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Encyclopedia > Anastasius I (emperor)
Flavius Anastasius.
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Flavius Anastasius.

Flavius Anastasius or Anastasius I (c. 430July 9, 518) was Byzantine emperor from 10 December 491 until his death. He was born at Dyrrhachium not later than A.D. 430. At the time of the death of Zeno (491), Anastasius, a palace official (silentiarius), held a very high character, and was raised to the throne of the Roman empire of the East, through the choice of Ariadne, Zeno's widow, who married him shortly after his accession. His reign, though afterwards disturbed by foreign and internecine wars and religious distractions, commenced auspiciously. He gained the popular favour by a judicious remission of taxation, and displayed great vigour and energy in administering the affairs of the empire. Image File history File links Anastasius I. 491-518 AD. AV Semissis (2. ... Image File history File links Anastasius I. 491-518 AD. AV Semissis (2. ... Events Saint Patrick reaches Ireland on his missionary expedition. ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... Events July 9 - Justin becomes Roman emperor September 29 - Severus, Patriarch of Antioch is deposed by a synod for his Monophysitism. ... This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... Durrës (Italian: Durazzo; see also different names) is the most ancient and one of the most economically important important cities of Albania. ... Imperator Caesar Flavius Zeno Augustus or Tarasicodissa or Trascalissaeus (c. ... Events AElle conquers the fortified Roman town of Anderida through siegecraft. ...


The principal wars in which Anastasius was engaged were those known as the Isaurian and the Persian. The former (492-496) was stirred up by the supporters of Longinus, the brother of Zeno. The victory of Cotyaeum in 493 "broke the back" of the revolt, but guerrilla warfare continued in the Isaurian mountains for some years longer. In the war with Persia (502-505), Theodosiopolis and Amida were captured by the enemy, but the Persian provinces also suffered severely and the Romans recovered Amida. Both adversaries were exhausted when peace was made (506) on the basis of status quo. Anastasius afterwards built the strong fortress of Daras to hold Nisibis in check. The Balkan provinces were devastated by invasions of Slavs and Bulgarians; to protect Constantinople and its vicinity against them he built the Anastasian Wall, extending from the Propontis to the Euxine. Several wars are termed Persian or called simply the Persian War: Greco-Persian Wars Russo-Persian War Turko-Persian War Anglo-Persian War Persian Gulf War This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Events Pope Gelasius I succeeds Pope Felix III Longinus, brother of the deceased Eastern Roman emperor Zeno I, revolts against Anastasius I in Isauria. ... Events Battle of Tolbiac; Clovis I defeats the Alamanni accepts Catholic baptism at Reims. ... Longinus, a Greek literary critic who may have lived in the 1st century, wrote a treatise On the Sublime. ... Kütahya is a city in western Turkey with 170,000 inhabitants (2004 estimate), lying on the Porsuk river, at 930 metres above sea level. ... Events February 25 - Odoacer agrees to a mediated peace with Theodoric the Great, and is later killed by him personally. ... Guerrilla War redirects here. ... ... Events End of the Qi Dynasty and beginning of the Liang Dynasty in southern China. ... Events Births Belisarius, Byzantine general (+ 565) Deaths Categories: 505 ... Arpos was an ancient city in the region that is now European Turkey. ... Amida can mean: Amida is the Japanese name of a popular Buddhist deity. ... Events Byzantine Empire and Persia accept a peace agreement based on status quo. ... Dara (fortress, compare Dura-Europos) was a Byzantine fort in Syria. ... The newly excavated Church of Saint Jacob in Nisibis. ... The Balkans is the historic and geographic name used to describe a region of south-eastern Europe. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Map of Constantinople. ... Anastasian Wall The Anastasian Wall (Turkish: Anastasius Suru) or the Long Walls of Thrace (Uzun Duvar) is an ancient, stone and turf fortification located 65 km west of Istanbul, Turkey built by the Byzantines during the late 5th century. ... The Sea of Marmara (Turkish: Marmara denizi, Modern Greek: Μαρμαρα̃ Θάλασσα or Προποντίδα) (also known as the Sea of Marmora or the Marmara Sea) is an inland sea that separates the Black Sea from the Aegean Sea (thus the Asian part of Turkey from its European part) by Bosporus and... Map of the Black Sea. ...


The emperor was a convinced Monophysite, but his ecclesiastical policy was moderate; he endeavoured to maintain the principle of the Henotikon of Zeno and the peace of the church. It was the uncompromising attitude of the orthodox extremists, and the rebellious demonstrations of the Byzantine populace, that drove him in 512 to abandon this policy and adopt a monophysitic programme. His consequent unpopularity in the European provinces was utilized by an ambitious man, named Vitalian, to organize a dangerous rebellion, in which he was assisted by a horde of "Huns" (514-515); it was finally suppressed by a naval victory won by the general Marinus. The financial policy of Anastasius was so prudent and economical that it gained him a reputation for avarice and contributed to his unpopularity. Monophysitism (from the Greek monos meaning one and physis meaning nature) is the christological position that Christ has only one nature, as opposed to the Chalcedonian position which holds that Christ has two natures, one divine and one human. ... The Henotikon (the act of union) was issued by Byzantine emperor Zeno I in 482, in an attempt to reconcile the differences between the supporters of Orthodoxy and Monophysitism. ... Events Roman (Byzantine) Emperor Anastasius I ends a period of moderate ecclestical policy, and starts strongly favoring his own monophysitist beliefs. ... Vitalianus (died January 27, 672) was a Pope (657 - 672). ... Hun is a term that refers to a specific group of Central Asian nomadic tribes, who appeared in Europe in the 4th century. ... Events Pope Symmachus (498-514) succeeded by Pope Hormisdas Rebellion in the Byzantine Empire, led by Vitalius Births Deaths Aelle of Sussex, king of Sussex, Bretwalda (approximate date) Categories: 514 ... Events Births Deaths Northern Wei Xuan Wu Di, ruler of the Chinese Northern Wei Dynasty Euphemius, deposed Patriarch of Constantinople Categories: 515 ... Marinus, neo-Platonist philosopher, was born in Palestine and was early converted to the old Greek religion. ...


There is a story about his choosing of a successor: Anastasius could not decide which of his three nephews should succeed him, so he put a message under a couch and had his nephews take seats in the room, which also had two other seats; he believed that the nephew to sit on the special couch would be his proper heir. However, two of his nephews sat on the same couch (one story has it that they were incestuous lovers), and the one with the concealed message remained empty. Then, after putting the matter to God in prayer, he determined that the first person to enter his room the next morning should be the next emperor, and that person was Justin, the chief of his guards. In fact, Anastasius probably never thought of Justin as a successor, but the issue was decided for him after his death. Prayer is an effort to communicate with God, or to some deity or deities, or another form of spiritual entity, or otherwise, either to offer praise, to make a request, or simply to express ones thoughts and emotions. ... Flavius Iustinus Augustus. ...


External links

Commons
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Anastasius I (emperor)
Preceded by:
Zeno
Byzantine Emperor Succeeded by:
Justin I

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Zeno on a coin celebrating his victories. ... This is a list of the Emperors of the late Roman Empire, called Byzantine. ... Flavius Iustinus Augustus. ...

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Anastasius I (emperor) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (508 words)
He was born at Dyrrhachium not later than A.D. At the time of the death of Zeno (491), Anastasius, a palace official (silentiarius), held a very high character, and was raised to the throne of the Roman empire of the East, through the choice of Ariadne, Zeno's widow, who married him shortly after his accession.
The emperor was a convinced Monophysite, but his ecclesiastical policy was moderate; he endeavoured to maintain the principle of the Henotikon of Zeno and the peace of the church.
It was the uncompromising attitude of the orthodox extremists, and the rebellious demonstrations of the Byzantine populace, that drove him in 512 to abandon this policy and adopt a monophysitic programme.
Roman Emperors - DIR Anastasius (713 words)
Anastasius was born in Dyrrachium (modern Durazzo, in Albania), on the Adriatic coast, ca.
Anastasius was the choice of Ariadne Zeno's widow, and seems to have been a surprise to the aristocracy.
Anastasius was prepared to discuss Chalcedon with Pope Hormisdas, but Hormisdas' attitude to Acacius, the patriarch of Constantinople who had been excommunicated in Zeno's reign, and his insistence that the emperor and eastern bishops approve Chalcedon without qualification sabotaged negotiations.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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