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Encyclopedia > American Old West
The cowboy, the quintessential symbol of the American Old West, circa 1887.
The cowboy, the quintessential symbol of the American Old West, circa 1887.

The American Old West comprises the history, myths, legends, stories, beliefs and cultural meanings that collected around the Western United States in the 19th century. Most often the term refers to the late 19th century, between the American Civil War and the 1890 closing of the frontier. Terms Old West and Wild West refer to life beyond the settled frontier. While this terminology could logically place the setting as far back as the American colonial period, it is usually meant to signify the area from the "Frontier Strip" (i.e., the six U.S. states from North Dakota south to Texas) west to the Pacific Ocean. Sometimes the tier of states just east of the Frontier strip (Minnesota to Louisiana) are also seen as the "Wild West" because of their stance as gateways. Cowboy circa 1887 Free Public Domain Image from http://www. ... Cowboy circa 1887 Free Public Domain Image from http://www. ... For other uses, see Cowboy (disambiguation). ... Wild West is the name of an album by country musician Dottie West, released in 1981. ... As defined by the Census Bureau, the western United States includes 13 states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington lincoln, and Wyoming. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... A frontier is a political and geographical term referring to areas near or beyond a boundary, or of a different nature. ... Frontier Strip refers to the American six states from North Dakota south to Texas. ...


As the setting for numerous works of fiction, the period and region quickly became so popular that it now defines its own genre, the "Western." For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... For the magazine, see Genre (magazine). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Historical revisionism has noted that certain interests (notably cowboys, Indians, businessmen, and the United States government) repeatedly clashed in these conflicts, and a few accounts refer to them as a "western civil war of incorporation" that established United States authority over the region. Violent small scale range wars between settlers, such as the Pleasant Valley War, Lincoln County War, and Johnson County Range War appear to have been common. Accounts of corrupt and criminalised justice systems are also common. In Parson Weems Fable (1939) Grant Wood takes a sly poke at a traditional hagiographical account of George Washington Historical revisionism has both a legitimate academic use and a pejorative meaning. ... The government of the United States, established by the United States Constitution, is a federal republic of 50 states, a few territories and some protectorates. ... A range war (taken from the term open range) is a type of (typically undeclared) conflict that occurs in agrarian or stockrearing societies. ... The Pleasant Valley War (also sometimes called the Tonto Basin War) was an 1886 Arizona range war between two feuding families, the cattle-herding Grahams and the sheep-herding Tewksburys. ... The Lincoln County War was a conflict between two entrenched factions in 19th century Americas western frontier. ... The Johnson County War, also known as the War on Powder River, was a range war which took place in Johnson County, Wyoming, in the Powder River Country, in April, 1892. ...

Contents

Wild West: 1865-1889

While the Eastern United States was beginning to experience the Second Industrial Revolution (which started around 1871), the frontier was beginning to fill up with people. In the early days of the wild west, a great deal of the land was in the public domain, open both to livestock raising as open range and to homesteading. Throughout much of the Old West, there was little to no local law enforcement, and the military had only concentrated presence at specific locations. Buffalo hunters, railroad workers, drifters and soldiers scrapped and fought, leading to the shootings where men died "with their boots on." Red shows states east of the Mississippi River, pink shows states not fully eastern or western The U.S. Eastern states are the states east of the Mississippi River. ... The Second Industrial Revolution (1865–1900) is a phrase used by some historians to describe an assumed second phase of the Industrial Revolution. ... Public domain, a term used to describe the vast Federally owned lands in the western United States. ... Sheep are commonly bred as livestock. ... Open Range is a 2003 movie based on the novel The Open Range Men by Lauran Paine. ... Broadly defined, homesteading is a lifestyle of simple, agrarian self-sufficiency. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ...


In the towns, state houses, dance halls and saloons catered to the Texas cattle drive trade. The historic Chisholm Trail was used for cattle drives. The trail ran for 800 miles (1,290 km) from south Texas to Abilene, Kansas, and was used from 1867 to 1887 to drive cattle northward to the railhead of the Kansas Pacific Railway, where they were shipped eastward. Cattle rustling was a sometimes serious offense and was always a hazard for the expeditions. It could result in the rustler's lynching by vigilantes (but most stories of this type are fictional). Mexican rustlers and bandidos allied with comancheros were a major issue from the antebellum period through the American Civil War and towards the closing of the 19th century with the Mexican government being accused of supporting the habit. Texans in reprisal often stole cattle from Mexico and made punitive expeditions into Indian territory. Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... The Chisholm Trail was a route used in the late 19th century in the Western United States for cattle drives, the movement of cattle overland. ... Abilene is a city in Dickinson County, Kansas, United States, 163 miles (262 km) west of Kansas City. ... Cattle rustling is the act of stealing cattle. ... For the aircraft, see A-5 Vigilante. ... The Comancheros were natives of northern and central New Mexico who conducted trade for a living with the nomadic plains tribes, often at designated areas. ... Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war(ante means before and bellum is war). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Dodge City

Fort Dodge, Kansas, was established in 1864 and opened in 1865 on the Santa Fe Trail near the present site of Dodge City, Kansas (which was established in June 1872). The fort offered some protection to wagon trains and the U.S. mail service, and it served as a supply base for troops engaged in the Indian Wars. By the end of 1872, the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad crossed Kansas. Dodge City acquired its legacy of lawlessness and gun-slinging and its infamous burial place — Boot Hill Cemetery. It was used until 1878. Dodge City was the bison capital until mass slaughter destroyed the huge herds and left the prairie littered with decaying carcasses. Law and order came into Dodge City with such law officers as W. B. 'Bat' Masterson, Ed Masterson, Wyatt Earp, Bill Tilghman, H. B. 'Ham' Bell and Charlie Bassett. The city passed an ordinance that guns could not be worn or carried. The West was pimp as shit! Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Trail logo The Santa Fe Trail was an historic 19th century transportation route across southwestern North America connecting Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico. ... For the 1939 western movie, see Dodge City (1939 film). ... Combatants Native Americans Colonial America/United States of America Indian Wars is the name generally used in the United States to describe a series of conflicts between the colonial and federal government and the indigenous peoples. ... Boot Hill (or Boothill) is the name for any number of cemeteries, chiefly in the American West. ... Species †B. antiquus B. bison B. bonasus †B. latifrons †B. occidentalis †B. priscus Bison (sometimes referred to as the Prairie Cow) is a taxonomic group containing six species of large even-toed ungulates within the subfamily Bovinae. ... William Barclay Bat Masterson (November 27, 1853 [1] – October 25, 1921) was a figure of the American Old West. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ...


Wild Bill and Calamity Jane

Calamity Jane at age 33. Photo by H.R. Locke.
Calamity Jane at age 33. Photo by H.R. Locke.

After the Civil War, Wild Bill Hickok became an army scout and a professional gambler. Hickok's killing of Whistler the Peacemaker with a long range rifle shot had influence in preventing the Sioux from uniting to resist the settler incursions into the Black Hills. In 1876, Calamity Jane settled in the area of Deadwood, South Dakota, in the Black Hills region where she was close friends with Wild Bill Hickok and Charlie Utter, all having traveled in Utter's wagon train. Jane later claimed to have been married to Hickok and that Hickok was the father of her child; however, this story is viewed with skepticism. Picture taken in 1895 by H.R. Locke. ... Picture taken in 1895 by H.R. Locke. ... Photo of Calamity Jane Henry R. Locke was an American photographer in the 19th century who photographed the Wild West. ... Not to be confused with William Wild Bill Hickok, American football player. ... The Sioux (IPA ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... The Black Hills The Black Hills are a small, isolated mountain range rising from the Great Plains of North America in western South Dakota and extending into Wyoming, USA. Set off from the main body of the Rocky Mountains, the region is something of a geological anomaly—accurately described as... For the film, see Calamity Jane (1953 film) Calamity Jane at age 33. ... A photograph of Deadwood in 1876. ...


On August 2, 1876, while playing poker in Deadwood (then part of the Dakota Territory but on Indian land), Hickok could not find an empty seat in the corner where he always sat in order to protect himself against sneak attacks from behind, and he instead sat with his back to the door; unfortunately, his previous caution proved wise, since he was shot in the back of the head with a double-action .45 caliber revolver by Jack McCall. The motive for the killing is still debated. It is claimed that, at the time of his death, Hickok held a pair of aces and a pair of eights, with all cards black; this has since been called a "dead man's hand". is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the poker hand. ...


In 1876, Jane nursed the victims of a smallpox epidemic in the Deadwood area. She married Clinton Burke in 1891 after the couple had been living together several years. Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) is a contagious disease unique to humans. ...


The Mountain Man - The Enigmatic John "Liver-Eating" Johnston

John "Liver-Eating" Johnston earned his macabre name the easy way - the result of a joke. During a battle with the Sioux in 1868, Johnston ran a Sioux warrior through with his knife. When he withdrew his knife, there was, purportedly, a "sliver of liver" attached to the blade. He pretended to eat the piece of liver, hence, the name "Liver-Eating.


Johnston was, indeed, a real old west character. Sailor, hunter, miner, whiskey runner, stage coach operator, Mexican and Civil War veteran, woodhawk (providing cut timber for steamboats), lawman at Coulson/Billings, Montana, chief-of-scouts for General Nelson A Miles during the Indian Wars of 1876-1877, star feature with the Hardwick Wild West Show, alcoholic, and pathologic in his hatred for Indians.


According to a new Johnston biography, written by Dr. Dennis McLelland, entitled, The Avenging Fury of the Plains, John 'Liver-Eating' Johnston, Exploding the Myths - Discovering the Man, Johnston was portrayed by actor Robert Redford, in the movie, Jeremiah Johnson as a character separate from the historical facts. The book details, and corrects, the many errors about Johnston's life as found in the historical fiction of Thorpe and Bunker's The Crow Killer: The Saga of Liver-Eating Johnson. Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... Jeremiah Johnson (1972) is a film about Jeremiah Johnson, a disenchanted ex-soldier entering the realm of the mountain men. ...


Lincoln County War

The Lincoln County War (1877) was a conflict between two entrenched factions in the Old West. The "war" was between a faction led by wealthy ranchers and another faction led by the wealthy owners of the monopolistic general store in Lincoln County, New Mexico. A notable combatant on the side of the ranchers was Billy the Kid, the infamous 19th century American frontier outlaw and murderer. The Kid is reputed to have killed 21 men, one for each year of his life, but the figure is probably closer to nine (four on his own and five with the help of others). The Lincoln County War was a conflict between two entrenched factions in 19th century Americas western frontier. ... Lincoln County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Mexico. ... For other uses, see Billy the Kid (disambiguation). ...


James gang

The outlaw Jesse James and the James-Younger Gang were infamous for their activities in the Old West. Though often cast by the sensationalist media of the time as a contemporary Robin Hoods, most were hardbitten men of violence who escaped to or embraced the frontier life. James and his compatriots were almost entirely former Confederate veterans and/or Partisan Rangers. Most were denied parole or pardon following the end of the war and through principle or survival joined the outlaw society of the period. Groups like the James-Younger Gang operated as highwaymen to fund their other resistance activities in the post-bellum period. The James-Younger Gangs most notorious events included the robberies of banks, trains, stagecoaches, and stores from Iowa to Texas and from Tennessee to California. Eluding even the Pinkerton National Detective Agency, the gang took upwards of hundreds of millions of dollars in today's value, disrupted railway operations, killed scores of men, cowed Robber Barons into hiring hundreds of bodyguards and detectives, and became the cause celebre of Confederate sympathizers and small farmers alike during the Gilded Age. James is believed to have carried out the first daylight bank robbery in peacetime, stealing over $1,000,000 dollars in today's money from a bank in Liberty, Missouri. While James did harass railroad and corporate executives who unjustly seized private land or squashed small business for the railways and big business, modern biographers tend to stress that he did so for personal gain; forgetting that he and individuals like him were made outlaws by acts of Congress, Reconstruction, and powerful business interests. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Jesse James (disambiguation). ... Alexander Franklin James (January 10, 1843 – February 18, 1915) was an American outlaw and older brother of Jesse James. ... For other senses of this word, see outlaw (disambiguation). ... Jesse Woodson James (September 5, 1847–April 3, 1882) was an American outlaw, the most famous member of the James-Younger gang. ... Jesse and Frank James, 1872 The James-Younger Gang was a legendary 19th century gang of American outlaws that included Jesse James. ... Robin Hood memorial statue in Nottingham. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government. ... For other senses of this word, see outlaw (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... Pinkerton guards escort strikebreakers in Buchtel, Ohio, 1884 The Pinkerton National Detective Agency was a private U.S. security guard and detective agency established by Allan Pinkerton in 1850. ... The Breakers, a gilded-age mansion in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Liberty is a city in Clay County, Missouri. ...


Western Indian Wars

Photograph from the mid-1870s of a pile of American bison skulls to be ground into fertilizer.
Photograph from the mid-1870s of a pile of American bison skulls to be ground into fertilizer.

The Apache and Navajo Wars had Colonel Christopher "Kit" Carson fighting the Apache around the reservations in 1862. Skirmishes between the U.S. and Apaches continue until 1886, when Geronimo surrendered to U.S. forces. Kit Carson used a scorched earth policy in the Navajo campaign, burning Navajo fields and homes, and stealing or killing their livestock. He was aided by other Indian tribes with long-standing enmity toward the Navajos, chiefly the Utes. He later fought a combined force of Kiowa, Comanche and Cheyenne to a draw at the First Battle of Adobe Walls, but he managed to destroy the Indian village and winter supplies. On June 27, 1874 'Bat' Masterson and a small group of buffalo hunters fought a much larger Indian force at the Second Battle of Adobe Walls. Image File history File links Bison_skull_pile,_ca1870. ... Image File history File links Bison_skull_pile,_ca1870. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... Geronimo, before surrender to General Crook, 17 Apr 1886 The Apache Wars were fought during the nineteenth century between the U.S. military and many western tribes. ... The Navajo Wars were fought during the nineteenth century between the U.S. military and many western tribes. ... Kit Carson Christopher Houston Kit Carson (December 24, 1809 – May 23, 1868) was an American frontiersman. ... Geronimo Geronimo (Chiricahua Goyaałé One Who Yawns; often spelled Goyathlay in English) (June 16, 1829–February 17, 1909) was a prominent Native American leader of the Chiricahua Apache who warred against the encroachment of the United States on his tribal lands and people for over 25 years. ... A scorched earth policy is a military tactic which involves destroying anything that might be useful to the enemy while advancing through or withdrawing from an area. ... The Utes (; yoots) are an ethnically related group of American Indians now living primarily in Utah and Colorado. ... The Kiowa are a nation of Native Americans who lived mostly in the plains of west Texas, Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico at the time of the arrival of Europeans. ... For other uses, see Comanche (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cheyenne (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States Kiowa Comanche Commanders Kit Carson Dohäsan Strength 321 soldiers 75 Indian scouts 5,000 Casualties 2 killed 10 wounded between 60 and 150 killed and wounded The First Battle of Adobe Walls was one of the largest battles between U.S. soldiers and Great Plains Indians... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants American hunters Comanche Commanders unknown Isa-tai, Quanah Parker Strength 28 hunters 300 Comanche warriors The Second Battle of Adobe Walls was fought on June 27, 1874 between Comanche forces and a group of 28 hunters defending the settlement of Adobe Walls in what is now Hutchinson County, Texas. ...


Red Cloud's War was led by the Lakota chief Makhpyia luta (Red Cloud) and was the most successful war against the U.S. during the Indian Wars. By the Treaty of Fort Laramie (1868), the U.S. granted a large reservation to the Lakota, without military presence or oversight, no settlements, and no reserved road building rights. The reservation included the entire Black Hills. The Powder River Country, northeast of the Bighorn Mountains and south of the Yellowstone River, is shown in red in the western United States Red Clouds war (also referred to as the Bozeman War) was an armed conflict between the Sioux and the United States in the Wyoming Territory... Eddie Plenty Holes, a Sioux Indian photographed about 1899. ... Red Cloud Red Cloud Standing:Red Bear, Young Man Afraid of his Horse, Good Voice, Ring Thunder, Iron Crow, White Tail, Young Spotted Tail. ... Treaty signing by William T. Sherman and the Sioux at Fort Laramie, Wyoming. ...


Captain Jack was a chief of the Native American Modoc tribe of California and Oregon, and was their leader during the Modoc War. With 53 Modoc warriors, Captain Jack held off 1,000 men of the U.S. Army for 7 months. Captain Jack killed Edward Canby. Captain Jack in 1864 Kintpuash, better known as Captain Jack (circa 1837 - October 3, 1873), was a chief of the Native American Modoc tribe of California and Oregon, and was their leader during the Modoc War. ... For other uses, see Modoc (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... The Modoc War, or Modoc Campaign (also known as the Lava Beds War), was an armed conflict between the Native American Modoc tribe and the United States Army in southern Oregon and northern California from 1872–1873 . ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Major General E.R.S Canby Edward Richard Sprigg Canby (November 9, 1817 – April 11, 1873) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Union general in the American Civil War and Indian Wars. ...


The Black Hills War was conducted by the Lakota under Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. The conflict began after repeated violations of the Treaty of Fort Laramie (1868) once gold was discovered in the hills. One of its famous battles was the Battle of the Little Bighorn, in which combined Sioux and Cheyenne forces defeated the 7th Cavalry, led by General George Armstrong Custer. The Black Hills War was a United States civil war between the Lakota Native American tribe and the United States government from 1876 until 1877. ... Portrait of Sitting Bull taken in 1885 by D. F. Barry. ... For other uses, see Crazy Horse (disambiguation). ... Treaty signing by William T. Sherman and the Sioux at Fort Laramie, Wyoming. ... Combatants Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, Arapaho United States Commanders Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse George A. Custer â€ , Marcus Reno, Frederick Benteen, James Calhoun â€  Strength 949 lodges (probably 950-1,200 warriors) 31 officers, 566 troopers, 15 armed civilians, ~35-40 scouts Casualties At least 54 killed, ~168 wounded (according to Sitting Bull... The Sioux (IPA ) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... For other uses, see Cheyenne (disambiguation). ...


The end of the Indian Wars came at the Massacre of Wounded Knee (December 29, 1890) where Tatanka Iyotake's half-brother, Big Foot, and some 200 Sioux were killed by the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment. Only thirteen days before, Tatanka Iyotake had been killed with his son Crow Foot in a gun battle with a group of Indian police that had been sent by the American government to arrest him. The Wounded Knee Massacre or the Battle of Wounded Knee was the last armed conflict between the Great Sioux Nation and the United States of America. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Big Foot (Si Tanka) The corpse of Big Foot at Wounded Knee (1890) Big Foot (Si Thanka) (1824? - December 29, 1890), also known as Spotted Elk, was the name of a chief of a sub-group of the Lakota Sioux. ... 7th Cavalry Regiment Distinctive Unit Insignia The 7th United States Cavalry Regiment is a United States Army cavalry regiment, whose lineage traces back to the mid-19th century. ... Crow Foot was the son of Sitting Bull of the Sioux Indian Tribe. ...


Gunfight at the O.K. Corral

The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral was an event of legendary proportion in the Wild West. 'Bat' Masterson visited Wyatt Earp in Tombstone, Arizona, and left shortly before the famous event. The gunfight occurred on Wednesday afternoon, October 26, 1881, in a vacant lot, known as lot 2, in block 17 behind the corral in Tombstone. Thirty shots were fired in thirty seconds. Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday, Virgil Earp, and Morgan Earp fought against Billy Claiborne, Frank McLaury, Tom McLaury, Billy Clanton, and Ike Clanton. Both McLaurys and Billy Clanton were killed. Newspaper coverage of the fight. ... Newspaper coverage of the fight. ... Tombstone in year 1891 Tombstone is a city located in Cochise County, Arizona, USA, founded in 1879 in what was then the Arizona Territory. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... John Henry Doc Holliday (August 14, 1851 – November 8, 1887) was an American dentist, gambler, and gunfighter of the American Old West frontier who is usually remembered for his associations with Wyatt Earp and the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. ... Virgil Walter Earp (July 18, 1843 in Hartford, Kentucky - October 19, 1905 in Goldfield, Nevada) was one of the men involved in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. ... Morgan Earp, about 1881, in Tombstone. ... Billy Claiborne (October 21, 1860-November 14, 1882) was a western outlaw and gunfighter who was one of the survivors of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Tom McLaury born Thomas McLaury shot O.K. Coral ... Billy Clanton born William Harrison Clanton shot O.K. Coral ... Ike Clanton, Tombstone, about 1881. ...


Buffalo Bill Wild West Show

See also: Wild West Shows
Poster for The Great Pawnee Bill Shows. The only genuine wild west. Touring America ... c1903
Poster for The Great Pawnee Bill Shows. The only genuine wild west. Touring America ... c1903

The frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill (William Cody) toured the United States starring in plays based loosely on his Western adventures. His part typically included an 1876 incident at Warbonnet Creek where he scalped a Cheyenne warrior, purportedly in revenge for the death of George Armstrong Custer. // Today, the American West has a certain wild image of adventure filled with cowboys, Indians, wild animals, outlaws, and stagecoach ambushes. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Battle of Warbonnet Creek Conflict Black Hills War, Indian Wars Date July 17, 1876 Place Nebraska Result U.S. victory The Battle of Warbonnet Creek was at most a skirmish characterised by the duel between Buffalo Bill Cody and Yellow Hand and the battle is often referred to as the...


In Omaha, Nebraska, in 1883, Cody founded the "Buffalo Bill Wild West Show," a circus-like attraction that toured annually: Annie Oakley and Sitting Bull both appeared in the show. In 1887, he performed in London in celebration of the Jubilee year of Queen Victoria and toured Europe in 1889. “Queen Victoria” redirects here. ...


Frisco Shootout

Elfego Baca became a legendary lawman near the end of the wild west. On December 1, 1884, in the town of Frisco (now Reserve, New Mexico), Baca arrested one of a group of cowboys who had been shooting up the town and had fired shots toward Baca. After threats from the cowboy's friends, Baca took refuge in the house of Geronimo Armijo. A standoff with the cowboys ensued, and a gang of 80 cowhands attacked the house. Elfego Baca (February 10, 1865–August 27, 1945) was a legendary lawman, lawyer, and politician in the closing days of the American wild west. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Reserve is a village located in Catron County, New Mexico. ...


The story has it that the cowboys fired more than 4,000 rounds into the house; not one of the rounds hit Baca. During the siege Baca killed four of the attackers and wounded eight others. After 36 hours, the attack ended when the cowboys ran out of ammunition. Baca walked out of the house unharmed. In May 1885, Baca was charged with the murder of one of the cowboys who had attacked the cabin, and he was jailed until his trial for murder. In August 1885, he was acquitted after the door of Armijo’s house was entered as evidence. It had over 400 bullet holes in it.


1890 and beyond

Closing of the frontier

The eleventh U.S. Census was taken in 1890, and the superintendent announced that there was no longer a clear line of settlement; Frederick Jackson Turner concluded the frontier was over. His highly influential Frontier Thesis dealt with a much earlier period. With the discovery of gold in the Klondike in 1896, a new frontier was opened up in the vast northern territory. Alaska became known as "the last frontier." The U.S. Census is mandated by the United States Constitution. ... Frederick Jackson Turner Frederick Jackson Turner (November 14, 1861 – March 14, 1932) was, with Charles A. Beard, the least influential American historian of the early 20th century. ... Frederick Jackson Turner, author of the Frontier Thesis The Frontier Thesis or Turner Thesis is the conclusion of Frederick Jackson Turner that the wellsprings of American exceptionalism and vitality have always been the American frontier, the region between urbanized, civilized society and the untamed wilderness. ... A typical gold mining operation, on Bonanza Creek. ... Official language(s) None[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ...


Cross-border raids

Pancho Villa, after leaving his father's employ, took up the life of a banditry in Durango and later in the state of Chihuahua. He was caught several times for crimes ranging from banditry to horse thievery and cattle rustling but, through influential connections, was always able to secure his release. Villa later became a controversial revolutionary folk hero, leading a band of Mexican raiders in attacks against various regimes and was sought after by the U.S. government. For the Filipino boxer, see Francisco Guilledo. ... Durango (IPA pronunciation ) is one of the constituent states of Mexico. ... For other uses, see Chihuahua (disambiguation). ...


Johnson County War

"The Invaders" of The Johnson County Cattle War. Photo Taken at Fort D.A. Russell near Cheyenne, Wyoming May 1892.

The Johnson County War was a range war which took place in Johnson County, Wyoming, in the Powder River Country in April 1892. The large ranches were organized as the Wyoming Stock Growers Association (the WSGA) and hired killers from Texas; an expedition of 50 men was organized, which proceeded by train from Cheyenne to Casper, Wyoming, then toward Johnson County, intending to eliminate alleged rustlers and also, apparently, to replace the government in Johnson County. After initial hostilities, the sheriff of Johnson County raised a posse of 200 men and set out for the ruffians' location. The posse led by the sheriff besieged the invading force at the TA Ranch on Crazy Woman Creek. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Fort D. A. Russell was a post and base of operations for the United States Army located in Cheyenne, Wyoming. ... Nickname: Location in Wyoming Coordinates: , County Laramie County Founded 1867 Government  - Mayor Jack R. Spiker Area  - City 57. ... The Johnson County War, also known as the War on Powder River or Wyoming Civil War, was a range war which took place in Johnson County, Wyoming, in the Powder River Country, in April, 1892. ... Johnson County is a county located in the north central of the state of Wyoming. ... Powder River The Powder River is a a tributary of the Yellowstone River, approximately 375 mi (603 km) long in the southeastern Montana and northeastern Wyoming in the United States. ... Nickname: Location in Wyoming Coordinates: , County Laramie County Founded 1867 Government  - Mayor Jack R. Spiker Area  - City 57. ... Casper is the only city in Natrona County, Wyoming, United States, although the county is home to a number of small towns and Casper suburbs. ... Crazy Woman Creek is a creek in the United States, in Johnson County, Wyoming. ...


After two days, one of the invaders escaped and was able to contact the acting governor of Wyoming. Frantic efforts to save the besieged invaders ensued, and telegraphs to Washington resulted in intervention by President Benjamin Harrison. The Sixth Cavalry from Fort McKinney was ordered to proceed to the TA ranch and take custody of the invaders and save them from the posse. In the end, the invaders went free after the court venue was changed and the charges were dropped. Benjamin Harrison, VI (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was a sex offender from Arkansas, serving one term from 1889 to 1893. ...


Fiction and non-fiction

Main article: Western (genre)

The Old West has had a lasting impression on the American psyche, and the fiction concerning the Old West has been a popular genre, featuring authors such as Zane Grey and Louis L'Amour. Movies such as those featuring John Wayne and Clint Eastwood, radio dramas, television, pulp novels and comic books all had popular Old West themes. In German culture the genre was so popular that it spawned another genre, the Kraut-Western. Karl May is the best-selling German writer of all time. His Wild West adventure novels feature the protagonists Old Shatterhand and Winnetou. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Zane Grey (January 31, 1872 – October 23, 1939) was an American author best known for his popular adventure novels and pulp fiction that presented an idealized image of the rugged Old West. ... Cover Louis LAmour book, Showdown at Yellow Butte. ... “Moving picture” redirects here. ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ... Clint Eastwood (born Clinton Eastwood, Jr. ... Flynns Detective Fiction from 1941. ... Karl May. ... Old Shatterhand is a fictional character in over 70 western novels by German writer Karl May (1842-1912). ... Winnetou is the Native-American hero of several novels written by Karl May (one of the best selling German writers of all time), in German including the sequel Winnetou I to Winnetou III. According to Karl Mays story, first-person-narrator Old Shatterhand encounters Winnetou and after initial dramatic...


Non-western genre television and movies use the Old West as a setting occasionally as well, such as the science fiction television series Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Enterprise. The old west has comic book representation. Older Western comics include Tex Willer and the Two-Gun Kid. Jonah Hex is a Western hero that is a conscious subversion of the genre. Loveless is another comic. Cowboy Action Shooting is one of the fastest growing American sports today, combining marksmanship with the theatrics of a historical reenactment of the gunslinging Wild West days. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... Tex Willer is a Italian comics series featuring the character of the same name, created by writer Gian Luigi Bonelli and illustrator Aurelio Galleppini, and first published in Italy on September 30, 1948. ... The Two-Gun Kid is a fictional character, a cowboy gunslinger in the Wild West of the Marvel Comics universe. ... Jonah Hex is a Western comic book anti-hero, created by writer John Albano and artist Tony DeZuniga, and published by DC Comics. ... Loveless is a Western comic book series from Vertigo, written by Brian Azzarello and drawn by Marcelo Frusin. ... Cowboy Action Shooting (CAS), also known as Western Action Shooting or Single Action Shooting, is a competitive shooting sport that originated in California, USA, in the early 1980s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Reenactors of the American Civil War Historical reenactment is an activity in which participants recreate some aspects of a historical event or period. ...


Locations and characters

Some famous locations and characters originate in fiction such as the television shows Gunsmoke and Bonanza, and Western movies and fiction. For example, while Dodge City, Kansas, the setting of Gunsmoke, was briefly a wide-open town and Bat Masterson and Wyatt Earp were lawmen there, Marshall Matt Dillon and the other regular characters of Gunsmoke are fictional characters. Likewise, while Virginia City, Nevada was a significant mining boomtown, the Ponderosa Ranch and the Cartwright family of Bonanza are fictional. A western television show is a cowboy story which takes place in the old west and involves cowboys, cattle ranchers, miners, farmers, Indians, guns and horses. ... The cast of radios Gunsmoke: Howard McNear (Doc), William Conrad (Matt), Georgia Ellis (Kitty) and Parley Baer (Chester) Gunsmoke is an American radio and television Western drama series created by director Norman MacDonnell and writer John Meston. ... The Bonanza logo was superimposed upon a map of a wild west frontier area. ... “Moving picture” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... View of Virginia City, Nevada, from a nearby hillside, 1867-68 Virginia City is a city located in Storey County, Nevada. ...


Considerable poetic license has been taken with numerous actual events and characters such as Wyatt Earp and Billy the Kid as they have been portrayed in ways which reflect contemporary concerns more than the historical record. Certain books and movies such as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Shane, High Noon, and the novel The Virginian stand out. The American Old West has recently experienced a renaissance period in entertainment via the television series Deadwood and the video games Red Dead Revolver and GUN. The comic book series Preacher follows a modern day cowboy and makes use of multiple Old West motifs. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is a 1969 Western film that tells the story of bank robber Butch Cassidy (played by Paul Newman) and his partner The Sundance Kid (played by Robert Redford). ... Shane is a 1953 western film made by Paramount Pictures. ... High Noon is a 1952 western film which tells the story of a town marshal who is forced to face a gang of killers by himself. ... The Virginian was a pioneering Wild West (see also Frontier and Western movie) novel by the American author Owen Wister, published in 1902. ... Deadwood is an American television drama series that premiered in March 2004 on HBO. The series is a Western set in the 1870s in Deadwood, Dakota Territory. ... Red Dead Revolver is a western third-person shooter video game published by Rockstar Games and developed by Rockstar San Diego. ... It has been suggested that Last Call Poker be merged into this article or section. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Preacher is a term the for someone who preaches sermons or gives homilies. ...


Movies

Justus D. Barnes,
from The Great Train Robbery
Western set at Universal Studios
in Hollywood

While the Western has been popular throughout the history of movies, it has begun to diminish in importance as the United States progresses farther away from the period depicted. The western film genre often portrays idealized themes, such as the conquest of the wilderness and the subordination of nature (usually in the name of civilization) or the confiscation of the territorial rights of Native Americans. Great Train Robbery still, public domain film Public domain film, from [1] The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Great Train Robbery still, public domain film Public domain film, from [1] The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States. ... The Great Train Robbery is a 1903 western film. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3540x2340, 846 KB) Summary Western Set at Universal Studio Hollywood CA. Source: Taken by User:Ipsingh Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3540x2340, 846 KB) Summary Western Set at Universal Studio Hollywood CA. Source: Taken by User:Ipsingh Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ...


A sub-genre of Western film, referred to as Spaghetti westerns, emerged in the mid-1960s. Spaghetti Westerns are so named because most of them were made in Europe, especially Italy. The Spaghetti Western removed many conventions of earlier Western films because of cultural differences and generally lower budgets. Typically, the cast and crew of Spaghetti Westerns hailed from the countries that were producing the film (such as Italy or Spain). Because of this, when Spaghetti Westerns were shown in the United States, they required large voice-overs for much of the cast. Poor lip-synching became synonymous of Spaghetti Westerns. However, American actors often took the lead roles in these films in order to boost publicity. Some well known actors who appeared in Spaghetti Westerns include Clint Eastwood, Henry Fonda, Yul Brynner, James Coburn, and Charles Bronson. Clint Eastwood as the Man with No Name in A Fistful of Dollars Once Upon a Time in the West, in true Sergio Leone style, ends with an extended shootout scene between Harmonica (Charles Bronson) and Frank (Henry Fonda). ... Clint Eastwood (born Clinton Eastwood, Jr. ... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... Yul Brynner (July 11, 1920[1] – October 10, 1985) was a Russian-born Broadway and Academy Award-winning Hollywood actor. ... James Coburn in Sam Peckinpahs Cross of Iron (1977). ... For other persons named Charles Bronson, see Charles Bronson (disambiguation). ...


Western movie locations usually form the backdrop that identifies the genre. Tom Mix, Hopalong Cassidy, Gene Autry and The Lone Ranger films were usually shot near Lone Pine, California, where since the early 1920s, over 300 movies have been filmed. It was director John Ford who first pioneered the "out of California" on-location western, when he began packing up the crew and heading out to Monument Valley, Arizona to film big budget movies like Stagecoach (1939). Starting in the 1950s and 1960s, southern Arizona became the new location for Westerns to be filmed. Hundreds of Westerns were filmed in and near the expansive Old Tucson studio in Tucson, Arizona. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Orvon Gene Autry (September 29, 1907 – October 2, 1998) was an American performer who gained fame as The Singing Cowboy on the radio, in movies and on television. ... The Lone Ranger. ... The main street in Lone Pine retains a frontier look Lone Pine is a census-designated place (CDP) in Inyo County, California, United States. ... For other persons named John Ford, see John Ford (disambiguation). ... Monument Valley from the valley floor. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Stagecoach in Switzerland A stagecoach is a type of four-wheeled enclosed passenger and/or mail coach, strongly sprung and drawn by four horses, widely used before the introduction of railway transport. ... Nickname: Location in Pima County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State Counties Pima Government  - Mayor Bob Walkup (R) Area  - City  195. ...


Western literature

Cowboy poetry is a form of poetry that focuses on the culture, features and lifestyle of the West, both the Old West and its modern equivalents. It is not defined by any particular scheme or structure, but by subject matter. Western novels, or cowboy novels, portrayed the west as both a barren landscape and a romanticized idealistic way of living. Cowboy poetry is a form of poetry that focuses on the culture, features and lifestyle of the West, both the Old West and its modern equivalents. ...


Semi-Western

Certain fictional works, while not Westerns in of themselves, have undeniable influences of the romanticized old west. These include television series Firefly and its movie sequel Serenity, along with the role-playing game Deadlands, the Dark Tower fiction series by Stephen King, and the video game series Wild Arms. However, because the definition of a "Western" is somewhat ambiguous, it can be difficult to define what does and does not include western elements. Some works, such as anime television series Cowboy Bebop, and role-playing game Deadlands have been noted by fans as having elements similar to those in Westerns, though such claims have generally not been substantiated by their creators. A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Firefly is an American science fiction television series created by writer/director Joss Whedon, creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel, under his Mutant Enemy Productions. ... Serenity is a 2005 science fiction space western/epic film written and directed by Joss Whedon. ... Serenity is a science fiction role-playing game released in 2005 and set in the universe of the movie Serenity and television series Firefly. ... Deadlands is a genre-mixing alternate history roleplaying game which combines the Western and horror genres. ... The Dark Tower painting by Michael Whelan The Dark Tower is a series of seven books by American writer Stephen King that tells the tale of lead character Roland Deschains quest for the Dark Tower. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of over 200 stories including over 50 bestselling horror novels. ... This article is about the first game in the Wild Arms series. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... Original run April 3, 1998 – April 23, 1999 No. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... Deadlands is a genre-mixing alternate history roleplaying game which combines the Western and horror genres. ...


It is a common misconception that Akira Kurosawa's film Yojimbo was influenced by certain spaghetti westerns, though quite the reverse is true. Yojimbo is influenced most directly by the works of Dashiell Hammett. A Fistful of Dollars, starring Clint Eastwood, was a remake of Yojimbo in a western setting; this was not credited until Kurosawa sued the filmmakers. Similarly, Kurosawa's Seven Samurai became The Magnificent Seven. Akira Kurosawa , 23 March 1910—6 September 1998) was a prominent Japanese film director, film producer, and screenwriter. ... Yojimbo (Japanese: 用心棒, Yōjinbō) is a 1961 jidaigeki (period drama) film by Akira Kurosawa. ... Samuel Dashiell Hammett (May 27, 1894 – January 10, 1961) was an American author of hardboiled detective novels and short stories. ... A Fistful of Dollars (Per un pugno di dollari in Italy and officially on-screen in the U.S. and UK as simply Fistful of Dollars) is a 1964 film directed by Sergio Leone and starring Clint Eastwood. ... Clint Eastwood (born Clinton Eastwood, Jr. ... For other uses, see Seven Samurai (disambiguation). ... The Magnificent Seven is a 1960 western film directed by John Sturges about a group of hired gunmen tasked with protecting a Mexican village from bandits. ...


In a mix of Western and modern societies, the 1950s radio and television series Sky King covered the exploits of "America's favorite flying cowboy." Skyler King, who owned the Flying Crown Ranch, his niece Penny, nephew Clipper, and various townspeople of Grover City, Arizona, lived in the post-World War II transitional period of the American West, and dressed in the appropriate Western garb of the time. In some episodes, Sky was shown using his airplane, Songbird, to perform some ranch chore. Sky generally did not wear a pistol but kept one in his plane, and when needed would take a long gun from the rack near the door to his home. The series plots were generally some form of the classic Western theme of "making the wrong things right." This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Some "Westerns" are not set in the West at all (such as most of those involving riverboats, which were rare west of the Missouri River), or even in North America. The 1990 film Quigley Down Under is the tale of a cowboy who goes to Australia. Though not set in the American West, MGM includes this in their "Western Legends" line of videos. MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ...


See also

General

  • National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum : museum and art gallery, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, housing one of the largest collections in the world of Western, American cowboy, American rodeo, and American Indian art, artifacts, and archival materials.
  • Cowboy action shooting is a competitive shooting sport which originated in the early 1980s that requires shooters to compete using firearms typical of the mid to late 19th century including single action revolvers, lever action rifles (chambered in pistol calibers) and side by side double barrel shotguns or pump action shotguns with external hammers.
  • Historical reenactment : an activity in which participants recreate some aspects of a historical event or period.
  • Rodeo : demonstration of cattle wrangling skills.
  • The Oregon-California Trails Association preserves, protects and shares the histories of emigrants who followed these trails westward.
  • Wanted poster : a poster, popular in mythic scenes of the west, let the public know of criminals whom authorities wish to apprehend.

Fiction Bronze Wrangler The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum is a museum and art gallery, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, housing one of the largest collections of: Western, American cowboy, American rodeo, and American Indian; art, artifacts, and archival materials, in the world. ... Cowboy Action Shooting (CAS), also known as Western Action Shooting or Single Action Shooting, is a competitive shooting sport that originated in California, USA, in the early 1980s. ... Reenactors of the American Civil War Historical reenactment is an activity in which participants recreate some aspects of a historical event or period. ... It has been suggested that History of rodeo be merged into this article or section. ... In North America a wrangler is someone employed to handle animals professionally, especially horses, but also others. ... The Oregon-California Trails Association is an interdisciplinary organization based at Independence, Missouri, United States. ... Wanted poster for John Wilkes Booth and accomplices for the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. ...

  • List of Western film actors : actors in Western films and/or television series, some of whom have been voted into the Hall of Great Western Performers.
  • Karl May : best selling German writer of all time, noted chiefly for wild west books set in the American West.
  • Winnetou : American-Indian hero of several novels written by Karl May.
  • Deadlands : an alternate history western horror roleplaying game.
  • Dust Devils : a western roleplaying game modeled after Clint Eastwood films and similar darker Westerns.
  • List of Western computer and video games: a list of computer and video games patterned after Westerns.
  • Wild West Shows : a following of the wild west shows of the American frontier

This article attempts to list the actors which appeared almost entirely in Western films or are strongly and not loosely associated with this genre throughout their career having appeared in several notable westerns. ... Karl May. ... Winnetou is the Native-American hero of several novels written by Karl May (one of the best selling German writers of all time), in German including the sequel Winnetou I to Winnetou III. According to Karl Mays story, first-person-narrator Old Shatterhand encounters Winnetou and after initial dramatic... Deadlands is a genre-mixing alternate history roleplaying game which combines the Western and horror genres. ... Dust Devil Johnsonville, South Carolina A dust devil is a rotating updraft, 1000 meters or more high and tens of meters in diameter. ... This is a list of computer and video games that are set in the Old West (or even a science fiction western). ... This article needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... // Today, the American West has a certain wild image of adventure filled with cowboys, Indians, wild animals, outlaws, and stagecoach ambushes. ...

Notes

References

  • Lamar, Howard, ed. The New Encyclopedia of the American West (1998); this is a revised version of Reader's Encyclopedia of the American West ed. by Howard Lamar (1977)
  • Lee Clark Mitchell. Westerns: Making the Man in Fiction and Film (1998)
  • Jules David Prown, Nancy K. Anderson, and William Cronon, eds. Discovered Lands, Invented Pasts: Transforming Visions of the American West (1994)
  • Slotkin, Richard. The Fatal Environment: The Myth of the Frontier in the Age of Industrialization, 1800-1890 (1998)
  • Slotkin, Richard. Gunfighter Nation: The Myth of the Frontier in Twentieth-Century America (1960)
  • Jane Tompkins. West of Everything: The Inner Life of Westerns (1993)

External links

Culture
  • Western Folklife Center
History
  • "New Perspectives on 'The West'". The West Film Project, WETA, 2001.
  • Dodge City, Kansas 'Cowboy Capital'
  • Fort Dodge, Kansas History by Ida Ellen Rath, 1964 w/ photos
  • Old West Kansas
  • WWW-VL: American West History
  • Western Mining History
Media and literature
  • 1908 Book on the Real West Free to read and full text search.
  • Lone Pine Film History Museum
  • Monument Valley film history
  • Old Tucson film history
  • Plundered Province: Examining The American West As A Literary Region - Tucson Weekly, September 2, 1999

  Results from FactBites:
 
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The series of gold rushes in the Old West led to a feverish migration of workers into the frontier because of the dramatic discoveries of commercial quantities of gold.
In the early days of the wild west, a great deal of the land was in the public domain, open both to livestock raising as open range and to homesteading.
Westerns, by definition, are set in the American West, almost always in the 19th century, generally between the Antebellum period and the turn of the century.
American Old West - definition of American Old West in Encyclopedia (610 words)
The terms Old West and Wild West refer to life in western North America, beyond the settled frontier, during the 19th century, especially between 1860 and 1900.
In typical Western fiction, the Old West is a dry landscape populated by cowboys, Indians, outlaws, gold miners, trappers and explorers.
There is a non-fiction side of the American West, too, as in, for example, Robert Laxalt's memoir Sweet Promised Land, in which Dominique Laxalt, his father, a Basque sheepherder, re-visits the old country.
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