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Encyclopedia > Ancient art
Art history
series
Prehistoric art
Ancient art history
Western art history
Eastern art history
Islamic art history
Western painting
History of painting
Ancient art history
series
Middle East
Ancient Egypt
Mesopotamia
Asia
India
China
Japan
Scythia
European prehistory
Etruscan
Celtic
Picts
Norse
Visigothic
Classical art
Ancient Greece
Hellenistic
Rome

Arts of the ancient world refers to the many types of art that were in the cultures of ancient societies, such as those of ancient China, India, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... This article is an overview of the history of art worldwide. ... In the history of art, prehistoric art is all art produced in preliterate cultures (prehistory), beginning somewhere in very late geological history. ... Also see articles: History of painting, Western painting Clio, muse of heroic poetry and history, by Pierre Mignard, 17th century. ... Eastern art history, devoted to the arts of the Far East includes a vast range of influences from various cultures and religions. ... Islamic art encompasses the arts produced from the 7th century onwards by people (not necessarily Muslim) who lived within the territory that was inhabited by culturally Islamic populations. ... See also Western art, History of painting, History of art, Art history, Painting, Outline of painting history Jan Vermeer, Girl with a Pearl Earring, known as the Mona Lisa of the North 1665-1667 Édouard Manet, The Balcony 1868 The history of Western painting represents a continuous, though disrupted, tradition... // The history of painting reaches back in time to artifacts from pre-historic humans, and spans all cultures. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... This article has been tagged since January 2007. ... For other uses, see Mesopotamia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... By far the greatest collection of Scythian gold is preserved at the Hermitage Museum. ... Map showing the extent of the Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ... Muiredacha Cross. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Image:San Juan de Baños . ... The art of ancient Greece has exercised an enormous influence on the culture of many countries from ancient times until the present, particularly in the areas of sculpture and architecture. ... Laocoön Group, Vatican Museums, Rome The art of the Hellenistic period has long been the victim of the relative disdain attached to the period. ... Fresco from the Villa of the Mysteries. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... For the span of recorded history starting roughly 5,000-5,500 years ago, see Ancient history. ... For other uses, see Mesopotamia (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...

Contents

Morocco

The earliest figurine the Venus of Tan-Tan discovered to date originated somewhere between 500,000 and 300,000 BC, during the Middle Acheulean period. Discovered in Morocco, it is about 6 centimeters long. Evidence suggests that this Moroccan piece may have been created by natural geological processes with a minimum of human tool-work, but the piece bears evidence of having been painted; "a greasy substance" on the stone's surface has been shown to contain iron and manganese and indicates that it was decorated by someone and used as a figurine, regardless of how it may have been formed. [1] A rare Dresden porcelain figurine Figurine is a diminutive form of the word figure, and generally refers to a small human-made statue that represents a human (or deity or animal). ... Venus of Tan-Tan The Venus of Tan-Tan was found in Morocco. ... Acheulean hand-axes from Kent. ... Geology (from Greek γη- (ge-, the earth) and λογος (logos, word, reason)) is the science and study of the Earth, its composition, structure, physical properties, history, and the processes that shape it. ... A modern hammer is directly descended from ancient hand tools A tool or device is a piece of equipment which typically provides a mechanical advantage in accomplishing a physical task, or provides an ability that is not naturally available to the user of a tool. ... For other uses, see FAT. Fats consist of a wide group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and largely insoluble in water. ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... General Name, symbol, number manganese, Mn, 25 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 7, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Standard atomic weight 54. ...


Jōmon

Main article: Jōmon period
A Jōmon statue

According to archeological evidence, the Jōmon people in ancient Japan were amongst the first to develop pottery, dating to the 11th millennium BC. The Jōmon people were making pottery figures and vessels decorated with patterns made by impressing the wet clay with braided or unbraided cord and sticks with a growing sophistication. The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Jomon Period. ... Download high resolution version (429x607, 161 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (429x607, 161 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Characters for Jōmon (Cord marks). The Jomon period ) is the time in Japanese pre-history from about 10,000 BC to 300 BC. Most scholars agree that by around 40,000 BC glaciation had connected the Japanese islands with the Asian mainland. ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... (Redirected from 11th millennium BC) The Paleolithic or Palaeolithic – lit. ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ...


India

Petroglyphs at Edakkal Caves in Wayanad, Kerala. They date back to about 4000 BC

The earliest known Indian paintings are the petroglyphs such as found in Bhimbetka, some of them being older than 5500 BC. The production of such works continued for several millennia with later examples, from the 7th century being the carved pillars of Ellora, Maharashtra state. Other examples are the frescoes of Ajanta and Ellora Caves. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 785 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Image taken by me with my digital camera. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 785 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Image taken by me with my digital camera. ... Stone age writing Edakkal Caves are two natural caves located 1000 metres high on Ambukutty Mala 25 kms from Kalpetta in the Wayanad district of Kerala in Indias Western Ghats. ... For other uses, see Petroglyph (disambiguation). ... Bhimbetka is a place in Madhya Pradesh where the earliest known traces of human life in India were found. ... (7th millennium BC – 6th millennium BC – 5th millennium BC – other millennia) Events c. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Kailasanatha Temple Ellora is an ancient village 30 km from the city of Aurangabad in the Indian state of Maharashtra famous for its magnificent rock cut architecture comprising of Buddhist, Hindu and Jaina cave temples and monasteries built between the 6th and 10th century A.D. These structures were excavated... , Maharashtra (Marathi: महाराष्ट्र , IPA:  , translation: Great Nation) is Indias third largest state in area and second largest in population after Uttar Pradesh. ... India is a federal republic comprising twenty-eight states and seven union territories. ... Ajanta takes the name after the village AjinÅ£hā in Aurangabad district in the state of Maharashtra(N. lat. ... Jain cave in Ellora Ellora is an ancient village 30 km (18. ...


Persia (Iran)

One of the ancient countries which developed art in it self was Iran. One of the most important things in art is Music which was very important in Persia. There are two statues which had been excavated from Susawas guitar. Also Persia had a lot of palaces in its capitals Susa, Persepolis, Ecbatana and Estakhr. All of them reveal the rich Persian art which are very beautiful. For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Winged sphinx from the palace of Darius the Great at Susa. ...

After 2500 years, the ruins of Persepolis still inspire visitors from far and near.

Also after Islam Persians used Arab art and they combined it with their art and they made a new technique to paint and write and build things. Image File history File linksMetadata Takht-jamshid. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Takht-jamshid. ...

Shah Mosque in a north-south view of Naqsh-e Jahan Square

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1033 KB) Summary Masjed-e-shah in Esfahan seen from the Balcony of Ali Qapu Palace. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1033 KB) Summary Masjed-e-shah in Esfahan seen from the Balcony of Ali Qapu Palace. ... Shah Mosque is a mosque in Isfahan,Iran standing in soyth side of Naghsh-i Jahan square. ...

Arts of Ancient Mesopotamia

Mesopotamia (modern day Iraq), is often considered the "cradle of civilization." Within its boundaries, some of the most ancient civilizations known to man first developed writing and agriculture. Many civilizations flourished there, leaving behind a rich legacy of ancient art. For other uses, see Mesopotamia (disambiguation). ... “Write” redirects here. ...


Sumer

Sumerian goddess from 2120BC

Sumer was once considered to be the first civilization. Archaeological evidence attests to their existence during the 5th millennium BC. The Sumerians decorated their pottery with cedar oil paints. The Sumerians also developed jewellery. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1000x1085, 158 KB) Description Description: Sumerian goddess, fragment of a stele, c. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1000x1085, 158 KB) Description Description: Sumerian goddess, fragment of a stele, c. ... Sumer (or Å umer) was the earliest known civilization of the ancient Near East, located in lower Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), from the time of the earliest records in the mid 4th millennium BC until the rise of Babylonia in the late 3rd millennium BC. The term Sumerian applies to all speakers... Sumer (or Å umer) was the earliest known civilization of the ancient Near East, located in lower Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), from the time of the earliest records in the mid 4th millennium BC until the rise of Babylonia in the late 3rd millennium BC. The term Sumerian applies to all speakers... Central New York City. ... // Events 4860 BC - Mount Mazama in Oregon collapses, forming a caldera that later fills with water and becomes Crater Lake, the deepest lake in the United States. ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... Cedar oil was used as the base for paints by the ancient Sumerians. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Korean music group, see Jewelry (group). ...


One of the most remarkable artifact remaining from the Sumerian civilization is known as the Standard of Ur. Dated to approximately 2500 B.C., the Standard is a wooden box inlaid with shells and lapis lazuli. It depicts soldiers presenting their king with prisoners on one side and peasants presenting him with gifts on the other - stunning evidence attesting to the vibrancy of art in this ancient culture. the War panel Peace, detail showing lyrist. ... A block of lapis lazuli Lapis lazuli is one of the oldest of all gems, with a history of use stretching back 7,000 years. ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... In a detail of Brueghels Land of Cockaigne (1567) a soft-boiled egg has little feet to rush to the luxuriating peasant who catches drops of honey on his tongue, while roast pigs roam wild: in fact, hunger and harsh winters were realities for the average European in the... For the span of recorded history starting roughly 5,000-5,500 years ago, see Ancient history. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ...


Babylon

The conquest of Sumer and Akkad by Babylon marks a turning point in the artistic as well as political history of the region. Sumer (or Å umer) was the earliest known civilization of the ancient Near East, located in lower Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), from the time of the earliest records in the mid 4th millennium BC until the rise of Babylonia in the late 3rd millennium BC. The term Sumerian applies to all speakers... For the Egyptian writer, see Abbas Al-Akkad. ... For other uses, see Babylon (disambiguation). ...


The Babylonians took advantage of the abundance of clay in Mesopotamia to create bricks. The use of brick led to the early development of the pilaster and column, as well as of frescoes and enamelled tiles. The walls were brilliantly coloured, and sometimes plated with bronze or gold as well as with tiles. Painted terra-cotta cones were also embedded in the plaster. For other uses, see Clay (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mesopotamia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Brick (disambiguation). ... In architecture, pilasters comprise slightly-projecting pseudo-columns built into or onto a wall, with capitals and bases. ... For other uses, see Column (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Sculpture of Hanuman in terra cotta. ...


The sean were also great metal-workers, creating functional and beautiful tools with copper. It is possible that Babylonia was the original home of copper-working, which spread westward with the civilization to which it belonged. In addition, the want of stone in Babylonia made every pebble precious and led to a high perfection in the art of gem-cutting. The arts of Babylon also included tapestries, and Babylonian civilization was from an early date famous for its embroideries and rugs. This article is about metallic materials. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Gemstone (disambiguation). ... There is an album by Carol King called Tapestry A tapestry cushion, depicting pansies Tapestry is a form of textile art. ...


Assyria

Assyrian statue

Like all other kingdoms, the Babylonian kingdom did not last forever. When Babylon fell into decline it was eventually conquered by Assyria, one of its former colonies, Assyria inherited its arts as well as its empire. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1136, 303 KB) Summary Statue aus Khorsabad (Musée du Louvre) Photograph: Luidger Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Arts of the ancient world ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1136, 303 KB) Summary Statue aus Khorsabad (Musée du Louvre) Photograph: Luidger Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Arts of the ancient world ... For other uses, see Assyria (disambiguation). ... For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... For other uses, see Assyria (disambiguation). ...


At first, Assyrian architects and artists copied Babylonian styles and materials, but as time went by, however, the later Assyrians began to shake themselves free of Babylonian influences. The walls of the Assyrian palaces were lined with slabs of stone instead of brick, and were colored instead of painted as in Chaldea. In place of the bas relief we have scuplted figures, the earliest examples being the statues from Telloh which are realistic but somewhat clumsy. For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chaldean. ... Bas-relief (pronounced bah-relief, French for low relief) is a method of sculpting which entails carving or etching away the surface of a flat piece of stone or metal creating a sculpture portrayed as a picture. ... “Sculptor” redirects here. ... Girsu (modern Telloh, Dhi Qar Governorate, Iraq) is a city of ancient Sumer, situated some 25 km northwest of Lagash. ...


No remarkable specimens of metallurgic art from early Assyria have been found, but at a later epoch great excellence was attained in the manufacture of such jewellery as ear-rings and bracelets of gold. Copper was also worked with skill. For the Korean music group, see Jewelry (group). ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ...


The forms of Assyrian pottery were graceful; the porcelain, like the glass discovered in the palaces of Nineveh, was derived from Egyptian originals. Transparent glass seems to have been first introduced in the reign of Sargon II. Stone as well as clay and glass were employed in the manufacture of vases. Vases of hard stone have been disinterred at Tello similar to those of the early dynastic period of Egypt. “Fine China” redirects here. ... This article is about the material. ... , For other uses, see Nineveh (disambiguation). ... Sargon II (right), king of Assyria (r. ...


Ashurbanipal had promoted art and culture and had a vast library of cuneiform tablets at Nineveh.


Ancient Egyptian Art

Main article: Art of Ancient Egypt
Egyptian papyrus

Faience that was produced in ancient Egyptian antiquity as early as 3500 BC was in fact superior to the tin-glazed earthenware of the European 15th century ([2]; also see Faience). Ancient Egyptian faience was not made of clay but instead actually of a ceramic composed primarily of quartz. Approximately two hundred of these "masterpieces of faience" are the subject of the on-line article posted at [3]. This article has been tagged since January 2007. ... Image:Egypt. ... Image:Egypt. ... Faience or faïence is the conventional name in English for fine tin-glazed earthenware on a delicate pale buff body. ... Main article: Ancient Egypt Archaeological evidence indicates that a distinct culture was developing in the Nile valley from before 5000 BC. What is now called the Pharaonic Period is dated from around 3100 BC, when Egypt became a unified state, until its survival as an independent state ceased in 332... (36th century BC - 35th century BC - 34th century BC - other centuries) (5th millennium BC - 4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC) Events ? - Formation of the Sahara Desert 3450 (?) - Stage IId of the Naqada culture in Egypt Significant persons Inventions, discoveries, introductions ? _ Irrigation in Egypt ? - First use of Cuneiform (script) Categories... Earthenware is a common ceramic material, which is used extensively for pottery tableware and decorative objects. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Faience or faïence is the conventional name in English for fine tin-glazed earthenware on a delicate pale buff body. ... Khafres Pyramid and the Great Sphinx of Giza, built about 2550 BC during the Fourth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom,[1] are enduring symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt was a civilization in Northeastern Africa concentrated along the middle to lower reaches of the Nile River... Faience or faïence is the conventional name in English for fine tin-glazed earthenware on a delicate pale buff body. ... For other uses, see Clay (disambiguation). ... Fixed Partial Denture, or Bridge The word ceramic is derived from the Greek word κεραμικός (keramikos). ... For other uses, see Quartz (disambiguation). ...


Because of the highly religious nature of Ancient Egyptian civilization, many of the great works of Ancient Egypt depict gods, goddesses, and Pharaohs, who were also considered divine. Ancient Egyptian art is characterized by the idea of order. Clear and simple lines combined with simple shapes and flat areas of color helped to create a sense of order and balance in the art of ancient Egypt. Ancient Egyptian artists used vertical and horizontal reference lines in order to maintain the correct proportions in their work. Political and religious, as well as artistic order, was also maintained in Egyptian art. In order to clearly define the social hierarchy of a situation, figures were drawn to sizes based not on their distance from the painter's point of view but on relative importance. For instance, the Pharaoh would be drawn as the largest figure in a painting no matter where he was situated, and a greater God would be drawn larger than a lesser god. Symbolism also played an important role in establishing a sense of order. Symbolism, ranging from the Pharaoh's regalia (symbolizing his power to maintain order) to the individual symbols of Egyptian gods and goddesses, was omnipresent in Egyptian art . Animals were usually also highly symbolic figures in Egyptian art. Color, as well, had extended meaning— Blue and green represented the Nile and life; yellow stood for the sun god; and red represented power and vitality. The colors in Egyptian artifacts have survived extremely well over the centuries because of Egypt's dry climate. Despite the stilted form caused by a lack of perspective, ancient Egyptian art is often highly realistic. Ancient Egyptian artists often show a sophisticated knowledge of anatomy and a close attention to detail, especially in their renderings of animals. During the 18th Dynasty of Egypt a Pharaoh by the name of Akhenaton took the throne and abolished the traditional polytheism. He formed a monotheistic religion based on the worship of Aten, a sun god. Artistic change followed political upheaval. A new style of art was introduced that was more naturalistic than the stylized frieze favored in Egyptian art for the previous 1700 years. After Akhenaton's death, however, Egyptian artists reverted to their old styles.

Olmec art

An Olmec stone head

See [4] for photographs of an ancient Olmec "Bird Vessel" and bowl, both ceramic and dating to circa 1000 BC. Other ancient artifacts are listed (no photographs) at [5]. Ceramics are produced in kilns capable of exceeding approximately 900° C (see pottery). The only other prehistoric culture known to have achieved such high temperatures is that of Ancient Egypt ([6]; also see faience). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1200, 810 KB) Cabeza olmeca etiquetada como número 1 en el museo de antropología de Xalapa, también conocida como el rey. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1200, 810 KB) Cabeza olmeca etiquetada como número 1 en el museo de antropología de Xalapa, también conocida como el rey. ... Monument 1, one of the four Olmec colossal heads at La Venta. ... Monument 1, one of the four Olmec colossal heads at La Venta. ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... (Redirected from 1000 BC) Centuries: 12th century BC - 11th century BC - 10th century BC Decades: 1050s BC 1040s BC 1030s BC 1020s BC 1010s BC - 1000s BC - 990s BC 980s BC 970s BC 960s BC 950s BC Events and Trends 1006 BC - David becomes king of the ancient Israelites (traditional... Ancient Egyptian ceramic art: Louvre Museum. ... Charcoal Kilns, California Gold Kiln, Victoria, Australia Hop kiln. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... Stonehenge, England, erected by Neolithic peoples ca. ... Khafres Pyramid and the Great Sphinx of Giza, built about 2550 BC during the Fourth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom,[1] are enduring symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt was a civilization in Northeastern Africa concentrated along the middle to lower reaches of the Nile River... Faience or faïence is the conventional name in English for fine tin-glazed earthenware on a delicate pale buff body. ...


Much Olmec art is highly stylized and uses an iconography reflective of the religious meaning of the artworks. Some Olmec art, however, is surprisingly naturalistic, displaying an accuracy of depiction of human anatomy perhaps equaled in the Pre-Columbian New World only by the best Maya Classic era art. Olmec art-forms emphasize monumental statuary and small jade carvings. A common theme is to be found in representations of a divine jaguar. Olmec figurines were also found abundantly through their period. A selection of antique, hand-crafted Chinese jade (jadeite) buttons Unworked Jade Jade is used as an ornamental stone, the term jade is applied to two different rocks that are made up of different silicate minerals. ... For other uses, see Jaguar (disambiguation). ... The Wrestler, an Olmec era figurine, 1200 - 800 BCE. Copyright George and Audrey DeLange, used with permission. ...


Arts of the Ancient Aegean

The Minoan Civilization

See also: Minoan pottery

The greatest civilization of the Bronze Age was that of the Minoans, a mercantalist people who built a trading empire from their homeland of Crete and from other Aegean islands. Minoan civilization was known for its beautiful ceramics, but also for its frescos, landscapes, and stone carvings. In the early Minoan period ceramics were characterised by linear patterns of spirals, triangles, curved lines, crosses, fishbone motives and such. In the middle Minoan period naturalistic designs such fish, squids, birds and lilies were common. In the late Minoan period flowers and animals were still the most characteristic, but variability had increased. The 'palace style' of the region around Knossos is characterised by strong geometric simplification of naturalistic shapes and monochromatic painting. The Palace at Knossos was decorated with frescoes showing aspects of everyday life, including court ritual and entertainment such as bull-leaping and boxing. The Minoans were also skilled goldsmiths, creating beautiful pendants and masks in the precious metal. Minoan pottery is more than a useful tool for dating the mute Minoan civilization. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... The Minoan civilization was a bronze age civilization which arose on Crete, an island in the Aegean Sea. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Ancient Egyptian ceramic art: Louvre Museum. ... For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... A portion of Arthur Evans reconstruction of the Minoan palace at Knossos. ... Something which is monochromatic has a single color. ... For other senses of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... The Minoans were an ancient pre-Hellenic civilization on what is now Crete (in the Mediterranean), during the Bronze Age, prior to classical Greek culture. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ...


The Mycenaen Civilization

Mycenaen art is close to the Minoan and includes many splendid finds from the royal graves, most famously the Mask of Agamemnon, a gold funeral mask. As may be seen from this item, the Mycenaens specialized in gold-working. Their artworks are known for a plethora of decorative motives employed therein. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1457x1472, 793 KB) de: Â»Maske des Agamemnon« von Leo2004 fotografiert. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1457x1472, 793 KB) de: Â»Maske des Agamemnon« von Leo2004 fotografiert. ... The Mask of Agamemnon The Mask of Agamemnon is an artifact discovered at Mycenae in 1876 by Heinrich Schliemann. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... The Mask of Agamemnon The Mask of Agamemnon is an artifact discovered at Mycenae in 1876 by Heinrich Schliemann. ...


Greek art

Main article: Art in Ancient Greece
Kouros of the Archaic period, Thebes Archaeological Museum

Ancient Greek art includes much pottery, sculpture as well as architecture. Greek sculpture is known for the contrapposto standing of the figures. The art of Ancient Greece is usually divided stylistically into three periods: the Archaic, the Classical and the Hellenistic. The history of Ancient Greek pottery is divided stylistically into periods: the Protogeometric, the Geometric, the Late Geometric or Archaic, the Black Figure and the Red Figure. Ancient Greek art has survived most successfully in the forms of sculpture and architecture, as well as in such minor arts as coin design, pottery and gem engraving. The art of ancient Greece has exercised an enormous influence on the culture of many countries from ancient times until the present, particularly in the areas of sculpture and architecture. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Doryphoros of Polyclitus, an early example of classical contrapost. ...


Greek painters worked mainly on wooden panels, and these perished rapidly after the 4th century AD, when they were no longer actively protected. Today not much survives of Greek painting, except some examples of painted terra cotta and a few paintings on the walls of tombs, mostly in Macedonia and Italy. Of the masterpieces of Greek painting we have only a few copies from Roman times, and most are of inferior quality. Painting on pottery, of which a great deal survives, gives some sense of the aesthetics of Greek painting. The techniques involved, however, were very different from those used in large-format painting. It was mainly in black and gold and was painted using different paints than the ones used on walls or wood, because it was a different surface. GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ...


Steppe Art

Main article: Scythian art
Scythian pectoral. 4th-century B.C. Discovered in the kurgan "Tovsta Mohyla", Dnipropetrovsk region. Displayed in Museum of Historical Treasures of Ukraine, Kiev.

Superb samples of Scythian art - mostly golden jewelry and trappings for horse - are found over a vast expanse of land stretching from Hungary to Mongolia. Dating from the period between the 7th and 3rd centuries BC, art objects are usually diminutive, as may be expected from nomadic people always on the move. Art of the steppes is primarily an animal art, i.e., combat scenes involving several animals (real or imaginary) or single animal figures (such as golden stags) predominate. Probably the most famous find of Scythian items was made in 1947, when the Soviet archaeologist Sergei Rudenko discovered a royal burial at Pazyryk, Altay Mountains, which featured - among many other important objects - the most ancient extant pile rug. By far the greatest collection of Scythian gold is preserved at the Hermitage Museum. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1425x1470, 352 KB) Description Fragments Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Arts of the ancient world History of jewellery in Ukraine ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1425x1470, 352 KB) Description Fragments Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Arts of the ancient world History of jewellery in Ukraine ... Location The clavicular head of the pectoralis major takes its origin from the anterior surface of the medial half of the clavicle. ... Sarmatian Kurgan 4th c. ... Dnipropetrovsk region (Дніпропетровська область, Dnipropetrovs’ka oblast’ in Ukrainian) is a region of northern Ukraine. ... Map of Ukraine with Kiev highlighted Coordinates: , Country Ukraine Oblast Kiev City Municipality Raion Municipality Government  - Mayor Leonid Chernovetskyi Elevation 179 m (587 ft) Population (2006)  - City 4,450,968  - Density 3,299/km² (8,544. ... By far the greatest collection of Scythian gold is preserved at the Hermitage Museum. ... Sergei Ivanovich Rudenko (January 16, 1885, Kharkov - July 16, 1969, Leningrad) was a prominent Russian/Soviet anthropologist and archaeologist who discovered and excavated the most celebrated of Scythian burials, Pazyryk in Siberia. ... Horseman, Pazyryk felt artifact, c. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Look up Rug in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Roman culture

Main article: Roman art

It is commonly said that Roman art was derivative from Greek and Etruscan art. Indeed, the villas of the wealthy Romans unearthed in Pompeii and Herculaneum show a strong predilection for all things Greek. Many of the most significant Greek artworks survive by virtue of their Roman interpretation and imitation. However, Roman artists sought to commemorate great events in the life of their state and to glorify their emperors rather than record the inner life of man and express ideas of beauty and nobility, as their Greek counterparts did. Fresco from the Villa of the Mysteries. ... Map showing the extent of the Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ... For other uses, see Pompeii (disambiguation). ... Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) is an ancient Roman town, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano. ...


Chinese Art

Main article: Chinese art Chinese Jade ornament with flower design, Jin Dynasty (1115-1234 AD), Shanghai Museum. ...

Bronze vessel Beast Face Flat Footed Ding (兽面扁足鼎) dated early Shang Dynasty, 1600 BC - 1350 BC.

The art of ancient and medieval China had deep impact on classical Korean and Japanese art, especially during the Chinese Tang Dynasty. Prehistoric artwork such as painted pottery in Neolithic China can be traced back to the Yangshao culture and Longshan culture of the Yellow River valley. During China's Bronze Age, Chinese of the ancient Shang Dynasty and Zhou Dynasty produced multitudes of artistic bronzeware vessels for practical purposes, but also for religious ritual and geomancy. The earliest (surviving) Chinese paintings date to the Warring States period, mostly on lacquer ware items, while the earliest surviving paintings on silk date to the Han Dynasty (example: the intricate silk paintings found at the tombs of Mawangdui). One of ancient China's most famous artistic relics remains the Terracotta Army, an assembly of 8,099 individual and life-size terracotta figures (such as infantry, horses with chariots and cavalry, archers, and military officers), buried in the tomb of Qin Shi Huang, the First Qin Emperor, in 210 BC. Image File history File links Shang-ding1. ... Image File history File links Shang-ding1. ... Remnants of advanced, stratified societies dating back to the Shang period have been found in the Yellow River Valley. ... (Redirected from 1600 BC) Centuries: 18th century BC - 17th century BC - 16th century BC Decades: 1650s BC 1640s BC 1630s BC 1620s BC 1610s BC - 1600s BC - 1590s BC 1580s BC 1570s BC 1560s BC 1550s BC Events and trends Egypt: End of Fourteenth Dynasty The creation of one of... (Redirected from 1350 BC) Centuries: 15th century BC - 14th century BC - 13th century BC Decades: 1400s BC 1390s BC 1380s BC 1370s BC 1360s BC - 1350s BC - 1340s BC 1330s BC 1320s BC 1310s BC 1300s BC Events and Trends Significant People 1350 BC - Pharaoh Amenhotep IV Akhenaton rises to... For the band, see Tang Dynasty (band). ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Yangshao culture (仰韶文化) was a Neolithic culture that existed extensively along the central Yellow River in China. ... Longshan culture (龍山文化) was a late Neolithic culture centered around the central and lower Yellow River in China. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Remnants of advanced, stratified societies dating back to the Shang period have been found in the Yellow River Valley. ... This article is about the ancient Chinese dynasty. ... Geomancy (from Old French geomancie <Late Latin geōmantia <Late Greek geōmanteia< geo, earth + manteia, divination) from the eponymous ilm al-raml (the science of sand), is a method of divination that interprets markings on the ground, or how handfuls of dirt land when someone tosses them. ... Alternative meaning: Warring States Period (Japan) The Warring States Period (traditional Chinese: &#25136;&#22283;&#26178;&#20195;, simplified Chinese: &#25112;&#22269;&#26102;&#20195; pinyin Zhànguó Shídài) takes place from sometime in the 5th century BC to the unification of China by Qin in 221 BC. It is nominally... In a general sense, lacquer is a clear or coloured coating, that dries by solvent evaporation only and that produces a hard, durable finish that can be polished to a very high gloss, and gives the illusion of depth. ... Han Dynasty in 87 BC Capital Changan (202 BC–9 AD) Luoyang (25 AD–190 AD) Language(s) Chinese Religion Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy History  - Establishment 206 BC  - Battle of Gaixia; Han rule of China begins 202 BC  - Interruption of Han rule 9 - 24  - Abdication to Cao Wei 220... Mawangdui (馬王堆) is an archaeological site located in Changsha, China. ... The Terracotta Army (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ; literally soldier and horse funerary statues) or Terracotta Warriors and Horses is a collection of 8,099 life-size Chinese terra cotta figures of warriors and horses located near the Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor (Chinese: ; pinyin: ). The figures were discovered... The monarch known now as Qin Shi Huang (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chin Shih-huang) (November / December 260 BCE – September 10, 210 BCE), personal name Yíng Zhèng, was king of the Chinese State of Qin from 247 BCE to 221 BCE (officially still under the Zhou Dynasty... Events Caracalla is Roman Consul Births Dexippus, Greek historian Mani, founder of Manichaeism (approximate date) Deaths Sauromates II, King of Bosporus Claudius Galen, Greek scholar Monoimus, Arab gnostic (approximate date) Zhou Yu, Chinese strategist Category: ...


References

  • Bailey, Douglass. (2005). Prehistoric Figurines: Representation and Corporeality in the Neolithic. Routledge Publishers. ISBN 0-415-33152-8

this was chosen to be named huhuh suko


External links


 
 

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