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Encyclopedia > Ancona
Comune di Ancona
Coat of arms of Comune di Ancona
Municipal coat of arms
Country Italy Italy
Region Marche
Province Ancona (AN)
Mayor Fabio Sturani (since May 2006)
Elevation 0 to 100 m
Area 123 km²
Population
 - Total (as of November, 2005) 101, 909
 - Density 816/km²
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 43°37′N 13°31′E
Gentilic Anconitani, Anconetani
Dialing code 071
Postal code 60100
Patron San Ciriaco
 - Day May 4
Website: www.comune.ancona.it


Ancona is a city and a seaport in the Marche, a region of central Italy, population 101,909 (2005). Ancona is situated on the Adriatic Sea and is the center of the province of Ancona and the capital of the region. Image File history File links Ancona-Stemma. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... This article is about the Italian region. ... In Italy, the province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of an intermediate level, between municipality (comune) and region (Regione). ... The Province of Ancona (Italian: Provincia di Ancona) is a province in the Marche region of central Italy. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... This article is about the Italian region. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ... The Province of Ancona (Italian: Provincia di Ancona) is a province in the Marche region of central Italy. ...

The harbour of Ancona.
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The harbour of Ancona.

The city is located 210 km northeast of Rome and 200 km southeast of Bologna. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 144 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ancona ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 144 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ancona ... Nickname: The Eternal City Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 8th century BC Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The town is finely situated on and between the slopes of the two extremities of the promontory of Monte Conero, Monte Astagno, occupied by the citadel, and Monte Guasco, on which the Duomo stands (150 m). The latter, dedicated to St Judas Cyriacus, is said to occupy the site of a temple of Venus, who is mentioned by Catullus and Juvenal as the tutelary deity of the place. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Duomo is a generic Italian term for a cathedral church. ... . Barcelona, 12th century. ... Gaius Valerius Catullus (ca. ... Frontispiece depicting Juvenal and Persius, from a volume translated by John Dryden in 1711. ... A tutelary spirit is a god, usually a minor god, who serves as the guardian or watcher over a particular site, person, or nation. ...

Contents

History

Ancona was founded from Syracuse about 390 BC, who gave it its name: Ancona is a very slightly modified transliteration of the Greek Αγκων, meaning "elbow"; the harbor to the east of the town was originally protected only by the promontory on the north, shaped like an elbow. Greek merchants established a Tyrian purple factory here (Sil. Ital. viii. 438). In Roman times it kept its own coinage with the punning device of the bent arm holding a palm branch, and the head of Aphrodite on the reverse, and continued the use of the Greek language. Syracuse (Italian, Siracusa, ancient Syracusa - see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a city on the eastern coast of Sicily and the capital of the province of Syracuse, Italy. ... Tyrian purple is a purple dye made in the ancient Phoenician city of Tyre from a secretion of Spiny Dye-Murex (Murex brandaris), a marine snail. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη) was the Greek goddess of love, lust, beauty and sexuality. ... Greek (, IPA — Hellenic) has a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single language within the Indo-European family. ...


When it became a Roman colony is doubtful. It was occupied as a naval station in the Illyrian War of 178 BC (Livy xli. i). Julius Caesar took possession of it immediately after crossing the Rubicon. Its harbour was of considerable importance in imperial times, as the nearest to Dalmatia, and was enlarged by Trajan, who constructed the north quay, his architect being Apollodorus of Damascus. At the beginning of it stands the marble triumphal arch with a single archway, and without bas-reliefs, erected in his honour in 115 by the senate and people. The Roman Forum was the central area around which ancient Rome developed. ... A portrait of Titus Livius made long after his death. ... Gāius Jūlius Caesar (IPA: ;[1]), July 12 or July 13, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC) was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Presumed course of the Rubicon The Rubicon (Rubico, in Italian Rubicone) is an ancient Latin name for a small river in northern Italy. ... Map of Croatia with Dalmatia highlighted Dalmatia (Croatian: Dalmacija Serbian: Далмација) is a region on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, in modern Croatia, spreading between the island of Rab in the northwest and the Gulf of Kotor (Boka Kotorska) in the southeast. ... : Marcus Ulpius Nerva Traianus (September 18, 53–August 9, 117), Roman Emperor (98–117), commonly called Trajan, was the second of the Five Good Emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Apollodorus of Damascus, a famous Greek architect, engineer, designer and sculptor, flourished during the 2nd century AD. He was a favourite of Trajan, for whom he constructed Trajans Bridge over the Danube (104) for the campaign in Dacia. ... Arc de Triomphe, Paris A triumphal arch is a structure in the shape of a monumental archway, usually built to celebrate a victory in war. ... Bas relief is a method of sculpting which entails carving or etching away the surface of a flat piece of stone or metal. ...


After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, Ancona was successively attacked by the Goths, Lombards and Saracens, but recovered its strength and importance. It was one of the cities of the Pentapolis under the exarchate of Ravenna[1]. With the Carolingian conquest of northern Italy, it became the capital of the Marca di Ancona, whence the name of the modern region. After 1000 AD Ancona became incresingly independent, eventually turning into an important maritime republic (together with Gaeta, Trani and Ragusa, it is one of those not appearing on the Italian naval flag), often clashing against the nearby power of Venice. An oligarchic republic, Ancona was ruled by six Elders, elected by the three terzieri into which the city was divided: S. Pietro, Porto and Capodimonte. It has a coin of its own, the agontano, and a series of laws known as Statuti del mare e del Terzenale and Statuti della Dogana. Ancona was usually allied with Ragusa and the Byzantine Empire. In 1137, 1167 and 1174 it was strong enough to push back imperial forces. Anconitan ships took part to the Crusades, and his navigators include Cyriac of Ancona. In the struggle between the Popes and the Emperors that troubled Italy from the 12th century onwards, Ancona sides for Guelphs. Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche portrays the Goths as cavalrymen. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... For the rugby club Saracens see Saracens (rugby club) The term Saracen comes from Greek sarakenoi. ... A Pentapolis, from the Greek words penta five and polis city(-state) is geographic and/or institutional grouping of five cities. ... Ravenna is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ... Ensign of the Italian Navy, sporting the coat of arms of the four main Repubbliche Marinare[1] The Repubbliche Marinare ( ) is the collective name of a number of important city-states which flourished in Italy and Dalmatia in the Middle Ages. ... Gaeta (ancient Latin name Caieta) is a city in Province of Latina, in Lazio, Italy. ... Trani is a seaport and episcopal see of Apulia, Italy, on the Adriatic Sea, in the Province of Bari, and 26 miles by railway west northwest of that town, 23 ft. ... Ragusa can refer to: The city of Ragusa in Sicily, Italy. ... Map of the Venetian Republic, circa 1000 CE. The republic is in dark red, borders in light red. ... What Up. ... // Groups BL1137 is the (now defunct) Unix group at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ where Unix and C were invented. ... Events Taira no Kiyomori becomes the first samurai to be appointed Daijo Daijin, chief minister of the government of Japan Peter of Blois becomes the tutor of William II of Sicily Absalon, archbishop of Denmark, leads the first Danish synod at Lund Absalon fortifies Copenhagen William Marshal, the greatest knight... Ciriaco de Pizzicoli (c. ... Guelph has several meanings: Guelph is a city in Ontario, Canada. ...


Differently from other cities of northern Italy, Ancona never became a seignory. The sole exception was the rule of the Malatesta, who took the city in 1348 taking advantage of the black death and of a fire that had destroyed much of the edifices. The Malatesta were ousted in 1383. In 1532 it lost definitively its freedom and became part of the Papal States, under Pope Clement VII. Symbol of the papal authority was the massive Citadel. Together with Rome and Avignon, Ancona was the sole city in the Papal States in which the Jew were allowed to stay after 1569, living into the ghetto built after 1555. Errico Malatesta Errico Malatesta (December 14, 1853 – July 22, 1932) was an anarchist with an unshakable belief, which he shared with his friend Peter Kropotkin, that the anarchist revolution would occur soon. ... Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411). ... The Papal States (Gli Stati della Chiesa or Stati Pontificii, States of the Church) was one of the major historical states of Italy before the boot-shaped peninsula was unified under the Piedmontese crown of Savoy (later a republic). ... For the antipope (1378–1394) see antipope Clement VII and other Popes named Clement see Pope Clement. ...   City flag City coat of arms Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Département Vaucluse (préfecture) Arrondissement Avignon Canton Chief town of 4 cantons Intercommunality Communauté dagglomération du Grand Avignon Mayor Marie-Josée Roig  (UMP... A ghetto is an area where people from a specific racial or ethnic background or united in a given culture or religion live as a group, voluntarily or involuntarily, in milder or stricter seclusion. ...


Pope Clement XII prolonged the quay, and an inferior imitation of Trajan's arch was set up; he also erected a Lazaretto at the south end of the harbor, Luigi Vanvitelli being the architect-in-chief. The southern quay was built in 1880, and the harbour was protected by forts on the heights. Clement XII, born as Lorenzo Corsini (Florence, April 7, 1652 – Rome, February 6, 1740), Pope from 1730 to 1740, had been an aristocratic lawyer and financial manager under preceding pontiffs. ... A lazaretto or lazaret is a quarantine station for maritime travellers. ... Luigi Vanvitelli (Naples, May 12, 1700 – March 1, 1773, Caserta), an engineer as well as the most prominent 18th-century Italian architect, practiced a sober classicizing academic Late Baroque style that made an easy transition to Neoclassicism. ...


From 1797 onwards, when the French took it, it frequently appears in history as an important fortress, until Christophe Léon Louis Juchault de Lamoricière capitulated here on September 29, 1860, eleven days after his defeat at Castelfidardo. Christophe Léon Louis Juchault de Lamoricière (5 September 1806 - 11 September 1865) was a French general. ... September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Country Italy Region Marche Province Ancona (AN) Mayor Elevation 215 m Area 32 km² Population  - Total (as of 2004-12-31) 17,947  - Density 562/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Fidardensi Dialing code 071 Postal code 60022 Frazioni Acquaviva, Campanari, Cerretano, Crocette, Figuretta, Fornaci, SantAgostino, San...

The Cathedral of San Ciriaco.
The Cathedral of San Ciriaco.
The portal of the church of San Francesco.
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The portal of the church of San Francesco.
The Vanvitelli's Lazzaretto.
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The Vanvitelli's Lazzaretto.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1065x705, 689 KB)Carli - DellAcqua - Storia dellArte, 1967 Images of uncertain copyright status ^ 17 U.S.C. §104A File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1065x705, 689 KB)Carli - DellAcqua - Storia dellArte, 1967 Images of uncertain copyright status ^ 17 U.S.C. §104A File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1920x2560, 1119 KB) it: il portale della chiesa di San Francesco alle scale ad Ancona File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ancona Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1920x2560, 1119 KB) it: il portale della chiesa di San Francesco alle scale ad Ancona File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ancona Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 911 KB) it: Il Lazzaretto di Ancona, progettato dallarchitetto Luigi Vanvitelli File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ancona Metadata This file contains additional information, probably... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 911 KB) it: Il Lazzaretto di Ancona, progettato dallarchitetto Luigi Vanvitelli File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ancona Metadata This file contains additional information, probably...

Main sights

Cathedral church of S. Ciriaco

The Cathedral, entitled to St. Ciriaco, was consecrated in 1128 and completed in 1189. Some writers suppose that the original church was in the form of a Latin cross and belonged to the 8th century. An early restoration was completed in 1234. It is a fine Romanesque building in grey stone, built in the form of a Greek cross, with a dodecagonal dome over the center slightly altered by Margaritone d'Arezzo in 1270. The façade has a Gothic portal, ascribed to Giorgio da Como (1228), which was intended to have a lateral arch on each side. . Barcelona, 12th century. ... The traditional form of the Christian cross, known as the Latin cross The Christian cross is a familiar religious symbol of most Christianity. ... Romanesque St. ...


The interior, which has a crypt under each transept, in the main preserves its original character. It has ten columns which are attributed to the temple of Venus, and there are good screens of the 12th century, and other sculptures. The church was carefully restored in the 1980s.


Other monuments

  • The marble Arch of Trajan, 18 m high, was erected in 114/115 as an entrance to the causeway atop the harbor wall in honor of the emperor who had made the harbor, is one of the finest Roman monuments in the Marche. Most of its original bronze enrichments have disappeared. It stands on a high podium approached by a wide flight of steps. The archway, only 3 m wide, is flanked by pairs of fluted Corinthian columns on pedestals. An attic bears inscriptions. The format is that of the Arch of Titus in Rome, but made taller, so that the bronze figures surmounting it, of Trajan, his wife Plotina and sister Marciana, would figure as a landmark for ships approaching Rome's greatest Adriatic port.
  • The Lazzaretto (Laemocomium or "Mole Vanvitelliana"), planned by architect Luigi Vanvitelli in 1732 is a pentagonal building covering more than 20,000 m², built to protect the military defensive authorities from the risk of contagious diseases eventually reaching the town with the ships. Later it was used also as a military hospital or as barracks; it is currently used for cultural exhibits.
  • The Episcopal Palace was the place where Pope Pius II died in 1464.
  • The church of Santa Maria della Piazza has an elaborate arcaded façade (1210).
  • The Palazzo del Comune, with its lofty arched substructures at the back, was the work of Margaritone d'Arezzo, but has been since twice restored.

There are also several fine late Gothic buildings, including the churches of S. Francesco and S. Agostino, the Palazzo Benincasa, the Palazzo del Senato and the Loggia dei Mercanti[1], all by Giorgio Orsini, usually called da Sebenico, and the prefecture, which has Renaissance additions. The Roman emperor Trajan built triumphal arches all over the Roman empire during his reign. ... The Corinthian order as used for the portico of the Pantheon, Rome provided a prominent model for Renaissance and later architects, through the medium of engravings. ... Detail from the Arch of Titus showing spoils from the Sack of Jerusalem The Arch of Titus is a triumphal arch with a single arched opening, located on the Via Sacra just to the south-east of the Forum in Rome. ... Luigi Vanvitelli (Naples, May 12, 1700 – March 1, 1773, Caserta), an engineer as well as the most prominent 18th-century Italian architect, practiced a sober classicizing academic Late Baroque style that made an easy transition to Neoclassicism. ... Pius II, né Enea Silvio Piccolomini, in Latin Aeneas Sylvius (October 18, 1405 – August 14, 1464) was Pope from 1458 until his death. ... See also Gothic art. ... Juraj Matejev Dalmatinac (called Giorgio Orsini in Italy) (circa 1410 - 1473/1475), originally called Georgius Mathaei Dalmaticus (in Latin) was a medieval sculptor and architect. ... Šibenik Šibenik (Italian: Sebenico) is a historic town in Croatia, population 51,553 (2001). ... The term prefecture (from the Latin Praefectura) indicates the office, seat, territorial circonscription of a Prefect; consequentally, like that word, is its applied in English in relation to actual Prefects, whose title is just that (or the forms it takes in other, especially Romance, languages), in the broadest sense in... Raphael was famous for depicting illustrious figures of the Classical past with the features of his Renaissance contemporaries. ...


The portal of S. Maria della Misericordia is an ornate example of early Renaissance work.


The archaeological museum contains interesting pre-Roman (Picene) objects from tombs in the district, and two Roman beds with fine decorations in ivory. Picene is a hydrocarbon found in the pitchy residue obtained in the distillation of peat tar and of petroleum. ...


Twin cities

Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Look up Split in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia_(bordered). ... Area: 153,6 km² Population  - males  - females 9. ...

See also

Ensign of the Italian Navy, sporting the coat of arms of the four main Repubbliche Marinare[1] The Repubbliche Marinare ( ) is the collective name of a number of important city-states which flourished in Italy and Dalmatia in the Middle Ages. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The other four were Fano, Pesaro, Senigallia and Rimini

Country Italy Region Marche Province Pesaro e Urbino (PU) Mayor Stefano Aguzzi (since June 2004) Elevation 12 m Area 121 km² Population  - Total (as of December 31, 2004) 61,675  - Density 512/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Fanesi Dialing code 0721 Postal code 61032 Frazioni Bellocchi, Camminate... Pesaro (in Antiquity, Pisaurum) is a town and comune in the Italian region of the Marche, capital of the Pesaro e Urbino province, 43°55N 12°55E; on the Adriatic, at sea-level. ... Country Italy Region Marche Province Ancona (AN) Mayor Elevation 3 m Area 115 km² Population  - Total (as of December 31, 2004) 43,899  - Density 359/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Senigalliesi Dialing code 071 Postal code 60019 Frazioni see list Patron St. ... Rimini is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy and capital city of the Rimini Province. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

External links

  • Official Site
  • Marche Tourism site
  • Bill Thayer's site
  • Ancona, a breed of chicken named after the Italian city
  • Site with photo, guides and forum
  • Wine and Fish in the city of Ancona
  • Free online service in Ancona

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ancona: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (1302 words)
Ancona is a city and a seaport in the Marche, a region of northeastern Italy, population 101,909 (2005).
Ancona is situated on the Adriatic Sea and is the center of the province of Ancona and the capital of the region.
Ancona was founded from Syracuse about 390 BC, who gave it its name: Ancona is a very slightly modified transliteration of the Greek Αγκων, meaning "elbow"; the harbor to the east of the town was originally protected only by the promontory on the north, shaped like an elbow.
Ancona, Italy (215 words)
Ancona, capital of the Marche region and the province of the same name, is picturesquely situated between foothills and the bay on the Italian Adriatic coast.
At present Ancona is an important traffic junction (railway; airport 13km/8mi west at Falconara) and a developing port: ferry services to Yugoslavia and Greece and the growing fishing industry mean a considerable economic upswing in recent years.
Ancona was founded by refugees from Syracuse about 390 B.C. under the name of Dorica Ancon (from the Greek word ankón = bend or curve, after the shape of the promontory on which the town was built).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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