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Encyclopedia > Andover, Massachusetts
Andover, Massachusetts

Flag
Official seal of Andover, Massachusetts
Seal
Location in Essex County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 42°39′30″N 71°08′15″W / 42.65833, -71.1375
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Essex
Settled 1642
Incorporated 1646
Government
 - Type Open town meeting
 - Town Manager Reginald "Buzz" Stapczynski
 - Board of
   Selectmen
Ted Teichert (2009)
Mary Lyman (2008)
Alexander Vispoli (2010)
Jerry Stabile (2010)
Brian Major (2009)
Area
 - Total 32.1 sq mi (83.2 km²)
 - Land 31.0 sq mi (80.3 km²)
 - Water 1.1 sq mi (2.9 km²)
Elevation 180 ft (55 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 31,247
 - Density 1,007.8/sq mi (389.1/km²)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 01810
Area code(s) 351 / 978
FIPS code 25-01465
GNIS feature ID 0619444
Website: http://andoverma.gov/

Andover is a town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. It was incorporated in 1646 and as of the 2000 census population was 31,247. It is part of the Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, Massachusetts-New Hampshire metropolitan statistical area. Andover may mean: Phillips Academy, a Massachusetts prep school often known as Andover Hawker Siddeley Andover, a British military transport aircraft RAF Andover, a former Royal Air Force station now used by the Army Air Corps Andover, Kansas Tornado, a tornado in Kansas Andover. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1131x1151, 37 KB) Summary taken from http://gis. ... Image File history File links Andover_ma_highlight. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Massachusetts counties This is a list of Massachusetts counties, consisting of the 14 Massachusetts counties currently in existence. ... Essex County is a county located in the northeastern part of the state of Massachusetts. ... An Open Town Meeting is a form of municipal legislature, typical in the New England region of the United States. ... Council-manager government - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Area codes 351 and 978 are Commonwealth of Massachusetts area codes serving the communities of Fitchburg and Peabody as well as northeastern Massachusetts. ... Area code 978 is a Commonwealth of Massachusetts area code serving the communities of Lawrence, Lowell and Peabody as well as northeastern Massachusetts. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... The system of local government in use in New England is very different from that found throughout the rest of the United States. ... Essex County is a county located in the northeastern part of the state of Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... 1646 (MDCXLVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Boston redirects here. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - Total 7. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Norfolk County Settled 1625 Incorporated 1792 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor William J. Phelan Area  - City  26. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ...

Contents

History

Establishment and incorporation

In 1634, the Great and General Court of Massachusetts set aside a portion of land in what is now Essex County for an inland plantation, including parts of what is now Andover, North Andover and South Lawrence. In order to encourage settlement, early colonists were offered three years' immunity from taxes, levies and services (except military service). The first permanent settlement in the Andover area was established in 1641 by John Woodbridge and a group of settlers from Newbury and Ipswich. North Andover is a town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. ...   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1847 Zip Code(s): 01840 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... Seal of Newbury, MA Newbury is a town located in Essex County, Massachusetts. ... Ipswich is a coastal town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. ...


Shortly after they arrived, they purchased a piece of land from the local Pennacook tribal chief Cutshamache for the price of "six pounds of currency and a coat" and on the condition that Roger, a local Pennacook man, would still be allowed to plant his corn and take alewives from a local water source. Roger's Brook, a small stream which cuts through the eastern part of town, is named in his honor. In May of 1646 the settlement was incorporated as a town and was named Andover. This name was likely chosen in honor of the town of Andover in England, which was near the original home of some of the first residents. The first recorded town meeting was held in 1656 in the home of settler John Osgood. The Pennacook or Merrimack Tribe were a people that formerly inhabited the Merrimac River Valley of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and portions of southern Maine. ... Binomial name (Wilson, 1811) The alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) is a species of small shad. ... Statistics Population: 52,000 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SU3645 Administration District: Test Valley Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Hampshire Historic county: Hampshire Services Police force: Hampshire Constabulary Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Central Post office and telephone Post town...


The old burying ground in what is now North Andover marks the center of the early town. Contrary to popular belief, the towns split due to the location of the Old North Church, also located in what is now North Andover. So technically, what is now Andover was not incorporated as a township until many years after 1646. The villagers from the southwestern part of the town were tired of walking all the way to the extreme north of what was then Andover, and decided to build their own church central to what is now Andover. Logically you would think the northern part of the town would keep the name Andover, due to their higher stake of villagers, but fights and quibbles throughout the church and town meetings ultimately led to the elder part of town being known as what is now North Andover. Early on the general populous was concentrated together around the Old Center(North Andover) for protection from feared Indian attacks, but the Indians were fairly peaceful until the outbreak of King Philip's War in 1675. King Philip was an Indian who organized a revolt against the white settlers throughout most of New England. Six Indian raids occurred between 1676 and 1698 until ever-increasing numbers of white settlers established control of the land.[citation needed] Attack King Philips War, sometimes called Metacoms War or Metacoms Rebellion,[1] was an armed conflict between Indian inhabitants of present-day southern New England and English colonists and their Indian allies from 1675 – 1676. ... Metacomet (died August 12, 1676), also known as King Philip or Metacom, was a war chief or sachem of the Wampanoag Indians and their leader in King Philips War. ...


Witchcraft

In 1692, a resident of Salem Village asked for help for his wife from several girls in the village who were said to have the power to detect and cure disease. After visiting her, the girls claimed that several people in Andover had bewitched her. During the course of the frenzy that swept Salem Village and surrounding communities, more than 40 Andover citizens, mostly women, were eventually accused of being in league with Satan. About a quarter of them were condemned to death, and as many as three were executed. Many of the rest were imprisoned for months. Danvers is a town located in Essex County, Massachusetts. ... 1876 illustration of the courtroom; the central figure is usually identified as Mary Walcott The Salem witch trials were a series of hearings by local magistrates and county court trials to prosecute people alleged to have committed acts of witchcraft in Essex, Suffolk and Middlesex Counties of Massachusetts in 1692... This article is about the concept of Satan. ...


The two parishes and the division of the town

By 1705, Andover's population had begun to move southward and the idea of a new meeting house in the south end of town was proposed. This was strongly opposed by the people living near the original meeting house in the north, but the dispute was finally settled in 1709 when the Great and General Court divided Andover into two parishes, North and South. Despite this split, the town remained politically one unit.


For many years Andover was geographically one of the largest towns in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; in 1826 a third parish was established and West Parish Church was constructed on Reservation Road. In 1854, a measure was passed to divide the town into two separate political units according to the old parish boundaries. The name Andover was assumed by the more populous and wealthy West and South parishes, while the name North Andover was given to the North Parish.


Andover in the Revolutionary War

Records show that on the morning of April 19, 1775, approximately 350 Andover men marched toward Lexington. Although they did not arrive in time for the battle that day, they did go on to participate in the battle of Bunker Hill two months later and fought in subsequent skirmishes with the Redcoats during the war. is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1642 Incorporated 1713 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Total 16. ... The Battle of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 was the first battle of the American Revolutionary War and was described as the shot heard round the world in Emersons Concord Hymn. ...


Among the Andover men who were representatives to the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention were Col. Samuel Osgood, Zebadiah Abbot, John Farnum and Samuel Phillips, Jr. Phillips - who would later go on to found Phillips Academy - was later appointed by John Adams to help draft the Massachusetts state constitution. Samuel Osgood (February 3, 1747– August 12, 1813) was an American merchant and statesman from Andover, Massachusetts. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ...


Death of President-elect Franklin Pierce's son

On January 6, 1853, Benjamin "Bennie" Pierce, (18411853) the 11- or 12-year-old son of President-elect Franklin Pierce, was killed in a train accident in town. The Boston & Maine noon express, traveling from Boston to Lawrence, was moving at 40 miles per hour when an axle broke. The only coach, in which Franklin Pierce was also riding, went down an embankment and broke in two. (The baggage car and locomotive had remained on the track.) Pierce's son was the only one killed, but it was initially reported that Pierce was also a fatality. He was only badly bruised. Jane Pierce, the child's mother, was also on the train. The Pierces had previously lost two other children. The death is said to have cast a pall on the couple, especially Jane, who entertained hardly at all in the White House and spent much of her time writing letters to her dead children. She died, still grief-stricken, in 1863.[1] is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... The Boston & Maine (AAR reporting mark BM), also known by the abbreviation B&M, was the dominant railroad of the northern New England region of the United States for a century. ...


Civil War

Memorial Hall Library, which was constructed in 1873 in memory of the 53 Andover men who lost their lives during the Civil War, was financed through private donations.

The anti-slavery movement had many supporters in Andover long before the American Civil War began. William Jenkins - an ardent abolitionist and friend of William Lloyd Garrison - and several others provided stops on the Underground Railway for runaway slaves. It should be noted that Harriet Beecher Stowe, ardent participant in the Underground Railroad, was a long time resident who wrote the famous book Uncle Tom's Cabin. Her home, now known as Stowe House is now owned by Phillips Academy Andover. Her body is buried in Phillips Academy's cemetery. When the Confederate Army shelled Fort Sumter in 1861, a company of 79 volunteers formed. By the time the war ended in 1865, 600 Andover men had served in the Union Army. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 989 KB) Summary self taken, late august 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 989 KB) Summary self taken, late august 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... William Lloyd Garrison William Lloyd Garrison (December 12, 1805–May 24, 1879) was a prominent United States abolitionist, journalist, and social reformer. ... Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and novelist, whose Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) attacked the cruelty of slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential, even in Britain. ... This article is about a 19th-century slave escape route. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... Fort Sumter, a Third System masonry coastal fortification located in Charleston harbor, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ...


Shawsheen Village

In 1919, the American Woolen Company announced plans to build a million dollar mill in the already-existing mill community of Frye Village and rename the region "Shawsheen." The village was completely rebuilt as a "model industrial community" and became the site of the company's headquarters. The mill began operating in 1922 and within two years the village contained more than 200 houses, several community buildings, a few tennis courts, a swimming area, a bowling green, an athletic field and a golf course. The employees rented their homes from the company; the brick structures were reserved for upper management and the wooden buildings for those of lesser position. This industrial utopia, however, was short-lived - by the early 1940s almost all of the houses and administration buildings were in private hands. The mills became a victim of changing technology as synthetic fibers became more popular than wool. The American Woolen Company closed its mills in 1953, and the buildings today house a variety of businesses, homes, and apartments. The village left its mark nationally, however, when its soccer team, the Shawsheen Indians won the national soccer championship in 1925. The American Woolen Company was established in 1899 under the leadership of William M. Wood and his father-in-law Frederick Ayer through the consolidation of eight financially troubled New England woolen mills. ... Bowling Green is the name of some places in the United States of America: Bowling Green, Florida, named after the town in Kentucky. ... For other uses, see Utopia (disambiguation). ... Soccer redirects here. ... The Shawsheen Indians was an American soccer club based in Shawsheen, Massachusetts that was a member of the American Soccer League. ... The Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup is an American soccer competition open to all United States Soccer Federation(USSF) affiliated teams, from amateur adult club teams all the way up to the top professional clubs of Major League Soccer. ...


Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 83.2 km² (32.1 mi²). 80.3 km² (31.0 mi²) of it is land and 2.9 km² (1.1 mi²) of it (3.49%) is water. Significant water areas include the Shawsheen River and Haggetts Pond, located in west Andover, which serves as the town's reservoir. Haggetts Pond was originally set apart from other waters, but since the late 1990s has had waters added from the nearby Merrimack River to supplement the growing needs of the town. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Haggetts Pond is the reservoir for the town of Andover, Massachusetts. ... Merrimack River watershed The Merrimack River (or Merrimac River, an earlier spelling that is sometimes still used) is a -long river in the Northeastern United States. ...


Andover borders the following cities and towns: Lawrence, North Andover, North Reading, Wilmington, Tewksbury, Dracut and Methuen. Methuen and Dracut are opposite the Merrimack River from Andover, and are not accessible directly from Andover except by Interstate 93, which connects Andover with Methuen.   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1847 Zip Code(s): 01840 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... North Andover is a town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... North Reading is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... For other towns and places named Wilmington, see Wilmington. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex County Settled 1637 Incorporated 1734 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Town  21. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1653 Incorporated 1701 Government  - Type Open Town Meeting Area  - Town  21. ... Methuen is a city[1] in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 93 Interstate 93 (abbreviated I-93) is an interstate highway in the New England section of the United States. ...


Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 31,247 people, 11,305 households, and 8,490 families residing in the town. The population density was 389.1/km² (1,007.8/mi²). There were 11,590 housing units at an average density of 144.3 persons/km² (373.8 persons/mi²). The racial makeup of the town was 91.60% White, 0.75% African American, 0.06% Native American, 5.73% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.84% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. 1.81% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ...


There are 11,305 households out of which 40.3% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.6% were married couples living together, 7.5% have a woman whose husband does not live with her, and 24.9% were non-families. 21.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.24. The household is the basic unit of analysis in many microeconomic and government models. ... Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the town the population was spread out with 28.8% under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 12.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.9 males.


The median income for a household in the town was $87,683, and the median income for a family was $104,820. Males had a median income of $78,291 versus $44,292 for females. The per capita income for the town was $41,133. 3.9% of the population and 2.5% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 3.7% are under the age of 18 and 6.8% are 65 or older. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ...


Government

County government: Essex County
Clerk of Courts: Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. (D)
County Treasurer: Position Eliminated
District Attorney: Jonathan W. Blodgett (D)
Registrar of Deeds: Robert F. Kelley (D)
Registrar of Probate:
County Sheriff: Frank G. Cousins, Jr. (R)
State government
State Representative(s): Barry R. Finegold (D)
Barbara A. L'Italien (D)
State Senator(s): Susan C. Tucker (D)
Governor's Councilor(s): Mary-Ellen Manning (D)
Federal government
U.S. Representative(s): Niki Tsongas (D-5th District),
U.S. Senators: Ted Kennedy (D), John Kerry (D)


Essex County is a county located in the northeastern part of the state of Massachusetts. ... A court clerk or clerk of the court is an occupation whose responsibilities include maintaining the records of a court. ... Look up Treasurer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A district attorney is, in some U.S. jurisdictions, the title of the local public official who represents the government in the prosecution of criminals. ... Recorder of deeds refers to the government office tasked with maintaining a record of real estate ownership, as well as other deeds that provide persons other than the owner of a property with real rights over that property. ... Probate is the legal process of settling the estate of a deceased person; specifically, resolving all claims and distributing the decedents property. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... The Massachusetts Senate is the upper house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... The Governors Council (also known as the Executive Council) of Massachusetts is a popularly-elected board which oversees judicial nominations. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Niki Tsongas is the widow of US Senator Paul Tsongas. ... Massachusetts Congressional District 5 is a congressional district in Massachusetts. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... For other persons named Ted Kennedy, see Ted Kennedy (disambiguation). ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...

Education

Samuel Phillips Hall, the main building of Phillips Academy

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 370 KB) Summary Took this photo of Samuel Phillips Hall at Phillips Academy Andover in Andover, MA in August of 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 370 KB) Summary Took this photo of Samuel Phillips Hall at Phillips Academy Andover in Andover, MA in August of 2005. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ...

Public schools

Andover has a public school system.


Schools

  • Elementary schools (K-5)- Shawsheen, Bancroft, West Elementary, South, Sanborn, High Plain
  • Middle Schools (6-8)- Doherty, West Middle, Wood Hill
  • High Schools (9-12)- Andover High School

Andover High School is a high school in the town of Andover, Massachusetts. ...

Private schools

The Pike School, founded in 1926 by Cynthia E. Pike, is a private day school in Andover, Massachusetts. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ...

Higher Education

Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

Transportation

Andover is an important location for businesses due to its proximity to several major roads in Massachusetts, including I-93, I-95, and I-495. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 93 Interstate 93 (abbreviated I-93) is an interstate highway in the New England section of the United States. ... Interstate 95 is 92 miles in the state of Massachusetts. ... Interstate 495 (abbreviated I-495) is the designation of an Interstate highway beltway in Massachusetts. ...


Points of interest

Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... The following is a list of famous past students of Phillips Academy and/or Abbot Academy (Phillips coeducated in 1973 by merging with its sister school). ... Seal of the Internal Revenue Service Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        IRS redirects here. ... Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) is a major American defense contractor and industrial corporation with core manufacturing concentrations in defense systems and defense and commercial electronics. ... Four Patriot missiles like the one shown here can be fired from this mobile launcher between loadings. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... The Andover Village Improvement Society (AVIS) is a land preservation society in Andover, Massachusetts. ...

Notable residents

See also: List of notable Phillips Academy alumni Abiel Abbot (August 17, 1770-June 7, 1828) was a prominent clergyman. ... Benjamin Abbot (September 17, 1762-October 25, 1849) was a schoolteacher. ... Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, also Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres[1] in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ... Amos Abbott (September 10, 1786 _ November 2, 1868) was a Representative from Massachusetts. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... John Adams (September 18, 1772-April 24, 1863) was an American educator noted for organizing several hundred Sunday schools. ... Apollo Sunshine is an alternative rock band of the 2000s currently based out of Leverett, Massachusetts. ... Harriette Newell Woods Baker (August 19, 1815 - April 26, 1893) was a prolific American author of books for children. ... GFWC - General Federation of Womens Clubs For over 100 years GFWC members have been providing support to their communities by establishing over 75% of the countrys libraries, assisting in the creation of the National Park Service and establishing six national parks. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Michael Charles Chiklis (born August 30, 1963) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning American actor. ... This article is about the TV series. ... // Andrew William Coburn (born 1956 in Chester, England) is a leading expert in catastrophe modeling. ... The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Abiel Foster (8 August 1735 – 6 February 1806) was an American clergyman and statesman from Canterbury, New Hampshire. ... see also Holy Orders The following terms have traditional meanings for the Anglican Church, and possibly beyond: A churchman is in principle a member of a church congregation, in practice someone in holy orders. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Joseph Frye, a renowned military leader from Colonial Maine, obtained the rank of General in the British Army after serving his nation exemplarily in the Seven Years War. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Fryeburg is a town located in Oxford County, Maine. ... Howard Kyongju Koh (born March 15, 1952) is the inaugural Harvey V. Fineberg Professor of the Practice of Public Health and Associate Dean for Public Health Practice at the Harvard School of Public Health. ... New Life Network (NLN) is an international distributor of family friendly television programs. ... James Douglas Muir Jay Leno (April 28, 1950) is an Emmy Award-winning American comedian and television host, who succeeded Johnny Carson as host of The Tonight Show in 1992. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... James Loscutoff (born February 4, 1930 in San Francisco, California, United States) is a former professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Outward Bound (OB) is an international, non-profit, independent educational organization with approximately 40 schools around the world and 100,000 participants per year. ... Paul Monette (October 16, 1945, Lawrence, Massachusetts – February 10, 1995, Los Angeles, California) was an American author, poet, and activist who wrote about gay relationships and AIDS. Monette graduated from Yale University in 1967, conflicted about his sexual identity, and moved to Los Angeles where he lived with his... Bowdoin College, founded in 1794, is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... Samuel Osgood (February 3, 1747– August 12, 1813) was an American merchant and statesman from Andover, Massachusetts. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Piebald is an American alternative rock band. ... Salem Poor (c. ... Blanchard Ryan (born January 12, 1967) is an American actress. ... Open Water is a 2003 film inspired by a true story about an American couple, Tom and Eileen Lonergan, who in 1998 went out with a scuba diving group, Outer Edge Dive Company, into the South Pacific. ... Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward (1844-1911) was an American author. ... Samuel Francis Smith Samuel Francis Smith, (1808-1895), Baptist minister, journalist and author, is best known for having written the lyrics to My Country, Tis of Thee, which he entitled America. ... Andover Theological Seminary, now part of Andover Newton Theological School, is the oldest graduate school of theology in the United States. ... Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and novelist, whose Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) attacked the cruelty of slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential, even in Britain. ... George Levick Street, III (July 27, 1913 – February 26, 2000) was a submariner in the United States Navy. ... The following is a list of famous past students of Phillips Academy and/or Abbot Academy (Phillips coeducated in 1973 by merging with its sister school). ...


See also

Ballardvale (sometimes written archaically as BallardVale or Ballard Vale) is a village located within the boundaries of the town of Andover, Massachusetts. ... The following is a list of towns in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ...

References

  1. ^ Jane Means Appleton Pierce. History Central.com. Retrieved on 2006-09-24.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l (1963) Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume,. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 
  3. ^ Commander George Levick Street III. World War II Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. medalofhonor.com.
  4. ^ Stott, Frederick A.. Full Text Citations For Award of The Navy Cross To U.S. Marines, World War II. Home of Heroes.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sources

External links

Coordinates: 42.65833° N 71.1375° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Vital records of Andover, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849 - Ancestry.com (122 words)
Vital records of Andover, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849
Andover marriages to the end of the year 1849
Andover deaths to the end of the year 1849
Andover Inn Massachusetts|On the Campus of Phillips Academy (194 words)
The Andover Inn is a New England Country Inn located about 25 miles north of Boston on the campus of Phillips Academy, the oldest private secondary boarding school in the United States.
The Andover Inn is located near the intersection of Routes 495 and 93, less than an hour by car from Boston to the south, or the seaside towns of Newburyport and Salisbury to the east, and is open every day.
Local attractions within a short walking distance are the Addison Gallery of American Art, The Robert S Peabody Museum of Archeology (by appointment), and the 125 acre Moncrieff Cochran Sanctuary.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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