FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > American Philosophical Society

The American Philosophical Society is a discussion group founded as the Junto in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin. Through research grants, published journals, the upkeep of an extensive library, and regular meetings, the society continues to advance careful study in a wide variety of disciplines in the humanities and the sciences. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Benjamin Franklin by Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1777 Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most prominent of the Founders and early political figures, inventor, and a statesmen of the United States. ... The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... Science in the broadest sense refers to any knowledge or trained skill, especially (but not exclusively) when this is attained by verifiable means. ...

Contents


History of the Society

From the beginning, the Society attracted some of America's finest minds. Early members included George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Paine, David Rittenhouse, and John Marshall. The Society also drew philosophers from other nations as members, including Alexander von Humboldt, the Marquis de Lafayette, Baron von Steuben, and Tadeusz KoĹ›ciuszko. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the Commander in Chief of American forces in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and, later, the first President of the United States, an office he held from 1789 to 1797. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was the first (1789–1797) Vice President of the United States, and the second President of the United States, whose term lasted from 1797 to 1801. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and an influential Founding Father of the United States. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 – July 12, 1804) was an American politician, statesman, financier, intellectual, and founder of the Federalist Party. ... Thomas Paine Thomas Paine (January 29, 1737 – June 8, 1809), intellectual, scholar, revolutionary, deist and idealist. ... David Rittenhouse. ... John Marshall (September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was an American statesman and jurist who greatly influenced American constitutional law. ... Friedrich Heinrich Alexander, Baron von Humboldt, (September 14, 1769, Berlin–May 6, 1859, Berlin), was a German naturalist and explorer, and the younger brother of the Prussian minister, philosopher, and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt. ... Marie-Joseph-Paul-Roch-Yves-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (September 6, 1757 – May 20, 1834), was a French aristocrat most famous for his participation in the American Revolutionary War and early French Revolution. ... Baron von Steuben Friedrich Wilhelm Augustus Steuben, Baron von Steuben (November 15, 1730-November 28, 1794) was a German army officer who served with George Washington in the American Revolutionary War and is credited with teaching American troops the essentials of military drill and discipline. ... Tadeusz KoÅ›ciuszko Andrzej Tadeusz Bonawentura KoÅ›ciuszko ((?); 1746 – 1817) was Polish national hero, general and a leader of that nations uprising (which bears his namesake) against the Russian Empire in 1794. ...


After the end of the American Revolution, the Society looked for leadership to Francis Hopkinson, one of the signatories of the Declaration of Independence. Under his influence, the Society received land from the government of Pennsylvania, along with a plot of land in Philadelphia where Philosophical Hall now stands. The American Revolution was an upheaval that ended British control of middle North America, resulting ultimately in the formation of the United States of America. ... The word leadership can refer to: the process of leading the concept of leading those entities that perform one or more acts of leading. ... Francis Hopkinson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A declaration of independence is a proclamation of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 160 miles (255 km)  - Length 280 miles (455 km)  - % water 2. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates , Government Country  State   County United States  Pennsylvania   Philadelphia Founded Incorporated October 27, 1682 October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 369. ...


Illustrious names have continually added themselves to the APS's membership roster, showing the breadth and depth of the society's reach. People from such diverse interests and backgrounds as Charles Darwin, Robert Frost, Louis Pasteur, Elizabeth Cady Agassiz, John James Audubon, Linus Pauling, Margaret Mead, and Thomas Edison became members of the Society. The Society continues to attract names of high renown today, with a current membership list (as of the April 2005 elections) of 920 members. There are 772 Resident members (citizens or residents of the United States) and 148 Foreign members representing more than two dozen countries. In his lifetime, Charles Darwin gained international fame as an influential scientist examining controversial topics. ... Portrait of Frost c. ... Louis Pasteur (December 27, 1822 – September 28, 1895) was a French microbiologist and chemist. ... John James Audubon John James Audubon (April 26, 1785 – January 27, 1851) was a Franco-American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter. ... Linus Carl Pauling (February 28, 1901 – August 19, 1994) was an American theoretical chemist, molecular biologist, and biochemist, widely regarded as the premier chemist of the twentieth century. ... Margaret Mead Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901 – November 15, 1978) was an American cultural anthropologist. ... Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman who developed many devices which greatly influenced life in the 20th century. ...


By 1746 the American Philosophical Society had lapsed into inactivity. In 1769, however, the Society was revived and united with the American Society for Promoting Useful Knowledge to form the "American Philosophical Society, held at Philadelphia, for Promoting Useful Knowledge." // Events Catharine de Ricci (born 1522) canonized. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Society Awards

In 1786, the Society established the Magellanic Premium, a prize for achievement in "navigation, astronomy, or natural philosophy", the oldest scientific prize awarded by an American institution, which it still awards. Other awards include the Barzun prize for cultural history, the Franklin medal, the Lashley award for neurobiology, the Lewis award, and the Jefferson medal for distinguished achievement in the arts, humanities, or social sciences. The Magellanic Premium also known as the Magellanic Gold Medal and Magellanic Prize was established in 1786 through a grant by the grandson of Ferdinand Magellan Jean-Hyacynthe Magellan. ... Radio telescopes are among many different tools used by astronomers Astronomy (Greek: αστρονομία = άστρον + νόμος, astronomia = astron + nomos, literally, law of the stars) is the science of celestial objects and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere, such as stars, planets, comets, auroras, galaxies, and the cosmic background radiation. ... Jacques Martin Barzun (born November 30, 1907 - 2005) continues to be a leading voice in the fields of literature, education, and cultural history. ... Neurobiology is a branch of biology that is involved in the study of nervous systems of all animals from a biological and evolutionary perspective. ...


Society Publications

The APS has published the Transactions of the American Philosophical Society since 1771. Currently five issues appear each year. The Proceedings have appeared since 1838: they publish the papers delivered at the biannual meetings of the Society. The Society has also published the collected papers of Benjamin Franklin, Joseph Henry, William Penn, and Lewis and Clark. Benjamin Franklin by Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1777 Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most prominent of the Founders and early political figures, inventor, and a statesmen of the United States. ... Joseph Henry Joseph Henry (December 17, 1797 – May 13, 1878) was an American scientist. ... William Penn William Penn (October 14, 1644–July 30, 1718) founded the Province of Pennsylvania, the British North American colony that became the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... The Lewis and Clark expedition (1804-1806) was the first American overland expedition to the Pacific coast and back. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
American Philosophical Society - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (370 words)
Through research grants, published journals, the upkeep of an extensive library, and regular meetings, the Society continues to advance careful study in a wide variety of disciplines (in the humanities and the sciences).
Under his influence, the Society received land from the government of Pennsylvania, along with a plot of land in Philadelphia where Philosophical Hall now stands.
In 1786, the Society established the Magellanic Premium, a prize for achievement in "navigation, astronomy, or natural philosophy", the oldest scientific prize awarded by an American institution, which it still awards.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m