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Encyclopedia > Amherst College
Amherst College

Motto: Terras irradient (Let Them Give Light to the World)
Established 1821
Type: Private
Endowment: ~$1.66 billion
President: Anthony Marx
Staff: 190
Undergraduates: 1,648
Location Amherst, MA, USA
Campus: Rural
Colors:
Nickname: The Singing College, The Fairest College, Lord Jeffs, Jeffs
Mascot: Lord Jeffrey Amherst
Website: www.amherst.edu

Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. It has been coeducational since 1975. Amherst College is also part of the Pioneer Valley's Five Colleges, along with Mount Holyoke College, Smith College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. According to current U.S. News and World Report rankings, Amherst College is the #2 liberal arts college in the United States. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Anthony W. Marx, President of Amherst College Anthony W. Marx (born 1959) is the current president of Amherst College, in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Hampshire County Settled 1703 Incorporated 1775 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  27. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Hampshire County Settled 1703 Incorporated 1775 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  27. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... . ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pioneer Valley and Connecticut River, looking southward toward the towns of Sunderland, Amherst and Whately. ... The Five Colleges are composed of four liberal arts colleges and one university in the Connecticut River Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, belonging to a consortium called Five Colleges, Incorporated, which was established in 1965. ... Mount Holyoke College is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ... Smith College is a private, independent womens liberal arts college located in Northampton, Massachusetts. ... Hampshire College is an experimenting private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

Contents

History

Founded in 1821, Amherst College developed out of the secondary school Amherst Academy. The college was originally suggested as a successor to Williams College, which was struggling to stay open. Although Williams remained open, Amherst was formed, and diverged from its Williams roots into an individual institution. Williams College is a private, liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ...


Amherst Academy

In 1812, funds were raised in Amherst for a secondary school, Amherst Academy. The institution was named after the town, which in turn had been named after Jeffery Amherst, 1st Baron Amherst, a veteran from the Seven Year's War and later commanding general of the British forces in North America. On November 18, 1817, a project was adopted at the Academy to raise funds for the free instruction of "indigent young men of promising talents and hopeful piety, who shall manifest a desire to obtain a liberal education with a sole view to the Christian ministry." This required a substantial investment from benefactors. Jeffrey Amherst by Joshua Reynolds Jeffrey Amherst, 1st Baron Amherst (sometimes spelled Geoffrey, he himself spelled his name as Jeffery) (January 29, 1717 – August 3, 1797) served as an officer in the British Army. ... The Seven Years War (1754 and 1756–1763) pitted Great Britain, Prussia and Hanover against France, Austria, Russia, Sweden, and Saxony. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


During the fundraising for the project, it became clear that without larger designs, it would be impossible to raise sufficient funds. This led the committee overseeing the project to conclude that a new institution should be created. On August 18, 1818, the Amherst Academy board of trustees accepted this conclusion and began building a new college. is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Williams College Debate Re: Removal

According to Tyler:

As early as 1815, six years before the opening of Amherst College, the question of removing Wlliams College to some more central part of Massachusetts was agitated among its friends and in its board of trustees. At that time Williams College had two buildings and fifty-eight students, with two professors and two tutors. The library contained fourteen hundred volumes. The funds were reduced and the income fell short of the expenditures. Many of the friends and supporters of the college were fully persuaded that it could not be sustained in its present location. The chief ground of this persuasion was the extreme difficulty of the access to it. At the same meeting of the board of trustees at which Professor Moore was elected president of Williams College, May 2, 1815, Dr. Packard of Shelburne introduced the following motion: "That a committee of six persons be appointed to take into consideration the removal of the college to some other part of the Commonwealth, to make all necessary inquiries which have a bearing on the subject, and report at the next meeting." The motion was adopted, and at the next meeting of the board in September, the committee reported that "a removal of Williams College from Williamstown is inexpedient at the present time, and under existing circumstances." But the question of removal thus raised in the board of trustees and thus negatived only "at the present time and under existing circumstances," continued to be agitated. And at a meeting on the 10th of November, 1818, influenced more or less doubtless by the action of the Franklin County Association of Congregational Ministers, and the Convention of Congregational and Presbyterian Ministers in Amherst, the board of trustees resolved that it was expedient to remove the college on certain conditions. President Moore advocated the removal, and even expressed his purpose to resign the office of president unless it could be effected, inasmuch as when he accepted the presidency he had no idea that the college was to remain at Williamstown, but was authorized to expect that it would be removed to Hampshire County. Nine out of twelve of the trustees voted for the resolutions, which were as follows: May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ...

"Resolved, that it is expedient to remove Williams College to some more central part of the State whenever sufficient funds can be obtained to defray the necessary expenses incurred and the losses sustained by removal, and to secure the prosperity of the college, and when a fair prospect shall be presented of obtaining for the institution the united support and patronage of the friends of literature and religion in the western part of the Commonwealth, and when the General Court shall give their assent to the measure."

In November, 1819, the trustees of Williams College voted to petition the Legislature for permission to remove the college to Northampton. To this application, Mr. Webster says, "the trustees of Amherst Academy made no opposition and took no measures to defeat it." In February, 1820, the petition was laid before the Legislature. The committee from both houses, to whom it was referred, after a careful examination of the whole subject, reported that it was neither lawful nor expedient to remove the college, and the Legislature, taking the same view, rejected the petition. ... Thus the long and exciting discussion touching the removal of Williams College and the location of a college in some more central town of old Hampshire County at length came to an end, and the contending parties now directed all their energies to building up the institutions of their choice. (William S. Tyler, A History of Amherst College (1895))

The opening of Amherst College

Moore, however, still believed that Williamstown was an unsuitable location for a college, and with the advent of Amherst College, was elected its first president on May 8, 1821. Amherst was founded as a non-sectarian institution "for the classical education of indigent young men of piety and talents for the Christian ministry." (Tyler, History of Amherst College) Amherst College is today an independent, non-denominational liberal arts college for women and men. Amherst's diverse student body includes, among other backgrounds and racial and ethnic groups: African-Americans, Asian-Americans, bi- or multi-racial students, Caucasian-Americans, international students (non-U.S. citizens), Latina/o-Americans, and Native Americans. Williamstown is a town located in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

College Row, consisting of Williston, South, North, and Appleton Halls, with Johnson Chapel at center
College Row, consisting of Williston, South, North, and Appleton Halls, with Johnson Chapel at center

At its opening, Amherst had forty-seven students. Fifteen of these had followed Moore from Williams College. Those fifteen represented about one-third of the whole number at Amherst, and about one-fifth of the whole number in the three classes to which they belonged in Williams College. President Moore died on June 29, 1823, and was replaced with a Williams College trustee, Heman Humphrey. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 855 KB) A photograph of College Row at Amherst College. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 855 KB) A photograph of College Row at Amherst College. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


For two years in the mid-1830's, Amherst was the second largest college in the United States, second only to Yale. In 1835, Amherst attempted to create a course of study parallel to the classical liberal arts education. This parallel course focused less on Greek and Latin, instead focusing on English, French, Spanish, chemistry, economics, etc. The parallel course did not take hold, however, until the next century. For other uses, see Yale (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ...


Williams alumni are fond of an apocryphal story ascribing the removal of books from the Williams College library to Amherst College, but there is no contemporaneous evidence to verify the story. In 1995, Williams president Harry C. Payne declared the story false, but the legend is still nurtured by many. Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ...


Academic hoods in the United States are traditionally lined with the official colors of the school, in theory so watchers can tell where the hood wearer earned his or her degree. Amherst's hoods are purple (Williams' official color) with a white stripe or chevron, said to signify that Amherst was born of Williams.


Presidents of the college

  1. Zephaniah Swift Moore, 1821–1823
  2. Heman Humphrey, 1823–1845
  3. Edward Hitchcock, 1845–1854
  4. William Augustus Stearns, 1854–1876
  5. Julius Hawley Seelye, 1876–1890
  6. Merrill Edward Gates, 1890–1899
  7. George Harris, 1899–1912
  8. Alexander Meiklejohn, 1912–1924
  9. George Daniel Olds, 1924–1927
  10. Arthur Stanley Pease, 1927–1932
  11. Stanley King, 1932–1946
  12. Charles W. Cole, 1946–1960
  13. Calvin Plimpton, 1960–1971
  14. John William Ward, 1971–1979
  15. Julian Gibbs, 1979–1983
  16. Peter R. Pouncey, 1984–1994
  17. Tom Gerety, 1994–2003
  18. Anthony Marx, 2003—

Zephaniah Swift Moore (1770 - 1823) was a U.S. Congregational clergyman and educator. ... Edward Hitchcock (24 May 1793 – 27 February 1864) was the third President of Amherst College, from 1845 to 1854. ... Rev. ... Merrill Edward Gates (1848-1922) Merrill Edward Gates, LL.D. (1848 in Warsaw, New York – 11 August 1922 in Bethlehem, New Hampshire) was the ninth President of Rutgers College (now Rutgers University) serving from 1882 to 1890. ... 1928 Time cover featuring Meiklejohn Alexander Meiklejohn (February 1, 1872—December 17, 1964) was a philosopher, university administrator, and free-speech advocate. ... George Daniel Olds (October 14, 1853 - May 10, 1931) was the President of Amherst College Olds was born in Middleport, New York and received his A.B. (1873) and A.M. (1876) from the University of Rochester. ... Stanley King (May 11, 1883 - April 28, 1951) was a U.S. college president. ... Calvin Hastings Plimpton (born 7 October 1918, Boston, Massachusetts; died 30 January 2007, Westwood, Massachusetts) was an American physician and educator, who served as president of Amherst College and American University of Beirut. ... John William Ward (1922 - 1985), was a Profeesor of English and History at Princeton University from 1952 to 1964 and a Professor of History and American Studies at Amherst College from 1964 to 1971. ... Julian Howard Gibbs (June 24, 1924 - February 20, 1983) was an American educator and the fifteenth President of Amherst College. ... Peter Pouncey is a British author and classicist. ... Anthony W. Marx, President of Amherst College Anthony W. Marx (born 1959) is the current president of Amherst College, in Amherst, Massachusetts. ...

Academics and resources

Johnson Chapel
Johnson Chapel

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (576x768, 76 KB) Johnson Chapel at Amherst College. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (576x768, 76 KB) Johnson Chapel at Amherst College. ...

Academic program

Admission to Amherst College is among the most competitive in the country. Notable faculty members include, among others, modern literature and poetry critic William H. Pritchard, Beowulf translator Howell Chickering, Jewish and Latino studies scholar Ilan Stavans, Pulitzer Prize-winning Khruschev biographer William Taubman, African art specialist Rowland Abiodun, Natural Law expert Hadley Arkes, and law and society expert Austin Sarat. Amherst is distinguished by one of the most open curricula and intellectually rigorous academic programs in the United States. Amherst's strength across the curricula and among the disciplines is illustrated by, among other indicia, the accomplishments of its alumni in various fields. This article is about the epic poem. ... Ilan Stavans Ilan Stavans (born Ilan Stavchansky on April 7, 1961, in Mexico City) is an American intellectual, essayist, lexicographer, cultural commentator, translator, short-story author, TV personality, teacher, and man of letters known for his insights into American, Hispanic, and Jewish cultures. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Nikita Khrushchev in 1962 Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev (Russian: Ники́та Серге́евич Хрущёв) (nih-KEE-tah khroo-SHCHYOFF) (April 17, 1894 – September 11, 1971) was the leader of the Soviet Union... William Taubman is an American historian. ... Hadley P. Arkes is a political science professor at Amherst College. ... Austin Sarat is William Nelson Cromwell professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science at Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts. ...


During the freshman year, the only course requirement mandated by the registrar is one of the First-Year Seminars (each is limited to no more than 15 students). Although these First-Year Seminars have similar structures (focusing on critical analysis, development of argument in writing and class discussion, and research), there are usually about twenty different topics from which to choose. The common purpose of the Seminars is to introduce students to Amherst's rigorous academic culture. The focus on critical analysis, development of argument in writing and speaking, and research continues for all four years of study across the curricula.


The 31 other courses that must be completed in order to receive a degree from Amherst College can be elected by the individual student. Faculty advisors guide students through the process. Personal attention is the priority. In the freshman year, each faculty advisor works with no more than five students to ensure a course of study that has breadth and depth and is both integrated across disciplines and intellectually fulfilling. Faculty advising continues for the remainder of each student's undergraduate career. Other curricular guidance resources are available as needed from professors and class deans. First year students can take advanced courses; seniors can take introductory courses (such as beginning study of a second, third or fourth foreign language).


However, students must adhere to departmental course requirements to complete their major, including satisfactory performance on comprehensive examinations in their major field. Thirty-two percent of Amherst students double major. A small number triple major; many create, with faculty advice, an interdisciplinary major. Fifty percent write theses during their senior year. Those students who choose to write a senior thesis have additional faculty advisors whose areas of expertise mirror each thesis topic. Within five years of graduation, seventy-four percent of Amherst alumni attend graduate school and are accepted into top programs around the country and the world.


Teaching

Amherst places a high priority on meaningful interaction between students and their professors. Faculty are leading scholars and researchers in their fields, as well as effective teachers. The historic guiding principle is the Amherst dialogue between professor and student. Amherst classes are characterized by interchanges among students and faculty skilled at asking challenging and probing questions and offering alternative points of view. Professors are accessible and responsive to their students (both inside and outside the classroom ) and build face-to-face, professor-to-student learning into the campus culture. To this end, professors serve as mentors and advisors, as well as teachers.


Traditionally, Amherst has made intensive writing for students a priority for all four years of study at all levels of instruction, throughout the curricula, and across disciplines. As a result, over the course of their undergraduate careers, students are expected to refine the form, logic, depth, and substance of their writing for a variety of audiences (in the sciences, arts, social sciences, and humanities). Amherst also has as priorities an emphasis on quantitative analysis across the disciplines and fostering global comprehension. The faculty always is striving to develop better and more innovative ways to teach and for students to learn, discover, and create. Professors find that their research often sheds new light on how they teach their classes.


Students are encouraged early to undertake independent or small group research or creative work, mentored by a faculty member, that results in an original scholarly work or other product. Professors also draw students into faculty research. In the sciences, students participate in sophisticated research, using state-of-art equipment and facilities. Students collaborate with professors and are listed regularly as co-authors on faculty articles. Students often present the findings of their work, whether self-directed or in collaboration with faculty, at regional or national conferences.


Amherst maintains a student-faculty ratio of 8:1 and has an average class size of fifteen students. The curriculum is remarkably diverse. Amherst offers 33 fields of study (with 850 courses) in the sciences, arts, humanities, mathematics and computer sciences, social sciences, foreign languages, classics, several interdisciplinary fields, and premedical and prelaw studies, plus the possibility of creating one's own unique interdisciplinary major. A substantial number of faculty hold appointments in two departments, a traditional academic discipline and one of many interdisciplinary programs. Amherst pioneered the interdisciplinary fields of American Studies; Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought; and Neuroscience. The American Studies department at Amherst College is the oldest department in the United States. Amherst created the interdisciplinary study of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought. In 1973, Amherst became the first institution to offer an undergraduate major in Neuroscience. Amherst helped pioneer many other interdisciplinary programs, including Asian languages and civilization. With such academic and professorial resourses, students and their advisors can tailor a program of study to a student's specific academic interests. As evidence of students' satisfaction with the effective teaching of Amherst professors, nearly seventy percent of alumni finacially support Amherst annually through the Amherst annual fund (which supports financial aid, among other things). American studies or American civilization is an interdisciplinary field dealing with the study of the United States. ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ...


Students

Amherst's outstanding resources, accomplished faculty, and rigorous academic life allow the college to enroll students with an extraordinary range of talents, interests, and commitments. Students represent all fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, fifty countries, a variety of tastes, sensibilities, and political ideologies, and a broad mix of socioeconomic, ethnic, national, racial, and religious backgrounds, thus ensuring a diversity of viewpoints -- essential to developing the ability to listen to and evaluate the positions of others. Students' varied experiences and backgrounds enrich discussion, debate, conjecture, broaden learning, and make life at Amherst more interesting. Ninety-seven percent of students live on campus. Ninety-seven percent of Amherst freshmen return for their sophomore year; ninety-six percent graduate, among the highest retention and graduation rates in the country.

The Kirby Memorial Theater
The Kirby Memorial Theater

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 114 KB) Taken by me, Qin Zhi Lau at Amherst College in December 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 114 KB) Taken by me, Qin Zhi Lau at Amherst College in December 2005. ...

Five College Consortium

Amherst is a member of the Five Colleges consortium, which allows its students to attend classes at four other Pioneer Valley institutions. These include Mount Holyoke College, Smith College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts. In addition to the 850 courses available on campus, Amherst students have an additional 6,000 classes to consider through the Consortium (without paying additional tuition) and access to 8 million library volumes. The Five Colleges are geographically close to one another and are linked by buses which run between the campuses. The Five Colleges share resources and develop common programs, including the Museums10 program. The Consortium has two joint academic departments, Astronomy and Dance. The Dance department is one of the largest in the nation. The Astronomy department is internationally renowned. The Pioneer Valley schools' proximity to Amherst adds to its rich extracurricular and social life. The Five Colleges are composed of four liberal arts colleges and one university in the Connecticut River Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, belonging to a consortium called Five Colleges, Incorporated, which was established in 1965. ... The Pioneer Valley and Connecticut River, looking southward toward the towns of Sunderland, Amherst and Whately. ... Mount Holyoke College is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ... Smith College is a private, independent womens liberal arts college located in Northampton, Massachusetts. ... Hampshire College is an experimenting private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... This page is about the university system across Massachusetts. ... The Pioneer Valley Transit Authority (PVTA) oversees and coordinates public transportation in the Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts. ... Museums10 is a consortium of Museums in Western Massachusetts and includes museums in which are part of the Five Colleges and Historic Deerfield. ...


Five College Coastal & Marine Sciences Program

Among other common programs developed by the Consortium, Amherst students can take classes in The Five College Coastal & Marine Sciences Program. The program offers an interdisciplinary curriculum to undergraduate students in the Five Colleges. Through active affiliations with some of the nation's premier centers for marine study, students engage in hands-on research to compliment course work. Faculty from the natural and social sciences teach courses in the program. The disciplines represented include biology, botany, chemistry, ecology, geology, physics, wildlife management, and zoology in the sciences, and economics, government, and public policy in the social sciences. Many students in the program go on to advanced study or professional work in various areas of marine science. The Five Colleges could refer to: Five Colleges, Incorporated (in Massachusetts) The Five Colleges of Ohio, Incorporated This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Resources

Among the resources on the 1,000 acre campus at Amherst College are more than 100 academic and residential buildings, athletic fields and facilities, a wildlife sanctuary, a forest for the study of ecology, and trails and areas for walking and cycling. Notable resources include the Mead Art Museum (with over 16,000 works); the Amherst Center for Russian Culture; four libraries (the main Robert Frost Library -- having one million plus volumes, nearly 400,000 media materials, extensive Archives and Special Collections, and a media center and language lab, as well as separate libraries dedicated to science, math, and music); the Amherst College Museum of Natural History (including the Hitchcock Ichnological Cabinet); the Basset Planetarium; the Wilder Observatory; state-of-the-art science facilities (including the Merrill Science Center and the 50,000 square foot McGuire Life Sciences Building); the Center for Creative Writing; well-equipped art studios; ample rehearsal and performance facilities for music, theater, and dance (including the Amherst College Ames Music Center, the Kirby Memorial Theater, and the Holden Experimental Theater); the Center for Community Engagement; and a student run radio station (WAMH 89.3 FM). Nearly every academic building and all residential buildings have been renovated or constructed in the past three years. Mead Art Museum is an art museum associated with Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... The Amherst Center for Russian Culture was created by Amherst College in Amherst Massachusetts after the gift of a major collection of Russian books, manuscripts, periodicals and ephemera by Thomas P. Whitney in 1991. ... For alternate uses see: Archive (disambiguation). ... Special Collections (often abbreviated to or ) is the name applied to the department within a public or academic library that houses rare or old materials including books, theses, incunabula, handwritten manuscripts and other documents. ... Mammals of the Ice Age in the Main Hall Amherst College Museum of Natural History is a museum of geology and natural history associated with and on the campus of Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... The Hitchcock Ichnological Cabinet is a remarkable collection of fossil footmarks assembled between 1836-1865 by Edward Hitchcock (1793–1864), noted American geologist, state geologist of Massachusetts, and President of Amherst College. ... Wilder Observatory is an astronomical observatory owned and operated by Amherst College. ... WAMH is the radio station of Amherst College. ...


Internet access is available in all student residences (one connection for each student in every room), and wireless access is available almost everywhere on campus. There are thirty-seven residence buildings, nine theme houses, and two language houses (supporting four languages). Just off campus, Amherst is caretaker and owner of the Emily Dickinson Museum in downtown Amherst, in addition to about half of the poet's manuscripts. Amherst maintains a relationship with Doshisha University in Japan, which was founded by Amherst alumnus Joseph Hardy Neesima. In accordance with the will of Amherst alumnus Henry Clay Folger, Amherst College is charged with the governance of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C.; Amherst maintains a close relationship with the Folger. The Emily Dickinson Museum is a museum owned by Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts and is a member of Museums10. ... Doshisha University ), or Dodai ) is a private university in Kyoto, Japan. ... Joseph Hardy Neesima (新島 襄, Nījima Jō) (February 12, 1843 - January 23, 1890) is the founder of Doshisha University in Japan. ... Henry Clay Folger (1857-1930) was president of Standard Oil Company, a collector of Shakespeareana, and founder of the Folger Shakespeare Library. ... The Folger Shakespeare Library is an independent research library located on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. History Standard Oil president, then chairman of the board, Henry Clay Folger was an avid collector of Shakespeareana. ...


Student groups

Students can pursue nearly any interest through more than one hundred autonomous, student-led organizations funded by the student government, including a variety of student groups, cultural and religious groups, publications, fine and performing arts and political advocacy and service groups. In that there is approximately one group for every 16 students at Amherst, leadership opportunities abound. Numerous forms of community service exist at Amherst, and community service (locally - through the Center for Community Engagement, nationally, and internationally) is a priority at Amherst and for President Anthony Marx (who helped start a secondary school for black students in apartheid South Africa). Anthony W. Marx, President of Amherst College Anthony W. Marx (born 1959) is the current president of Amherst College, in Amherst, Massachusetts. ...


Study abroad and off-campus

Forty-two percent of Amherst students, usually juniors, study abroad and can select from more than 260 study-abroad programs in countries including Argentina, Egypt, England, France, India, New Zealand, Spain, and Senegal, as well as Japan where Amherst maintains a special relationship with Doshisha University, founded in 1875 by an Amherst alumnus. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Doshisha University ), or Dodai ) is a private university in Kyoto, Japan. ...


Off-campus, Amherst students have the opportunity to study at a number of institutions, from the National Theater Institute in Connecticut to Amherst's own Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. The Twelve College Exchange program, of which Amherst is a member, has special exchange arrangememts with Bowdoin, Connecticut, Dartmouth, Mount Holyoke, Smith, Trinity, Vassar, Wellesley, Wheaton and Williams Colleges and Wesleyan University for programs not available in the Five College area. The Folger Shakespeare Library is an independent research library located on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. History Standard Oil president, then chairman of the board, Henry Clay Folger was an avid collector of Shakespeareana. ...


The Folger Shakespeare Library

Amherst's relationship with the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. offers various opportunities for students and faculty to study and learn and engage in cultural and arts programs. The Folger holds the world's largest collection of the printed works of William Shakespeare, as well as collections of other rare Renaissance books and manuscripts. The Folger, a primary repository of rare materials from the modern period (1500-1750), is an internationally recognized research library and center for scholarship and learning. The Folger is also an innovator in the preservation of rare materials and an award winning producer of cultural and arts programs, including theater, early music concerts (performed by the Folger Consort), poetry, exhibits, lectures, and family programs. More than 200,000 visitors attend events and exhibitions at the Folger each year. Millions visit its website (www.folger.edu), which includes event listings, virtual exhibitions, access to an on-line catalog of the collection, and teaching plans for educators. The Folger produces its own scholarly journal, "Shakespeare Quarterly," and the Library continues to publish the Folger Library Shakespeare editions, which outsell all other editions of the bard's plays. The Folger Shakespeare Library is an independent research library located on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. History Standard Oil president, then chairman of the board, Henry Clay Folger was an avid collector of Shakespeareana. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ...


Fellowships and internships

The Amherst Tom Gerety Fellowships for Action and the Winternship program allows more than 100 students to receive funding from the college each year to do public service work around the country and the world. Students also can select internships beginning as early as the first year, opting from among 15,000 opportunities nationwide through the Liberal Arts Center Network, as well as the "Amherst 100" internships that are sponsored by alumni.


Historically, graduating seniors and recent graduates have competed successfully for the most prestigious fellowships in the nation, including Fulbright, Goldwater, Watson, and Rhodes.


Tuition and financial aid

Amherst's total tuition, fees, room, and board for the '06-07 academic year was $43,360. About half (49%) of students receive scholarship aid,[1] with 64% receiving some form of financial aid.[2]


In July 2007, Amherst announced that scholarships will replace loans (both from the college and federal loans) in all financial aid packages beginning in the 2008-09 school year. Amherst had already been the first school to eliminate loans for low-income students, and with this announcement it joins Princeton and Davidson as the only colleges to completely eliminate loans from financial aid considerations.


Athletics

Varsity athletics

Although Amherst has always been a rigorous liberal arts college, Amherst's athletic program (founded in 1821) is the oldest in the nation.[1] One-third of the student body participates in sports at the intercollegiate level, and eighty percent participate in intramural and club sports teams.[1] The school's twenty-seven intercollegiate sports teams are known as the Lord Jeffs; women's teams are sometimes referred to as "Lady Jeffs", though the official title covers all teams.


The school participates in the NCAA's Division III, the Eastern College Athletic Conference, and the New England Small College Athletic Conference, which includes Bates, Bowdoin, Colby, Connecticut College, Hamilton, Middlebury, Trinity, Tufts, Wesleyan, and Williams College. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The Eastern College Athletic Conference is a College Athletic Conference comprising schools that compete in 35 mens and womens sports. ... The New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) is an athletic conference consisting of eleven highly selective liberal arts colleges located in New England and New York. ... Bates College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1855 by abolitionists, located in Lewiston, Maine, in the United States. ... Bowdoin College, founded in 1794, is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is an elite liberal arts college located on Mayflower Hill in Waterville, Maine. ... Connecticut College is a coeducational, highly selective private liberal arts college located in New London, Connecticut. ... For other colleges with the same name, see Hamilton College (disambiguation). ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... Trinity College is a private liberal arts college in Hartford, Connecticut. ... Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ... Wesleyan University is a private liberal arts college founded in 1831 and located in Middletown, Connecticut. ...


Amherst is also one of the "Little Three," along with Williams and Wesleyan. This rivalry, over one hundred years old, can be considered the oldest athletic conference in the nation. A Little Three champion is informally recognized by most teams based on the head-to-head records of the three schools, but three-way competitions are held in some of the sports. The Little Three is an unofficial athletic conference of three liberal arts colleges in New England. ...


Amherst has placed in the top ten of the NACDA Director's Cup in the NCAA Division III in five of the last ten years[citation needed]. The 2007 "National Collegiate Scouting Association's Collegiate Power Ranking" ranked Amherst College second "overall", ahead of Duke, USC-SD, Notre Dame, Stanford, Northwestern, Harvard, Princeton, Yale, and MIT.

  • The first intercollegiate baseball game was played between Williams and Amherst on July 1, 1859. Amherst won, 73-32.
  • The first Harvard College loss on Soldiers Field was in 1903. They lost 6-0 to Amherst.
  • The last tie in an NCAA football game was on November 11, 1995, when Amherst and Williams tied 0-0 on Weston Field in Williamstown, Massachusetts.
  • In 1999, the Amherst Women's Tennis team won the Division III National Championship, by a score of 5-2, over arch-rival Williams College. It was Amherst's first team National Championship.
  • In 2003, the Amherst Women's Lacrosse team won the Division III National Championship, by a score of 11-9, over NESCAC rival Middlebury College. It was the second team National Championship for Amherst (in all sports).
  • In 2007, the Amherst Men's Basketball team won the Division III National Championship, by a score of 80-67, over Virginia Wesleyan College.

This article is about the sport. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts Legislature. ... The 2007 NCAA Mens Division III Basketball Tournament involved 59 schools playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division III college basketball. ... Virginia Wesleyan College is a small Methodist liberal arts college on the border of Virginia Beach and Norfolk, Virginia offering a Bachelor of Arts in many disciplines and has added Bachelor of Science programs as well. ...

Club Athletics

The College has a number of successful and well-attended club athletic teams, including Rugby union (M), Rugby (W), Water Polo, Ultimate teams, Equestrian Team, Mountain Biking, Crew (M), Crew (W), Fencing, Sailing, and Skiing. (Intramural sports include soccer, tennis, golf, basketball, volleyball, and softball.) For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Water polo is a team water sport that combines some elements of swimming and football. ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ... Look up equestrian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Mountain biker riding in the Arizona desert. ... For other uses, see Crew (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ...


Music at Amherst

Nicknamed "the singing college," Amherst has many a capella and singing groups, some of them affiliated with the college music department, including the Concert Choir, the Madrigal Singers, the Women's Chorus, and the Glee Club, which is the oldest singing group on the campus. Some of the a capella groups are the Zumbyes, the Bluestockings, Route 9, the Sabrinas, the DQ, and Terras Irradient ( the co-ed christian acapella group.). Amherst's symphony orchestra with more than 70 members and no hired professional musicians is the only one of its size among national liberal art's colleges. A variety of other instrumental groups also rehearse and perform regularly and include: Javanese gamelan, chamber music, South Indian, and jazz. The Amherst College Ames Music Center has 25 listening and practice rooms (thirteen of which are equipped with pianos), an electronic and recording music studio, separate rehearsal space for instrumental and vocal groups, classrooms, a library, and a 500-seat recital hall that serves during the year as a performance venue for students and visiting artists. The New York Times recently referred to the Amherst College Zumbyes as the most dangerous a capella group in the world. ...


Miscellaneous Facts

  • Edward Jones, the first African-American student to attend Amherst College and the second African-American to graduate from an American college, was in the class of 1826. He was later a missionary to Sierra Leone.
  • The Amherst Alumni Society was founded in July 1842.
  • Amherst records one of the first uses of Latin honors of any American college, dating back to 1881. Contemporaneous writings stated that the system was new.
  • An asteroid, 516 Amherstia, is named after Amherst College. The name was given by its discoverer, Raymond Smith Dugan in honor of his alma mater.
  • Ultimate Frisbee was founded at Amherst College in the late 1960s by Jared Kass.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Latin honors are Latin phrases used to indicate the level of academic distinction with which an academic degree was earned. ... For other uses, see Asteroid (disambiguation). ... 516 Amherstia was the 8th asteroid discovered by Raymond Smith Dugan, and was named after Amherst College, his alma mater. ... Raymond Smith Dugan (May 30, 1878 – August 31, 1940) was an American astronomer and a graduate of Amherst College in Massachusetts (1899). ... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... Ultimate Frisbee is a competitive non-contact team sport played with a Frisbee or similar flying disc most commonly weighing 175 g. ...

Notable alumni

A small college, Amherst has many accomplished alumni, including Nobel and Crafoord Prize laureates, MacArthur Fellowship and Pulitzer Prize winners, National Medal of Science and National Book Award winners, and Academy, Tony, and Emmy Award winners; a U.S. President, Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Poet Laureate, and the legal architect of Brown v Board of Education; leaders in science, religion, politics, the Peace Corps, medicine, law, education, communications, and business; as well as acclaimed actors, artists, astronauts, engineers, human rights activists, inventors, musicians, philanthropists, and writers. This is a list of some notable people affiliated with Amherst College. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, is awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace. ... The Crafoord Prize was established in 1980 by Holger Crafoord, the inventor of the artificial kidney, and his wife Anna-Greta Crafoord. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... An Emmy Award. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties/Parishes/Boroughs, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial... The Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress is appointed by the United States Librarian of Congress and earns a stipend of $35,000 a year. ... Holding Racial segregation in public education violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment; separate facilities are “inherently unequal. ...


References

  1. ^ a b "Amherst College and Amherst Athletics Quickfacts", www.amherst.edu (accessed 31 October 2007).

Bibliography

  • W.S. Tyler, History of Amherst College during its first half century, 1821-1871 (C. W. Bryan, 1873).
  • Debby Applegate, The Most Famous Man in America: The Biography of Henry Ward Beecher (Doubleday, 2006).
  • Nancy Pick and Frank Ward, Curious Footprints: Professor Hitchcock's Dinosaur Tracks & Other Natural History Treasures at Amherst College (Amherst College Presss, 2006).

External links

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Amherst College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1553 words)
It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts.
Amherst Academy and Amherst College were both named for the town of Amherst, which in turn was named for Lord Jeffery Amherst, commanding general of British forces in North America during the French and Indian War.
Amherst maintains a relationship with Doshisha University in Japan, which was founded by Amherst alumnus Joseph Hardy Neesima.
Five Colleges (Massachusetts) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (472 words)
The Five Colleges are affiliated colleges in the Connecticut River Pioneer Valley of western Massachusetts, belonging to a consortium called Five Colleges, Incorporated, which was established in 1965.
The flagship Amherst campus of the University of Massachusetts system is the only public university among the five; the other four are private liberal-arts colleges.
The legend has Daphne representing Smith College and Velma as Mount Holyoke (though the two are sometimes reversed, particularly by those who perceive Velma – and Smith – as lesbian), with Fred representing Amherst College, Shaggy as Hampshire College, and Scooby as UMass Amherst.
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