FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Anatolians
Jump to: navigation, search
Asia Minor lies east of the Bosporus, between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean.
Asia Minor lies east of the Bosporus, between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean.

Anatolia' (Greek: ανατολή anatolē or anatolí) is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. It means "rising of the sun" or "East", is also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor. In Turkish it is called Anadolu meaning full of mothers. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (948x449, 661 KB)composite satellite image of Anatolia (blue marble). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (948x449, 661 KB)composite satellite image of Anatolia (blue marble). ... This article is about the strait; Bosphorus is also a university in Turkey. ... Jump to: navigation, search Southwest Asia (PDF) Southwest Asia (often called the Middle East) is the southwestern part of Asia. ... Jump to: navigation, search World map showing Asia (geographically) Asia is the central and eastern part of Eurasia and worlds largest continent. ... Jump to: navigation, search Latin is an Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...


Because of its strategic location at the intersection of Asia and Europe, Anatolia has been a cradle for several civilizations since prehistoric ages, with neolithic settlements such as Catal Höyük (pottery neolithic), Cayönü (Pre-Pottery Neolithic A to pottery Neolithic), Nevali Cori (PPN B), Hacilar (pottery neolithic), Göbekli Tepe (PPN A) and Mersin. The settlement of Troy starts in the Neolithic, but continues up into the Iron age. World map showing Europe (geographically) When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... Jump to: navigation, search A civilization or civilisation has a variety of meanings related to human society. ... Prehistory (Greek words προ = before and ιστορία = history) is the period of human history prior to the advent of writing (which marks the beginning of recorded history). ... Jump to: navigation, search The Neolithic, (Greek neos = new, lithos = stone, or New Stone Age) was a period in the development of human technology that is traditionally the last part of the Stone Age. ... Excavations at the South Area of Çatal Höyük Çatalhöyük (also Çatal Höyük and Çatal Hüyük, or any of the three without accent marks -- Çatal is Turkish for fork and Höyük is Turkish for mound) was a very large Neolithic and... Cayönü is a neolithic settlement in eastern Turkey. ... The Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (short PPNA) represents the early neolithic in the Levantine and upper Mesopotamian region of the Fertile Crescent. ... Nevali Cori is an early Neolithic settlement in the upper Euphrates valley, eastern Turkey, around 490 m high. ... Pre-Pottery Neolithic B is a division of the Neolithic developed by Dame Kathleen Kenyon during her archaeological excavations at Jericho in Israel. ... Hacilar is a Neolithic settlement in south western Turkey, 25 km southwest of present day Burdur. ... Göbekli Tepe is an early Neolithic site in southeastern Turkey. ... The Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (short PPNA) represents the early neolithic in the Levantine and upper Mesopotamian region of the Fertile Crescent. ... Mersin is the capital city of İçel Province, in Turkey. ... Jump to: navigation, search Walls of the excavated city of Troy (Turkey) This article is about the ancient city of Ilion as described in the works of Homer, and the location of an ancient city associated with it. ...


Major civilizations and peoples that have settled in or conquered Anatolia include the Colchians, Hattians, Luwians, Hittites, Phrygians, Cimmerians, Lydians, Persians, Celts, Tabals, Meshechs, Greeks, Pelasgians, Armenians, Romans, Goths, Kurds, Byzantines, Seljuk Turks, and Ottomans. These peoples belonged to many varied ethnic and linguistic traditions. Through recorded history, Anatolians have spoken both Indo-European and Semitic languages, as well as many languages of uncertain affiliation. In fact, given the antiquity of the Indo-European Hittite and Luwian languages, some scholars have proposed Anatolia as the hypothetical center from which the Indo-European languages have radiated. Other authors have proposed an Anatolian origin for the Etruscans of ancient Italy. Jump to: navigation, search Colchians were the residents of Colchis, the westernmost part of the Republic of Georgia, bordering the Euxinus Pontus (Black Sea). ... The Hattians were an ancient people who inhabited the land of Hatti in Asia Minor in the 3rd to 2nd millennia BC. They spoke a non-Indo-European language of uncertain affiliation called Hattic (now believed by some to be related to the Northwest Caucasian language group). ... Luwian (sometimes spelled Luwiyan) is an Anatolian language known in three forms: (1) Cuneiform Luwian, (2) Hieroglyphic-Luwian and (3), the somewhat later Lycian. ... Jump to: navigation, search Relief of Suppiluliuma II, last known king of the Hittite Empire Hittites is the conventional English-language term for an ancient people who spoke an Indo-European language and established a kingdom centered in Hattusa (the modern village of Boğazköy in north-central Turkey... In antiquity, Phrygia was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolian highlands, part of modern Turkey, from ca. ... The Cimmerians were an ancient people of Iranian origin, who lived in the south of modern-day Ukraine (Crimea and northern Black sea coast) and Russia (Black Sea coast and Caucasus), at least in the 8th and 7th century BC. Little is known about them, but they were mentioned in... Jump to: navigation, search Lydia (disambiguation) Lydia is a historic region of western Anatolia, congruent with Turkeys modern provinces of İzmir and Manisa. ... Official Government Links The following websites belong to the various branches of government, or are directly operated by the government of the Islamic Republic of Iran: Official site of the Supreme Leader, (Qom office) Presidency of the Islamic Republic of Iran - Official website. ... Jump to: navigation, search A Celtic cross. ... Tabals (also Tobal, Tubal, Jabal, and Tibarenoi) were an indigenous tribe of Asia Minor, who inhabited Great Cappadocia, now part of Turkey. ... Jump to: navigation, search Meshechs (Meshekhs/Mosokhs/Mushki, Mushku in Akkadian, Moschoi in Greek) were an ancient, non-Indo-European and non-Semitic, indigenous tribe of Asia Minor of the 3rd-1st millennias BC, said to be the offspring of Meshech, son of Japheth. ... Ancient Greek writers used the name Pelasgians (Gk. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Roman Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Ancient Roman polity in the centuries following its reorganization under the leadership of Octavian (better known as Caesar Augustus). ... Jump to: navigation, search Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche portrays the Goths as cavalrymen. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centred at its capital in Constantinople. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Seljuk Turks (also Seldjuk, Seldjuq, Seljuq; in Turkish Selçuklu; in Arabic سلجوق Saljūq, or السلاجقة al-Salājiqa; in Persian سلجوقيان Saljūqiyān) were a major branch of the Oghuz Turks and a dynasty that ruled parts of Central Asia and the Middle East from... Jump to: navigation, search Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (the Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Bursa (1335 - 1365), Edirne (1365-1453), İstanbul (Constantinople) (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanli... An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ... Broadly conceived, linguistics is the study of human language, and a linguist is someone who engages in this study. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Indo-European languages include some 443 (SIL estimate) languages and dialects, including most of the major language families of Europe, as well as many languages of Southwest and South Asia, which belong to a single superfamily. ... Jump to: navigation, search 12th century Hebrew Bible script The Semitic languages are a family of languages spoken by more than 250 million people across much of the Middle East, where they originated, and North and East Africa. ... The Hittite language is the dead language once spoken by the Hittites, a people who once created an empire centered on ancient Hattusa (modern Boğazköy) in north-central Anatolia (modern Turkey). ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ...

Asia Minor in Antiquity
Asia Minor in Antiquity

Today the inhabitants of Anatolia are mostly native speakers of the Turkish language, which was introduced with the conquest of Anatolia by Turkic peoples and the rise of the Seljuk Empire in the 11th century. However, Anatolia remained multi-ethnic until the early 20th century until the Rise of Nationalism under the Ottoman Empire. The Turks in Thrace were forced to leave their homes and settle in Anatolia during the balkan wars. The last population exchange, as result of the Treaty of Lausanne, between Turkey and Greece eliminated the majority of Turks in Greece and Greeks in Turkey. A significant Kurdish ethnic and linguistic minority exists in the south eastern regions. Jump to: navigation, search Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2339x1541, 413 KB)Asia Minor under the Greeks. ... Jump to: navigation, search Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2339x1541, 413 KB)Asia Minor under the Greeks. ... Jump to: navigation, search Turkish (Türkçe) is a Turkic language spoken natively in Cyprus, Bulgaria, and by perhaps 80% of the population of Turkey, as well as by several million immigrants in the European Union. ... Jump to: navigation, search If you mean the Turks from Final Fantasy VII see: Turks (Final Fantasy VII) Turkic peoples are Northern and Central Eurasian peoples who speak languages belonging to the Turkic family of languages and which share in varying degrees, ethnic, cultural and historical traits. ... The Seljuk Turks (Turkish: Selçuk; Arabic: سلجوق Saljūq, السلاجقة al-Salājiqa; Persian: سلجوقيان Saljūqiyān; also Seldjuk, Seldjuq, Seljuq) were a major branch of the Oghuz Turks and a dynasty that occupied parts of Central Asia and the Middle East from the 11th to 14th centuries. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Millet; linked on commons ...the Ottoman Sultan did not introduce the millet system into their empire only on the capture of Constantinople, but were already applying its principles to the non-Muslim Communities under their rule. ... Thrace (Greek Θρᾴκη ThrákÄ“, Bulgarian Тракия Trakija, Turkish Trakya) is a historical and geographic area in southeast Europe spread over southern Bulgaria, northeastern Greece, and European Turkey. ... Jump to: navigation, search The outcome as of April 1913 Boundaries on the Balkans after the First and the Second Balkan War (1912-1913) Distribution of races in the Balkan Peninsula and Asia Minor in 1923, Historical Atlas by William R. Shepherd, New York (The map does not reflect the... Jump to: navigation, search Areas with significant Kurdish population. ...

Contents


States of Anatolia

Anatolia has been the center of many great states through out the history. The first state that is known was built by Hittites.

States that existed over the Anatolia
Old Kingdom Ionia Sultanate of Rüm
New Kingdom Roman Greece Ottoman Empire
Neo-Hittite Byzantium Republic of Turkey
Urartu Hellenistic Greece

Jump to: navigation, search The Hittite Empire at the height of its power (red), bordering on the Egyptian Empire (green) The early history of the Hittite kingdom is known through tablets that may first have been written in the 17th century BC but survived only as copies made in the... Ionia (Greek Ιωνία; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was an ancient region of southwestern coastal Anatolia (now in Turkey) on the Aegean Sea. ... The Sultanate of Rûm was a Seljuk sultanate in Anatolia from 1077 to 1307. ... Jump to: navigation, search With the reign of Tudhaliya I (who may actually not have been the first of that name; see also Tudhaliya), the Hittite Empire reëmerges from the fog of obscurity. ... The Greek peninsula became a Roman protectorate in 146 BC, and the Aegean islands were added to this territory in 133. ... Jump to: navigation, search Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (the Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Bursa (1335 - 1365), Edirne (1365-1453), İstanbul (Constantinople) (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanli... Jump to: navigation, search Although the Hittites disappeared from most of Anatolia after c. ... Jump to: navigation, search Byzantium was an ancient Greek city-state, founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named after their king Byzas. ... Jump to: navigation, search Urartu map Urartu (a. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Hellenistic period of Greek history was the period between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the annexation of the Greek peninsula and islands by Rome in 146 BC. Although the establishment of Roman rule did not break the continuity of Hellenistic...

Ottoman Rule of Asia Minor after 1885

After 1885, with the governing reforms of Tanzimat, the control of the Ottoman land in Asia Minor divided into 15 vilayets, one sanjak and one mutersaflik of the vilayet of Constantinople (both being on the asiatic side of the Bosporus). The Tanzimat was a period of reform in the Ottoman Empire that lasted from 1839 to 1876. ... Vilâyet (also eyalet or pashaluk) was the Turkish name for the provinces of the Ottoman Empire. ... This page is about districts of the Ottoman Empire; for a region in Serbia and Montenegro, see Sandžak. ... Jump to: navigation, search Map of Constantinople. ... This article is about the strait; Bosphorus is also a university in Turkey. ...


Every vilayet was further divided in a number of sanjaks.


More specifically the political division of Asia Minor in 1915 was as follows;

Also the Shows the Location of the Province Ä°zmir Izmir from space, June 1996 Izmir (Turkish spelling Ä°zmir, contraction of its former name Smyrna), the second-largest port (after Ä°stanbul) and the third most populous city (2,409,000 in 2000) of Turkey, is located on the Aegean Sea near the Gulf... Manisa is the capital of the Turkish province of Manisa. ... Jump to: navigation, search Aydın is the capital city of the Aydın Province in Turkey. ... Denizli is a province of Turkey in Western Anatolia. ... The Dardanelles (Turkish: Çanakkale BoÄŸazı), formerly Hellespont, is a narrow strait in northwestern Turkey connecting the Aegean Sea with the Sea of Marmara. ... Bursa (formerly known as Brusa or Prusa) is the capital of the Bursa Province in northwestern Turkey. ... Balkesir is a city of approximately 250. ... Kütahya is a city in western Turkey with 170,000 inhabitants (2004 estimate), lying on the Porsuk river, at 930 metres above sea level. ... Afyonkarahisar (Turkish for the black opium castle) is a city in western Turkey, also known simply as Afyon (i. ... Konya (also Koniah, Konieh, Konia, and Qunia; historically known as Iconium, Greek: Ικόνιον) is a city in Turkey, on the central plateau of Anatolia. ... Burdur is a city in the Burdur Province of Turkey. ... A reference from the PS2 series Xenosaga. ... Kastamonu is the capitol district of the Kastamonu Province, Turkey. ... Bolu (Bithynium lat) Turkish province and town of 75,000 inhabitants. ... ankiri (correct Turkish spelling ankırı) is a town in Turkey, in ankırı Province, about 140 km northeast of Ankara. ... For other meanings of Sinop/Sinope, see Sinope Sinop (also Sinope) is a city with a population of 47,000 on the coast of the Black Sea, in the modern region of Galatia in modern-day northern Turkey, historically known as Sinope. ... Jump to: navigation, search Ankara from the Atakule Tower, looking N-NE Ankara is the capital of Turkey and the countrys second largest city after Ä°stanbul. ... Kirsehir is a small city in Turkey with a population of 85000. ... Yozgat is a city in Central Turkey in the Yozgat province. ... Kayseri 1897 Kayseri is an industrialized city in Turkey that is famous for Mount Erciyes. ... Jump to: navigation, search See Adana Province. ... Mersin is the capital city of İçel Province, in Turkey. ... Sivas is the provincial capital of Sivas Province in Turkey. ... Tokat is a city in Turkey, at the mid Black Sea region of Anatolia. ... Ottoman houses and a pontic tomb in Amasya Amasya (formerly Amaseia or Amasia) is a town in northern Turkey, the capital of Amasya Province with approximately 80,000 inhabitants. ... Jump to: navigation, search Traditional Trabzon country house Location of Trabzon Province within Turkey Trabzon, formerly known as Trebizond or Τραπεζούντα (Trapezoúnda; see also List of traditional Greek place names) in Greek, is a city on the Black Sea coast of north-eastern Turkey (Lat (DMS) 41° 2 60N Long... Samsun is a city in northern Turkey, on the coast of the Black Sea, with a population of 396,900 as of 2004. ... Jump to: navigation, search Lazistan (Lazona in Laz, Lazeti or Chaneti in Georgian) was the Ottoman administrative name for the sanjak comprising the Laz or Lazuri speaking population on the southeastern shore of the Black Sea. ... Erzurum (or Erzerum, Arzen in antiquity, Karin in ancient Armenian, Theodosiupolis or Theodosiopolis during Byzantine rule) is one of the Provinces of Turkey, in the Eastern Anatolia Region, to the east of the country. ... Bitlis is a city in Turkey, capital of Bitlis Province. ... Mus can refer to: a genus, to which the mouse belongs a city in Turkey, capital of Mus Province Mus, a commune of the Gard département in France This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Jump to: navigation, search Siirt is the capital of Siirt Province in eastern Turkey. ... Van can mean: Van, a road vehicle. ... Hakkâri, formerly Çölemerik, is the capital city of the Hakkâri il, Turkey. ... Diyarbakir (Syriac: ܐܡܝܕ; Greek: Amida; Turkish spelling: Diyarbakır) is a city in Turkey, situated on the banks of the River Tigris. ... Sanli Urfa (in Turkish Şanlıurfa) is a city in eastern Turkey, and the provincial capital of Sanliurfa Province. ... Jump to: navigation, search KahramanmaraÅŸ is the capital city of KahramanmaraÅŸ Province in southeastern Turkey. ...

  • Independent mutersaflik of Izmit and
  • the sanjak of Uskudar

Jump to: navigation, search rught Ä°zmit (also known as Kocaeli; previously known as Ismid or Isnikmid) is a city in the northwestern part of Anatolia, Turkey. ... Üsküdar (ancient Scutari) was a city in Bithynia in Anatolia. ...

Ethnic distribution in Asia Minor in the early 20th century (before the Treaty of Lausanne)

Based on French census files of 1915 the total population of Asia Minor (not including Eastern Thrace, the vilayets of the orient & the city of Constantinople) was 10,372,411 persons of all nationalities and religions. The Treaty of Lausanne was a peace treaty that delimited the boundaries of modern Greece and Turkey. ... Jump to: navigation, search A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1915 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Prominent issues in Greek foreign policy include a dispute over the name of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, the enduring Cyprus problem, Greek-Turkish differences over the Aegean, and relations with the USA. The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Greek refusal to recognize the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia...


More specifically the distribution of differerent ethnic groups as per Vilayet and Sanjak is as follows; Vilâyet (also eyalet or pashaluk) was the Turkish name for the provinces of the Ottoman Empire. ... This page is about districts of the Ottoman Empire; for a region in Serbia and Montenegro, see Sandžak. ...

Sanjak or Vilayet Greeks Turks Armenians Rest Total
Sanjak of Uskudar 74,457 124,281 35,560 24,192 258,490
Mutersaflik of Izmit 73,134 116,949 48,635 3,615 242,333
Vilayet of the Dardanelles 32,830 138,902 2,336   177,894
Vilayet of Izmir:
Sanjak of Izmir 449,044 219,494 11,395   754,046
Sanjak of Manisa 83,625 247,778 3,960   337,925
Sanjak of Aydin 54,633 162,554 634   219,959
Sanjak of Mentese 27,798 197,317 430   205,457
Sanjak of Denizli 7,710 113,700 0   142,142
Vilayet of Bursa:
Sanjak of Bursa 82,503 215,492 50,809   353,976
Sanjak of Balikesir 150,946 194,391 17,882   239,236
Sanjak of Kutahya 16,800 244,698 5,040   250,938
Sanjak of Afyon 1,200 291,317 8,800   317,017
Sanjak of Erdogrul (Bilecig) 26,970 246,851 7,495   408,957
Vilayet of Konya:
Sanjak of Konya 8,589 294,191 6,900   325,180
Sanjak of Atalya 10,253 196,087 489   207,258
Sanjak of Burdur 2,565 149,968 987   153,565
Sanjak of Nigde 55,518 174,140 753   230,490
Sanjak of Hamid Abad (Isparta) 10,096 174,337 600   185,056
Vilayet of Ankara:
Sanjak of Ankara 3,154 265,283 14,019   283,043
Sanjak of Kirsehir 717 116,999 346   118,062
Sanjak of Kayseri 23,201 157,331 44,985   226,912
Sanjak of Yozgat 18,801 128,787 39,448   194,281
Vilayet of Kastamonu:
Sanjak of Kastamonu 10,783 334,337 1,424   346,552
Sanjak of Sinop 7,986 319,224 507   324,738
Sanjak of Kankiri 1,143 165,407 960   167,510
Sanjak of Bolu 5,007 119,467 314   129,846
Vilayet of Sivas:
Sanjak of Sivas 7,702 451,214 64,070   522,986
Sanjak of Amasya 36,739 198,000 50,600   285,339
Sanjak of Karahisar-Sarki 27,761 38,500 18,046   84,307
Sanjak of Tokat 27,174 151,800 37,919   216,893
Vilayet of Trebzon:
Sanjak of Trabzon 154,774 404,656 26,321   583,751
Sanjak of Samsun (Djanik) 136,087 233,454 22,585   392,126
Sanjak of Lazistan 2,924 231,885 0   234,809
Sanjak of Argiropolis (Gumus-Haneh) 59,748 87,871 1,718   149,337

See also


Jump to: navigation, search This is list of names of ethnic groups. ... The Levant or Sham (Arabic root word related to the term Semite) is an approximate historical geographical term referring to a large area in Southwest Asia south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea in the west, and the north Arabian Desert and Mesopotamia to the east. ... Overview map of the Ancient Near East The term Ancient Near East or Ancient Orient encompasses the early civilizations predating Classical Antiquity in the region roughly corresponding to that described by the modern term Middle East (Egypt, the Fertile Crescent, Anatolia), during the time roughly spanning the Bronze Age from... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...

Regions of the World
Africa: Central Africa | East Africa | Great Lakes | Guinea | Horn of Africa | North Africa | Maghreb / Northwest Africa | Sahel | Southern Africa | Sub-Saharan Africa | Sudan | West Africa
Americas: Andean states | Caribbean | Central America | Great Lakes | Great Plains | Guianas | Latin America | North America | Patagonia | South America | Southern Cone
Asia: Central Asia | East Asia | East Indies | Far East | Indian subcontinent | North Asia | Southeast Asia | Southwest Asia (Middle East / Near East, Levant, Anatolia, Arabia)
Europe: Balkans | Baltic region | Benelux | British Isles | Central Europe | Eastern Europe | Northern Europe | Scandinavia | Southern Europe | Western Europe
Eurasia: Caucasus | Mediterranean | Post-Soviet states
Oceania: Australasia | Melanesia | Micronesia | Polynesia | Aleutian Islands | Pacific Rim
Polar: Arctic | Antarctic

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dog and Kennel Magazine Anatolian Breed Profile (2000 words)
Anatolians are not pampered, nor can their owners generally afford to give them veterinary care beyond that which is necessary to keep them healthy enough for guard duty.
Other Anatolians had come to this country prior to the birth of the Ballard litter, but in most cases they were dogs that had been sent by the Turkish government to the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental work as flock guardians.
Whether an Anatolian's "flock" is a herd of sheep or the dog's family and household, the breed is supposed to perform its duties without aggression.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m