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Encyclopedia > Anatole France
Jacques Anatole François Thibault

Jacques Anatole François Thibault
Pseudonym: Anatole France
Born: 16 April 1844
Paris
Died: 21 October 1924
Tours
Occupation: Novelist
Genres: Novel
French literature
By category
French literary history

Medieval
16th century - 17th century
18th century -19th century
20th century - Contemporary Image File history File links Size of this preview: 182 × 179 pixelsFull resolution (182 × 179 pixel, file size: 22 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... A pseudonym (Greek pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons true name. ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... Jan. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Floating not submerging) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 71 days remaining. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Tours is a city in France, the préfecture (capital city) of the Indre-et-Loire département, on the lower reaches of the river Loire, between Orléans and the Atlantic coast. ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... French literature is, generally speaking, literature written in the French language, particularly by citizens of France; it may also refer to literature written by people living in France who speak other traditional non-French languages. ... Medieval French literature is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in Oïl languages (including Old French and early Middle French) during the period from the eleventh century to the end of the fifteenth century. ... French Renaissance literature is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in French (Middle French) from the French invasion of Italy in 1494 to 1600, or roughly the period from the reign of Charles VIII of France to the ascension of Henri IV of France to the throne. ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) French literature of the 17th century spans the reigns of Henry IV of France, the Regency of Marie de Medici, Louis XIII of France, the Regency of Anne of Austria (and the civil war called the Fronde) and the... French literature of the 18th century spans the period from the death of Louis XIV of France, through the Régence (during the minority of Louis XV) and the reigns of Louis XV of France and Louis XVI of France to the start of the French Revolution. ... French literature of the nineteenth century is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in French from (roughly) 1799 to 1900. ... French literature of the twentieth century is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in French from (roughly) 1895 to 1990. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

French Writers

Chronological list
Writers by category
Novelists - Playwrights
Poets - Essayists
Short story writers Chronological list of French language authors (regardless of nationality), by date of birth. ...

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Anatole France (April 16, 1844October 12, 1924) was the pen name of French author Jacques Anatole François Thibault. He was born in Paris, France, and died in Tours, Indre-et-Loire, France. April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... Jan. ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Floating not submerging) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Tours is a city in France, the préfecture (capital city) of the Indre-et-Loire département, on the lower reaches of the river Loire, between Orléans and the Atlantic coast. ... Indre-et-Loire is a département in west-central France named after the Indre and the Loire rivers. ...

Contents

Biography

The son of a bookseller, he spent most of his life around books. His father's bookstore was called the Librairie de France and from this name Jacques Anatole François Thibault took his nom-de plume. Anatole France studied at the Collège Stanislaus and after graduation he helped his father by working at his bookstore. After several years he secured the position of a cataloguer at Bacheline-Deflorenne and at Lemerre, and in 1876 he was appointed a librarian for the French Senate. Ironic, skeptical, he was considered in his day the ideal French man of letters. He was elected to the French Academy in 1896 and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1921. 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ...


Career

Anatole France became known after the publication of Le crime de Sylvestre Bonnard (1881) where he looked back at the 18th century as a golden age. Its protagonist, skeptical old scholar Sylvester Bonnard, embodied France's own personality. The novel was praised for its elegant prose and won him a prize from the French Academy. In La rotisserie de la Reine Pedauque (1893) Anatole France ridiculed belief in the occult; and in Les opinions de Jerome Coignard (1893), France captures the atmosphere of the fin de siècle. Fin de siècle is French for end of the century. The term turn-of-the-century is sometimes used as a synonym, but is more neutral (lacking some or most of the connotations described below), and can include the first years of a new century. ...


France's later works include L'Île des Pingouins (1908) which satirizes human nature by depicting the transformation of penguins into humans - after the animals have been baptized in error by the nearsighted Abbot Mael. La Revolte des Anges (1914), often considered France's most profound novel, tells the story of Arcade, the guardian angel of Maurice d'Esparvieu, who falls in love, joins the revolutionary movement of angels, and toward the end realizes that the overthrow of God is meaningless unless in ourselves and in ourselves alone we attack and destroy Ialdabaoth. Penguin Island (LÃŽle des Pingouins) is a satirical novel by Anatole France first published in 1908. ... The Demiurge, The Craftsman or Creator, in some belief systems, is the deity responsible for the creation of the physical universe. ...


In the 1920s France's writings were put on the index of Libri prohibiti. The 1920s is a decade sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... Venetiis, M. D. LXIIII. The Index Librorum Prohibitorum (List of Prohibited Books) is a list of publications which the Catholic Church censored for being a danger to itself and the faith of its members. ...


Works, partial list

  • Penguin Island, L'Île des Pingouins
  • The Crime of Sylvestre Bonnard, Le Crime de Sylvestre Bonnard
  • Thaïs
  • Le jongleur de Notre Dame
  • The Human Tragedy, L'Humaine Tragedie
  • The Queen Pedauque, La Rotisserie de la Reine Pedauque
  • The Red Lily, Le Lys Rouge
  • The Revolt of the Angels, La Revolte des Anges
  • Crainquebille; Putois; Riquet; et Plusieurs Autres Recits Profitables
  • Les Sept Femmes de la Barbe-Bleue et Autres Contes Merveilleux
  • Monsieur Bergeret a Paris
  • Sur la Pierre Blanche
  • The Man Who Married A Dumb Wife play
  • The Gods Are A-Thirst, Les Dieux ont Soif
  • The Life of Joan of Arc 2 volumes
  • Mother of Pearl

Penguin Island (LÎle des Pingouins) is a satirical novel by Anatole France first published in 1908. ... Le jongleur de Notre Dame is a religious miracle story by the French author Anatole France, published in 1892 and based on an old medieval legend. ...

Famous sayings

  • "Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
  • "I prefer the folly of enthusiasm to the indifference of wisdom."
  • "The law, in its majestic equality, forbids rich and poor alike to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets, and to steal their bread."
  • "To accomplish great things, we must not only act but also dream, not only plan but also believe."
  • "Irony is the gaiety of reflection and the joy of wisdom."
  • "Wandering re-establishes the original harmony which once existed between man and the universe."
  • "For every monarchy overthrown the sky becomes less brilliant, because it loses a star. A republic is ugliness set free."
  • "She fought him off vigorously, scratched, cried that she will die before she submits, but the chevalier paid no attention to her words and took her. Afterwards, she smiled coyly and told him: “Do not think, dear chevalier, that you won me against my will. Better thank our good preacher who reminded me that we are mortal, and a pleasure missed today is missed forever. Now we can proceed, for I missed too many pleasures while being too prudent for my own good”. (Fable by Anatole France.)


Misattributed

  • "If fifty million people say a foolish thing, it is still a foolish thing." (A misquote derived from a piece of writing by W. Somerset Maugham.)

W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Anatole France
Preceded by
Ferdinand de Lesseps
Seat 38, Académie française
1896-1924
Succeeded by
Paul Valéry
Persondata
NAME Thibault, Jacques Anatole François
ALTERNATIVE NAMES France, Anatole
SHORT DESCRIPTION French novelist
DATE OF BIRTH 16 April 1844
PLACE OF BIRTH Paris
DATE OF DEATH 21 October 1924
PLACE OF DEATH Tours

  Results from FactBites:
 
Anatole France Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography (900 words)
Jacques Anatole François Thibault, who was to take the literary name of Anatole France, was born in Paris on April 16, 1844, the son of a self-educated bookseller.
France's first book was a study of the poet Alfred de Vigny and was followed by poetry and a verse drama, politely received but not particularly successful.
France's last major work was La Révolte des anges (1914; The Revolt of the Angels), another satire, in which a group of angels attempt to free themselves from divine despotism.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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