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Encyclopedia > American Pop
American Pop

Theatrical release poster.
Directed by Ralph Bakshi
Produced by Ralph Bakshi
Martin Ransohoff
Written by Ronni Kern
Music by Lee Holdridge
Editing by David Ramirez
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date(s) February 13, 1981
Running time 96 min
Country USA
Language English
Gross revenue $6,000,000
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

American Pop is a 1981 American animated film directed by Ralph Bakshi. The film tells the story of four generations of a Russian Jewish immigrant family of musicians whose careers parallel the history of American popular music. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (497x755, 77 KB) Source: http://www. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... Martin Ransohoff (born 1927 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is a cinema and television producer. ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For the musical term, see American pop. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... The vast territories of the Russian Empire at one time hosted the largest Jewish population in the world. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ... For the music genre, see Pop music. ...


The majority of the film's animation was completed through rotoscoping, a process in which live actors are filmed and the subsequent footage is used for animators to draw over. However, the film also uses a variety of other mixed media including water colors, computer graphics, live action shots, and archival footage. Rotoscoping is an animation technique in which animators trace over live-action film movement, frame by frame, for use in animated films. ...


Though the film performed decently at the box office, it did not perform well enough to cover the enormous licensing costs for the music that was used in the film. Thus, the film was considered to be a flop. It is important to note, however, that it was released during a period when animation was thought to be dead and a significant audience for adult-oriented animation was still a decade away. After Who Framed Roger Rabbit was released in 1988, animation went through a renaissance and American Pop began to be rediscovered. It quickly became a cult classic on VHS and DVD, earning praise for its emotionally powerful story and for its unique use of mixed-media animation. Fail and Phail redirect here. ... Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a 1988 film produced by Amblin Entertainment and The Walt Disney Company (released on its Touchstone Pictures banner), which blends traditional animation and live action. ... A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...

Contents

Plot

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...

1890s-1930s: Zalmie

The film begins in Russia during the late 1890s while under the rule of the Tsars. A rabbi's wife urges her husband, Jaacov, to flee from the Cossacks who are engaging in a pogrom. However, Jaacov refuses because he hasn't finished his prayer. Jaacov's wife and Zalmie escape to America, but Jaacov is killed by the Cossacks. The sequence is set to Aneinu, a traditional Jewish prayer, and is presented in a similar manner as a silent film, as the dialogue appears in intertitles. Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... Tsar (Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian цар, Russian  , in scientific transliteration respectively car and car ), occasionally spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English, is a Slavonic term designating certain monarchs. ... For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... For other uses, see Cossack (disambiguation). ... Pogrom (from Russian: ; from громить IPA: - to wreak havoc, to demolish violently) is a form of riot directed against a particular group, whether ethnic, religious or other, and characterized by destruction of their homes, businesses and religious centres. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Aneinu, also transliterated as Aneynu or Anainu (Hebrew for answer us) is a Jewish prayer of atonement, asking God to forgive and protect his followers. ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... In motion pictures, an intertitle is a piece of filmed, printed text edited into the midst of (i. ...


Shortly after their arrival in New York City, Zalmie becomes fascinated with the music coming from a local burlesque house. He gets recruited by Louie, an infrequent performer, to hand out chorus slips to the audiences of various nearby clubs throughout the night in a montage set to "Maple Leaf Rag". At the end of the night, Louie reluctantly pays Zalmie for his work. Zalmie uses the money to buy two bananas from a street merchant before running home to his worried mother. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Burlesque (disambiguation). ... Look up montage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Second edition cover of Maple Leaf Rag, perhaps the most famous rag of all The Maple Leaf Rag (1897) is an early Ragtime composition for piano by Scott Joplin. ...


As Zalmie grows into adolescence, he spends more time with Louie backstage at burlesque shows. When Zalmie's mother dies in a sweatshop blaze (possibly the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire), he begins working with Louie fulltime at a small theatre. Though Zalmie aspires to be a singer, he is beginning to enter puberty and his changing voice becomes a significant obstacle. His immature voice remains unchanged even as he nears adulthood. When World War I strikes, Zalmie travels the globe performing for the troops, but not as a singer – he plays the bottom half of a costumed horse with Louie. At age seventeen, during a performance, the onlooking American soldiers are briefly attacked by a small group of biplane fighters and in the ensuing battle, Zalmie sustains a wound to his throat, effectively ending his dream as a singer. For other uses, see Sweatshop (disambiguation). ... The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City on March 25, 1911, was the largest industrial disaster in the history of the city of New York, causing the death of 148 garment workers who either died from the fire or jumped to their deaths. ... Puberty refers to the process of physical changes by which a childs body becomes an adult body capable of reproduction. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Reproduction of a Sopwith Camel biplane flown by Lt. ...


When Zalmie returns to New York, he briefly continues performing as a clown, although his comedic talents are largely unimpressive. He falls in love with a stripper named Bella and vows to make her a famous singer. In order to get her started in showbusiness, however, Zalmie becomes involved with the mob during prohibition. After Zalmie gets Bella pregnant with their first child, Benny, he uses money from mob boss Nicky Palumbo to pay for their wedding. Clowning redirects here. ... For other uses, see Striptease (disambiguation). ... Detroit police inspecting equipment found in a clandestine underground brewery during the prohibition era. ...


As Bella begins achieving modest success, Zalmie becomes more deeply involved in the mafia. At one of Bella's performances at a high class ballroom, two gangsters arrive and a violent shootout occurs in front of a young Benny. Tensions in the mafia world increase, as seen by way of a montage featuring "Sweet Georgia Brown". Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... Sweet Georgia Brown is the theme of the Harlem Globetrotters. ...


1930s-1950s: Benny

One night during a game of poker at the Belinksy residence, Bella receives a package at the door that is meant for Zalmie. Thinking it's a box of pretzels, a bomb from within the package ignites, killing Bella. Benny, who is already an introverted child, focuses all of his efforts into becoming a talented jazz pianist. A transition from childhood to adulthood is accompanied again by "Sweet Georgia Brown", this time performed by Benny at a nightclub with a rehearsing jazz band. For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ...


Zalmie, noticing Benny's talent, encourages him to record a record for RCA Victor and pursue fame, but Benny seems content performing in nightclubs. Benny does, however, get married to Nicky Palumbo's daughter at Zalmie's request. After she becomes pregnant, Benny enlists to fight in World War II seeking redemption for his family, despite pleas from his father. Scenes from the bloody war are intercut with various couples swing dancing to "Sing, Sing, Sing". The montage ends with a burlesque dancer moving exotically to the song as tassels swing with her bare breasts. Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Swing Dancing The term swing dance is commonly used to refer either to a group of dances developing in response to swing music in the 1920s, 30s and 40s, or to lindy hop, a popular partner dance today. ... Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing) is a 1936 song written by Louis Prima that has become one of the definitive songs of the big band and Swing Era. ... Pasties (sing. ...


On the battlefield, Benny poorly plays "As Time Goes By" on a harmonica in a trench much to the irritation of his war buddies. In Germany, Benny finds a piano in an abandoned house, and sets down his gun to play it. As he plays "As Time Goes By" on the piano, an injured German soldier sneaks up on him from behind. Benny hears the German accidentally kick a chair to the side, turns around and sees him. As the German struggles to hold his BAR(an American weapon), Benny plays a short segment from "Lili Marleen". The German sways happily until Benny stops abruptly. The German says "danke" to Benny, cocks his gun, and kills Benny, who collapses onto the piano. As Time Goes By is a song written by Herman Hupfeld for the 1931 Broadway musical Everybodys Welcome. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Lili Marleen is a famous German love song which became very popular on both sides during World War II. A Lili Marleen and Lale Andersen memorial in Langeoog The words were written in 1915 during World War I by Hans Leip (1893-1983), a school teacher from Hamburg who had...


The focus of the film is shifted to Long Island, where Benny's wife and son are now living. Nicky Palumbo has forced Benny's wife to remarry, though she chooses to marry outside of "the business" (she instead marries a refrigerator salesman). Zalmie, who has since been committed to the Jacksonville State Prison for eight years, appears on television in a trial concerning the mob. Nicky Palumbo, two gangsters, Louie and Benny's young son, Tony, watch the trial on television. Nicky Palumbo is shocked when Zalmie testifies against him. Zalmie remarks, "This country has been good to me in its way. 'I took,' my son said. So... now it's time to give back." While the gangsters argue angrily that they should have murdered Zalmie when they had the chance, Louie watches unaffected. One man yells "I can't believe that schmuck is going to sing!" Louie replies calmly, "Sing? Sure. That's all he ever wanted." This article is about the island in New York State. ... Fridge redirects here. ...

Long Island cityscape.

Image File history File links American_Pop_cityscape. ... Image File history File links American_Pop_cityscape. ...

1950s-1980s: Tony

The decade is now established as the 1950s through an audio montage of sound clips including an excerpts from a speech by Harry S. Truman ("We are fighting for time. The young men in Korea and Japan are fighting for time--for us.")[1] and from Lucille Ball in an episode of I Love Lucy ("Ethel, how could you ever think up a sneaky scheme like that?"). At night, in a beat café, a poet gives an energetic reciting of Allen Ginsberg's Howl. Tony, now a young adult, watches the performance intently. He then rides the subway home (as "Take Five" by The Dave Brubeck Quartet is heard). When Tony returns home, he finds his three younger siblings (two sisters and a brother) sitting on a couch, watching television. They hardly acknowledge his presence. Upon questioning what the children are watching, they tell Tony their mother has instructed them to ignore him, and that he's "going through a phase". When Tony explodes, cursing at them, one of the girls threatens to call their mother. Tony then remarks that their mother wouldn't hear him yelling while she's "shut up in that room listening to that goddamn record"; a recording made by Benny. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Lucille Désirée Ball (August 6, 1911 – April 26, 1989) was an iconic American comedienne, film, television, stage and radio actress, glamour girl and star of the landmark sitcoms I Love Lucy, The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, The Lucy Show and Heres Lucy. ... I Love Lucy is a popular American situation comedy, starring Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance and William Frawley. ... Beats redirects here. ... Sappho and Alcaeus of Mytilene, by Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1881). ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... Howl and Other Poems was published in the fall of 1956 as number four in the Pocket Poets Series from City Lights Books This article is about the poem by Allen Ginsberg. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about Dave Brubeck Quartet jazz piece. ... Dave Brubeck formed The Dave Brubeck Quartet in 1951, which consisted of Joe Dodge on drums, Bob Bates on bass, Paul Desmond on saxophone, and of course Brubeck on piano. ...


Tony shuts himself in his room, pacing angrily. On his dresser is a framed photograph of Benny along with his harmonica. Tony spontaneously decides to leave town, taking with him only the harmonica and some money he has stashed in a Playboy magazine. He steals his stepfather's car and drives across the country for four weeks, picking up a variety of hitchhikers along the way. He ends up in Kansas, abandoning the car by the side of the road. He wanders to a diner, staring at a blonde, blue-eyed waitress. Immediately taken with her, Tony spends the day washing dishes at the diner until the girl gets off from work. The two spend the night together in a corn field and Tony leaves the next day for California, train hopping with a group of hobos who perform "This Train". A chest of drawers is a piece of furniture with many parallel, horizontal drawers; traditionally used to store clothing. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Look up diner in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A hobo was a member of a distinctive sub-culture of homeless, travelling workers in the United States during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. ...


In California, Tony takes another job dishwashing, but soon grows tired of the job and quits. He tells his employer he's interested in pursuing a career in music, but his boss reminds him that he can't sing and he can barely play the guitar. Undeterred, he roams the streets at night playing "California Dreamin'" on the harmonica until a six-piece rock group invites him to write songs for them. Among the songs Tony writes for them are "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right" and "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" (both actually composed by Bob Dylan). Both songs are performed with lead vocals by Frankie Hart, the self-destructive female lead singer (who is a fictionalized amalgamation of Grace Slick and Janis Joplin[citation needed]). The band becomes successful but slowly starts to decompose because of drug addictions. At a concert during the 1960s, the band plays "Somebody to Love" (actually performed by Jefferson Airplane). During the concert's animation sequence, the band's performance is inter-cut with live action stock footage and photos of various important events of the decade (including the Vietnam war, various riots, and the Kent State shootings). Before the song ends, Tony is given punch spiked with LSD. He staggers to the stage, hallucinating, and then falls off. Dont Think Twice, Its All Right is a song written by Bob Dylan in 1962, and released on the 1963 album The Freewheelin Bob Dylan. ... A Hard Rains a-Gonna Fall is a song written by Bob Dylan in 1962 in Chip Moncks apartment in the basement of the Village Gate (now The Village Theater) on the corner of Bleecker and Thompson Streets in Greenwich Village. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Grace Slick (born Grace Barnett Wing on October 30, 1939) is an American singer and songwriter, who was one of the lead singers of the rock groups The Great Society, Jefferson Airplane, Jefferson Starship, Starship, and was a solo artist, for nearly three decades, from the mid-1960s to the... Janis Lyn Joplin (19 January 1943 – 4 October 1970) was an American singer, songwriter, and music arranger, from Port Arthur, Texas. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... Somebody to Love is a well-known rock song by 1960s folk-psychedelic band The Great Society. ... Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the psychedelic rock movement. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... The Kent State shootings, also known as the May 4 massacre or Kent State massacre,[2][3][4] occurred at Kent State University in the city of Kent, Ohio, and involved the shooting of students by members of the Ohio National Guard on Monday, May 4, 1970. ... For the Swedish liquor, see Punsch. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ...


In the next scene Tony is in the hospital in a body cast. The band visits him, Frankie excited that Cash Box and Billboard have broke news that their new album is number one on the charts. Given a $5000 advance on their next album, Frankie buys Tony an electric typewriter. He unenthusiastically accepts the gift. Cash Box magazine was a weekly publication devoted to the music and coin-operated machine industry. ... It has been suggested that Billboard be merged into this article or section. ... // A record chart, also known as a music chart, is a method of ranking music according to popularity during a given period of time. ... Mechanical desktop typewriters, such as this Underwood Five, were long time standards of government agencies, newsrooms, and sales offices. ...


Out of the hospital, Tony is seen living alone in a state of disrepair, using a cane to walk. Through a desperate phone call for heroin, it is revealed that the band has left Tony behind and is continuing to achieve success without him, their new album having just gone gold. While The Doors' "People Are Strange" plays, Tony reads that Frankie and the band's drummer, Johnny Webb, have married. For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... “Golden record” redirects here. ... The Doors were an American rock band formed in 1965 in Los Angeles by vocalist Jim Morrison, keyboardist Ray Manzarek, drummer John Densmore, and guitarist Robby Krieger. ... For the album with the same name see People Are Strange (album) People Are Strange is a song by The Doors, released on their second album Strange Days. ...


Tony visits the band at their recording studio, trying to finish up "Up, Up and Away" (originally by The Fifth Dimension). Frankie's behavior is becoming more erratic as she drinks heavily in the studio. Tony learns that Frankie and Johnny's marriage only lasted two weeks and Frankie has missed Tony's songwriting. The two have an affair and are seen using heroin together in transition to a concert scene featuring Jimi Hendrix performing "Purple Haze" at an arena in Kansas. Frankie's band begins complaining backstage that Hendrix is opening the concert ("we're going to look like shit after him!") but their manager reassures them that they're performing last because they're the bigger stars. Frankie begins coughing, obviously in a poor state of health. Concerned, the band's manager asks Frankie to take care. Frankie states that she takes good care of the manager, the record companies and "every connection from here to the coast". The manager clarifies that he wants Frankie to take good care of herself, to which she replies "Who?" The Fifth Dimension The Fifth Dimension (also known as The 5th Dimension) is an American popular music vocal group, whose repertoire also includes R&B, soul, and jazz. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... For other meanings of Purple Haze, see Purple Haze (disambiguation). ...


Tony, high on drugs, realizes where he is and spots a blonde, blue-eyed boy who identifies himself as Little Pete. The boy reminds Tony of the blonde-haired waittress he slept with in Kansas. Tony walks outside into a corn field and has a breakdown while remembering the waittress, underscored by "Summertime" as performed by Big Brother and the Holding Company. Summertime is the name of an aria composed by George Gershwin for the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess. ... Big Brother and the Holding Company is an American rock band that formed in San Francisco in 1965 as part of the psychedelic music scene that also produced the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane. ...


Soon after the concert, Frankie is seen carried out of a motel on a gourney, dead.


1980s: Pete

"It was old fashion optical work. You can change colors on the negative. You start with high contrast black and white of the live footage and optical houses can change color per frame. It's a basic optical effect. Then you overlap and print it with the original neg so you have like a double negative print. The shape you lost, you get back. It's a technical thing I knew about in my old days of film."
- Ralph Bakshi[2]

Tony and Pete move to New York City, living in a room at the Hotel Chelsea, barely making rent. Tony, who is almost no longer able to function on his own, is looked after by Pete. One afternoon, Pete brings home a box of cornflakes for the two to eat and Tony reacts negatively, telling Pete he hates them. Pete encourages Tony to finish his songs so he can get paid, but Tony angrily tells Pete he doesn't need any money ("All I need is love.") Image File history File links American_Pop_blue_suede_shoes. ... Image File history File links American_Pop_blue_suede_shoes. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Hotel Chelsea is a well-known residence for artists, musicians, and writers in the neighborhood of Chelsea in Manhattan, New York City. ... Corn flakes are a food made by combining cooked corn along with sugar and vitamins. ...


The two are soon forced to live out on the street as Tony resorts to peddling drugs. Meanwhile, Pete begins to adapt to street life, as seen in a montage featuring a live version of "I'm Waiting for the Man" as performed by Lou Reed. Pete makes a small amount of money playing the acoustic guitar, but Tony uses it to buy more drugs. Tony takes any money that Pete earns. Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational purposes rather than for work, medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. ... Im Waiting for the Man is a song by the American rock band The Velvet Underground, written by Lou Reed. ... Lou Reed, born Lewis Allen Reed[1] March 2, 1942, is an American rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. ...


Lying on a park bench, Tony comes to realize that Pete has stayed with him because he considers Tony his father. Tony gives Benny's harmonica to Pete, then takes Pete's guitar to pawn it, telling Pete to wait on the bench. Pete waits on the bench all day and night, playing "As Time Goes By". The next morning, a man approaches Pete and gives him a small package and a card from an unidentified person whose instructions are "not to sell it all in one place". Pete asks if this person said anything else, and the man remembers to tell Pete "'goodbye'".


Years later, an adult Pete is seen sitting on the same park bench. The song "Hell is for Children", performed by Pat Benatar plays as Pete hands out small, white packages of cocaine to street hustlers. Passing a synagogue, Pete hears a rabbi completing the prayer that his great-great grandfather Jaacov started nearly a century ago. Returning home Pete drops his new shipment of cocaine into the top of a piano, and begins playing it with skill. The next night, in a surreal montage, Pete deals more cocaine to various punks at a nightclub until he arrives at a high tech recording studio where a band is recording an album. Pete refuses to sell the band members any more cocaine unless they are willing to listen to his music. They agree to listen to one song and Pete performs his song "Night Moves" (actually written and performed by Bob Seger). His talent stuns both the band and the management and they agree to record and hire him on the spot. Pat Benatar (born Patricia Mae Andrzejewski on 10 January 1953) is an influential, four-time Grammy Award-winning US rock singer who has recorded several million- and multimillion-selling albums and singles. ... For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ... The synagogue Scolanova Trani in Italy. ... The punk subculture is a subculture that is based around punk rock. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Robert Clark Seger (born May 5, 1945) is a Rock and Roll singer, songwriter, and musician from Michigan. ...


The final sequence of the film shows Pete, harmonica in hand, appearing in a concert sequence performing a medley of "Blue Suede Shoes", "Devil with a Blue Dress On" and "Crazy on You" as a famous pop star at a sold-out stadium. The sequence not only features rotoscoped animation, but inverted live-action footage with an optical effect. Blue Suede Shoes is a rock and roll standard written and first recorded by Carl Perkins in 1955. ... Rotoscoping is a technique where animators trace live action movement, frame by frame, for use in animated films. ...


The ending credits are set to Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Free Bird". Lynyrd Skynyrd (pronounced lĕh-nérd skin-nérd) (pronounced ) is an iconic U.S. Southern rock band. ... This article is about the song. ...


Trivia

  • Director Ralph Bakshi makes a cameo in the film, providing the voice of a pianist telling Bella that her song "is going to be a big hit."
  • Bob Seger recorded a unique version of "Night Moves" for the film, but it was never released on any album, including the soundtrack album to American Pop. The version is notable for integral use of piano (rather than guitar, as was used in the original recording).

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing) is a 1936 song written by Louis Prima that has become one of the definitive songs of the big band and Swing Era. ... The Nicholas Brothers were a famous American tap dance pair of brothers. ... Stormy Weather is the title of an American musical motion picture produced and released by 20th Century Fox in 1943. ... Summertime is the name of an aria composed by George Gershwin for the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess. ... Big Brother and the Holding Company is an American rock band that formed in San Francisco in 1965 as part of the psychedelic music scene that also produced the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane. ... Cheap Thrills is the second album from Big Brother and the Holding Company and their only studio album with Janis Joplin as primary lead vocalist. ... Robert Dennis Crumb (born August 30, 1943), often credited simply as R. Crumb, is an American artist and illustrator recognized for the distinctive style of his drawings and his critical, satirical, subversive view of the American mainstream. ... Robert Crumbs Fritz the Cat. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... Robert Clark Seger (born May 5, 1945) is a Rock and Roll singer, songwriter, and musician from Michigan. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Frankie and Johnny (also called Frankie and Albert) is a bluegrass murder ballad. ...

Soundtrack

Further information: American Pop (soundtrack)

Nearly fifty popular compositions are featured in the film. Many are performed by their original artists while some have been arranged specifically for the film. They include:

A Hard Rains a-Gonna Fall is a song written by Bob Dylan in 1962 in Chip Moncks apartment in the basement of the Village Gate (now The Village Theater) on the corner of Bleecker and Thompson Streets in Greenwich Village. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Peru, Indiana. ... As Time Goes By is a song written by Herman Hupfeld for the 1931 Broadway musical Everybodys Welcome. ... Herman Hupfeld (February 1, 1894- June 8, 1951) was an American songwriter. ... Helen Morgan was an born 2 August 1900 in rural Danville, Illinois. ... Blue Suede Shoes is a rock and roll standard written and first recorded by Carl Perkins in 1955. ... For other persons named Carl Perkins, see Carl Perkins (disambiguation). ... There are a number of things named Body and Soul: Body and Soul (song), a popular song written in 1930 by Edward Heyman, Robert Sour, Frank Eyton and Johnny Green. ... California Dreamin is a song by The Mamas & the Papas, first released in 1965. ... The Mamas & the Papas (credited as The Mamas and the Papas on the debut album cover) were a leading vocal group of the 1960s. ... Herbert Jeffrey Hancock (born April 12, 1940) is an Academy Award and multiple Grammy Award-winning jazz pianist and composer from Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Hancock is one of jazz musics most important and influential pianists and composers. ... Cecil Mack (1883 - 1944), born Richard McPherson, American composer, lyricist and music publisher. ... Jimmy Johnson may refer to: Jimmy Johnson (musician), guitarist, producer Jimmy Johnson (American football) (1938- ), American football player Jimmy Johnson (American football coach) (1943- ), American football coach Jimmie Johnson (1975- ), NASCAR race driver Jimmy Johnson (bassist) Jimmy Johnson (cartoonist) Jimmie Johnson (American football) (1968- ), American football player James A. Johnson... Bob Dylan Dont Think Twice Its All Right lyrics It aint no use to sit and wonder why, babe It dont matter, anyhow And it aint no use to sit and wonder why, babe If you dont know by now When your rooster crows... This article is about the recording artist. ... This article is about the song. ... Lynyrd Skynyrd (pronounced lĕh-nérd skin-nérd) (pronounced ) is an iconic U.S. Southern rock band. ... George Michael Cohan (July 3, 1878 – November 5, 1942) was a United States entertainer, playwright, composer, lyricist, actor, singer, dancer, director, and producer of Irish descent. ... Pat Benatar (born Patricia Mae Andrzejewski on 10 January 1953) is an influential, four-time Grammy Award-winning US rock singer who has recorded several million- and multimillion-selling albums and singles. ... Im Waiting for the Man is a song by the American rock band The Velvet Underground, written by Lou Reed. ... Lou Reed, born Lewis Allen Reed[1] March 2, 1942, is an American rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... Scott Joplin Scott Joplin (born between June 1867 and January 1868,[1] died April 1, 1917) was an American musician and composer of ragtime music. ... Robert Henry Bobby Timmons (Born: December 19, 1935 in Philadelphia _ Died: March 1, 1974 in New York City) was an American jazz pianist and composer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mona Lisa is an Academy Award-winning song written by Ray Evans and Jay Livingston for the film . ... Jimmy Van Heusen (January 26, 1913 - February 7, 1990), was an American composer. ... Phil Silvers (May 11, 1911 – November 1, 1985) was an American entertainer and comedy actor. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Robert Clark Seger (born May 5, 1945) is a Rock and Roll singer, songwriter, and musician from Michigan. ... Onward, Christian Soldiers is a 19th century English hymn. ... The Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould (28 January 1834 – 2 January 1924) was an English Victorian hagiographer, antiquarian, novelist and eclectic scholar. ... Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (May 13, 1842 – November 22, 1900) was an English composer best known for his operatic collaborations with librettist W. S. Gilbert. ... George Michael Cohan (July 3, 1878 – November 5, 1942) was a United States entertainer, playwright, composer, lyricist, actor, singer, dancer, director, and producer of Irish descent. ... Scott Joplin Scott Joplin (born between June 1867 and January 1868,[1] died April 1, 1917) was an American musician and composer of ragtime music. ... For the album with the same name see People Are Strange (album) People Are Strange is a song by The Doors, released on their second album Strange Days. ... The Doors were an American rock band formed in 1965 in Los Angeles by vocalist Jim Morrison, keyboardist Ray Manzarek, drummer John Densmore, and guitarist Robby Krieger. ... Pretty Vacant was the third single released by punk band the Sex Pistols. ... For other meanings of Purple Haze, see Purple Haze (disambiguation). ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Say Si Si is a popular song. ... Louis Prima (December 7, 1910 – August 24, 1978) was an American entertainer, singer, actor, songwriter, and trumpeter. ... Gershwin redirects here. ... Grace Slick (born Grace Barnett Wing on October 30, 1939) is an American singer and songwriter, who was one of the lead singers of the rock groups The Great Society, Jefferson Airplane, Jefferson Starship, Starship, and was a solo artist, for nearly three decades, from the mid-1960s to the... Summertime is the name of an aria composed by George Gershwin for the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess. ... Gershwin redirects here. ... Ira Gershwin (6 December 1896 – 17 August 1983) was an American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, composer George Gershwin, to create some of the most memorable songs of the 20th century. ... Janis Joplin on the cover of her posthumously-released live album In Concert Janis Lyn Joplin (January 19, 1943 - October 4, 1970) was an American blues-influenced rock and soul singer and occasional songwriter with a distinctive voice. ... This article is about Dave Brubeck Quartet jazz piece. ... Dave Brubeck (born December 6, 1920 in Concord, California) is an American jazz pianist who wrote a number of jazz standards, including In Your Own Sweet Way and The Duke. ... Peter, Paul and Mary (often PP&M) was one of the most successful folk-singing groups of the 1960s. ... Fabian on Hollywood Squares, 1979 Fabiano Anthony Forte, who performed as Fabian, (born February 6, 1943 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was an American teen idol of the late 1950s and early 1960s. ... For other persons named James Webb, see James Webb (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Cast and crew

Cast

Frank Dekova Italian actor (born March 17,1910) once taught languages as a school teacher in New York. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Richard Moll (born January 13, 1943) is an American actor. ... Actress Lisa Jane Persky was born May 5, 1960 in Atlanta, Georgia, and grew up in New Yorks Greenwich Village. ... Elsa Raven (December 27, 1935) is a Sweden actress, and starred for two years (1988-1990) on the American sitcom, Amen. ... Vincent Schiavelli and his then wife Allyce Beasley (September 20, 1987) Photo by Alan Light Vincent Andrew Schiavelli (November 10, 1948 – December 26, 2005) was an American character actor noted for his work in film and television. ... Leonard Stone (born 3 November 1923) is an American actor most recognized for playing the father of Violet Beauregarde in the 1971 movie Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. ... Ron Thompson (born 20 November 1966) is an American politician from the state of West Virginia. ... Lynda Wiesmeier (born May 30, 1963 in Washington, DC) is an American model and actress. ...

Crew

Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... Martin Ransohoff (born 1927 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is a cinema and television producer. ...

References

  1. ^ Harry S. Truman: Remarks at the Armed Forces Day Dinner, May 18th, 1951 at The American Presidency Project
  2. ^ As quoted on the official Bakshi forum

External links


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