. It is for this reason that the community is often referred to as a "Squaddy" town (slang for British Army soldiers).


The Borough Council and Andover Rural District Council were abolished in the local government reorganisation of 1974, and replaced by Test Valley Borough Council, which included the land down to the edge of Southampton in the south, quite a rural area apart from Andover. Light industry is still the main employer. Situated about 1 hour 20 minutes from London by train there are also quite a few who commute to the capital to work. The tensions between town and country and the “old” and “new” Andover still exist in some measure, and in the future more expansion is planned. Andover is now an unparished area in Test Valley. 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Test Valley is a local government district and borough in Hampshire, England. ... Southampton is a city and major port situated on the south coast of England. ... In England a civil parish (usually just parish) is the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ...


Geography

Andover is located at 51°13′00″N, 01°28′00″W (51.2167, -1.4667)1. A gazetteer is a geographic dictionary index; a combination atlas/almanac. ...


Mills and Milling

Rooksbury Mill & Mill House
Rooksbury Mill & Mill House

Watermills have played an important part in Andover's history. The Domesday Book of 1086 provides the earliest record of watermills in Andover, which identifies eleven mills. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1840x1232, 1378 KB) Summary Rooksbury Mill & Mill House, Andover, Hampshire, England West Elevation After Restoration in 2003 Source: Anthony de Sigley Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1840x1232, 1378 KB) Summary Rooksbury Mill & Mill House, Andover, Hampshire, England West Elevation After Restoration in 2003 Source: Anthony de Sigley Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old... A watermill is a machine constructed by connecting a water wheel to a pair of millstones. ... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... Events Domesday Book is completed in England Emperor Shirakawa of Japan starts his cloistered rule Imam Ali Mosque is rebuilt by the Seljuk Malik Shah I after being destroyed by fire. ... Watermill of Braine-le-Château, Belgium (12th century) A watermill is a structure that uses a water wheel or turbine to drive a mechanical process such as flour or lumber production, or metal shaping (rolling, grinding or wire drawing). ...


Rooksbury Mill is one of the few surviving mill buildings in Andover. The existence of Rooksbury Mill is first recorded by name in the 17th century. Functioning as a flour mill, it has passed through a succession of owners. Milling ceased in the early 20th century, after which the mill building went through a series of uses including being used as a small theatre. Test Valley Borough Council sold the building in 2002, shortly after it had been devasted by fire following an arson attack. The new owners, Anthony and Sarah de Sigley, restored the building in 2003, rebuilding much of the original structure. Rooksbury Mill & Mill House Rooksbury Mill after the Fire in 2002 Rooksbury Mill after Restoration in 2003 Rooksbury Mill is an old watermill in Andover, Hampshire, UK. Watermills have played an important part in Andovers history. ... Test Valley is a local government district and borough in Hampshire, England. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Andover Cricket Club

The main cricket club is Andover Cricket Club. They run five teams every Saturday during the cricket season (May-August). Originally formed in 1863 the club has been at its present ground at London Road since the 1930s. There are two grounds, back to back. Andover were founder members of the Hampshire Cricket League in 1973 when they finished runners-up for the first two years of the League's existence. They had to wait until 1997 for their first championship win. Currently they have teams in the Silver and Bronze divisions of the Southern Premier League whilst the 3rd,4th & 5th teams all play in the Hampshire Cricket League. For the insect, see Cricket (insect). ... Look up May in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... August is the eighth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

The Andover workhouse scandal occurred following events at the workhouse in Andover, United Kingdom, in the 19th century. ... Andover Airfield is a former Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force station now used by the Army Air Corps. ... Amport House is a manor house near Andover, Hampshire used by the British military. ... The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ... Official crest Andover F.C. are an English football club based in Andover. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

References

[http://www.hants.org.uk/ahc-colts Andover Hockey Club Junior Section

  1. ^ Ordnance Survey (2004). OS Explorer Map 131 - Romsey, Andover & Test Valley. ISBN 0-319-23600-5.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Andover, New Hampshire (374 words)
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Andover, Hampshire - definition of Andover, Hampshire in Encyclopedia (1104 words)
Andover is a town in Hampshire, England, west of Basingstoke.
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Andover Airfield was opened during the First World War and became the site of an RAF Staff College.
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