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Encyclopedia > American University
American University
Image:AUlogo.jpg

Motto: Pro deo et patria
(For God and Country)
Established: February 24, 1893
Type: Private
Endowment: $435 million[1]
President: Cornelius M. Kerwin
Provost: Ivy E. Broder, Interim Provost
Faculty: 600 full time, 420 adjunct
Undergraduates: 5,824
Postgraduates: 3,925 (1,688 law)
Location: Flag of the United States Washington, D.C.
Campus: Urban 84 acre (34 ha)
Study Abroad: 470 programs
Colors: AU red and blue           
Nickname: Eagles AU Eaglesl.
Mascot: Clawed Z. Eagle
Athletics: Eagles NCAA Division I
Affiliations: Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs; Patriot League; International Association of Methodist-related Schools, Colleges, and Universities; Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area
Website: www.american.edu
For other universities known as American University, see American University (disambiguation).

American University (AU) is a private United Methodist-affiliated university in Washington, D.C., U.S., the main campus of which comes to a corner at the intersection of Nebraska and Massachusetts Avenues at Ward Circle, straddling the Spring Valley, Wesley Heights, and American University Park neighborhoods of Northwest. Roughly 6,000 undergraduate students and 4,000 graduate students are currently enrolled.[2] Though there is sometimes confusion, American University is separate from most "American Universities" around the world. Image File history File links AUlogo. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Dr. Cornelius M. Kerwin (born 1949), known as Neil, is an American educator in public administration and the interim president of American University. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... The American University Eagles are the sports teams for American University. ... Image File history File links AmericanEagle. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The American University Eagles are the sports teams for American University. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Patriot League is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ... International Association of Methodist-related Schools, Colleges, and Universities (IAMSCU) is a private, not-for-profit organization of colleges and universities associated with the United Methodist Church. ... The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area allows students to enroll in courses offered by other member institutions and students at other member institutions to enroll in courses at AU. Students and faculty of WRLC member universities may use and borrow from the libraries at other WRLC member... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... American University may refer to a number of institutions of higher learning. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The intersection of Nebraska Avenue and Massachusetts Avenue in northwest Washington, District of Columbia. ... Spring Valley is an upper class neighborhood in northwest Washington, D.C. The neighborhood is situated west from American Universitys main campus on Massachusetts Avenue. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Map of Washington, D.C., with American University Park highlighted in red American University Park is a neighborhood of Washington, DC, named for the American University. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


It is served by the Tenleytown-AU station on the Washington Metro subway line, which is located roughly one mile from the main campus in the neighborhood of Tenleytown. AU is a member of the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area, allowing students to enroll in courses offered by other member institutions and students at other member institutions to enroll in courses at AU. A member of the Patriot League, its sports teams compete as the American University Eagles. Washington Metro redirects here. ... Tenleytown is the historic name for a neighborhood in northwest Washington, DC. It is the second oldest neighborhood in Washington, being surpassed in age only by Georgetown. ... The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area allows students to enroll in courses offered by other member institutions and students at other member institutions to enroll in courses at AU. Students and faculty of WRLC member universities may use and borrow from the libraries at other WRLC member... The Patriot League is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ... The American University Eagles are the sports teams for American University. ...

Contents

History

The American University
The American University

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 379 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 485 pixel, file size: 281 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 379 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 485 pixel, file size: 281 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (495x627, 90 KB) Summary American Universitys School of International Service Photo by Asiir in April 2006 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (495x627, 90 KB) Summary American Universitys School of International Service Photo by Asiir in April 2006 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The School of International Service (SIS) is American Universitys school of advanced international study in the areas of international security, communications, development, economics, peace & conflict resolution, and American foreign policy. ...

Founding

American University traces its history to a letter written by George Washington, in which he expressed a desire for a "national university" to be located in the nation's capital. The university was established in the District of Columbia by an Act of Congress on February 24, 1893 primarily due to the efforts of Methodist Bishop John Fletcher Hurst. Bishop Hurst and his colleagues were concerned with building an institution that would meld the strengths of the best German universities with the strengths of the existing university system in America. As their plans developed during the early years, they began to conceive of American University as an institution that would be: George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... A national university is a university created or run by a national government and might or might not be autonomous from government interference. ... ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... John Fletcher Hurst (born: August 17, 1834, Salem, Dorchester County, Maryland - died: May 4, 1903, Bethesda, Maryland) was a bishop in the Methodist Episcopal Church. ...

  • A privately supported university financed principally by the membership of the churches, particularly the Methodist Episcopal Church, which had been the founders of many of the colleges and universities in the early years of American history.
  • An internationally minded institution where scholars from across the nation and from throughout the world would gather to dedicate their combined efforts to the advancement and dissemination of knowledge.
  • A center of higher education and research activities that, while independent of the government, would draw freely on the intellectual and scientific resources of the Nation's Capital to supplement and to extend its own capabilities.
  • An institution that would contribute to the general cultural life and development of the capital in much the same manner that state-supported universities in other world capitals contributed to their communities.

The Methodist Episcopal Church, sometimes referred to as the M.E. Church, officially began at the Baltimore Christmas Conference in 1784. ...

1900–1948

After more than three decades devoted principally to securing financial support, the university was officially dedicated on May 15, 1914. The first instruction began on October 6 of that year, when 28 students were enrolled (19 of them graduate students, nine of them special students who were not candidates for a degree). The First Commencement, at which no degrees were awarded, was held on June 2, 1915. The Second Annual Commencement was held on June 2, 1916 where the first degrees (one master's degree and two doctor's degrees) were awarded. is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Shortly after these early commencement ceremonies, classes were interrupted by war. During World War I, the university allowed the U.S. military to use some of its grounds for testing. In 1917, the U.S. military divided American University into two segments, Camp American University and Camp Leach. Camp American University became the birthplace of the United States' chemical weapons program, and chemical weapons were tested on the grounds; this required a major cleanup effort in the 1990s. Camp Leach was home to advanced research, development and testing of modern camouflage techniques. As of 2007, the Army Corps of Engineers is still removing ordnance including mustard gas and mortar shells. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... Camp American University was the name the U.S. military used for the segment of the Washington, DC main campus of American University during World War I and World War II. During both wars, the university allowed the U.S. military to use parts of its grounds for weapons development... Camp Leach was the name the U.S. military used for the segment of the Washington, DC main campus of American University during World War I and World War II. During both wars, the university allowed the U.S. military to use parts of its grounds for weapons development and... Early detection of chemical agents Sociopolitical climate of chemical warfare While the study of chemicals and their military uses was widespread in China, the use of toxic materials has historically been viewed with mixed emotions and some disdain in the West (especially when the enemy were doing it). ... This article is about protective camouflage used to disguise people, animals, or military targets. ... United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 military men and women. ... Airborne exposure limit 0. ... US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ...


During the next ten years, instruction was offered at the graduate level only, in accordance with the original plan of the founders. In the fall of 1925, the College of Liberal Arts (subsequently named the College of Arts and Sciences) was established. Since that date, the University has offered both undergraduate and graduate degrees and programs. The College of Arts and Sciences is the oldest and largest academic unit at American University in terms of student enrollment and faculty lines. ...


During World War II, the campus again offered its services to the U.S. government and became home to the U.S. Navy Bomb Disposal School and a WAVE barracks. For AU's role in these wartime efforts, the Victory ship SS American Victory was named in honor of the university. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... USN redirects here. ... The Victory ship was a type of cargo ship produced in large numbers by North American shipyards during World War II to replace losses caused by German submarines. ... SS American Victory is a Second World War Victory ship which has been preserved as a museum ship in Tampa, Florida. ...


1949–1990

The present structure of the university began to emerge in 1949. The Washington College of Law became part of the University in that year, having begun in 1896 as the first coeducational institution for the professional study of law in the District of Columbia. Shortly thereafter, three departments were reorganized as schools: the School of Business Administration in 1955 (subsequently named the Robert P. and Arlene R. Kogod College of Business Administration and in 1999 renamed the Kogod School of Business); the School of Government and Public Administration in 1957; and the School of International Service in 1958. The American University Washington College of Law (WCL) was founded in 1896 as the culmination of the pioneering efforts of two women, Ellen Spencer Mussey and Emma Gillett, who wished to open the field of law to women. ... American Universitys Kogod School of Business is among the best business schools in the Washington, D.C. area, and is the school of choice for interdisciplinary business education. ... The School of International Service (SIS) is American Universitys school of advanced international study in the areas of international security, communications, development, economics, peace & conflict resolution, and American foreign policy. ...


In the early 1960s, the Department of Defense and the Central Intelligence Agency operated a think tank under the guise of Operation Camelot at American University. The government abandoned the think tank after the operation came to public attention. AU's political intertwinement was furthered by President John F. Kennedy's Spring 1963 commencement address.[3] In the speech, Kennedy called on the Soviet Union to work with the United States to achieve a nuclear test ban treaty and help reduce the considerable international tensions and the specter of nuclear war during that juncture of the Cold War. The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... CIA redirects here. ... Operation Camelot was an operation run by the Department of Defense and the Central Intelligence Agency that funded anthropological research. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


From 1965 to 1977, the College of Continuing Education existed as a degree-granting college with responsibility for on- and off-campus adult education programs. The Lucy Webb Hayes School of Nursing provided undergraduate study in Nursing from 1965 until 1988. In 1972, the School of Government and Public Administration, the School of International Service, the Center for Technology and Administration, and the Center for the Administration of Justice (subsequently named the School of Justice) were incorporated into the College of Public and International Affairs. The School of International Service (SIS) is American Universitys school of advanced international study in the areas of international security, communications, development, economics, peace & conflict resolution, and American foreign policy. ...


In October 1984, President Richard Berendzen announced that the University would purchase the Immaculata Campus in 1986 to help alleviate space problems. This investment would later become the Tenley Campus. Image:Berendzen. ...


In 1986, construction on the Adnan Khashoggi Sports and Convocation Center began. Financed with $5 million from and named for Saudi Arabian Trustee Adnan Khashoggi, the building was intended to update athletics facilities and provide a new arena, as well as a parking garage and office space for administrative services. Costing an estimated $19 million, the building represented the largest construction project to date, but met protest by both faculty and students to the University's use of Khashoggi's name on the building due to his involvement in international arms trade[4]. Adnan Khashoggi (or Kashoggi) (Arabic:عدنان خاشقجي, Turkish: Adnan Kaşıkçı) (born 25 July 1935 in Mecca) is a billionaire Saudi arms-dealer and businessman. ...


In 1988, the College of Public and International Affairs was reorganized to create two free-standing schools: the School of International Service and the School of Public Affairs, incorporating the School of Government and Public Administration and the School of Justice. That same year, construction on the Adnan Khashoggi Sports Center completed while the Iran-Contra Affair controversy was at its height although his name was not removed from the building until after Khashoggi defaulted on his donation obligation in the mid to late 90's. The School of International Service (SIS) is American Universitys school of advanced international study in the areas of international security, communications, development, economics, peace & conflict resolution, and American foreign policy. ... The School of Public Affairs at American University is among the nations leading public policy schools. ... The Iran-Contra Affair was a political scandal occurring in 1987 as a result of earlier events during the Reagan administration in which members of the executive branch sold weapons to Iran, an avowed enemy, and illegally used the profits to continue funding anti-Communist rebels, the Contras, in Nicaragua. ...


1990—present

In 1991, Richard E. Berendzen stepped down as President after admitting to making obscene phone calls. He sought immediate medical treatment and remained a full-time member of the American University faculty until his retirement in 2006. Image:Berendzen. ...

The American University flag.
The American University flag.

Berendzen was succeeded by Joseph Duffy, who left after one year to become the head of the United States Agency for International Development under President Clinton. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,304 × 3,072 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,304 × 3,072 pixels, file size: 1. ...


The School of Communication became independent from the College of Arts and Sciences in 1993. The School of Communication at American University is highly regarded for its faculty, facilities, and high professional standards by The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications [1]. The school offers four majors: communication studies (BA), print/broadcast journalism (BA), public communication (BA), and visual media (BA). ... The College of Arts and Sciences is the oldest and largest academic unit at American University in terms of student enrollment and faculty lines. ...


In 1997 American University of Sharjah, the only coeducational, liberal arts university in the United Arab Emirates, signed a two year contract with AU to provide academic management, a contract which has since been extended multiple times through August 2009. A team of senior AU administrators relocated to Sharjah to assist in the establishment of the university and guide it through the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools accreditation process. The American University of Sharjah (AUS) (in Arabic: الجامعة الأميركية في الشارقة) is a coeducational higher educational institution in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, founded in 1997. ... Sharjah Central Souq - Shopping Mall The flag of Sharjah The Emirate of Sharjah (Arabic: الشارقة ash-shaariqah) is a small Country that extends along approximately 16 kilometres of the United Arab Emiratess Persian Gulf coastline and for more than 80 kilometres into the interior. ... The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools is a voluntary, peer based, non-profit association dedicated to the educational excellence and improvement through peer evaluation and accreditation. ...


In 2003, American launched the largest fund raising campaign in its history. The program, ANewAU[5], has a goal of raising $200 million dollars. As of January 31, 2008, the University has raised $158.533 million dollars. When the campaign is completed, the University's website states that it "will help to attract and retain the finest faculty, increase scholarship support, create and endow research and policy centers, ensure state-of-the-art resources in all of our schools and colleges, expand global programs, and secure the long-term financial health of the university by boosting the endowment."[6] is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the fall of 2005, the much anticipated Katzen Arts Center opened. The Katzen Arts Center is home to all of the visual and performing arts programs at American University. ...


Benjamin Ladner was suspended from his position as president of the university on August 24, 2005, pending an investigation into possible misuse of university funds for his personal expenses. University faculty passed votes of no confidence in President Ladner on September 26 [7] . On October 10, 2005, the Board of Trustees of American University decided that Ladner would not return to American University as its president.[citation needed] Dr. Cornelius M. Kerwin served as interim president and was appointed to the position permanently on September 1, 2007.[8]. According to The Chronicle of Higher Education, [9], he received a total compensation of $4,270,665 in his final year of service, the second highest of any university president in the United States. Dr. Benjamin Ladner (born October 30, 1941, Mobile, Alabama) is an academic in the fields of philosophy and theology. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr. Cornelius M. Kerwin (born 1949), known as Neil, is an American educator in public administration and the interim president of American University. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ...


Ground was broken for the new School of International Service building on November 14th, 2007. A speech was given by Senator Daniel K. Inouye (D-HI). Construction is slated to begin in early March 2008, and expected to last for two years. The School of International Service (SIS) is American Universitys school of advanced international study in the areas of international security, communications, development, economics, peace & conflict resolution, and American foreign policy. ...


Campus

Aerial view of main campus
Aerial view of main campus

AU has two campuses for academics, the main campus and the Tenley Campus, and an additional facility that houses the Washington College of Law. Additionally, AU owns several buildings in the Tenleytown and Spring Valley areas. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 2976 KB) Aerial photo of American Universitys main campus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 2976 KB) Aerial photo of American Universitys main campus. ... Capitol Hall, Tenley Campus, American University Tenley Campus is a satellite campus of American University located on Tenley Circle, in Northwest Washington, DC. It is home to the Washington Semester Program, University Publications and Media Relations Departments. ... The American University Washington College of Law (WCL) was founded in 1896 as the culmination of the pioneering efforts of two women, Ellen Spencer Mussey and Emma Gillett, who wished to open the field of law to women. ... Tenleytown is the historic name for a neighborhood in northwest Washington, DC. It is the second oldest neighborhood in Washington, being surpassed in age only by Georgetown. ... Spring Valley is the name of some places in the United States of America: Spring Valley, Arizona Spring Valley, California Spring Valley, Illinois Spring Valley, Kentucky Spring Valley, Minnesota Spring Valley, New York Spring Valley, Nevada Spring Valley, Ohio Spring Valley, Wisconsin Spring Valley, Texas Spring Valley is also the...


Main campus

The first design for campus was done by Frederick Law Olmsted but was significantly modified over time due to financial resources.The campus occupies 84 acres (340,000 m²) in a residential neighborhood of Northwest Washington, D.C., at Ward Circle, the intersection of Nebraska and Massachusetts Avenues. Highlights of the campus include a main quadrangle surrounded by academic buildings, seven residential halls, a 5,000-seat arena, and an outdoor amphitheatre. The campus is a designated arboretum. {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Color-enhanced USGS satellite image of Washington, DC, taken April 26, 2002. ... The intersection of Nebraska Avenue and Massachusetts Avenue in northwest Washington, District of Columbia. ... Massachusetts Avenue, colloquially abbreviated Mass. ... The Colosseum in Rome, Italy. ... This article is about a type of botanical garden. ...

Satellite View of American University

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Major buildings

  • University (Bender) Library, which holds over a million books
  • Hurst Hall, first building of the university, ground broken in 1896 for what was to be the College of History. Now home to departments of Biology and Environmental Science, the University Honors Program, and the Center for Teaching Excellence. Hurst Hall has no elevators and its only bathrooms are located in the basement.
American's quadrangle, looking towards the Mary Graydon Center and the Battelle-Tompkins Building.
American's quadrangle, looking towards the Mary Graydon Center and the Battelle-Tompkins Building.
  • Mary Graydon Center, home to student organization offices, the main dining facilities, and the School of Communication. (building history)
  • Katzen Arts Center, Provided for by a monetary gift from Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen, opened in 2005 and is now home to the Department of Performing Arts, the American University Museum, and other Academic Departments.
  • Abbey Joel Butler Pavilion, holds the campus store, the Office of Campus Life, the Career Center, and meeting spaces.
  • Sports Center: Bender Arena, Reeves Aquatic Center, Jacobs Fitness Center (see Athletics below)
  • School of International Service, ground broken by President Dwight Eisenhower. A new building is under construction as of March 3, 2008.
A view of a path along American University's Eric Friedheim Quadrangle.
A view of a path along American University's Eric Friedheim Quadrangle.
  • McKinley Building, cornerstone laid by President Theodore Roosevelt. Currently the home of the department of Computer Science, Audio Technology, and Physics. Slated to become the new home to the School of Communication.
  • Battelle-Tompkins Building, the university library until 1977 and now home to the College of Arts and Sciences.
  • Ward Circle Building, the largest classroom building on campus, built in 1968 as a home for the School of Government and Public Administration (now the School of Public Affairs).
  • Kay Spiritual Life Center, built in 1963, a nondenominational place of worship, home to the University Chaplains and is used for speeches and performances.
  • Kogod School of Business, formerly known as the Myers-Hutchins Building, and previous home to the Washington College of Law. Construction is currently underway to annex it to the now empty Experimental Theatre and Butler Instructional Center.
See also American University Housing and Dining Programs

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1270 KB) Summary I took this picture on Sept. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1270 KB) Summary I took this picture on Sept. ... The School of Communication at American University is highly regarded for its faculty, facilities, and high professional standards by The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications [1]. The school offers four majors: communication studies (BA), print/broadcast journalism (BA), public communication (BA), and visual media (BA). ... The Katzen Arts Center is home to all of the visual and performing arts programs at American University. ... Bender Arena is a 4,500-seat multi-purpose arena in Washington, DC. The arena opened in 1988. ... For other universities known as American University, see American University (disambiguation). ... The School of International Service (SIS) is American Universitys school of advanced international study in the areas of international security, communications, development, economics, peace & conflict resolution, and American foreign policy. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1076 KB) Summary I took this picture of the Mall at American Univeristy Washington DCs Campus on Sept 4th, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1076 KB) Summary I took this picture of the Mall at American Univeristy Washington DCs Campus on Sept 4th, 2006. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... The School of Communication at American University is highly regarded for its faculty, facilities, and high professional standards by The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications [1]. The school offers four majors: communication studies (BA), print/broadcast journalism (BA), public communication (BA), and visual media (BA). ... The College of Arts and Sciences is the oldest and largest academic unit at American University in terms of student enrollment and faculty lines. ... The School of Public Affairs at American University is among the nations leading public policy schools. ... American Universitys Kogod School of Business is among the best business schools in the Washington, D.C. area, and is the school of choice for interdisciplinary business education. ... The American University Washington College of Law (WCL) was founded in 1896 as the culmination of the pioneering efforts of two women, Ellen Spencer Mussey and Emma Gillett, who wished to open the field of law to women. ...

Residence halls

The American University Amphitheatre.
The American University Amphitheatre.

Student housing is divided into North and South Sides of Campus Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,072 × 2,304 pixels, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,072 × 2,304 pixels, file size: 3. ...

  • North-Side: Hughes, McDowell and Leonard Halls
    • Nebraska Hall: located across Mass Ave. from main campus is a suite-style residence opened August 2007
  • South-Side: Anderson, Letts and Centennial Halls

Most students are housed in double-rooms, but there are a few singles and triples. In periods of high demand, some rooms are converted into triples.


Tenley campus

Main article: Tenley Campus
Capital Hall, Tenley Campus, American University
Capital Hall, Tenley Campus, American University

Formerly the Immaculata School, Tenley Campus is located half a mile east of the main campus, and was purchased by American University in 1987 specifically for the Washington Semester program. During the academic year, Tenley Campus is home to the Washington Semester Program students, and during the summer, American University uses the residence halls for summer interns. Administratively, Tenley Campus is home to the Washington Semester Program, the Office of Development, University Marketing, University Publications, and Media Relations Capitol Hall, Tenley Campus, American University Tenley Campus is a satellite campus of American University located on Tenley Circle, in Northwest Washington, DC. It is home to the Washington Semester Program, University Publications and Media Relations Departments. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 268 pixelsFull resolution (400 × 268 pixel, file size: 22 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Created image myself. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 268 pixelsFull resolution (400 × 268 pixel, file size: 22 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Created image myself. ... Capitol Hall, Tenley Campus, American University Tenley Campus is a satellite campus of American University located on Tenley Circle, in Northwest Washington, DC. It is home to the Washington Semester Program, University Publications and Media Relations Departments. ... The Washington Semester is a semester-long residential program that partners with institutions around the world to bring college students to American University. ... The Washington Semester is a semester-long residential program that partners with institutions around the world to bring college students to American University. ... The Washington Semester is a semester-long residential program that partners with institutions around the world to bring college students to American University. ...


Buildings:

  • Capital Hall, the oldest and most ornate of the Tenley Campus buildings, houses 170 students, a fitness center and the stained glass chapel that is used for dance and music recitals.
  • Congressional Hall, with 156 students, contains the central reception desk for the Tenley Campus
  • Federal Hall, housing 107 students, contains the mailroom and the cafeteria, Tenley Cafe, on its first floor.
  • Dunblane House, a small administrative and classroom building.
  • Constitution Building, an administrative building.
  • A sports field used for intramural sport matches.

Proposed renovations and expansions

Starting in 2006, American University has actively sought to expand and rejuvenate their campus. The proposed renovations and additions to the campus with their expected competition dates are: [10][11]


Fall 2006:

  • Renovating the Watkins Art Building to add classrooms and administrative space (Complete).

Fall 2007:

  • Renovating the first floor of the Mary Graydon Center which will help in efficiently using the space already available (complete) [12]
  • Renovating Nebraska Hall, which currently houses academic classrooms and administrative office space, to create a new suite-style residence hall for 115 upperclassmen. (complete)
  • More Watkins Building Renovation-renovating and updating this building (complete) [1]

Fall 2008:

  • Add a canopy over a walkway between the Mary Graydon Center and the Batelle-Tomkins building [2]

Spring 2009: [3]

Spring 2010: American Universitys Kogod School of Business is among the best business schools in the Washington, D.C. area, and is the school of choice for interdisciplinary business education. ...

  • Constructing a new, larger building for the School of International Service, complete with three levels of underground parking and an environmentally-friendly design that meets LEED's Gold Standard [5](in progress). Excavation of the construction site began late March 2008. (in progress) [6]

[7] The School of International Service (SIS) is American Universitys school of advanced international study in the areas of international security, communications, development, economics, peace & conflict resolution, and American foreign policy. ... 7 World Trade Center, considered New York Citys first green office tower by gaining gold status in the U.S. Green Building Councils LEED program. ...


To Be Announced:

The School of Communication at American University is highly regarded for its faculty, facilities, and high professional standards by The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications [1]. The school offers four majors: communication studies (BA), print/broadcast journalism (BA), public communication (BA), and visual media (BA). ...

Academics

American University Museum at the Katzen Center.
American University Museum at the Katzen Center.

American University enrolls a little more than 1,000 freshmen each year.[13][14] The average class size is 23 and the student-faculty ratio is 14:1. [15] AU is ranked 85th among the top national universities by US News & World Report's college and university rankings guide[16], and is one of the 270 universities that house a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest honor society. Image File history File links Katzengallery. ... Image File history File links Katzengallery. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...


AU was named the most politically active school in the nation in the Princeton Review’s annual survey of college students.[17] In 2006, the Fiske Guide to Colleges ranked AU as a "Best Buy" college for the quality of academic offerings in relation to the cost of attendance. For two years in a row, American University has had more students chosen to receive Presidential Management Fellowships than any other college or university in the country. In spring 2006, 34 graduate and law students were chosen for the honor.[18] - President George W. Bush The Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) program is a two year paid government fellowship sponsored by the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) for recent graduate students who seek a two year fellowship in a U.S. government agency. ...


The Kogod School of Business, the first school of business in Washington, was named by the Wall Street Journal and Business Week magazine as one of the top business schools in the country. "Kogod is positioning itself squarely in the upper echelons of America's finest business schools," according to the Princeton Review.[19] The Wall Street Journal ranked the Kogod School of Business in its 2004 “Top 50 MBA Programs.”[20] "On September 16, 2007 the Wall Street Journal announced their 2007 graduate rankings, and the Kogod School of Business was ranked 36 out of the top 51." [21] The School of International Service (SIS) is recognized as the largest of its kind in the U.S. Among The Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA) schools, AU’s School of International Service has the largest number of minority students and female students and is ranked 6th among APSIA schools in numbers of international students.[18] A review in Foreign Policy Magazine ranked the school 8th in the country for preparing future foreign policy professionals and 25th for academic careers. SIS’s undergraduate programs earned a spot at number 11, and its graduate programs were ranked number 8.[22] Because the field of international relations is not evaluated by U.S. News & World Report, the College of William and Mary recently published the results of their survey, which ranked the AU international relations master’s degree in the top 10 in the United States and the doctoral degree in the top 25.[18] The School of Communication is among the top 25 in the nation, and it graduates the third largest number of communication professionals among U.S. colleges and universities.[18] The School of Public Affairs is ranked among the top 10 programs in the country by U.S. News and World Report. Washington College of Law’s clinical program ranks second in the nation, its international law program is ranked 6th in the nation and the school overall ranks among the top 50 U.S. law schools according to U.S. News and World Report’s America’s Best Colleges.[18] American Universitys Kogod School of Business is among the best business schools in the Washington, D.C. area, and is the school of choice for interdisciplinary business education. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The School of International Service (SIS) is American Universitys school of advanced international study in the areas of international security, communications, development, economics, peace & conflict resolution, and American foreign policy. ... The Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA) is an organization that works to advance internationa understanding, prosperity, peace and security through professional education in international affairs. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... The School of Communication at American University is highly regarded for its faculty, facilities, and high professional standards by The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications [1]. The school offers four majors: communication studies (BA), print/broadcast journalism (BA), public communication (BA), and visual media (BA). ... The School of Public Affairs at American University is among the nations leading public policy schools. ... The American University Washington College of Law (WCL) was founded in 1896 as the culmination of the pioneering efforts of two women, Ellen Spencer Mussey and Emma Gillett, who wished to open the field of law to women. ...

Outside of the Mary Graydon Center.
Outside of the Mary Graydon Center.

AU is especially known for promoting international understanding.[23] This is reflected in the diverse student body who is from more than 150 countries, the university’s course offerings, the faculty's research, and from the regular presence of world leaders on its campus.[23] AU has the 12th largest number of graduates in current Peace Corps service (34), and ranks fourth in the number of Peace Corps volunteers as a percentage of the total undergraduate population. [24] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1451 KB) Summary I took this picture of American Universitys campus on Sept. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1451 KB) Summary I took this picture of American Universitys campus on Sept. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ...


AU has earned a reputation among the best schools in the nation for international relations, government and political science, as well as a hub for arts in Washington, D.C. The school has a long history of partnership with the Washington metropolitan area, beginning with its charter by the U.S. Congress in 1893. The University takes its responsibility to the community very seriously. In 2001, AU's economic impact on the District of Columbia totaled more than $600 million.[23] WAMU, American’s National Public Radio Station, is one of the top 5 NPR stations in the country.[23] "Over 80% of AU undergraduate students and 60% of graduate students complete an internship or other experiential education experience by graduation.... Fifty-seven percent of AU’s undergraduate and 40% of graduate students participate in significant community service in the local community by graduation," according to their website.[23] For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... ... WAMU is a public radio station that services the greater Washington, DC metropolitan area. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ...


Centers, institutes and special programs

  • See also: Washington College of Law Programs & Centers

The American University of Sharjah (AUS) (in Arabic: الجامعة الأميركية في الشارقة) is a coeducational higher educational institution in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, founded in 1997. ... For other universities known as American University, see American University (disambiguation). ... The Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies (CCPS) is an integrated teaching, research, and study program of the School of Public Affairs at American University, focusing on the United States Congress and the presidency and the interactions between them. ... The Center for Social Media (CSM) in the School of Communication at American University examines strategies to use media as creative tools for public knowledge and action. ... The Washington Semester is a semester-long residential program that partners with institutions around the world to bring college students to American University. ... The American University Washington College of Law (WCL) was founded in 1896 as the culmination of the pioneering efforts of two women, Ellen Spencer Mussey and Emma Gillett, who wished to open the field of law to women. ...

Notable American University alumni and staff

Main article: List of American University people This is a sorted list of notable persons who have had ties to the American University in Washington, DC. // A list of notable alumni of AU. Some particularly notable individuals are also listed in the main University article. ...


Academic organization

The university is composed of six divisions, referred to as colleges or schools, which house its academic programs: College of Arts and Sciences (CAS), Kogod School of Business (KSB), School of Communication (SOC), School of International Service (SIS), School of Public Affairs (SPA) and Washington College of Law (WCL). With the exception of WCL, undergraduate and graduate courses are housed within the same division, although organized into different programs. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1053 KB) Summary I took this picture Sept 4th, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1053 KB) Summary I took this picture Sept 4th, 2006. ... The College of Arts and Sciences is the oldest and largest academic unit at American University in terms of student enrollment and faculty lines. ... The College of Arts and Sciences is the oldest and largest academic unit at American University in terms of student enrollment and faculty lines. ... American Universitys Kogod School of Business is among the best business schools in the Washington, D.C. area, and is the school of choice for interdisciplinary business education. ... The School of Communication at American University is highly regarded for its faculty, facilities, and high professional standards by The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications [1]. The school offers four majors: communication studies (BA), print/broadcast journalism (BA), public communication (BA), and visual media (BA). ... The School of International Service (SIS) is American Universitys school of advanced international study in the areas of international security, communications, development, economics, peace & conflict resolution, and American foreign policy. ... The School of Public Affairs at American University is among the nations leading public policy schools. ... The American University Washington College of Law (WCL) was founded in 1896 as the culmination of the pioneering efforts of two women, Ellen Spencer Mussey and Emma Gillett, who wished to open the field of law to women. ...


Students who do not declare into a specific school are sorted into CAS, which combine with its variety of academic programs to make it the largest division, followed by SIS, SPA, WCL, KSB and SOC.


American University is also home to a unique program known as the Washington Semester Program. This program partners with institutions around the world to bring students to AU for a semester. The program operates independently from, but in conjunction with, the other academic units. The program combines two seminar courses on three days a week with a two day per week internship that gives students a unique look at Washington, DC. The program is unique in that the courses are not typical lecture courses; instead, speakers from various sectors of a particular field are invited to address the class, often from different perspectives.[25] The Washington Semester is a semester-long residential program that partners with institutions around the world to bring college students to American University. ...


Library system

American University Library
Location Washington, DC
Established 1926 as Battelle Library
Number of branches 5 (including the main library)
Collection size 1,035,000 books
Annual circulation 268,500
Population served 2,000 per day
Director Bill Mayer
Employees 80 (full-time)
Website http://www.library.american.edu/
The Jack I. and Dorothy G. Bender Library and Learning Resources Center sits at the top of the Eric Friedheim Quadrangle.
The Jack I. and Dorothy G. Bender Library and Learning Resources Center sits at the top of the Eric Friedheim Quadrangle.

The American University Library system consists of the main library and four branches and special collections: the University Archives, Curriculum Materials Center, Media Services, and the Music Library (located in the Katzen Arts Center). It is part of the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC), which includes numerous schools from the region that pool their resources to provide Interlibrary Loan (ILL) for their students respectively. The WRL Consortium also includes The Catholic University of America, Gallaudet University, George Mason University, George Washington University, Georgetown University, Marymount University, and University of the District of Columbia. The Pence Law Library, part of the Washington College of Law, is not part of the main university library system, and it even has a separate catalog. Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1216 KB) Summary I took this picture of the American Universitys Library on Sept. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1216 KB) Summary I took this picture of the American Universitys Library on Sept. ... The Katzen Arts Center is home to all of the visual and performing arts programs at American University. ... The Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC) was founded as a joint initiative of eight members of the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area to coordinate access and increase the scope of resources of each universitys main library. ... The Catholic University of America (abbreviated CUA), located in Washington, D.C., is unique as the national university of the Roman Catholic Church and as the only higher education institution founded by U.S. Roman Catholic bishops. ... It has been suggested that Gallaudet United Now Movement be merged into this article or section. ... George Mason University, also known as GMU or simply Mason, is a public university in the United States. ... The George Washington University (GW), is a private, coeducational university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1821 as The Columbian College in the District of Columbia by Baptist ministers using funds bequeathed by George Washington. ... Georgetown University is a Jesuit private university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. Bishop John Carroll founded the school in 1789, though its roots extend back to 1634. ... Marymount University is a coeducational, four-year Catholic university whose main campus is located in Arlington, Virginia. ... The University of the District of Columbia (also known as UDC) is a public university located in Washington, DC. The university was formed in 1977 through the amalgamation of the Federal City College and Washington Technical Institute - which had both been established in 1966 as the result of a study... The American University Washington College of Law (WCL) was founded in 1896 as the culmination of the pioneering efforts of two women, Ellen Spencer Mussey and Emma Gillett, who wished to open the field of law to women. ...


As of 2006, American University's Library contains over one million volumes, nearly 3,000 print periodicals, over 11,000 films and videos (which is rapidly increasing), well over one million microform materials, nearly 37,000 sound recordings, over 13,000 musical scores, 65 newspaper subscriptions, and 14,500 electronic journals. On average, the library attracts roughly 2,000 patrons each day. It circulates nearly 300,000 materials per year, which is impressive given the size of the university, and almost 50,000 reference questions are asked each year.[26]


Because American University is one of the most wireless campuses in the country (see “Technology” below), students can connect their laptops, PDAs or cell phones to the Internet from anywhere in the library. The library also has iPods loaded with news podcasts, and laptops freely available to be loaned out for library use. AU recently succeeded in digitizing the University Archive’s photographs and print collection.[27]


Campus life

Clubs

AU has more than 180 recognized organizations on campus governed by the American University Club Council and advised by Student Activities. Full Listing of Active Clubs


Much of the social justice work at AU is facilitated through the office of Office of Community Action and Social Justice.


The Kennedy political union has been AU's student-run and student-funded speaker's bureau charged with providing quality political speakers since the 1968-1969 academic year.


Student media

Composed of independent and fee-funded bodies, AU student media covers a number of mediums. Bodies include:

  • The Eagle, twice weekly student newspaper publishing since 1925. Online version 2003 -
  • The Eagle, past issues from 1925-1996.
  • The Talon, yearbook (formerly Aucola)
  • ATV (American Television), closed circuit student programs
  • WVAU, successor of WAMC and WAMU
  • American Literary, bi-semester literary magazine
  • AU Daily Jolt, online community
  • The Public Purpose: An Interdisciplinary Journal. Published annually by the American University School of Public Affairs Graduate Council.
  • Vitruvian Perspectives: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Scholars, published by the College of Arts and Sciences Graduate Student Council
  • Am Word, American University's only student-run online and print news magazine
  • American Observer, online news magazine covering Washington metro and campus activities and federal government

WVAU is the college radio station of American University. ... The Daily Jolt is a network of student-run college websites focused on local campuses. ... The College of Arts and Sciences is the oldest and largest academic unit at American University in terms of student enrollment and faculty lines. ...

Student governments

Students at American University are represented by four governing bodies:

Greek life

List of campus sororities


List of campus fraternities


Criticism

With the expansion of AU's alcohol policy to include violations that occur off campus and other changes, many students have criticized the Judicial Affairs department for being unrealistically strict. Consequences for alcohol and drug violations are far more severe than other DC schools. [28]


Athletics

A member of the Patriot League, AU is home to a wide variety of athletics, including men's and women’s basketball, soccer, cross-country, swimming & diving, track, women's volleyball, field hockey, and lacrosse, along with men's wrestling, not to mention several club sports such as rowing (aucrew.org [8]). Bender Arena, a state-of-the-art multi-purpose facility, hosts many of American’s athletic competitions. Bender Arena officially opened its doors on January 23, 1988, when AU's women's basketball team hosted James Madison University. Located at the center of AU’s main campus, it features several amenities: The American University Eagles are the sports teams for American University. ... The Patriot League is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ... This article is about the sport. ... Soccer redirects here. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Dive. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ... Bender Arena is a 4,500-seat multi-purpose arena in Washington, DC. The arena opened in 1988. ... Bender Arena is a 4,500-seat multi-purpose arena in Washington, DC. The arena opened in 1988. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... JMU redirects here. ...

  • William I Jacobs Fitness Center
  • 25-yard (23 m), eight-lane pool and facilities of Reeves Aquatic Center
  • Six-store mini-mall
  • Campus bookstore
  • 470-car, seven-level parking structure

Reeves Field, home to AU’s soccer team, is one of the premier soccer fields in Washington. Reeves Field earned the 2002 College Soccer Field of the Year by the Sports Turf Managers Association, hosted its fifth NCAA Tournament game, and served as the training site for the Uruguayan National Soccer team. FC Barcelona and Blackburn used Reeves Field as a training facility. In the summer of 2000, AU served as the practice site for Newcastle United, one of England's premier professional soccer clubs. Major League Soccer's D.C. United, Miami Fusion and San Jose Earthquakes have also practiced at AU. National teams from the U.S., Bolivia and Portugal trained at Reeves in 1996 in preparation for Summer Olympic games held at RFK Stadium. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... NCAA redirects here. ... For the Australian soccer club see Newcastle United (Australia). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The Summer Olympic Games are an international multi-sport event held every four years, organised by the International Olympic Committee. ... Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium, informally known as RFK Stadium, is a sports stadium that opened in 1961. ...

The American University

Reeves Field also features a six-lane track to accommodate the track and field programs at AU and functions as a multi-purpose event site. During his term as Vice President, George H. W. Bush regularly traveled in the morning from his home at the U.S. Naval Observatory, located about two miles (3 km) from American University, to run the track at Reeves Field. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,072 × 2,304 pixels, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,072 × 2,304 pixels, file size: 3. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Aerial view of USNO. The United States Naval Observatory (USNO) is one of the oldest scientific agencies in the United States. ...


AU’s nationally ranked field hockey and women’s lacrosse teams play on the field at the Jacobs Recreational Complex, which also features a softball diamond and two outdoor sand volleyball courts. AU's field hockey team earned the right to host the 2005 Patriot League Tournament, where American defeated Lehigh University 7-0 in the semifinals before capturing the league crown for the third straight year by downing Holy Cross 4-2 in the Championship Game. Lehigh University is a private, co-educational university located in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in the Lehigh Valley region of the United States. ... // Holy Cross or Saint Cross may refer to: Christian cross, a frequently used religious symbol of Christianity Feast of the Cross, a commemoration most often celebrated on September 14 Holy Cross may also refer to: A number of Holy Cross Schools A number of Holy Cross Colleges A number of...


American University features seven outdoor tennis courts for the use of the intercollegiate tennis teams as well as the University community. Two outdoor basketball courts complete the outdoor recreational facility located next to Reeves Field and behind Bender Arena. AU has hosted three of the last four tennis team championships since joining the Patriot League, with the men's team winning back-to-back titles on the AU hardcourts and setting Patriot League Championship attendance records each year. The women's team last captured the Patriot League title in 2002. Both tennis teams have since been cut from the athletics program. Bender Arena is a 4,500-seat multi-purpose arena in Washington, DC. The arena opened in 1988. ...


In 2007, AU Junior Josh Glenn won the NCAA Division I National Wrestling Title for 197 lb (89 kg). This was the first time since 1966 that an AU athlete won a national championship.


On March 14, 2008, AU earned its first NCAA Tournament berth by defeating Colgate University in the Patriot League Championship Game. However, AU lost its first-round NCAA tournament game against the University of Tennessee. is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Colgate University is a highly selective, private liberal arts college located in the Village of Hamilton in Madison County, New York, USA. It was founded in 1819 as a Baptist seminary, but has since become non-denominational. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ...


AU abroad

AU offers one of the most comprehensive and renowned study abroad programs in the United States. Open to both AU Students as well as students from other American universities, students can choose to participate in a number of diverse programs around the globe. Utilizing partner institutions as well as AU-operated programs abroad, students can take courses and/or intern in different 100 study abroad programs. Additionally, students may arrange to study at a non-partnered or hosted institution abroad through AU Abroad. Programs are offered by semester, year or summer. More than 850 AU students annually study abroad on programs offered by AU Abroad and other areas within the University.[29] Over 60% of all AU students will have a study abroad experience before they graduate.

  • Academic partnerships :
    • Ecole Supérieure de Journalisme de Paris, France

The Ecole Supérieure de Journalisme - ESJ Paris (in English: Tertiary college of Journalism) is an institution of higher education and French Grande École dedicated to the study of Journalism. ...

Public radio broadcasts

American University also operates a public radio station, WAMU, broadcasting at 88.5 MHz on the FM band. The commercial-free station is affiliated with National Public Radio (NPR) and Public Radio International. The station began broadcasting as the student radio station, but developed into a professionally staffed station when the administration spun off the student radio station. Students may still hold internships. Original programming includes The Diane Rehm Show and The Kojo Nnamdi Show. WAMU is a public radio station that services the greater Washington, DC metropolitan area. ... NPR redirects here. ... Public Radio International (PRI) is a Minneapolis-based American public radio organization, with locations in Boston, New York, and London. ... The Diane Rehm Show is an award-winning National Public Radio call-in show with more than 1. ... Kojo Nnamdi (born Rex Orville Montague Paul in Guyana, on Jan. ...


Technology

AU was included as one of the top 50 "wired campuses" in the United States by a 1997 Yahoo! survey. Since adding a campus-wide advanced wireless broadband network in 2001, AU has been classified as one of the most "unwired" campuses in the U.S. by Intel[30]. Recently, AU has expanded its wireless presence by teaming with T-Mobile to first convert AU into the first HotSpot campus in 2004 and then again in 2005 when the Kogod School of Business became the first business school to integrate RSS data services with BlackBerry devices distributed to all graduate business students. Shortly after implementing RSS services, the university began providing podcasts for on-demand educational multimedia, such as lectures, playable on such programs as iTunes and compatible MP3 players as Apple's iPod. With the release of video-enabled iPods in 2005, many podcasts will now also feature audio and video playback. Yahoo redirects here. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... T-Mobile logo T-Mobile is a multinational mobile phone operator. ... American Universitys Kogod School of Business is among the best business schools in the Washington, D.C. area, and is the school of choice for interdisciplinary business education. ... For RSS feeds from Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Syndication. ... This article is about the fruit. ... A podcast is a series of digital-media files which are distributed over the Internet using syndication feeds for playback on portable media players and computers. ... This article is about the iTunes application. ... For other uses, see MP3 (disambiguation). ... Apple Inc. ... iPod is a brand of portable media players designed and marketed by Apple Inc. ...


In 2005 AU became one of several in the country to provide students in campus housing with access to free and legal downloadable movie and music content via the Ruckus Network and later Napster. Ruckus is a free ad-supported online music service available to students at all American colleges. ... Napster was a file sharing service that paved the way for decentralized P2P file-sharing programs such as Kazaa, Limewire, iMesh, Morpheus, and BearShare, which are now used for many of the same reasons and can download music, pictures, and other files. ...


The University Library also launched a program whereby its Media Services Department is converting films to digital format for exclusive use by faculty in teaching their coursework for streaming media content.


Other facts

  • Ten U.S. presidents have either served on the AU Board of Trustees or spoken on campus.
  • AU’s School of Communication trained the cast and crew of MTV’s Road Rules and The Real World in public speaking.
  • In August 2006, the Princeton Review ranked American University as the most politically active university in the United States.
  • In 2006, The Advocate ranked American University among the nation's top 20 schools for LGBT students.[31]
  • Landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed New York City’s Central Park, laid out AU's grounds.
  • A number of television shows and films have references to AU. The X-FilesAgent Scully found she had an alien virus as a result of research that had been done in AU’s Paleoclimatology Lab in the fall 1997 season premiere. No such laboratory exists at AU.
  • In the film Eulogy, Ray Romano plays an incompetent attorney that sports an American University sweatshirt.
  • During a 2000 episode of The District, it is reported to the Metropolitan Police Chief during an overnight crime briefing that the AU mascot, fictitiously named Otis, is missing.
  • The Fox television series Bones, produced by an AU alum, features many references to American University. The series' recording studio in Hollywood features a full-scale replica of the Ward 2 lecture-hall where lectures are presented by one of the series' main characters who, in the series, is a part-time AU professor.

The School of Communication at American University is highly regarded for its faculty, facilities, and high professional standards by The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications [1]. The school offers four majors: communication studies (BA), print/broadcast journalism (BA), public communication (BA), and visual media (BA). ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Road Rules, MTVs second reality show, debuted on July 19, 1995. ... For the upcoming season, see The Real World: Hollywood. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... The Advocate (ISSN 0001-8996) is a US-based LGBT-related biweekly news magazine. ... The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Landscape architecture. ... {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... The X-Files is an American Peabody, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning science fiction television series created by Chris Carter, which first aired on 10 September 1993, and ended on 19 May 2002. ... Dana Scully Dana Katherine Scully (b. ... Paleoclimatology is the study of climate change taken on the scale of the entire history of the Earth. ... Eulogy is a 2004 comedy film directed by Michael Clancy. ... Raymond Romano (born December 21, 1957 in Queens, New York) is an Emmy Award-winning and Golden Globe-nominated, American actor and comedian best known for his starring role on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond. ... The television crime drama The District aired on CBS from October 7, 2000 to May 1, 2004. ... This article is about the animal. ... Bones is an American drama television series that premiered on the Fox Network on September 13, 2005. ... ...

External links

Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

References

  1. ^ www.american.edu/finance/vpfin/docs/S&PRatings.pdf Retrieved July 20, 2007
  2. ^ College Board American University Profile Retrieved March 19, 2008
  3. ^ "1963 Commencement" June 10, 1963. Retrieved February 5, 2007
  4. ^ NBC Evening News for Sunday, 11 January 1987
  5. ^ "A New AU" Retrieved February 5, 2007
  6. ^ "Why a new AU"Retrieved February 18, 2008
  7. ^ "AU Faculty Members Vote No Confidence in Ladner" Washington Post. September 27, 2005; Page A01
  8. ^ American University (2007). President-Elect Cornelius M. Kerwin biography. Retrieved on 2007-07-20.
  9. ^ Page B10, 16 November 2007
  10. ^ "Presentation to Faculty Senate" March 1, 2006. Retrieved February 5, 2007
  11. ^ "Facilities Projects" Office of the University Architect, American University. Retrieved February 5, 2007
  12. ^ "MGC to be renovated over summer"The Eagle Online. October 26, 2006. Retrieved February 5, 2007
  13. ^ "About the University" Retrieved February 5, 2007
  14. ^ "American University" Yahoo! Education. Retrieved February 5, 2007
  15. ^ "About the University" Retrieved February 5, 2007
  16. ^ "National Universities: Top Schools" US News and World Report. Retrieved February 19, 2008
  17. ^ "AU students named most politically active"American Weekly. Retrieved February 5, 2007
  18. ^ a b c d e AU Presidential Search Description. Retrieved April 2, 2007
  19. ^ "American University"The Princeton Review. Retrieved February 5, 2007
  20. ^ CollegeJournal | Rankings at a Glance
  21. ^ WSJ10: WSJ-WSJ REPORTS-MBA-ADVANCE PAGES <RPTMB05RANKING1> [2EE] ... 09/17/07
  22. ^ http://veracity.univpubs.american.edu/weekly/webnews/030807_sisrank.html "Foreign Policy survey ranks SIS master’s program in top-10." Retrieved April 2, 2007
  23. ^ a b c d e "About the University" Retrieved March 16, 2007
  24. ^ "Campus Update" Memorandum from President Kerwin, February 6, 2006. Retrieved February 5, 2007
  25. ^ "Washington Semester at American University" Retrieved February 5, 2007
  26. ^ "Library Facts: Fall 2006" American University Library. Retrieved February 5, 2007
  27. ^ "About This Collection" American University History: Photograph and Print Collection. Retrieved February 5, 2007
  28. ^ Student Handbook & Planner 2004-2005
  29. ^ "American Facts" Media Relations. Retrieved February 5, 2007
  30. ^ "Unwired Campuses"
  31. ^ "Top Colleges for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans Students" About.com. Retrieved February 5, 2007

  Results from FactBites:
 
American University of Beirut - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1518 words)
In 1900, the University established a school of commerce which was later incorporated into the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
When the hospital (currently the American University Hospital) opened in 1905, a school of nursing was also established.
On November 18, 1920, the Board of Regents of the State University of New York changed the name of the institution from the Syrian Protestant College to the American University of Beirut; other charter amendments expanded the functions of the University.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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