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Encyclopedia > Amherst, Massachusetts
Amherst, Massachusetts
Downtown Amherst. Shops along the west side of South Pleasant Street, February 2005.

Seal
Nickname: A-town, The Herst
Location in Hampshire County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 42°22′49″N 72°31′25″W / 42.38028, -72.52361
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Hampshire
Settled 1703
Incorporated 1775
Government
 - Type Representative town meeting
Area
 - Total 27.8 sq mi (71.9 km²)
 - Land 27.7 sq mi (71.8 km²)
 - Water 0.0 sq mi (0.1 km²)
Elevation 295 ft (90 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 34,874
 - Density 1,258.2/sq mi (485.8/km²)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 01002
Area code(s) 413
FIPS code 25-01325
GNIS feature ID 0618195
Website: www.amherstma.gov

Amherst is a town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, United States in the Connecticut River valley. As of the 2000 census, the population was 34,874. The town is home to Amherst College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst, three of the Five Colleges. The name of the town is pronounced correctly (by natives and long-term residents) without the h ("AM-erst"),[1] unlike some other towns of the same name.[2] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2631x1677, 605 KB) - Amherst, Massachusetts - February, 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... Image File history File links Amherst_ma_highlight. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Massachusetts counties This is a list of Massachusetts counties, consisting of the 14 Massachusetts counties currently in existence. ... Hampshire County is a county located in the state of Massachusetts. ... A Representative Town Meeting is a form of municipal legislature used in Massachusetts. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Area code 413 is the area code for western Massachusetts. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... The system of local government in use in New England is very different from that found throughout the rest of the United States. ... Hampshire County is a county located in the state of Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Connecticut River as seen from the French King Bridge in western Massachusetts. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Hampshire College is an experimenting private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst Massachusetts or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, Mass. ... The Five Colleges are composed of four liberal arts colleges and one university in the Connecticut River Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, belonging to a consortium called Five Colleges, Incorporated, which was established in 1965. ...


The communities of Amherst Center, North Amherst, and South Amherst are census-designated places. Amherst Center is a census-designated place and village located in the town of Amherst in Hampshire County, Massachusetts. ... North Amherst is a census-designated place and village located in the town of Amherst in Hampshire County, Massachusetts. ... South Amherst is a census-designated place and village located in the town of Amherst in Hampshire County, Massachusetts. ... A census-designated place (CDP) is an area identified by the United States Census Bureau for statistical reporting. ...


Amherst is part of the Springfield, Massachusetts Metropolitan Statistical Area. Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - Total 33. ...

Contents

History

The earliest known document of the lands now comprising Amherst is the deed of purchase dated December 1658 between John Pynchon of Springfield and three native inhabitants, referred to as Umpanchla, Quonquont and Chickwolopp. According to the deed, "ye Indians of Nolwotogg (Norwottuck) upon ye River of Quinecticott (Connecticut)" sold the entire area in exchange for "two Hundred fatham of Wampam & Twenty fatham, and one large Coate at Eight fatham wch Chickwollop set of, of trusts, besides severall small giftes" (sic). Amherst will celebrate its 250th anniversary in 2009. The Amherst 250th Anniversary Celebration Committee has been established to oversee the creation and implementation of Town-wide activities throughout 2009. Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - Total 33. ...


When the first permanent English settlements arrived in 1727, this land and the surrounding area (including present-day South Hadley and Granby) belonged to the town of Hadley. It gained precinct status in 1734 and eventually township in 1776, shortly before the colonies declared their independence.


Upon its incorporation, the colonial governor assigned to them the name Amherst after Jeffrey Amherst, 1st Baron Amherst. Many colonial governors at the time were scattering his name amidst the influx of new town applications, which is why several towns in the Northeast bear the name. Amherst was a hero of the French and Indian War who, according to popular legend, singlehandedly won Canada for the English and banished France from North America. He supported the American side in the Revolutionary war and resigned his commission rather than fight for the British. This too made him quite popular in New England. Amherst is also infamous for considering, in a letter to a peer, the use of smallpox-covered blankets in warfare against the Native Americans. It is for this reason that there have been occasional ad hoc movements to rename the town. Among the new names suggested for the town has been "Emily" after Emily Dickinson (see Notable Residents below). Jeffrey Amherst, painted by Joshua Reynolds in 1765 Jeffery Amherst, 1st Baron Amherst (sometimes spelled Geoffrey, or Jeffrey, he himself spelled his name as Jeffery) (January 29, 1717 – August 3, 1797) served as an officer in the British Army. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) is a contagious disease unique to humans. ... From the daguerreotype taken at Mount Holyoke, December 1846 or early 1847. ...


Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 27.8 square miles (71.9 km²), of which, 27.7 square miles (71.8 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.14%) is water. For interactive mapping provided by the Town of Amherst, see External Links on this page. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...

UMass, looking southeast
UMass, looking southeast

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1675 KB) Description: Amherst Massachusetts Viewed From The Northwest. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1675 KB) Description: Amherst Massachusetts Viewed From The Northwest. ...

Demographics

Historical population of
Amherst
[3]
1790 1,233
1800 1,258
1810 1,469
1820 1,917
1830 2,631
1840 2,550
1850 3,057
1860 3,206
1870 4,035
1880 4,298
1890 4,512
1900 5,028
1910 5,112
1920 5,550
1930 5,888
1940 6,410
1950 10,856
1960 13,718
1970 26,331
1980 33,229
1990 35,228
2000 34,874
2005 34,047 (estimate)

As of the 2000 U.S. Census, there were 34,874 people, 9,174 households, and 4,550 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,258.2 people per square mile (485.7/km²). There were 9,427 housing units at an average density of 340.1/sq mi (131.3/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 79.33% White, 5.10% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 9.02% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 2.89% from other races, and 3.35% from two or more races. 6.19% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 9,174 households out of which 27.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.4% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.4% were non-families. 28.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.97. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the town the population was spread out with 12.8% under the age of 18, 50.0% from 18 to 24, 17.2% from 25 to 44, 13.4% from 45 to 64, and 6.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 22 years. For every 100 females there were 92.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.8 males.


The median income for a household in the town was $40,017, and the median income for a family was $61,237. Males had a median income of $44,795 versus $32,672 for females. The per capita income for the town was $17,427. About 7.2% of families and 20.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.3% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over. The reason for the large population living below the poverty line is because of the large number of students that live in Amherst.[citation needed] Per capita income means how much each individual receives, in monetary terms, of the yearly income generated in their country. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Of residents 25 years old or older, 41.7% have a graduate or professional degree, and only 4.9% did not graduate from high school. The largest industry is education, health, and social services, in which 51.9% of employed persons work.


These statistics include some but not all of the large student population, many of whom only reside in the town part of the year. Amherst is home to thousands of part-time and full-time residents associated with the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst College, and Hampshire College. For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst Massachusetts or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, Mass. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Hampshire College is an experimenting private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts. ...

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of October 18, 2006[4]
Party Total Voters Percentage
  Democratic 8,350 49.18%
  Republican 1,076 6.34%
  Unaffiliated 7,228 42.57%
  Other Parties 326 1.92%
Total 16,980 100%

Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ...

Government

Amherst is among relatively few towns of its size in Massachusetts in not having moved to a mayor-council or council-manager form of government. Instead, it has maintained the traditional town meeting (legislative) and select board (executive), though with the important modification, allowed through a special state law, whereby Town Meeting is made up of elected representatives of each precinct in the town. In addition, the select board hires a town manager to handle the day-to-day administrative details of running a town. Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments in the United States. ... The council-manager government is one of two main variations of representative municipal government in the United States. ... A Representative Town Meeting is a form of municipal legislature used in Massachusetts. ... ...


In recent years, some have sought to abolish the 254-member Town Meeting with a new charter that would create a directly-elected mayor and a nine-member Town Council. The charter was rejected by voters in Spring 2003 by fourteen votes, and defeated again on March 29, 2005 by 252 votes. is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Transportation

The Pioneer Valley Transit Authority(PVTA), funded by local governments and the Five Colleges, provides public transportation in the area. The Pioneer Valley Transit Authority (PVTA) oversees and coordinates public transportation in the Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts. ...


Rail service is available through Amtrak at the Amherst station (AMH)


The closest airline service is through Westover Metropolitan Airport (CEF), approximately 15 minutes from Amherst. Although Westover Metropolitan is served by low-cost carrier Skybus Airlines, major domestic and limited international air service is available through Bradley International Airport (BDL) in Hartford, Connecticut. Bradley is located approximately one hour's driving time from Amherst. Major international service is available through Logan International Airport (BOS) in Boston, 90 miles away. Skybus Airlines is a privately held airline based in Columbus, Ohio, USA. It is an ultra-low-cost carrier, modeled after the European airline Ryanair and the early years of Southwest Airlines. ... BDL redirects here. ... Hartford redirects here. ... For the Logan airport in Billings, Montana, see Billings Logan International Airport. ...


General aviation service is close by, at Northampton Airport (7B2) and Turners Falls Airport (0B5).


Notable residents

Historical

From the daguerreotype taken at Mount Holyoke, December 1846 or early 1847. ... Noah Webster Noah Webster (October 16, 1758 – April 28, 1843) was an American lexicographer, textbook author, spelling reformer, political writer, word enthusiast, and editor. ... Osmyn Baker (May 18, 1800 - February 9, 1875) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Lakeside Park entrance Agnesian HealthCare Fond du Lac (locally pronounced Fonda-lack) is a city in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, United States. ... Edward Dickinson (January 1, 1803 - June 16, 1874) was a Massachusetts politician. ... Statue of Clark, Sapporo: Boys Be Ambitious Dr. William Smith Clark (July 31, 1825 - March 9, 1886) was a professor, Massachusetts State Senator, third president of the Massachusetts Agricultural College (now the University of Massachusetts Amherst) and first vice president of Sapporo Agricultural College (Japan) // William Smith Clark, the son... The center of the UMass Amherst campus. ... The center of the UMass Amherst campus. ... Sapporo Agricultural College (札幌農学校), once an autonomous school, became part of Tohoku Imperial University in 1907, and was transferred to Hokkaido Imperial University (now Hokkaido University) in 1918. ... Hokkaido University ), or Hokudai ), is one of the leading national universities of Japan. ... Helen Hunt Jackson Helen Maria Hunt Jackson (October 18, 1830 - August 12, 1885) was an American writer best known as the author of Ramona, a novel about the ill treatment of Native Americans in southern California. ... Ramona is a novel written by Helen Hunt Jackson and published in 1884. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... Robert Francis (1901-1987) was an American poet who lived much of his life in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... Melvil Dewey (December 10, 1851–December 26, 1931) was the inventor of the Dewey Decimal Classification system for library classification. ... Chinua Achebe (pronounced [1]), born Albert Chinualumogu Achebe on November 16, 1930, is a Nigerian[2] novelist, poet and critic. ...

Born or raised in Amherst

Steve Porter is a house music producer, remixer and DJ originally from Boston, Massachusetts. ... Allen St. ... The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws or NORML (pronounced normal) is a US-based non-profit corporation founded in 1970 to, according to their most recent mission statement, move public opinion sufficiently to achieve the repeal of marijuana prohibition so that the responsible use of cannabis by... Uma Karuna Thurman (born April 29, 1970) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Jesse Barrett-Mills is an award winning Director, Producer, and Cinematographer. ...

Live in Amherst

Christopher Benfey (28 October 1954 - ) is a literary critic and Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke College. ... Mount Holyoke College is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ... Augusten Xon Burroughs (born Christopher Robison on October 23, 1965 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an American writer noted for his New York Times best-selling memoir Running with Scissors (2002), which spawned a feature film of the same name written and directed by Ryan Murphy and starring Joseph Cross as... Running with Scissors is a 2002 memoir by American writer Augusten Burroughs. ... Norton Juster (born June 2, 1929) is an American architect and author. ... The Phantom Tollbooth (1961) is a childrens novel and a modern fairy tale full of wordplay and adventure. ... Julius Lester (born January 27, 1939), also known as Julius Bernard Lester or by his Hebrew name Yaakov Daniel, is an award winning American author of books for children and adults, and was an occasionally controversial professor at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. ... Michael Lesy is a writer and professor of literary journalism at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... Wisconsin Death Trip is a non-fiction book by Michael Lesy, first published in 1973. ... J Mascis (born Joseph Donald Mascis on December 10, 1965) is an American musician, best-known as the singer, guitarist and songwriter for Dinosaur Jr, though he also has been an occasional producer and film composer. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Dinosaur Jr is an American alternative rock band formed in Amherst, Massachusetts in 1983 as Dinosaur. ... James Tate James Vincent Tate (born December 8, 1943, Kansas City, Missouri) is a literary iconoclast, best known as a Pulitzer prize-winning and National Book Award-winning poet, educator, and man of letters. ... Joseph John Ellis (1943- ) is a Pulitzer Prize - winning Professor of History on the Ford Foundation at Mount Holyoke College. ... For other uses, see Historian (disambiguation). ... Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation (ISBN 0-571-21217-4) is a 2000 Pulitzer Prize-winning book written by Joseph Ellis, a professor of History at Mount Holyoke College. ... Holly Black (born 1971) is the New York Times bestselling author of The Spiderwick Chronicles series of childrens fantasy books (illustrated by Tony DiTerlizzi), Valiant : A Modern Tale of Faerie, and Tithe : A Modern Faerie Tale. ... A tithe (from Old English teogoþa tenth) is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a (usually) voluntary contribution or as a tax or levy, usually to support a Jewish or Christian religious organization. ... Look up valiant in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ironside may refer to: Ironside (TV series), an American television series starring Raymond Burr Ironside (novel), an urban fantasy novel by Holly Black The name Ironside may refer to a person: Ironside (cavalry), a cavalry trooper in the army formed by Oliver Cromwell Sir Ironside, a character in the Arthurian... This article is about the novel. ... Martín Espada Martín Espada (born 1957) is a poet and professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he teaches creative writing and Latino poetry. ... A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Archie Shepp is an American jazz saxophonist. ... Augusten Xon Burroughs (born Christopher Robison on October 23, 1965 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an American writer noted for his New York Times best-selling memoir Running with Scissors (2002), which spawned a feature film of the same name written and directed by Ryan Murphy and starring Joseph Cross as...

Points of interest

Mammals of the Ice Age in the Main Hall Amherst College Museum of Natural History is a museum of geology and natural history associated with and on the campus of Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... The Hitchcock Ichnological Cabinet is a remarkable collection of fossil footmarks assembled between 1836-1865 by Edward Hitchcock (1793–1864), noted American geologist, state geologist of Massachusetts, and President of Amherst College. ... The Theodore Baird Residence is a suburban house designed by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, and located at 38 Shays Street, Amherst, Massachusetts. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American architect, interior designer, writer, educator, and philosopher who designed more than 1,000 projects, of which more than 500 resulted in completed works. ... The Dickinson Homestead, located at 280 Main Street, Amherst, Massachusetts, was the home of poet Emily Dickinson, and currently is the site of a museum dedicated to her. ... From the daguerreotype taken at Mount Holyoke, December 1846 or early 1847. ... The Horse Caves of Amherst, Massachusetts are a geological feature in the southern part of the town of Amherst, near the base of Mt. ...

See also

Amherst Station is an Amtrak station in Amherst, Massachusetts on the Vermonter. ...

References

  1. ^ languagehat.com, uscho.com, bbc.co.uk
  2. ^ See, e.g., www.amerst.com, an Amherst College alumni website, among many other sources.
  3. ^ amherstma.gov, census.gov
  4. ^ 2006 State Election Party Enrollment Statistics (PDF, 108k) (PDF). Massachusetts Secretary of State. Retrieved on 2006-12-08.
  5. ^ a b c d e (1967) Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Marquis Who's Who. 

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Amherst, Massachusetts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1372 words)
Amherst is also infamous for considering, in a letter to a peer, the use of smallpox-covered blankets in warfare against the Native Americans.
On October 29, 1901 nurse Jane Toppan was arrested in Amherst for the murder of the Davis family of Boston by an overdose of morphine.
Amherst is among relatively few towns of its size in Massachusetts in not having moved to a mayor-council or council-manager form of government.
Amherst Massachusetts, 1890 (831 words)
The buildings of Amherst College occupy a commanding site in the central part of the town, and consist of halls, lecture-rooms, dormitories, and a handsome granite church edifice.
Amherst, originally known as " Hadley Third Precinct," was incorporated February 13, 1759 ; being named in honor of General Jeffrey Amherst.
Silas Wright, a member of Congress in 1827-29, and 1833-44, was born in Amherst in 1795, and died in Canton, N.Y., in 1847.
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