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Encyclopedia > Amphitryon

Amphitryon, or Amphitrion, in Greek mythology, was a son of Alcaeus, king of Tiryns in Argolis. Greek mythology comprises the collected legends of Greek gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. ... Alcaeus may refer to several ancient Greek figures: in mythology, Alcaeus was the son of Perseus and the father of Amphitryon. ... Tiryns is a Mycenaean site in the Peloponnesian peninsula in Greece. ... Argolis (Greek, Modern: Αργολίδα Argolida, Ancient/Katharevousa: Αργολίς -- still the official, formal name) is one of the fifty-one prefectures of Greece. ...


Amphitryon ("harassing either side") was a Theban general, who was originally from Tiryns in the eastern part of the Peloponnese. He was friends with Panopeus. For the ancient capital of Upper Egypt, see Thebes, Egypt. ... Tiryns is a Mycenaean site in the Peloponnesian peninsula in Greece. ... Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese (Greek Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos or modern Pelopónnisos; Latinized as Peloponnesus) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... In Greek mythology, Panopeus was a son of Phocus and father of Epeus. ...


Having accidentally killed his uncle Electryon, king of Mycenae, Amphitryon was driven out by another uncle, Sthenelus. He fled with Alcmene, Electryon's daughter, to Thebes, where he was cleansed from the guilt of blood by Creon, his maternal uncle, king of Thebes. In Greek mythology, Electryon was the father of Alcmene, son of Perseus and Andromeda, and king of Mycenae. ... The Lion Gate at Mycenae The Lion Gate (detail) Mycenae (ancient Greek: , IPA , in modern Greek: Μυκήνες ), is an archaeological site in Greece, located about 90km south-west of Athens, in the north-eastern Peloponnese. ... In Greek mythology, Sthenelus refers to four different people. ... Alcmene, or Alkmênê (might of the moon) was, in ancient Greek mythology, the daughter of Electryon, king of Mycenae, and wife of Amphitryon. ... In Greek mythology, Electryon was the father of Alcmene, son of Perseus and Andromeda, and king of Mycenae. ... For the ancient capital of Upper Egypt, see Thebes, Egypt. ... In Greek mythology, Creon, or Kreon (ruler), son of Menoeceus, was the father of Haemon and husband of Eurydice. ...


Alcmene, who had been betrothed to Amphitryon by her father, refused to marry him until he had avenged the death of her brothers, all of whom except one had fallen in battle against the Taphians. It was on his return from this expedition that Electryon had been killed. Amphitryon accordingly took the field against the Taphians, accompanied by Creon, who had agreed to assist him on condition that he slew the Teumessian fox which had been sent by Dionysus to ravage the country. In Greek mythology, the Teumessian fox (Greek: AlwpekoV TeumhsioV) was a gigantic fox that was destined never to be caught. ... Bacchus by Caravaggio The god Dionysus is occasionally confused with one of several historical figures named Dionysius, a theophoric name that simply means [servant] of Dionysus. ...


The Taphians, however, remained invincible until Comaetho, the king's daughter, out of love for Amphitryon cut off her father's golden hair, the possession of which rendered him immortal. Having defeated the enemy, Amphitryon put Comaetho to death and handed over the kingdom of the Taphians to Cephalus. On his return to Thebes he married Alcmene, who gave birth to twin sons, Iphicles being the son of Amphitryon, Heracles of Zeus, who had visited her during Amphitryon's absence. In Greek mythology, Comaetho was a Thapian princess who loved Amphitryon. ... In Greek mythology, Cephalus was the son of Hermes and Herse. ... In Greek mythology, Iphicles referred to three different people: The half-brother of Heracles, being the son of Alcmene and her human husband Amphitryon whereas Heracles was her son by Zeus. ... Statue of Heracles In Greek mythology, Heracles, or Heraklês (glory of Hera, Ἡρακλῆς) was the demigod son of Zeus and Alcmene, the grand-daughter of Perseus and the wife of Amphitryon. ... Statue of Zeus The Greek sculptor Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall Statue of Zeus in about 435 bc. ...


While Amphitryon was gone, Zeus came to Alcmene disguised as her husband. The result was Heracles. Later, Amphitryon and Alcmene had a son named Iphicles. Statue of Zeus The Greek sculptor Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall Statue of Zeus in about 435 bc. ... Statue of Heracles In Greek mythology, Heracles, or Heraklês (glory of Hera, Ἡρακλῆς) was the demigod son of Zeus and Alcmene, the grand-daughter of Perseus and the wife of Amphitryon. ... In Greek mythology, Iphicles referred to three different people: The half-brother of Heracles, being the son of Alcmene and her human husband Amphitryon whereas Heracles was her son by Zeus. ...


He fell in battle against the Minyans, against whom he had undertaken an expedition, accompanied by the youthful Heracles, to deliver Thebes from a disgraceful tribute. According to Euripides (Hercules Furens) he survived this expedition, and was slain by his son in his madness. Euripides (ca. ...


Plautus, the Roman comedian, used this tale to present a burlesque play, similar to the later Aristophanic stories except with a tragic side. Hence, this story is one of the few surviving examples of Middle Comedy. Plautus' version includes the Long Night motif. Titus Maccius Plautus was a comic playwright of the Roman Republic. ... Burlesque was originally a form of art that mocked by imitation, referring to everything from comic sketches to dance routines and usually lampooning the social attitudes of upper classes. ... Greek comedy is the name given to a wide genre of theatrical plays written, and performed, in Ancient Greece. ... A term describing, originally, the Greek god Zeus habit of darkening the sky when seducing women so that his wife, Hera, wouldnt see. ...


John Dryden's Amphitryon is based on Moliere’s 1668 version as well as on Plautus. Notable innovations include music by Henry Purcell and the character of Phaedra, who flirts with Sosia but is eventually won over by Mercury’s promises of wealth. John Dryden (August 19, 1631 – May 12, 1700) was an influential English poet, literary critic, and playwright. ... Molière, engraved frontispiece to his Works Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, better known as Molière (January 15, 1622 - February 17, 1673), was a French theatre writer, director and actor, one of the masters of comic satire. ... Henry Purcell (September 10 (?), 1659 (?)–November 21, 1695), a Baroque composer, is generally considered to be one of Englands greatest composers — indeed, he has often been called Englands finest native composer. ... In Greek mythology, Phaedra was the mother of Demophon and Acamas by Theseus. ...


Amphitryon was the title of a lost tragedy of Sophocles; the episode of Zeus and Alcmene forms the subject of comedies by Plautus and Molière. From Molière's line "Le véritable Amphitryon est l'Amphitryon où l'on dîne," the name Amphitryon has come to be used in the sense of a generous entertainer, a good host. In the 20th century, the myth was the subject of a play by Jean Giraudoux, Amphitryon 38, for the number of times the story had been used A Roman bust of Sophocles. ... Titus Maccius Plautus was a comic playwright of the Roman Republic. ... Molière, engraved frontispiece to his Works Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, better known as Molière (January 15, 1622 – February 17, 1673), was a French theatre writer, director and actor, one of the masters of comic satire. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Hippolyte Jean Giraudoux (October 29, 1882 - January 31, 1944) was a French dramatist who wrote internationally acclaimed plays. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Amphitryon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (481 words)
Amphitryon, or Amphitrion, in Greek mythology, was a son of Alcaeus, king of Tiryns in Argolis.
Amphitryon ("harassing either side") was a Theban general, who was originally from Tiryns in the eastern part of the Peloponnese.
Amphitryon accordingly took the field against the Taphians, accompanied by Creon, who had agreed to assist him on condition that he slew the Teumessian fox which had been sent by Dionysus to ravage the country.
Amphitryon, Greek Mythology Link. (1640 words)
But while Amphitryon was on his way to Thebes, Zeus, assuming his likeness, made love to Alcmena, telling her about the outcome of the war.
And that is why Alcmena did not seem to welcome Amphitryon when he returned and lay with her the same night that Zeus left, for she thought that she had already been with him.
Abas 2, Acrisius, Aegyptus 1, Alcaeus 1, Alcmena, Aletes 2, Amphitryon, Antiochus 1, Belus 1, Chaeron, Danae, Electryon 1, Epaphus 1, Eurystheus, Heleus, Heracles 1, Hippotes 2, Hippothoe 3, Io, Iolaus 1, Iphicles, Leipephilene, Libya, Lynceus 2, Mestor 1, Perseus 1, Phylas 2, Pterelaus, Sthenelus 3, Taphius, Thero 2, Zeus.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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