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Encyclopedia > Amphitrite
Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Poseidon and Amphitrite
Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Poseidon and Amphitrite
Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Titans and Olympians
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Aquatic deities

In ancient Greek mythology, Amphitrite (not to be confused with Aphrodite) was a sea-goddess. Under the influence of the Olympian pantheon, she became merely the consort of Poseidon, and was further diminished by poets to a symbolic representation of the sea. Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Neptune (god) and Amphitrite This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Neptune (god) and Amphitrite This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the telling of stories created by the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the general, on the ancient Greek civilization. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek , plural ) were greater even than the gods. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think, from which mind and mental are also derived[1]) are 50 goddesses or spiritual guides who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... In the Greek and Roman world-view, Oceanus (Greek , Okeanos), was the world-ocean, which they believed to be an enormous river encircling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Ceto, or Keto (Greek: Κητος, Ketos, sea monster) was a hideous aquatic monster, a daughter of Gaia and Pontus. ... Nereus: in Greek Mythology, eldest son of Pontus and Gaia, the Sea and the Earth. ... In Greek mythology, Glaucus (shiny or bright or bluish-green) referred to several different people. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... Triton is a Greek god, the messenger of the deep. ... In Greek mythology, Ophion (serpent), also called Ophioneus ruled the world with Eurynome before the two of them were cast down by Cronus and Rhea, according to some sources. ... This article is about Proteus in Greek mythology. ... Phorcys and Ceto, Mosaic, Late Roman, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia In Greek mythology, Phorcys, or Phorkys was one of the names of the Old One of the Sea, the primeval sea god, who, according to Hesiod, was the son of Pontus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Pontus (or Pontos, sea) was an ancient, pre-Olympian sea-god, son of Gaia and Aether, the Earth and the Air. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are blue-haired sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... Naiad by John William Waterhouse, 1893 In Greek mythology, the Naiads (from the Greek νάειν, to flow, and νἃμα, running water) were a type of nymph who presided over fountains, wells, springs, streams, and brooks, as river gods embodied rivers, and some very... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the telling of stories created by the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the general, on the ancient Greek civilization. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Αφροδίτη; Latin: Venus) (IPA: English: , Ancient Greek: , Modern Greek: ) was the Greek goddess of love, lust, and beauty. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ...


In Roman mythology, the consort of Neptune, a comparatively minor figure, was Salacia.[1] Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... This article is about the Greek god. ...

Contents

Mythography

She was a daughter of Nereus and Doris—and thus a Nereid—according to Hesiod's Theogony, but of Oceanus and Tethys—and thus an Oceanid—according to Apollodorus, who actually lists her among both the Nereids[2] and the Oceanids[3]. Nereus: in Greek Mythology, eldest son of Pontus and Gaia, the Sea and the Earth. ... Doris Smells!! ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... Bust, traditionally thought to be Seneca, now identified by some as Hesiod. ... In the Greek and Roman world-view, Oceanus (Greek , Okeanos), was the world-ocean, which they believed to be an enormous river encircling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ...


Amphitrite's offspring included seals [4] and dolphins. By her, Poseidon had a son, Triton, and a daughter, Rhode (if this Rhode was not actually fathered by Poseidon on Halia or was not the daugther of Asopus as others claim). Apollodorus (3.15.4) also mentions a daughter of Poseidon and Amphitrite named Benthesikyme. Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... Triton is a Greek god, the messenger of the deep. ... In Greek mythology, Rhode was the oldest Oceanid, a daughter of Tethys and Oceanus. ... In Greek mythology, Halia was a nymph from Rhodes. ... Asopus or Asôpos is the name of five different rivers in Greece and also in Greek mythology the name of the gods of those rivers. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... Benthesikyme in Greek mythology according to Apollodorus (3. ...


Amphitrite is not fully personified in the Homeric epics: "out on the open sea, in Amphitrite's breakers" (Odyssey iii.101); she shares her Homeric epithet Halosydne ("sea-nourished")[5] with Thetis[6]; in some sense the sea-nymphs are doublets. Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the poet Homer. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the poet Homer. ... Homer (Greek: , Hómēros) was an early Greek poet and aoidos (rhapsode) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ...


Representation and Cult

Amphitrite, "the third one who encircles (the sea)"[7], was so entirely confined in her authority to the sea and the creatures in it that she was almost never associated with her husband, either for purposes of worship or in works of art, except when he was to be distinctly regarded as the god who controlled the sea. An exception may be the cult image of Amphitrite that Pausanias saw in the temple of Poseidon at the Isthmus of Corinth (ii.1.7). Though Amphitrite does not figure in Greek cultus, at an archaic stage she was of importance, for in the Homeric Hymn to Delian Apollo, she appears at the birthing of Apollo among "all the chiefest of the goddesses, Dione and Rhea and Ichnaea and Themis and loud-moaning Amphitrite." The widely respected Pindar, in his sixth Olympian Ode, recognized Poseidon's role as "great god of the sea, husband of Amphitrite, goddess of the golden spindle." For later poets, Amphitrite was simply a metaphor for the sea: Euripides, in Cyclops (702) and Ovid, Metamorphoses, (i.14). In the practice of religion, a cult image is a man-made object that is venerated for the deity, spirit or daemon that it embodies or represents. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... The Isthmus of Corinth is the narrow landbridge which connects the Peloponnesos peninsula with the mainland of Greece, near the city of Corinth. ... In traditional usage, the cult of a religion, quite apart from its sacred writings (scriptures), its theology or myths, or the personal faith of its believers, is the totality of external religious practice and observance, the neglect of which is the definition of impiety. ... The anonymous Homeric Hymns are a collection of ancient Greek hymns. ... Dione in Greek mythology is a vague goddess presence who has her most concrete form in Book V of Homers Iliad as the mother of Aphrodite: Aphrodite journeys to Diones side after she has been wounded in battle while protecting her favorite son Aeneas. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... A nemesis is a seemingly unbeatable or unconquerable enemy, often used as a foil to the hero, where interaction between the hero and his nemesis forms the main conflict of the story. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... Pindar (or Pindarus) (522 BC – 443 BC), perhaps the greatest of the nine lyric poets of ancient Greece, was born at Cynoscephalae, a village in Thebes. ... Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC – Tomis, now Constanţa AD 17), a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ...


In the arts, Amphitrite was distinguishable from the other Nereids only by her queenly attributes. It was said that Poseidon first saw her dancing at Naxos among the other Nereids (EB 1911), and carried her off. But in another version of the myth, she fled from his advances to Atlas, at the farthest ends of the sea; there the dolphin of Poseidon found her, and was rewarded by being placed among the stars as the constellation Delphinus.[8] In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... Naxos is the largest island (428 km² ) in the Cyclades island group in the Aegean Sea, which separates Greece and Turkey. ... In Greek mythology, Atlas was one of the primordial Titans. ... Delphinus, being Latin for Dolphin, is a rather small (ranked 69th) northern constellation very close to the celestial equator. ...

Neptune and Amphitrite by 16th-century Dutch artist Jacob de Gheyn II
Neptune and Amphitrite by 16th-century Dutch artist Jacob de Gheyn II

In works of art, Amphitrite is represented either enthroned beside Poseidon or driving with him in a chariot drawn by sea-horses (hippocamps) or other fabulous creatures of the deep, and attended by Tritons and Nereids. She is dressed in queenly robes and has nets in her hair. The pincers of a crab are sometimes shown attached to her temples. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1010x751, 107 KB)Jacob de Gheyn II (1565-1629). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1010x751, 107 KB)Jacob de Gheyn II (1565-1629). ... Drawing in waterpaint by Jacques de Gheyn, Four times a mouse Jacob de Gheyn II (also Jacques de Gheyn II) (c. ... Species See text. ... In Greek mythology, Triton is the son of Poseidon and Amphitrite, the personification of the roaring waters, represented as having the upper body of a human and the tail of a fish. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are blue-haired sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ...


In poetry, Amphitrite's name is often used for the sea, as a synonym of Thalassa. In Greek mythology, Thalassa (sea) was a primordial sea goddess, daughter of Aether and Hemera. ...


An asteroid, 29 Amphitrite, is named for her. 29 Amphitrite (am-fi-trye-tee) is one of the largest Main belt asteroids. ...


Amphitrite is featured in a puzzle in the Playstation 2 game God of War, in which a statue of her is pointing towards the solution to the puzzle, the exit of the room. The PlayStation 2 , abbreviated PS2) is Sonys second video game console, the successor to the PlayStation and the predecessor to the PlayStation 3. ... This article is for the PlayStation 2 game. ...


Amphitrite is also a genus of the polychaete family Terebellidae. Subclasses Palpata Scoleoida Tomopteris from plankton The Polychaeta or polychaetes are a class of annelid worms, generally marine. ...


Notes

  1. ^ "...Salacia, the folds of her garment sagging with fish" (Apuleius, The Golden Ass 4.31).
  2. ^ Bibliotheke i.2.7
  3. ^ Bibliotheke i.2.2 and i.4.6.
  4. ^ "...A throng of seals, the brood of lovely Halosydne." (Homer, Odyssey iv.404).
  5. ^ Wilhelm Vollmer, Wörterbuch der Mythologie, 3rd ed. 1874 [1]
  6. ^ Odyssey iv.404 (Amphitrite), and Iliad, xx.207.
  7. ^ Robert Graves, The Greek Myths 1960.
  8. ^ Catasterismi, 31; Hyginus, Poetical Astronomy, ii.132.

Lucius Apuleius (c. ... The Metamorphoses of Lucius Apuleius, which according to St. ... The Bibliotheke was renowned as the chief work of Greek historian and scholar. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the poet Homer. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the poet Homer. ... It has been suggested that Deception of Zeus be merged into this article or section. ... Portrait of Robert Graves (circa 1974) by Rab Shiell Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 5 November 1955) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... Catasterismi (Greek Katasterismoi, placings among the stars) is an Alexandrian prose retelling of the mythic origins of stars and constellations, as they were interpreted in Hellenistic culture. ... Hyginus can refer to: Gaius Julius Hyginus (c. ...

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Amphitrite (273 words)
In Greek mythology, Amphitrite was the wife of Neptune and the daughter of Oceanus.
Amphitrite arrived at Tsingtao on 19 June, discharged much of her cargo there, and took on many replacement crewmen.
Amphitrite remained in reserve until her name was struck from the Navy list on 1 July 1961.
AMPHITRITE : Greek goddess, Queen of the sea ; mythology ; pictures : AMFITRITE (2242 words)
AMPHITRITE was the goddess queen of the sea, the wife of King Poseidon.
Amphitrite was depicted in Greek vase painting as a young woman, often raising her hand in a pinching gesture.
HALOSYDNE (Halosudnê), that is, "the seafed," or the sea born goddess, occurs as a surname of Amphitrite and Thetys.
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