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Encyclopedia > American Gods
American Gods

Cover of first edition (hardcover)
Author Neil Gaiman
Country United States
Language English
Genre(s) Fantasy novel
Publisher William Morrow
Publication date June 19, 2001
Media type Print (Hardcover & Paperback)
Pages 480 pp
ISBN ISBN 0-380-97365-0
Followed by Anansi Boys, "The Monarch of the Glen"

American Gods is a novel by Neil Gaiman. The novel is a blend of Americana, fantasy, and various strands of ancient and modern mythology, all centering on a mysterious and taciturn protagonist, Shadow. It is Gaiman's fourth prose novel, being preceded by Good Omens (a collaboration with Terry Pratchett), Neverwhere, and Stardust. Several of the themes touched upon in the book were previously glimpsed in The Sandman graphic novels, for which Gaiman may be best known. Image File history File links American_gods. ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Look up Fantasy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary For other definitions of fantasy, see fantasy (psychology). ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ... See also: 2000 in literature, other events of 2001, 2002 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Hardcover books A hardcover (or hardback or hardbound) is a book bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with cloth, heavy paper, or sometimes leather). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... ISBN redirects here. ... Anansi Boys is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... For other uses, see Americana (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (1990) is a fantasy novel written in collaboration between Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. ... Terence David John Pratchett, OBE (born 28 April 1948) is a British fantasy and science fiction author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Neverwhere is the novelization by Neil Gaiman of the television serial Neverwhere, also written by Neil Gaiman. ... Stardust (1998) is the second solo prose novel by Neil Gaiman. ... The Sandman was a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman and published by DC Comics for 75 issues from 1988 until 1996. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ...


The book was published in 2001 by Headline in the United Kingdom and by William Morrow in the United States.


Two signed and numbered limited editions have been released by Hill House Publishers. They are 12,000 words longer than the mass market editions and represent Neil Gaiman's preferred edition.


Gaiman's subsequent novel Anansi Boys was actually conceived before American Gods, and shares a character, Mr. Nancy. It is not a sequel but is a part of the same fictional world. The novella, "Monarch of the Glen" (from the Legends II anthology, later collected in Fragile Things), continues Shadow's journeys. This latter story also features the characters of Mr. Alice and Mr. Smith, a pair of dubious men who also appeared in a Gaiman short story called "Keepsakes and Treasures", suggesting that this tale is a part of the American Gods universe as well. Anansi Boys is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ... Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders is a collection of short stories and poetry by English author, Neil Gaiman. ...


On February 28, 2008, Gaiman announced on his journal that for one month, the complete text of American Gods would be available to the public on his publisher's website.[1]

Contents

Plot summary

The book follows the adventures of ex-convict Shadow, who is released from prison a few days early due to the death of his wife, Laura, in a car accident that also kills his best friend. Because his best friend, who was going to give Shadow a job, died, Shadow is hired by the mysterious Mr. Wednesday to act as an escort and bodyguard, and travels across America visiting Wednesday's colleagues and acquaintances. Gradually, it is revealed that Wednesday is an incarnation of Odin the All-Father (the word Wednesday is derived from "Odin's (Woden's) day"). Wednesday is recruiting American manifestations of the Old Gods of ancient mythology, whose powers have waned as their believers have decreased in number, to participate in an epic battle against the New American Gods, manifestations of modern life and technology (e.g. the internet, media, & modern means of transport). For other uses, see Book (disambiguation). ... Look up adventure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation). ... The god Woden, after whom Wednesday was named. ... Look up incarnation, incarnate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... The god Woden, after whom Wednesday was named. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... See power Powers, a comic book series by Brian Michael Bendis and Mike Avon Oeming (Super) powers, special abilities of super-humans, aliens, etc. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ...


Mythological characters prominently featured in the book include Odin, Loki, Czernobog, the Zorya, the Norns, Anansi, Eostre, Kali, Thoth, Anubis, Horus, and Bast. In addition to the numerous figures from real-world myths, a few characters from The Sandman and its spinoffs make brief cameos in the book. Other mythological characters featured in the novel are not divine, but are legendary or folk heroes, such as Johnny Appleseed. Shadow himself is implied to be Balder, which is confirmed in the follow-up novella, "Monarch of the Glen". The story also features, in its most erotic chapter, a succubus-like re-invention of the Queen of Sheba, who while posing as a prostitute literally swallows a man through her sexual organs. "Bilquis", as she is called here, is later killed by one of the New Gods. Sexuality as a rule plays a prominent part in the plot and subplots; Mr. Wednesday courts several young women on the journey across America, while Shadow is successfully seduced by a humanoid version of Bast. An exception to the association with sexuality is the Midnight Star of the Zorya, who gives Shadow the moon but does not require a kiss in return. For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Loki (disambiguation). ... The Black God is the god of night and darkness in Slavic mythology, and the waning year in opposition to Belobog, the White God of the waxing year. ... In Slavic mythology, the Zorya (alternately: Zarya, Zvezda, Zwezda) are the three (sometimes two) guardian goddesses, known as the Auroras. ... The Norns spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. ... For other uses, see Anansi the Spider. ... Eostre (Easter) and Ostara are the name of a putative Germanic goddess. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Thoth (Ramesseum, Luxor) Thoth (his Greek name derived from the Egyptian *, written by Egyptians as ) was considered one of the most important deities of the Egyptian pantheon, often depicted with the head of an ibis. ... For other uses, see Anubis (disambiguation). ... Ihy redirects here. ... In Egyptian mythology, Bast (also spelt Bastet, Ubasti, and Pasht) is an ancient goddess, worshipped at least since the Second Dynasty. ... The Sandman was a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman and published by DC Comics for 75 issues from 1988 until 1996. ... A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... This article is about the historical figure. ... Balders death is portrayed in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... For other uses, see Succubus (disambiguation). ... The Queen of Sheba, (Hebrew מלכת שבא , Arabic ملكة سبأ , Geez: ንግሥተ ሳባ Nigista Saba), referred to in the Hebrew scriputures (Old Testament), Bible books of 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles, the New Testament, the Quran, and Ethiopian history, was the ruler of Sheba, an ancient kingdom mentioned in the Jewish scriptures (Old Testament). ... This article is about human sexual perceptions. ... This article is about Earths moon. ...


When the New Gods murder Wednesday – thus galvanizing the Old Gods into action – Shadow obeys Wednesday's order by holding his vigil. This is accomplished by re-enacting the act performed by Odin of hanging from a "World Tree" while pierced by a spear. Shadow eventually perishes and visits the land of the dead, where he is guided by Thoth and judged by Anubis. Eostre later brings him back to life, obeying orders that she does not fully understand. During the period between life and death, Shadow learns that he is Wednesday's son, conceived as part of his plans. This article is about the religious motif. ... Spears were one of the most common personal weapons from the late Bronze Age until the advent of firearms. ... Thoth (Ramesseum, Luxor) Thoth (his Greek name derived from the Egyptian *, written by Egyptians as ) was considered one of the most important deities of the Egyptian pantheon, often depicted with the head of an ibis. ... For other uses, see Anubis (disambiguation). ... This article is about life in general. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation). ...


At the climax of the story, Shadow reveals that America is bad "growing ground" for Gods; that the power of gods eventually wanes as long as they spend time in America. Wednesday's attempt to rally the gods is proved to be a deception, in that the deaths of gods on both sides of the war would restore some of Odin's powers -- at least temporarily. The leader of the New Gods is revealed to be Loki, who was secretly working with Odin to create the "sacrifice of gods." Odin would feed on the Gods' deaths, while Loki would feed on the Chaos of the battle to empower himself. Shadow's information therefore stops the battle in its tracks. Look up Climax in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For other uses, see Loki (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chaos (disambiguation). ...


Thereafter, Shadow visits Iceland, where he meets the original Odin, of whom Wednesday is an incarnation. He accuses Odin of Wednesday's actions, but learns that although Wednesday was Odin, Odin is not Wednesday. Shadow gives Odin Wednesday's glass eye, which Odin places in his leather bag as a keepsake. Look up incarnation, incarnate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the material. ... For other uses, see Eye (disambiguation). ...


Various real-life towns and tourist attractions, including the House on the Rock (and its 'world's largest carousel') and Rock City, are featured through the course of the book. Gaiman states in an introduction that he has obscured the precise location of some actual locales. The House on the Rock is a complex of architecturally unique rooms, streets, and gardens built mostly by Alex Jordan, Jr. ... The Carousel at House on the Rock, located in Spring Green, Wisconsin, is reported to be the the worlds largest. ... A view from Rock City. ...


According to Gaiman, American Gods is not based on Diana Wynne Jones's Eight Days of Luke, "although they bear an odd relationship, like second cousins once removed or something." When working on the structure of a story linking gods and days of the week, he realised that this idea had already been used in Eight Days of Luke. He abandoned the story, but later used the character Wednesday and the day of meeting when writing American Gods.[2] Diana Wynne Jones (born London August 16, 1934) is a British writer, principally of fantasy novels for children and adults, as well as a small amount of non-fiction. ... Eight Days of Luke is a 1975 childrens novel by Diana Wynne Jones. ... Look up day in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For more details on each day of the week, see days of the week. ...


Website Tie-In

While Gaiman was writing American Gods, his publishers set up a promotional web site featuring a weblog in which Gaiman described the day-to-day process of writing, revising, publishing, and promoting the novel. After the novel was published, the web site evolved into a more general Official Neil Gaiman Web Site, and as of 2008 Gaiman still regularly adds to the weblog, describing the day-to-day process of being Neil Gaiman and writing, revising, publishing, or promoting his current project. A weblog (now more commonly known as a blog) is a web-based publication consisting primarily of periodic articles (normally, but not always, in reverse chronological order). ...


Awards

The book won the 2002 Hugo, Nebula and Bram Stoker awards, all for Best Novel, and likewise received nomination for the 2002 BSFA Award.[3] The Hugo Awards are given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ... Winners of the Nebula Award for Best Novel. ... The Bram Stoker Award is a recognition presented by the Horror Writers Association (HWA) for superior achievement in horror writing. ... The British Science Fiction Association (BSFA) annually presents four awards (though numbers have differed in previous years) based on a vote of BSFA members and recently also members of the Eastercon. ...


Gods and other characters of myth appearing in the novel

This literature-related list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.

In Vodun, and especially in Benin and Haiti, Ayida-Weddo (aso Aida-Wedo, Aido Quedo) is a loa of fertility, rainbows and snakes, and a companion or wife to Damballa. ... Painting by Akseli Gallen-Kallela, depicting the Aino Story of Kalevala on three panes: The first one is about the encounter of Väinämöinen and Aino in the forest, second depicts Väinämöinens proposal. ... Alvíss (All-Wise) was a dwarf in Norse mythology. ... A depiction of PAJARO in a late period papyrus, showing his decorated leonine body, and crocodile head. ... For other uses, see Anansi the Spider. ... Antinous or Antinoös (Greek: ) born circa 110 or 111 CE, died 130 CE), was the lover of the Roman Emperor Hadrian Bust of Antinous in the Palazzo Altemps museum in Rome // He was born to a Greek family in Bithynion-Claudiopolis, in the Roman province of Bithynia in what... For other uses, see Anubis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... ‘Ashtart, commonly known as Astarte (also Hebrew or Phoenician עשתרת, Ugaritic ‘ttrt (also ‘Attart or ‘Athtart), Akkadian dAs_tar_tú (also Astartu), Greek Αστάρτη (Astártê)), was a major northwest_Semitic goddess, cognate in name, origin, and functions with the east-Semitic goddess Ishtar. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... History Atum (alternatively spelt Tem, Temu, Tum, and Atem) is an early deity in Egyptian mythology, whose cult centred on the Ennead of Heliopolis. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... Balders death is portrayed in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... This article is about the banshee of Irish folklore. ... For other uses, see Baraka. ... Depiction of Baron Samedi Veve of Baron Samedi In Vodun or voodoo, Baron Samedi (Baron Saturday, also Baron Samdi, Bawon Samedi, or Bawon Sanmdi) is one of the aspects of Baron, one of the loa. ... For other uses, see Basilisk (disambiguation). ... In the cult of Orishas, Babalu Aye is the spirit of illness and disease. ... Belobog, Belbog, Bialbog, Byelobog, Bielobog, Belun, Bylun, (all names meaning: White God) is a reconstructed Slavic deity of light and Sun, the counterpart of dark and cursed Crnobog (Black God). ... For other uses, see Black dog. ... Bloody Bones is a hobgoblin feared by children. ... Brahma is a very important Hindu God. ... Bran the Blessed, also known as Bran Vendigaid, Bendigeidfran or Branovices, is a giant and king of Britain in Welsh mythology. ... A signature Cox Brownie A brownie/brounie or urisk (Lowland Scots) or brùnaidh, ùruisg, or gruagach (Scottish Gaelic) is a legendary kind of creature popular in folklore around Scotland and England (especially the north). ... Bucca is the name of a Cornish sea or fertility deity, transformed in post pagan times to the status of sprite. ... This article is about the mythological creatures. ... Statue of Coatlicue displayed in National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City Coatlicue, also known as Teteoinan (also transcribed Teteo Inan) (The Mother of Gods), is the Aztec goddess who gave birth to the moon, stars, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war. ... Conán mac Morna, also known as Conán Maol (the bald), is a member of the fianna and an ally of Fionn mac Cumhail in the Fenian Cycle of Irish mythology. ... The Black God is the god of night and darkness in Slavic mythology, and the waning year in opposition to Belobog, the White God of the waxing year. ... In Greek mythology, the Dactyls were the archaic race of small phallic male beings associated with the Great Mother, whether as Cybele or Rhea, spirit-men like the Curetes, Cabiri and Korybantes. ... Veve of Damballa In Vodun, Damballa is one of the most important of all the loa. ... Death is a fictional character from the DC comic book series, The Sandman (1988 - 1996). ... Delirium is one of The Endless, fictional characters from Neil Gaimans comic book series The Sandman. ... Genie is the anglicized word for the Arabic jinni. In Semitic mythology and Islamic religion, a jinni (also djinni or djini) is a member of the jinn (or djinn), a race of spirits. ... In Norse mythology, the dwarves (Old Norse: dvergar, sing. ... Aetites, also called Aquilaeus or eagle stone, is a stone said[Please name specific person or group] to have magical properties, particularly connected to childbirth. ... In Yoruba mythology, Eshu is an Orisha, and one of the most respected deities of the tradition. ... Read psychedelic section for amazing info! on the experiments of real elves good for school projects This article is about the small mythical creature, for the 2003 film, see Elf (film). ... Eostre (Easter) and Ostara are the name of a putative Germanic goddess. ... John Strudwick, A Golden Thread, 1885 (oil on canvas). ... by Sophie Anderson A fairy, or faery, is a creature from stories and mythology, often portrayed in art and literature as a minuscule humanoid with wings. ... For other uses, see Four Horsemen. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This 19th century representation of Freyr shows him with his boar Gullinbursti and his sword. ... -1... For other uses, see Frigg (disambiguation). ... Fusang (扶桑) was described by a Buddhist missionary, Hoei-Shin (慧深) in 499 AD, as a place 20,000 Chinese miles to the east of China. ... For other uses, see Ganesha (disambiguation). ... Geb (also spelt Seb, and Keb) was the personification of the earth, amongst the group who believed in the Ennead, a form of Egyptian mythology centred in Heliopolis, Since the Egyptians held that their underworld was literally that, under the earth, Geb was sometimes seen as containing the dead, or... Geri and Freki (also spelled Gere and Freke) are a pair of wolves, companions of the god Odin in Norse mythology. ... For other uses, see Golem (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek mythological monster. ... Tironensian monks, of the Order of Tiron, also spelled Thiron - apparently from Latin thironium, a high hill (Guillemin, 1999)- so called after the location of the mother abbey (established in 1109) in the woods of Tiron, Perche (some 35 miles west of Chartres, France). ... Roman griffon, Turkey This article is on the animal. ... In Welsh mythology, Gwydion is a magician appearing prominently in the Fourth branch of the Mabinogi and the ancient poem Cad Goddeu. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hathor (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... The Hero Twins feature prominently in Maya mythology, with the 16th-century Popol Vuh and ancient Maya ceramics as its main sources. ... Harsaphes In Egyptian mythology, Heryshaf (Egyptian Ḥry-Å¡=f He who is on his lake), transcribed in Greek as Harsaphes was an ancient ram-god whose cult was centered in Herakleopolis Magna (now Ihnasiyyah al-Madinah). ... Hodag captured by Shepard, 1896 The Hodag is a fictional animal of Wisconsin in the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Ihy redirects here. ... For other uses, see Tiamat (disambiguation). ... Hugin and Munin are a pair of ravens associated with the Norse god Odin. ... In Lakota mythology, Iktomi is a spider-trickster god, and a culture-hero for the Lakota people. ... {{Cleanup|date=March 20ungrateful! And whoever is grateful, truly, his gratitude is for (the good of) his ownself; and whoever is ungrateful, (he is ungrateful only for the loss of his ownself). ... IMP or imp may mean: Imp, a fantasy creature. ... This article discusses the ancient goddess Isis. ... In Egyptian mythology, Isten was a minor god. ... Jack the Giant Killer is a fairy tale. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham from a 1918 English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel Jack and the Beanstalk is an English fairy tale, closely associated with the tale of Jack the Giant Killer. ... This article is about the historical figure. ... Akh redirects here. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Prince Hanzoku terrorized by a nine-tailed fox. ... Kobolds are ugly spirits of German folklore. ... Kubera (also Kuvera or Kuber) is the god of wealth and the lord of Uttaradisha in Hindu mythology. ... In Irish mythology, a leprechaun is a type of elf said to inhabit the island of Ireland. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix, refers to the classical conception of the Goddess Liberty. ... For other uses, see Loki (disambiguation). ... In Gallo-Roman religion, Loucetios (Latinized as Leucetius) was a Gaulish god invariably identified with Mars. ... In Egyptian mythology, Maahes (also spelled Mihos, Miysis, Maihes, and Mahes) was a lion-god. ... In Irish mythology, Macha is a goddess linked with war, horses and kingship. ... Judah Lew ben Bezalel (Judah Loew son of Bezalel, also written as Yehudah ben Bezalel Levai [or Loew, Löw], 1525 – 17 September 1609 or 18 Elul 5369 according to the Hebrew calendar) was an important Talmudic scholar, Jewish mystic, and philosopher who served as a leading rabbi in Prague... Manticore illustration from The History of Four-footed Beasts (1607) For other uses, see Manticore (disambiguation). ... For the IETF MARID working group, see MARID. A Marid (Arabic : مارد ) in common mythology is a djinn associated with open waters of the Seas and Oceans where it finds sanctuary. ... Portrait of Marie Laveau, after a painting by Frank Schneider, in turn after George Catlin; the original hangs in the Cabildo in New Orleans. ... In Dahomey mythology, Mahu (alternately: Mawu) is a creator goddess, associated with the sun and moon. ... This article is about the Greek mythological figure. ... This article or section contains too much jargon and may need simplification or further explanation. ... For other meanings, see Fate, a disambiguation page. ... The Morrígan (terror or phantom queen) or Mórrígan (great queen) (aka Morrígu, Mórríghan, Mór-Ríogain) is a figure from Irish mythology who appears to have once been a goddess, although she is not referred to as such in the texts. ... Sídhe (IPA , shee, modern Irish: sí; Scottish Gaelic: sìth) is an Irish and Scottish Gaelic word referring first to earthen mounds that were thought to be home to a supernatural race related to the fey and elves of other traditions, and later to these inhabitants themselves. ... The Norns spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. ... In Egyptian mythology, Nuit or Nut was the sky goddess, in contrast to most other mythologies, which usually have a sky father. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... In Yoruba mythology, Obàtálá (alternatively Obatala) was a creator god; he made human bodies, and his father, Olorun (husband of Olokun), breathed life into them. ... Ogum In Haitian Vodun and Yoruba mythology, Ogoun (or Ogun, Ogum, Ogou) is a loa and orisha, who presides over fire, iron, hunting, politics and war. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Osiris (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ochun. ... Pan (Greek , genitive ) is the Greek god of shepherds and flocks, of mountain wilds, hunting and rustic music: paein means to pasture. ... In Haitian Vodou, Papa Legba is the intermediary between the lwa and humanity. ... For other uses, see Paul Bunyan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek goddess. ... For other mythic firebirds, see Fire bird (mythology). ... Pisky (or piskey) is the native Cornish language term for pixie. ... This is an article about the mythology of the Psychopomp. ... Ptah also refers to the asteroid 5011 Ptah Ptah In Egyptian mythology, Ptah (also spelt Peteh) was the deification of the primordial mound in the Ennead cosmogony, which was more literally referred to as Ta-tenen (also spelt Tathenen), meaning risen land, or as Tanen, meaning submerged land. ... The Queen of Sheba, referred to in the Bible, the Quran, and Ethiopic history, was the ruler of Sheba, which modern archeology places in present-day Yemen. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... For other uses, see Ra (disambiguation). ... A rakshasa (Sanskrit: रक्षस, raká¹£asa; alternately, raksasa or rakshas) is a demon or evil spirit in Hinduism. ... This image from a 17th century Icelandic manuscript shows Ratatoskr with a horn. ... Bloody Bones is a hobgoblin feared by children. ... Rusalka may refer to: Rusalkas, Slavic water nymphs. ... Saint Brigid of Ireland (Bridget, Bridgit, Brigit, Bride) (451- 525) was born at Faughart near Dundalk, County Louth, Ireland. ... A bald, bearded, horse-tailed satyr balances a winecup on his erect penis, a trick worthy of note, on an Attic red-figured psykter, ca. ... In Egyptian mythology, Seker is a god of craftsmen, the dead and funerals. ... Set In Ancient Egyptian mythology, Set (also spelled Seth, Sutekh or Seteh) is an ancient god, who was originally the god of the desert, storms, and chaos. ... Sha Wujing Sha Wujing (沙悟凈 WG: Sha Wu-ching) is one of the three helpers of Xuanzang in the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West. ... In Yorùbá mythology, Shango (Xango, Shango), or Changó in Latin America, is perhaps the most popular Orisha; he is a Sky Father, god of thunder and lightning. ... For other uses, see Shiva (disambiguation). ... Sobek (from the Temple of Kom Ombo) or Sebek, Sochet, Sobk, Sobki, Soknopais, and in Greek, Suchos) was the deification of crocodiles, and was originally a demon, as crocodiles were deeply feared in the nation so dependent on the Nile River. ... This article is about the Vedic plant and ritual. ... Spriggans are diminutive members of the faerie kingdom, more closely related to sprites and boggles than goblins and dwarves. ... The Buile Shuibhne is the tale of Sweeney, a legendary king of Ulster in Ireland. ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... Thoth (Ramesseum, Luxor) Thoth (his Greek name derived from the Egyptian *, written by Egyptians as ) was considered one of the most important deities of the Egyptian pantheon, often depicted with the head of an ibis. ... Depiction of a Thunderbird on a Totem Pole The mythological Thunderbird is a mythical creature common to Indigenous spirituality in North America . ... For other uses, see Troll (disambiguation). ... Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Iram of the Pillars. ... In Norse Mythology Urd (ON: Urðr) is one of the three Norns (old crones). ... Gamla Uppsala is an area rich in archaeological remains seen from the grave field whose larger mounds (left part) are close to the royal mounds. ... This is one of Odins Halls, a great dwelling built and roofed with pure silver. ... This article is about the Valkyries, figures of Norse mythology. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... Voodoo is a religious tradition originating in West Africa, which became prominent in the New World due to the importation of African slaves. ... Ewe Vudusi,Togo West Africa Vodou ceremony, Jacmel, Haiti. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Wisakedjak was a trickster god in Cree mythology, similar to Nanabozho in Ojibwa myth and Inktonme in Assiniboine myth. ... This is the article about the belief in Odin among West Germanic peoples, for other uses see Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Yggdrasil (disambiguation). ... In Yorùbá mythology, Yemoja is a mother goddess; patron deity of women, especially pregnant women; and the Ogun river (the waters of which are said to cure infertility). ... Ymir is killed by the sons of Borr in this artwork by Lorenz Frølich In Norse mythology, Ymir, also named Aurgelmir (Old Norse gravel-yeller) among the giants themselves, was the founder of the race of frost giants and an important figure in Norse cosmology. ... In Vodun, and especially in Haiti, Azaka-Tonnerre (also Azaca) is the loa of agriculture and thunder. ... For other uses see Zombie (disambiguation) A zombie is a kind of undead, or figuratively, a very apathetic person. ... In Slavic mythology, the Zorya (alternately: Zarya, Zvezda, Zwezda) are the three (sometimes two) guardian goddesses, known as the Auroras. ...

See also

Translations

  • Ameerika jumalad (Estonian),
  • Amerykańscy bogowie (Polish), ISBN 83-89004-10-0
  • Zei Americani (Romanian), ISBN 973-733-070-6
  • אלים אמריקאים (Elim Amerikaim) (Hebrew)
  • American Gods (Italian), ISBN 88-04-52083-3
  • Deuses Americanos (Portuguese)
  • Američtí bohové (Czech), ISBN 80-85911-98-1
  • Unohdetut jumalat ("Forgotten Gods") (Finnish), ISBN 951-1-18055-X
  • Amerikai Istenek (Hungarian), ISBN 9639441538
  • American Gods (Spanish), ISBN 84-8431-627-0
  • Američki Bogovi (Croatian), ISBN 953-220-126-2
  • Američki Bogovi (Serbian), ISBN 86-7436-039-4
  • Американские боги (Russian), ISBN 5-17-019844-2
  • Amerikos Dievai (Lithuanian), ISBN 9986-97-101-2
  • Amerikan Tanrıları (Turkish), ISBN 9789751019042
  • American Gods (German), ISBN 3-453-40037-2
  • Amerikanska Gudar (Swedish), ISBN 91-3712-227-4
  • 美國眾神 (Chinese), ISBN 978-986-7399-84-7

Hebrew redirects here. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Traditional Chinese (Traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字, Simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字) refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ...

Miscellaneous

In the acknowledgements of American Gods, Gaiman offers interested readers information on acquiring a tape or cd of the music of The House on the Rock. Write to: The House on the Rock, Spring Green, WI 53588 USA, or call (608) 935-3639.


References

  1. ^ *Gaiman, Neil. "Kids! Free! Book!", Neil Gaiman's Journal, 2008-02-28. Retrieved on 2008-02-29. 
  2. ^ *Gaiman, Neil. "Neil Gaiman - September 2001", Neil Gaiman's Journal, 2001-09-25. Retrieved on 2007-01-03. 
  3. ^ Honor roll:Fiction books. Award Annals (2007-08-16). Retrieved on 2007-08-16.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Preceded by
The Quantum Rose
by Catherine Asaro
Nebula Award for Best Novel
2002
Succeeded by
The Speed of Dark
by Elizabeth Moon
Preceded by
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
by J.K. Rowling
Hugo Award for Best Novel
2002
Succeeded by
Hominids
by Robert J. Sawyer
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Quantum Rose is a novel by Catherine Asaro which tells the story of Kamoj Aragali. ... Photo by Hugh Talman Catherine Asaro (born 1955) is an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Winners of the Nebula Award for Best Novel. ... See also: 2001 in literature, other events of 2002, 2003 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Speed of Dark is a near-future science fiction novel by American author Elizabeth Moon, first published as a paperback in 2002. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Elizabeth Moon, born 1945 March 7, is an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... HP4 redirects here. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: roll-ing; her former students used to joke with her name calling her the Rolling Stone), is a British fiction writer. ... The Hugo Awards are given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ... See also: 2001 in literature, other events of 2002, 2003 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Neanderthal Parallax is a trilogy of novels by Robert J. Sawyer. ... Robert J. Sawyer is a Canadian hard science fiction writer, born in Ottawa in 1960 and now resident in Mississauga. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
American Gods - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (663 words)
American Gods is a novel by Neil Gaiman.
The novel is a blend of Americana, fantasy, and various strands of ancient and modern mythology, all centering on a mysterious and taciturn protagonist, Shadow.
Wednesday is recruiting American manifestations of the Old Gods of ancient mythology, whose powers have waned as their believers have decreased in number, to participate in an epic battle against the New American Gods, manifestations of modern life and technology (e.g.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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