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Encyclopedia > Ancient universities of Scotland

The Ancient universities of Scotland are those universities founded during the medieval period, and comprise (list by year of being chartered): Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Alternate use, see charter airline or bare-boat charter. ...

Contents

The University of St Andrews was founded between 1410 and 1413 and is the oldest university in Scotland (and third oldest in the English-speaking world). ... Events February 11 : Peace of ToruÅ„ 1411 signed in ToruÅ„, Poland Births September 21 - Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, claimant to the English throne (died 1460) Juan de Mena, Spanish poet (died 1456) Deaths June 3 - Duke Leopold IV of Austria (born 1371) November 4 - Khalil Sultan, ruler of... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... The University of Glasgow, founded in 1451, is the largest of the three universities in Glasgow, Scotland. ... // Events February 3 - Murad II, Sultan of the Ottoman Empire dies and is succeeded by his son Mehmed II. April 11 - Celje acquires market-town status and town rights by orders from the Celje count Frederic II. June 30 - French troops under the Comte de Dunois invade Guyenne and capture... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... The University of Aberdeen is one of the ancient universities of Scotland. ... 1495 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... Kings College, Aberdeen was founded on 10 February 1495 by Bishop William Elphinstone in Old Aberdeen. ... The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583, is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... 1583 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ...


Marischal College

In April 1593, Marischal College, was founded by George Keith, the fifth Earl Marischal, in Aberdeen. This later merged with King's College, Aberdeen, to form the University of Aberdeen in 1860. At this point, it was highly unusual for a single city to have two universities. Marschal College viewed from Upper Kirkgate Marischal College was founded in 1593 in Aberdeen by George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal of Scotland. ... This article is about the Scottish city. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ...


It is occasionally claimed that this was the "Protestant College", but it is possible that the founding of another college in nearby Fraserburgh in 1592 was the true cause; its founder Sir Alexander Fraser who was a business rival of Marischal. Protestantism is a movement within Christianity, representing the splitting away from the Roman Catholic Church during the mid-to-late Renaissance in Europe—a period known as the Protestant Reformation. ... Fraserburgh is a town in Aberdeenshire, Scotland on the extreme North East corner. ... Events January 30 - The death of Pope Innocent IX during the previous year had left the Papal throne vacant. ...


University of Dundee

The University of Dundee (chartered 1967) has a history dating back to 1881, is also governed under the Universities (Scotland) Acts and shares all of the organizational features with the other ancients and a line of descent through St Andrews, of which it was a part 1897 to 1967, before it split, taking with it the School of Law. The University of Dundee is the principal university in the city and Royal Burgh of Dundee, Scotland. ... Alternate use, see charter airline or bare-boat charter. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ...


Governance and administration

Each of the Ancient Universities is governed by a tripartite system of General Council, University Court, and Academic Senate, as defined by the Universities (Scotland) Acts. The General Council of an ancient university in Scotland is the corporate body of all graduates and senior academics of each university. ... A University Court is the supreme governing body of an Ancient university in Scotland, analogous to a Board of Directors or a Board of Trustees The University Courts were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 and they are responsible for the finances and administration of each university. ... The Academic Senate (in latin Senatus Academicus) is the supreme academic body for an Ancient university in Scotland and its members are all the Professors of each university, along with certain senior Readers, and a number of Senior Lecturers and Lecturers, and students representatives. ...


In common with other Scottish universities the chief executive and chief academic is the University Principal who also holds the title of Vice-Chancellor as an honorific. The Chancellor is a titular non-resident head to each university and is elected for life by the respective General Council. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Chief Executive may refer to: Chief Executive of Hong Kong Chief Executive of Macau Chief Executive Officer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ... The Principal is the chief executive and the chief academic officer of a University in Scotland and at certains institutions in Canada and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... An honorific is a term used to convey esteem or respect. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... (In the context of property law, title refers to ownership or documents of ownership; see title (property). ...


Each also has a Students' Representative Council as required by statute. Students Representative Councils (SRC) were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1896 and are present at the five ancient universities of St Andrews, Aberdeen, Glasgow and Edinburgh as well as Dundee University. ... A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. ...


Degrees

The academic degrees awarded by the ancient are different from those of other Scottish universities, and share common features with the ancient universities in England. However, the key difference is the Scottish Master of Arts. A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages None official English de facto Capital None official London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001... A Master of Arts in Scotland is an undergraduate academic degree in humanities and social sciences awarded by the five ancient universities. ...


Scottish Master of Arts

Main article: Master of Arts (Scotland)

Uniquely, the five ancient universities award a degree bearing the title of Master of Arts for undergraduate courses in Arts, Humanities, Fine Art, Divinity and sometimes Social Sciences; this is roughly equivalent to a bachelor's degree from the rest of the United Kingdom. A Master of Arts in Scotland is an undergraduate academic degree in humanities and social sciences awarded by the five ancient universities. ... A Master of Arts in Scotland is an undergraduate academic degree in humanities and social sciences awarded by the five ancient universities. ... In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... The Cornfield is an oil on canvas painting by John Constable in 1826 Fine art refers to arts that are concerned with beauty or which appealed to taste (SOED 1991). ... Divinity is the academic study of Christian theology and religious ministry at school, university and seminary. ... Terms like SOSE (Studies of Society & the Environment) not only refer to social sciences but also studies of the environment. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Postgraduate Master's Degrees in the Arts

Because MA is in use for the undergraduate Arts degree, the ancient universities award differing titles for their postgraduate Masters degrees in the Arts and Humanities. There is presently a move towards awarding a taught Master of Letters (MLitt (T)) for the taught Masters degree, although for many years this was not the case and MLitt often refers to the more advanced two-year research degree. Similarly, the Master of Philosophy (MPhil) degree is often now used for the research Masters degree, although some universities (such as Glasgow) used MPhil for both taught and research degrees. Edinburgh currently uses Master of Science (MSc) for its taught Masters in the Arts (such as the MSc in English Literature [1]), using the older meaning of science ('knowledge'). Some universities (including Aberdeen) use the Master of Research (MRes) degree, not always for research degrees (eg [2]). Due to this confusion, holders of an ancient Scottish Master's degree will generally specify if it was a taught or research degree. A Master of Letters (M.Litt. ... In the usage of the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and some other countries, the Master of Philosophy (M.Phil. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... In the U.K., the Master of Research degree is an advanced postgraduate degree available in a range of academic diciplines. ...


External links

  • List of Medieval Universities in Europe

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ancient universities of Scotland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (519 words)
Each of the Ancient Universities is governed by a tripartite system of General Council, University Court, and Academic Senate, as defined by the Universities (Scotland) Acts.
The academic degrees awarded by the ancient are different from those of other Scottish universities, and share common features with the ancient universities in England.
Uniquely, the four ancient universities award a degree bearing the title of Master of Arts for undergraduate courses in Arts, Humanities, Fine Art, Divinity and sometimes Social Sciences; this is roughly equivalent to a bachelor's degree from the rest of the United Kingdom.
British degree abbreviations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (998 words)
Note that usage in some Scottish universities, particularly the ancient universities, differs from that in England and Wales in that MAs are given out in place of BAs as first degrees, where the course of study is four years rather than the three years typical in England.
However, in the Open University and some of the newer universities with a strong commitment to broadening access to higher education, the Pass degree remains a valuable qualification though of a lower standard (or indicating a shorter period of study) than an Honours degree.
At the Ancient universities of Scotland (St Andrews, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Dundee), a BSc(Hons) indicates a four year course, being the equivalent of the Scottish MA for science degrees.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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