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Encyclopedia > American Idol controversy

American Idol has generated controversy over the years in numerous areas. Among them: AMERICAN IDOL HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO DEATH OF SIMON ...

Contents

Voting controversies

The first major voting controversy occurred with the top 4 of season one when Tamyra Gray, the long front-runner of the competition, was voted off before the struggling contestant Nikki McKibbin. This was just a week after Simon Cowell had called Tamyra's rendition of "A House is Not a Home," one of the best performances on television he had ever seen in his life. All of the three judges were outraged and showed disapproval of the results. Out of 24 million votes recorded following the Season 2 finale, Ruben Studdard finished just 130,000 votes ahead of Clay Aiken, and there remains controversy over the accuracy of the reported results. There was much discussion in the communication industry about the phone system being overloaded, and that potentially more than 230 million calls were dropped just by AT&T and SBC (over 30% of the market), making the results statistically invalid.[1] Since then the voting methods have been modified in an attempt to avoid this problem. In an interview prior to the start of the fifth season, executive producer Nigel Lythgoe revealed for the first time that Aiken had led the fan voting from the wild card week onward until the finale.[2] Tamyra Monica Gray (born July 26, 1979 in Takoma Park, Maryland) is an American actress and singer, best known for her rise to fame as one of the finalists on the first season of the reality television program American Idol in 2002. ... Christopher Ruben Studdard (born September 12, 1978) is an American pop/R&B/gospel singer who rose to fame as winner of the second season of the American Idol television program. ... Clay Aiken (born Clayton Holmes Grissom on November 30, 1978) is an American pop singer who rose to fame on the second season of the television program American Idol in 2003. ... The fifth season of American Idol began on January 17, 2006 and concluded on May 24, 2006. ... So You Think You Can Dance judging panel, Nigel Lythgoe, Mary Murphy, Dan Karaty Nigel Lythgoe (born July 9, 1949 in the Wirral) is an English television and film director and producer. ...


During Season 5, there was additional controversy the week Chris Daughtry was voted off. Some voters claimed that phone calls dialed for Daughtry during the first few minutes of voting were misrouted to Katharine McPhee's lines, when they heard her recorded message thanking them for voting.[3] Other voters claimed similar problems voting for other contestants, in some cases resulting in votes going to Daughtry that were intended for another contestant, Elliott Yamin.[4] It is not clear whether votes were actually tabulated for the wrong contestant, or if the "Thank you for voting for me" messages that callers heard were incorrectly assigned. (If the recordings were incorrectly assigned, votes would have been counted for the correct contestant despite the caller hearing the wrong contestant's "thank you" message.) The fifth season of American Idol began on January 17, 2006 and concluded on May 24, 2006. ... Survivor contestant, see Chris Daugherty. ... Katharine Hope McPhee (born March 25, 1984) is an American pop singer who was the runner-up to Taylor Hicks on the fifth season of American Idol in 2006. ... Elliott Yamin (born Efraym Elliott Yamin[1] on July 20, 1978) is an American singer who is known for being the third-place finalist on the fifth season of American Idol. ...


A campaign to bring Daughtry back into the show was started by Daughtry's fans and garnered some attention in the popular press. Internet petitions in support of the cause were started and collected thousands of signatures. Ultimately, the campaign failed to gain support of the show or its producers, and Daughtry was not returned to the competition. [5] An Internet petition is a form of petition posted on a website. ...


Career control

American Idol has also come under fire for maintaining what some claim to be total control of the careers of the any of the contestants that sign with their management company, 19 Management. Former cohost Brian Dunkleman referred to the show as "owning" the contestants, noting that signees sign contracts to record only with companies owned by the show's producers and to allow related agencies to manage their careers. It should be noted that contestants are advised of the conditions and requirements for taking part in the contest and that signing the contract is optional but a requirement if they want to participate in the competition. Even knowing the restrictions, tens of thousands of contestants sign the contract anyway, as AI provides most of them an opportunity for success and visibility not otherwise available. 19 Entertainment, based in the United Kingdom, is a leading creator and producer of entertainment properties, including American Idol in the United States, Pop Idol in the United Kingdom, as well as versions of the Idol series in more than seventy countries around the world and US Television show So... !!Brian Dunkleman!! (born September 25, 1971 in Ellicottville, New York) is a comedian/actor who is best known for co-hosting the first season of American Idol on the Fox Network with Ryan Seacrest. ...


National Geographic Channel investigator and journalist Eric Olsen wrote: The National Geographic Channel is a subscription television network that features documentaries produced by the National Geographic Society. ...

'Branding' is what Fuller is all about. He redefines the role of manager for the 21st century. He treats pop acts as brands to be exploited over different media rather than human performers who make money selling records and playing concerts. He is a genius—he makes everyone else look like complete amateurs.

In his article, Olsen lauds Fuller for his ingenuity while at the same time berates him for the contract his contestants must sign. In essence, the agreement stipulates that the finalists are "forever and throughout the universe" properties of 19 Management.


Idol rules

  • During the course of Season 2, Ruben Studdard became known for wearing 205 Flava jerseys representing his area code. Shortly after the end of the contest Studdard sued 205 Flava, Inc for two million dollars for using his image for promotional purposes. Flava responded by alleging that Studdard had accepted over $10,000 in return for wearing 205 shirts, and produced 8 cashed checks to validate their claim. The allegations, if true, were a clear violation of the American Idol rules.[6] The lawsuit was later settled out of court.[7]

The second season of American Idol premiered on January 21, 2003 and continued until May 21, 2003. ... Christopher Ruben Studdard (born September 12, 1978) is an American pop/R&B/gospel singer who rose to fame as winner of the second season of the American Idol television program. ...

Contestants

  • Jim Verraros was the first and so far only openly gay contestant on the show. He was told by Fox TV to remove all gay comments from his online journal. Verraros later explained, "It wasn't because I was gay. It was because they thought I was trying to gain more votes and have that little extra edge."[8]
  • Corey Clark was disqualified when the producers found out that he lied about his criminal history. Later, he claimed to have had an affair with Paula Abdul. An investigation by external counsel later cleared Abdul of all charges levied by Clark.[9]
  • Semi-finalist Frenchie Davis was removed from the competition when topless photos of her surfaced on an adult website purportedly featuring underage content. In Spring of 2007 fellow season 2 Semi-finalist Kimberley Locke made claims on a radio show that Davis was disqualified, not for the topless shots, but for images depicting Davis masturbating with a Coca-Cola Bottle. Coca-Cola has been a main sponsor of Idol since the show's inception in 2002.

[10] James Conrad Verraros (b. ... Corey Corey Delaney Clark (born July 13, 1980 in San Bernardino, California) is an American man who was a disqualified finalist in the second season of American Idol in 2003. ... Paula Julie Abdul (born June 19, 1962) is an American television personality, jewelry designer, multi-platinum selling singer, and Emmy Award-winning choreographer. ... Franchelle Frenchie Davis (born November 18, 1979) is a former American Idol contestant who was disqualified in 2003 for appearing in topless photos on the Internet. ... Kimberley Dawn Locke (born January 3, 1978 in Hartsville, Tennessee) is an American adult contemporary pop/R&B singer and plus-size fashion model. ...

  • Terrell and Derrell Brittenum were twins who were featured prominently on the auditions and successfully made it past the Hollywood rounds in season 5 but were subsequently arrested for identity theft and disqualified.[11]
  • The website Vote For the Worst featured salacious pictures of Season 6 contestant Antonella Barba. These pictures have received mainstream attention including a full segment concerning the controversy on the February 26, 2007 edition of FOX News' The O'Reilly Factor and also on MSNBC's Countdown with Keith Olbermann, both of which showed screenshots from Vote for the Worst pages featuring these images.

It was later proven that the more explicit images, depicting sexual acts were not of Barba, but of an unnamed woman with a similar appearance. [12] Antonella Maria Barba (born November 22, 1986) is an American singer who placed fifteenth on the sixth season of American Idol. ... The OReilly Factor is an American talk show on the Fox News Channel hosted by commentator Bill OReilly, who discusses current political and social issues with guests from opposing ends of the political spectrum. ... Keith Olbermann (born January 27, 1959) is an American news anchor, commentator and radio sportscaster. ...


Other controversies

Virginia Tech massacre

On Tuesday, April 17th, 2007, the day after the Virginia Tech massacre, in which Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 students and professors before killing himself, while contestant Chris Richardson and Ryan Seacrest were discussing the shooting after Chris' critique, Simon Cowell apparently appeared to be rolling his eyes at the tragedy, when he was actually speaking to Paula Abdul and did not hear what Chris had said. On the results show, Cowell stated: "I may not be the nicest person in the world, but I would never, ever, ever, disrespect those families or those victims, and I felt it was important to set the record straight." To clear Cowell's name, a video was shown on the result show which proved his innocence. The Virginia Tech massacre was a school shooting comprising two separate attacks about two hours apart on April 16, 2007, on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, Virginia, United States. ... This is a Korean name; the family name is Cho Cho Seung-hui (January 18, 1984 – April 16, 2007), was the perpetrator of the Virginia Tech massacre[3][4] of April 16, 2007, in Blacksburg, Virginia, United States, according to police reports. ... Christopher Michael Richardson (born February 19, 1984) is an American singer who finished in the top six on the sixth season of American Idol. ... Ryan John Seacrest (born December 24, 1974) is an American radio, television personality, and anchorman. ... Simon Cowell (born 7 October 1959) is an English artist and repertoire (A&R) executive for Sony BMG in the United Kingdom, but is known as a judge on television programs such as Pop Idol, The X Factor, American Idol, Americas Got Talent and Britains Got Talent. ... Paula Julie Abdul (born June 19, 1962) is an American television personality, jewelry designer, multi-platinum selling singer, and Emmy Award-winning choreographer. ...


Overtime Finale Broadcast

During the Season 6 finale, the show went over its scheduled 2-hour time limit and ended at 10:09 PM EST. Many TiVo users claimed the recording show cut off before the new American Idol was announced shortly after 10 PM. FOX executives apologized; but this is not the only time the finale exceeded its time limit. TiVo (pronounced tee-voh, IPA: ) is a popular brand of digital video recorder (DVR) in the United States. ... Jordin Brianna Sparks (born on December 22, 1989 in Phoenix, Arizona)[2] is an American singer. ...


References

  1. ^ Siebel, Deborah S., American Idol Outrage: Your Vote Doesn't Count, Broadcastingandcable.com, 2004-05-17, Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  2. ^ Martin, Logan., "It's Going to be a Very Strong Season, I Think": An Interview with American Idol Producer Nigel Lythgoe, realitynewsonline.com, 2006-01-17, Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  3. ^ MSNBC staff, Some callers claim ‘Idol’ votes were misdirected, MSNBC.com, 2006-05-12, Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  4. ^ Elliott's votes going to Chris on DI, Dialidol.com forums, 2006-05-09, Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  5. ^ Online petition links - RECOUNT VOTES FOR CHRIS DAUGHTRY and Return Chris Daughtry to the American Idol competition, Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  6. ^ Paulsen, Wade., 205 Flava claims secret payoffs to 'American Idol' winner Ruben Studdard, realitytvword.com, 2003-08-06, Retrieved on 2007-03-02.
  7. ^ Paulsen, Wade., Ruben Studdard settles lawsuit against Birmingham jersey-maker 205 Flava, realitytvword.com, 2003-12-22, Retrieved on 2007-03-02.
  8. ^ Steele, Bruce C., A Teen Idol's dreams, The Advocate via Findarticles.com, 2003-01-21, Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  9. ^ Fox investigation clears Paula Abdul of Corey Clark's 'Idol' charges, UPI via realitytvworld.com, 2005-08-12, Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  10. ^ "American Idol" Star Bounced, The Smoking Gun archive, Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  11. ^ Starr, Michael., 'Idol' Twins Booted for Alleged ID Theft, Foxnews.com, 2006-01-27, Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  12. ^ Transcript, 'Countdown with Keith Olbermann' for Feb. 26, MSNBC.com, 2007-02-26, Retrieved on 2007-03-03.

Broadcasting & Cable magazine covers all pertinent aspects of the business of television in the U.S.-programming, advertising, regulation, technology, finance, and journalism. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... MSNBC, a combination of MSN and NBC, is a 24-hour cable news channel in the United States and Canada, and a news website. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Advocate (ISSN 0001-8996) is a US-based LGBT-related biweekly news magazine. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C. United Press International (UPI) is a global news agency headquartered in the United States filing news in English, Spanish and Arabic. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Screenshot from The Smoking Gun The Smoking Gun is a website that posts legal documents, arrest records, and police mugshots on a daily basis. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... MSNBC, a combination of MSN and NBC, is a 24-hour cable news channel in the United States and Canada, and a news website. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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