FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > American Express
American Express Company
Type Public (NYSEAXP)
Founded 1850
Headquarters New York, New York
Key people Kenneth Chenault,
Chairman & CEO
Industry Finance and Insurance
Products Financial services
Revenue $27.136 billion USD (2006) [1]
Net income $3.707 billion USD (2006) [2]
Employees 65,800 (2005)
Slogan Do More
Website www.americanexpress.com

American Express (NYSEAXP), sometimes known as "AmEx" or "Amex", is a diversified global financial services company, headquartered in New York City. The company is best known for its credit card, charge card and traveler's cheque businesses. American Express logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Kenneth Irvine Chenault (born 2 June 1951) is a former president (1997-2001) and current Chief Executive Officer (2001-present) of American Express. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... “Chief executive” redirects here. ... Finance and Insurance is an industry group that mainly handles the transfer of paper and money, financial assets. These include: Accounting, Asset Management, Electronic Communications Networks, Financial Services Regulatory Agencies, Investment Banking Investment Firms, Investment Funds, Lending, Outsourced Financial Products & Services Marketing, Securities Brokers & Traders, Stock Exchanges, Trade Facilitation, and... Financial services is a term used to refer to the services provided by the finance industry. ... Look up revenue in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... “USD” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Net income is equal to the income that a firm has after subtracting costs and expenses from the total revenue. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... “USD” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about work. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up slogan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... Financial services is a term used to refer to the services provided by the finance industry. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Look up credit card in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A charge card is similar to a credit card, except that the charges made to it must be paid-off each month, rather than having revolving credit which carries a balance forward. ... A travelers cheque (also travellers cheque, travelers check, or travelers cheque) is a preprinted, fixed-amount cheque designed to allow the person signing it to make an unconditional payment to someone else as a result of having paid the issuer (usually a bank) for that privilege. ...


The company's common stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol "AXP." It is one of the 30 stocks that comprise the Dow Jones Industrial Average and is ranked as the 74th largest company by Fortune. In 2007, BusinessWeek and Interbrand ranked American Express as the 15th most valuable brand in the world, estimating the brand to be worth US$20.87 billion.[1] Common stock, also referred to as common shares, are, as the name implies, the most usual and commonly held form of stock in a corporation. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... A stock symbol or ticker symbol is a mnemonic used to uniquely identify publicly-traded shares of a corporation on a particular stock market. ... Linear graph of the DJIA from 1901 until today Logarithmic graph of the DJIA from 1901 until today The Dow Jones Industrial Average (NYSE: DJI, also called the DJIA, Dow 30, or informally the Dow Jones or The Dow) is one of several stock market indices created by nineteenth-century... Fortune magazine is Americas second longest-running business magazine after Forbes magazine. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... Interbrand, a division of Omnicom, is the leading branding company in the world. ... “USD” redirects here. ...


The current CEO is Kenneth Chenault, who took over in 2001. Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Kenneth Irvine Chenault (born 2 June 1951) is a former president (1997-2001) and current Chief Executive Officer (2001-present) of American Express. ...

Contents

History

Early history

American Express was founded in 1850, in Buffalo, New York, as a joint stock corporation that was a merger of the express mail companies owned by Henry Wells (Wells & Company), William Fargo (Livingston, Fargo & Company), and John Butterfield (Butterfield, Wasson & Company), as an express business. [citation needed] American Express first established its headquarters in a building at the intersection of Jay Street and Hudson Street in the TriBeCa section of Manhattan, and enjoyed a virtual monopoly on the movement of express shipments (Goods, Securities, Currency, etc.) throughout New York State. In 1874, American Express moved its headquarters to 65 Broadway in what was becoming the Financial District of Manhattan, a location it was to retain through two buildings[2]. Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State County Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... In most postal systems Express mail refers to an accelerated delivery service for which the customer pays a surcharge and receives faster delivery. ... Henry Wells (December 12, 1805 - December 10, 1878) was an American businessman. ... William George Fargo (May 20, 1818 - August 3, 1881), pioneer American expressman, was born in Pompey, New York. ...


American Express Buildings

In 1854, the American Express Co. purchased a lot on Vesey Street in New York City as the site for its stables. The company's first New York headquarters were in an impressive marble Italianate palazzo at 55-61 Hudson Street between Thomas Street and Jay Street (1857-58, John Warren Ritch), which had a busy freight depot on the ground story with a spur line from the Hudson River Railroad. A stable was constructed nearby at 4-8 Hubert Street , between Hudson Street and Collister Street(1866-67, Ritch & Griffiths), five blocks north of the Hudson Street building.


The company prospered sufficiently that headquarters were moved in 1874 from the wholesale shipping district to the budding Financial District, and into rented offices in two five-story brownstone commercial buildings at 63 and 65 Broadway, between Exchange Alley and Rector Street, and between Broadway and Trinity Place that were owned by the Harmony family[3]. John Rocques Map, 1747 Exchange Alley or Change Alley is a narrow alleyway connecting shops and coffeehouses in an old neighborhood of the City of London, England, bounded by Lombard Street, Cornhill and Birchin Lane. ... Rector Street may refer to: Rector Street (IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line), a New York City Subway station Rector Street (BMT Broadway Line), a New York City Subway station A street in Lower Manhattan Category: ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ...


In 1880, American Express built a new warehouse behind the Broadway Building at 46 Trinity Place, between Exchange Alley and Rector Street. The designer is unknown, but it has a façade of brick arches that are redolent of pre-skyscraper New York. American Express has long been out of this building, but it still bears a terra cotta seal with the American Express Eagle[4]. In 1890-91 the company constructed a new ten-story building by Edward H. Kendall on the site of its former headquarters on Hudson Street. Hudson Street can refer to: The Manhattan street -- see Hudson Street (Manhattan) The 1978 TV series A.E.S. Hudson Street The 1995 TV series Hudson Street -- see Hudson Street (TV show) Category: ...


By 1903, the company had assets of some $28 million, second only to the National City Bank of New York among financial institutions in the city. To reflect this, the company purchased the Broadway buildings and site.


At the end of the Wells-Fargo reign in 1914, an aggressive new president, George Chadbourne Taylor (1868-1923), who had worked his way up through the company over the previous thirty years, decided to build a new headquarters. The old buildings, dubbed by the New York Times as "among the ancient landmarks" of lower Broadway, were inadequate for such a rapidly expanding concern. In March 1914, Renwick, Aspinwall & Tucker filed for the construction of a 32-story concrete-and steel-framed office tower in which all of the company's operations, then in four separate buildings, were to be consolidated. The building proposal of 1914 was abandoned, probably due to the war in Europe, but was resurrected two years later in a reduced form, at an estimated cost of $1 million[3].


The 23-story (plus basement), neo-classical, American Express Co. Building, was constructed in 1916-17 to the design of James L. Aspinwall, of the firm of Renwick, Aspinwall & Tucker, the successor to the architectural practice of the eminent James Renwick, Jr.. The building consolidated the two lots of the former buildings with a single address: 65 Broadway. This building was part of the "Express Row" section of lower Broadway at the time. The concrete-and-steel-framed building has an H-shaped plan with tall slender wings arranged around central light courts, a type of plan employed from the 1880s through the 1910s to provide offices with maximum light and air. Faced in white brick and terra cotta above a granite base, both facades employ the tripartite composition of base-shaft-capital then popular for the articulation of skyscrapers, with a colonnaded base and upper portion. The famous American Express Eagle adorns the building twice: there is an asymmetric eagle on the lower arch, while a symmetric eagle adorns the arch atop the building. The Broadway entrance features a double-story Corinthian colonnade with large arched windows. The building completed the continuous masonry wall of its block-front and assisted in transforming Broadway into the "canyon" of neo-classical masonry office towers familiar to this day[5] James Renwick, Jr. ...


American Express sold this building in 1975, but retained travel services here. The building was also the headquarters over the years of other prominent firms, including investment bankers J.& W. Seligman & Co. (1940-74), the American Bureau of Shipping, a maritime concern (1977-86), and currently J.J. Kenny, and Standard & Poors, who has renamed the building for itself[3][5]


American Express extended its reach nationwide by arranging affiliations with other express companies, (including Wells, Fargo – the replacement for the two former companies that merged to form American Express.) railroads, and steamship companies[2]. In 1882, American Express started its expansion in the area of financial services by launching its money order business[2]. to compete with the US Post Office's money orders. This product quickly spread to Europe where no such financial product existed. A money order is a payment order for a pre-specified amount of money. ...


American Express today

Current CEO Kenneth Chenault took over leadership of American Express from Harvey Golub, CEO from 1993 to 2001. Prior to that, it was headed by James D. Robinson III from 1977 to 1993. Harvey Golub was chairman of American Express (1994-2001) ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Sometime between 1888 and 1890, J.C. Fargo took a trip to Europe and returned frustrated and infuriated. Despite the fact that he was president of American Express and that he carried with him traditional letters of credit, he found it difficult to obtain cash anywhere except in major cities. Mr. Fargo went to Marcellus Flemming Berry and asked him to create a better solution than the traditional letter of credit. Mr. Berry created the American Express Travelers Cheque which was launched in 1891 in denominations of $10, $20, $50, and $100.[6] James Congdell Fargo (1829 – 1915) is a former president of American Express. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... After a contract is concluded between buyer and seller, buyers bank supplies a letter of credit to seller. ... A travelers cheque is a preprinted, fixed-amount check designed to allow the person signing it to make an unconditional payment to someone else as a result of having paid the issuer (usually a bank) for that privilege. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The travelers cheque established American Express as a truly international company. In 1914, at the outbreak of the First World War, American Express offices in Europe were among the few companies to honor the letters of credit (issued by various banks) held by Americans in Europe, despite other financial institutions having refused to assist these stranded travellers. “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


American Express became one of the monopolies that President Theodore Roosevelt had the Interstate Commerce Commission investigate during his administration. The interest of the ICC was drawn to its strict control of the railroad express business. However, the solution did not come immediately to hand.[2]. The solution to this problem came as a coincidence to other problems during World War I.


During the winter of 1917, the US suffered a severe coal shortage and on December 26 President Woodrow Wilson commandeered the railroads on behalf of the US government to move US troops, their supplies, and coal. Treasury Secretary William Gibbs McAdoo was assigned the task of consolidating the railway lines for the war effort. All contracts between express companies and railroads were nullified and McAdoo proposed that all existing express companies be consolidated into a single company to serve the country's needs. This ended American Express's express business, and removed them from the ICC’s radar. The result was a new company called the American Railway Express Agency company formed in July 1918. The new entity took custody of all the pooled equipment and property of existing express companies (the largest share of which, 40%, came from American Express, who had owned the rights to the express business over 71,280 miles of railroad lines, and had 10,000 offices, with over 30,000 employees). 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... The Military of the United States, also known as the United States Armed Forces, is structured into five branches consisting of the: United States Army United States Marine Corps United States Navy United States Air Force United States Coast Guard Reserves United States National Guard United States Army Reserve United... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... William Gibbs McAdoo (October 31, 1863–February 1, 1941) was a U.S. Senator and United States Secretary of the Treasury. ... In military affairs, the war effort refers to the harnessing of economic and human resources towards support of a military force. ... The Railway Express Agency was a rail express service, at one point the only one in the United States. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...


Travel Division

American Express established a Travel Division in 1915 that tied together all of the earlier efforts at making travel easier, and soon established its first travel agencies. A travel agency is a business that sells travel related products and services, particularly package tours, to end-user customers on behalf of third party travel suppliers, such as airlines, hotels, tour companies, and cruise lines. ...


Charge card services history

American Express executives discussed the possibility of launching a travel charge card as early as 1946, but it was not until Diners Club launched their own card in March 1950 that American Express began to seriously consider the possibility. At the end of 1957, American Express CEO Ralph Reed decided to get into the card business, and by the launch date of October 1, 1958 public interest had become so significant that they actually issued 250,000 cards prior to the official launch date. The card was launched with an annual fee of $6, $1 higher than Diners Club, to be seen as a premium product. The first cards were paper, with the account number and cardmember's name typed. It was not until 1959 that American Express began issuing embossed ISO 7810 plastic cards, an industry first. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to the patterns of everyday speech. ... A charge card is similar to a credit card, except that the charges made to it must be paid-off each month, rather than having revolving credit which carries a balance forward. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Diners Club International, originally founded as Diners Club, was formed in 1950 by Frank X. McNamara, Ralph Schneider and Alfred Bloomingdale. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Ralph Reed was the CEO of American Express in 1957. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Standards for financial and identity cards are set out by ISO. All credit cards and debit cards, and most ID cards, are the same shape and size ID-1 as specified by the ISO 7810 standard: ID-1 = 85. ...


In 1966, American Express introduced the Gold Card and in 1984 the Platinum Card, clearly defining different market segments within its own business, a practice that has proliferated across a broad array of industries. The Platinum Card was billed as super-exclusive and had a $250 annual fee (it is currently $450). It was offered by invitation only to American Express customers with at least 2 years of tenure, significant spending, and excellent payment history. Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Credit cards A credit card system is a type of retail transaction settlement and credit system, named after the small plastic card issued to users of the system. ... This article is about the year. ... Credit cards A credit card system is a type of retail transaction settlement and credit system, named after the small plastic card issued to users of the system. ... A Market segment is a subgroup of people or organizations sharing one or more characteristics that cause them to have similar product needs. ...


In 1987, American Express introduced the Optima card, their first credit card product. Previously, all American Express cards had to be paid in full each month, but Optima allowed customers to carry a balance (the charge cards also now allow extended payment options on qualifying charges based on credit availability). Although Optima is no longer heavily promoted, Optima and Optima Platinum cards are still available on the American Express website. Today American Express offers a wide range of other credit card products including co-branded cards like the JetBlue Card and the Starwood Preferred Guest Card, as well as other credit cards promoting customer rewards like the Blue from American Express Card and the Blue Cash Rebate Card. Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Look up credit card in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In 1994, the Optima True Grace card was introduced. The card was unique in that it offered a grace period on all purchases whether a balance was carried on the card or not (as opposed to traditional revolving credit cards which charge interest on new purchases if so much as $1 was carried over.) The card was discontinued a few years later; however, the currently-available One from American Express card offers a similar feature called "Interest Protection." Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... In law, a grace period is a period of time during which a particular rule exceptionally does not apply, or only partially applies. ...


In 1999, American Express introduced the Centurion Card which is often referred to as the "black card," catering to an even more affluent and elite customer segment. Again, this card is only available by invitation. The card charged a $1,000 annual fee at the time of its introduction (today, it is $2,500 with an additional one-time initiation fee to be disclosed) and offered (and continues to offer) a variety of exclusive benefits. There have always been rumors of a super-exclusive card that gives American Express' richest and most powerful customers special perks. It was this rumor that caused Amex to profit off the word-of-mouth and sparked the launch of Centurion.[7] This article is about the year. ... “Black card” redirects here. ...


The company made another addition to its products in 1999 by introducing Blue from American Express, which quickly became a popular card among young adults due to an appealing marketing campaign directed towards a youthful demographic. Based on a successful product for the European market, Blue had no annual fee, a rewards program, and a multi-functional onboard chip. A cashback version, "Blue Cash", quickly followed. The general term Young adult refers to different age groups based on context: In popular usage, young adult is a euphemism for an adolescent. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... When accepting payment by credit card, merchants typically pay a percentage of the transaction amount in commission to their bank or merchant services provider. ...


American Express also launched an exclusive agreement with Costco in 1999, replacing an earlier agreement with Discover Card. Under the agreement, American Express cards replaced Discover as the only credit/charge card accepted at the warehouse club in the US, and American Express became the first and only credit/charge card accepted at Costco's locations outside the US. To introduce Costco members to American Express, a no-annual-fee co-branded cashback credit card was also introduced. An added benefit of the agreement for the Costco member is the annual Costco membership fee is billed the American Express card. The agreement was highly successful and was renewed in 2004 for an additional 10 years. Costco Wholesale Corporation (NASDAQ: COST) is the largest membership warehouse club chain in the world based on sales volume, headquartered in Issaquah, Washington, United States,[1] with its flagship warehouse in nearby Seattle. ... Discover Network acceptance mark Discover Card is one of the four major credit card brands issued primarily in the United States, with over 50 million cardholders. ... A warehouse club is a retail store selling a small amount of merchandise in terms of variety. ... When accepting payment by credit card, merchants typically pay a percentage of the transaction amount in commission to their bank or merchant services provider. ...


As of 2005, the US Centurion card has a $2500 annual fee, while other American Express cards range between no annual fee (for Blue and many other consumer and business cards) and a $450 annual fee (for the Platinum Card.) Annual fees for the Green card start at $95, while Gold card annual fees start at $125. 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2005, American Express introduced Clear, advertised as the first credit card with no fees of any kind. It also incorporates the ExpressPay technology premiered with the Blue card. Also in 2005, American Express introduced One, a credit card with a "Savings Accelerator Plan" that contributes 1% of eligible purchases into an FDIC-insured High-Yield Savings Account. Other cards introduced in 2005 included "The Knot" and "The Nest" Credit Cards from American Express, co-branded cards developed with the wedding planning website theknot.com. They have also introduced City Reward Cards that earn INSIDE Rewards points to eat, drink, and play at New York, Chicago and LA hot spots. Newer American Express credit cards come with a feature known as ExpressPay. ... The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) was created by the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933. ... Explicit Deposit insurance is a measure introduced by policy makers in many countries to protect deposits, in full or in part, in the event of a run on a bank or banks. ... The passbook is the traditional document to keep track of earnings in a savings account Savings accounts are accounts maintained by commercial banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, and mutual savings banks that pay interest but can not be used directly as money (by, for example, writing a cheque). ...


Also in 2005, American Express introduced ExpressPay, a MasterCard#PayPass clone, based on a wireless RFID payment method, that requires a card to simply be waved in front of a special reader and not swiped. This technology replaced the smart chip on the Blue card. Many US merchant and restaurant partners including 7-Eleven, CVS/pharmacy, McDonald's, Regal Entertainment Group, and Ritz Camera, now offer ExpressPay at most or all of their locations. The technology was tested on the ski bus from Salt Lake City to local resorts. Newer American Express credit cards come with a feature known as ExpressPay. ... MasterCard Worldwide (NYSE: MA) is a membership organization owned by the 25,000+ financial institutions that issue its card. ... An EPC RFID tag used for Wal-Mart Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method, relying on storing and remotely retrieving data using devices called RFID tags or transponders. ... For other uses, see 7-Eleven (disambiguation). ... CVS/pharmacy (also CVS) is a pharmacy and convenience store chain in the United States. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Regal Entertainment Group (NYSE: RGC) is North Americas largest movie theatre chain, operating 6,273 screens in 584 locations in 40 U.S. states. ... Ritz Camera Centers is a company which operates more than one thousand stores under the names Ritz Camera, Wolf Camera, Kits Cameras, Inkleys and The Camera Shop offering cameras, film, photofinishing, and related products and services. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is Salt Lake Citys top tourist draw. ...


In 2006, the UK division of American Express licensed the Product Red brand and began to issue a Red Card. With each card member purchase the company contributes to good causes through The Global Fund to help African women and children suffering from HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases. Product Red (styled (PRODUCT)RED) is a for-profit brand which is licensed to partner companies such as American Express, Apple Inc. ... The American Express Red is an American Express credit card which has been launched for the first time in the United Kingdom in March 2006. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In 2007, American Express again raised the annual fee for their American Platinum charge cards, moving the Personal cards fee to $450, and the Business division to $395. With the increase, customers now receive four complimentary companion coach tickets per calendar year. Additionally, a long rumored "relationship" fee of $5,000 to establish a Centurion card was added. The annual fee of $2,500 remains the same, however.


Features: Some versions of the card include various features such as Damage waiver on cars rented with the card, and accident insurance during travel bought with the card. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


The "Boston Fee Party"

From the early 1980s until the early 1990s, American Express was known for cutting its merchant fees (also known as a "discount rate") to merchants and restaurants if they accepted only American Express and no other credit or charge cards. This prompted competitors such as Visa and MasterCard to cry foul for a while as the tactics "locked" restaurants into American Express. Interchange fee is a term used in commerce to describe fees charged to retailers and other merchants by an acquiring bank each time credit or debit cards, such as those issued by Visa or MasterCard affiliated banks are used to pay for a purchase. ...


However, in 1991, several restaurants in Boston started accepting and encouraging the use of Visa and MasterCard because of their far lower fees as compared to American Express's fees at the time (which were about 4% for each transaction versus around 1.2% at the time for Visa and MasterCard). A few even stopped accepting American Express credit and charge cards. The revolt, known as the "Boston Fee Party" in reference to the Boston Tea Party, quickly spread nationwide to over 250 restaurants across the US, including restaurants in other cities such as New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles. In response, American Express decided to reduce its discount rate gradually to compete more effectively and add new merchants to its network such as supermarkets and drugstores. Many elements of the exclusive acceptance program were also phased out so American Express could effectively encourage businesses to add American Express cards to their existing list of payment options. Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... This article is about a 1773 American protest. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ...


Currently, American Express' average US merchant rate is about 2.5%, while the average Visa/MasterCard credit card US merchant rate is about 2% (Visa/MasterCard signature debit cards are at 1.7%). Some merchant sectors, such as quick-service restaurants including McDonald's, have special reduced rates to accommodate business needs and profit margins. Look up debit card in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ...


Not all the changes from 1991 have taken wind: A very small number of restaurants in major cities still exclusively accept American Express because the vast majority of their customers primarily use Amex cards. Likewise, Neiman Marcus accepts only American Express and their store card; however, the current exclusive agreement with American Express is due to expire soon and may not be renewed as an exclusive agreement. Costco also has an exclusivity agreement with American Express; however, Costco's agreement with Amex was the result of a long negotiation process for exclusive acceptance with multiple parties that also included Visa, MasterCard, and Discover. Categories: Stub | Retail companies of the United States ... Costco Wholesale Corporation (NASDAQ: COST) is the largest membership warehouse club chain in the world based on sales volume, headquartered in Issaquah, Washington, United States,[1] with its flagship warehouse in nearby Seattle. ...


Financial services history

During the 1980s, American Express embarked on its dream to become a financial services supercompany. In mid-1981 it purchased Shearson Loeb Rhoades Inc the second largest securities firm in the US. In 1984 it purchased the 90-year old Investors Diversified Services, bringing with it a fleet of financial advisors and investment products. Also in 1984, American Express acquired the investment banking and trading firm, Lehman Brothers Kuhn Loeb, and added it to the Shearson family, creating Shearson Lehman/American Express. In 1988, the Firm acquired E.F. Hutton, forming Shearson Lehman Hutton until 1990, when the Firm's name became Shearson Lehman Brothers. When Harvey Golub took the reins in 1993 he negotiated the sale of Shearson's retail brokerage and asset management business to Primerica and in following year, spun-off of the remaining investment banking and institutional businesses as Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. Ameriprise logo Ameriprise Financial, Inc. ... Investment banks help companies and governments (or their agencies) raise money by issuing and selling securities in the capital markets (both equity and debt). ... Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. ... Please see Edward Hutton for the Russian-born New York dentist Dr. Edward F. Hutton. ... Investment management is the professional management of various securities (shares, bonds etc) assets (e. ... Primerica Financial Services (PFS) is the name of a division of Citigroup, which engages in multi-level marketing of financial services, particularly life insurance. ... Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. ...


In April 1992, American Express spun off its subsidiary, First Data Corp., in an IPO. Then, in October 1996, the company distributed the remaining majority of its holdings in First Data Corp., reducing its ownership to less than 5%. Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... First Data Corporation (NYSE: FDC) is a payment processing company based in Greenwood Village, Colorado. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


In December 2000, American Express agreed to acquire the credit card portfolio of Bank of Hawaii, then a division of Pacific Century Financial Corp. Bank of Hawaii, along with its sister bank, Pacific Century Bank, became the first U.S. banks to issue American Express cards when the deal was completed the following year. In January 2006, American Express sold its Bank of Hawaii card portfolio to Bank of America (MBNA). Bank of America will issue Visa and American Express cards under the Bank of Hawaii name. Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Bank of Hawaii is a regional commercial bank headquarted in Honolulu, Hawaii, owned by Bank of Hawaii Corporation (NYSE: BOH). ... Bank of America (NYSE: BAC TYO: 8648 ) is the largest commercial bank in the United States in terms of deposits, and the largest company of its kind in the world. ... MBNA logo, 2004-2006 MBNA Corporation was a bank holding company headquartered in Wilmington, Delaware, prior to being acquired by Bank of America in 2005. ... Visa is a brand of credit card and debit card operated by the Visa International Service Association of San Francisco, California, USA, an economic joint venture of 21,000 financial institutions that issue and market Visa products. ...


In January 2004, American Express reached a deal to have its cards issued by a U.S. bank, MBNA America. Initially decried by MasterCard executives as nothing but an "experiment", these cards were released in October of 2004. Some said that the relationship was going to be threatened by MBNA's merger with Bank of America, a major Visa issuer and original developer of VISA. However, an agreement was reached between American Express and Bank of America on December 21, 2005. Under the terms of the agreement, Bank of America will own the customer loans and American Express will process the transactions. Also, American Express will dismiss Bank of America from its antitrust litigation against Visa, MasterCard and a number of U.S. banks. Finally, both Bank of America and American Express also said an existing card-issuing partnership between MBNA and American Express will continue after the Bank of America-MBNA merger. The first card from the partnership, the no-annual-fee Bank of America Rewards American Express card, was released on June 30, 2006. MBNA logo, 2004-2006 MBNA Corporation was a bank holding company headquartered in Wilmington, Delaware, prior to being acquired by Bank of America in 2005. ... MasterCard Worldwide (NYSE: MA) is a membership organization owned by the 25,000+ financial institutions that issue its card. ... Visa is a brand of credit card and debit card operated by the Visa International Service Association of San Francisco, California, USA, an economic joint venture of 21,000 financial institutions that issue and market Visa products. ...


Since then, Citibank, GE Money, and USAA have also started issuing American Express cards. Citibank currently issues several American Express cards including an American Airlines AAdvantage co-branded card, while GE is currently issuing a co-branded card for Dillard's. HSBC Bank USA will also introduce co-branded American Express cards later this year for several of its private-label retail partners; however, those partners have yet to be announced at this time. Also, UBS launched its Resource Card program for US Wealth Management clients issuing Visa Signature credit cards and American Express charge cards linked to their customers accounts and employing a single rewards program for the two cards. Citibank is a major international bank, founded in 1812 as the City Bank of New York. ... GE Money is the direct-to-consumer financial services arm of General Electric, one of the largest companies in the world. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... American Airlines, Inc. ... AAdvantage is the frequent flyer program of American Airlines (AA). ... This article is about a department store chain. ... HSBC Holdings PLC (NYSE: HBC), (LSE: HSBA), (HKSE: 005), (Euronext: HSBC), is one of the largest banking groups in the world. ... UBS can refer to: UBS AG, a banking group Unbundled Bitstream Services United Building Society - the name of several financial institutions in different countries around the world. ...


In 2005, American Express released the American Express Travelers Cheque Card, a stored-value card that serves the same purposes as a traveler's cheque, but can be used in stores like a credit card. A stored-value card represents money on deposit with the issuer, and is similar to a debit card. ... A travelers cheque (also travellers cheque, travelers check, or travelers cheque) is a preprinted, fixed-amount cheque designed to allow the person signing it to make an unconditional payment to someone else as a result of having paid the issuer (usually a bank) for that privilege. ...


On 30 September, 2005, American Express spun off its American Express Financial Advisors unit as a publicly traded company, Ameriprise Financial, Inc.. Due to this, American Express revenues for 2005 are down around $5 billion, however, like-for-like they are up 10.5% in 2005. Also, on September 30, 2005, RSM McGladrey acquired American Express Tax & Business Services (TBS). is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ameriprise Financial, Inc. ... RSM McGladrey, Inc. ...


Advertising

In 1975, David Ogilvy of Ogilvy & Mather developed the highly successful "Don't Leave Home Without It" ad campaign for American Express Traveler's Cheques, featuring Oscar-award-winning actor Karl Malden. Karl Malden served as the public face of American Express Travelers Cheques for twenty-five years. His television ads were a combination of suspense, excitement, news, and a compelling call to action. First, you would see a thief stealing money from some poor unsuspecting tourist's wallet or beach bag or hotel room. Then Karl would arrive on the scene looking like the cop he played in the famous television series, Streets of San Francisco. He would say, "This could happen to you!" And then the call to action: "Don't let a thief spoil your vacation. Get American Express Travelers Cheques. Don't leave home without them." After Karl Malden's departure, and the card was promoted over the traveller's cheques, American Express continued to use celebrities. A typical ad for the American Express Card showed a celebrity saying "Do you know me?", giving some hints, but the person's name was never mentioned except as imprinted on an American Express card. The "Don't Leave Home Without It" slogan was revived in 2005 for the prepaid American Express Travelers Cheque Card. Cover David MacKenzie Ogilvy (June 23, 1911–July 21, 1999), was a notable advertising executive. ... Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide is an advertising agency that has a worldwide presence. ... An advertising campaign is a series of advertisement messages that share a single idea and theme which make up an integrated marketing communication (IMC). ... Karl Malden (born on March 22, 1912) is an Emmy Award-winning, Oscar-winning and Golden Globe-nominated American actor, known for his expansive manner. ... The Streets of San Francisco was a television police drama set in San Francisco, California in the 1970s. ...

  • Sesame Street parodied the "Do you know me?/Don't Leave Home Without It" ad campaigns with two skits involving holding a grownup's hand while crossing the street. One skit had Forgetful Jones and the other had Bert and Ernie. Both skits ended with their names being embossed onto a card looking like an American Express card, and a voiceover saying "A grownup's hand. Don't cross the street without it."

To this day, American Express continues to use celebrities in their ads. Some notable examples include a late 1990s ad campaign with comedian Jerry Seinfeld, including the two 2004 webisodes in a series entitled "The Adventures of Seinfeld and Superman." In late 2004, American Express launched the "My life. My card." brand campaign (also by Ogilvy & Mather) featuring famous American Express cardmembers talking about their life. The ads have featured actors Kate Winslet, Robert De Niro, Ken Watanabe, Duke University basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski, Comedian and talk show hostess Ellen DeGeneres, Professional golfer Tiger Woods, US Open tennis pros Venus Williams and Andy Roddick, Chelsea Football Club manager José Mourinho, and film directors Martin Scorsese, Wes Anderson, M. Night Shyamalan and most recently superstar Beyonce Knowles. In 2007, a two-minute black-and-white ad entitled "Animals" starring Ellen DeGeneres won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Commercial. Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Bert hosting a convention of the National Association of W Lovers meeting Bert is a fictional character, a Muppet on the Public Broadcasting Services long-running childrens television show, Sesame Street. ... For other uses, see Ernie (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Seinfeld_superman. ... Image File history File links Seinfeld_superman. ... Seinfeld and Superman walking in A Uniform Used to Mean Something. ... This article is about the comedian. ... A webisode is an episode of a television show that airs initially as an Internet download or stream as opposed to first airing on broadcast or cable television. ... Seinfeld and Superman walking in A Uniform Used to Mean Something. ... Kate Elizabeth Winslet (born October 5, 1975) is a five time Academy Award-nominated Emmy Award-nominated BAFTA, Grammy and Screen Actors Guild Award winning English actress. ... Robert De Niro in 1988 Robert De Niro (born August 17, 1943) is a two-time Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American film actor, director, and producer. ... Ken Watanabe , born October 21, 1959) is a Japanese Oscar-nominated stage, film, and television actor. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A talk show (U.S.) or chat show (Brit. ... Ellen Lee DeGeneres (born January 26, 1958) is an American stand-up comedian, actress, and currently the Emmy Award-winning host of the syndicated talk show The Ellen DeGeneres Show. ... In golf the distinction between amateurs and professionals is rigorously maintained. ... Personal Information Birth December 30, 1975 ) Cypress, California Height 6 ft 1 in (1. ... For other uses, see U.S. Open. ... Venus Ebone Starr Williams (born June 17, 1980 in Lynwood, California) is an American professional tennis player. ... Andrew Stephen Andy Roddick (born August 30, 1982) is an American professional tennis player and a former World No. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as the Blues, previously also known as the Pensioners), founded in 1905, is a Premier League football team that plays at Stamford Bridge football ground in west London. ... José Mário dos Santos Mourinho Félix, commonly known as José Mourinho, GOIH (pron. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... Wesley Wales Anderson (born May 1, 1969) is an American writer, producer, and director of films and commercials. ... Manoj Nelliattu Shyamalan (born August 6, 1970), known professionally as M. Night Shyamalan, //, is an Academy Award nominated screenwriter and director, who also performs smaller roles in his own movies. ... Beyoncé in 2004 with her five Grammys. ... Ellen Lee DeGeneres (born January 26, 1958) is an American stand-up comedian, actress, and currently the Emmy Award-winning host of the syndicated talk show The Ellen DeGeneres Show. ... An Emmy Award. ...


Many American Express credit card ads feature a sample American Express card with the name "C F Frost" on the front. This is not a fabricated name, as Charles F. Frost was an advertising executive.[8]


In addition, American Express was one of the earliest users of cause marketing, to great success. A 1983 promotion advertised that for each purchase made with an American Express card, American Express would contribute one penny to the renovation of the Statue of Liberty. The campaign generated contributions of $1.7 million to the Statue of Liberty restoration project. What would soon capture the attention of marketing departments of major corporations was that the promotion generated approximately a 28% increase in American Express card usage by consumers. Building on its earlier promotion, American Express later conducted a four-year Charge Against Hunger program, which generated approximately $22 million for a charity addressing poverty and hunger relief. In 2006, as part of Bono's Product Red, American Express launched the American Express Red Card. The card, currently available only in the United Kingdom, makes a donation to fight AIDS with every purchase made using the card. In May of 2007, American Express launched an initiative called the "membersproject" [3]. Cardholders were invited to submit ideas for projects and American Express is funding the winning (provide clean drinking water) project $2 million. Cause marketing or cause-related marketing refers to a type of marketing involving the cooperative efforts of a for profit business and a non-profit organization for mutual benefit. ... For other monuments to freedom, see Monument of Liberty. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ... Hunger is a feeling experienced when the glycogen level of the liver falls below a threshold, usually followed by a desire to eat. ... Product Red (styled (PRODUCT)RED) is a for-profit brand which is licensed to partner companies such as American Express, Apple Inc. ... The American Express Red is an American Express credit card which has been launched for the first time in the United Kingdom in March 2006. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


Workplace

Offices

In April 1986 American Express moved its headquarters to Three World Financial Center in New York City. The 51-story building was an architectural triumph and noted as a significant and important addition to the city. After the events of September 11, 2001, American Express had to leave its headquarters temporarily as it was located directly opposite to the World Trade Center and was damaged during the fall of the towers. The American Express tower became the backdrop to efforts in rescue, recovery, and reconstruction at Ground Zero. The company began gradually moving back into its rehabilitated building in 2002. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1040x1257, 455 KB) Summary The World Financial Center in New York City, as seen from the Hudson River. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1040x1257, 455 KB) Summary The World Financial Center in New York City, as seen from the Hudson River. ... Three World Financial Center Three World Financial Center is one of the thirty tallest skyscrapers in New York City, located on West Street between Liberty and Vesey Streets in Lower Manhattan. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Three World Financial Center Three World Financial Center is one of the largest skyscrapers in New York City, located on West Street between Liberty and Vesey Streets in Lower Manhattan. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... Ground zero is the exact location on the ground where any explosion occurs. ...


The company also has major offices in Fort Lauderdale, FL; Salt Lake City, UT; Greensboro, NC and Phoenix, AZ. The main data center is located in Phoenix, with a secondary back-up facility in the Boston area.


Amex Canada is based just north of Toronto, in the City of Markham. AMEX Bank of Canada is a unit of American Express Canada (AMEX Canada) and is owned by American Express of the United States. ... Map showing Markhams location in York Region Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario Regional Municipality York Region Communities Buttonville, Thornhill, German Mills, Milliken, Unionville Settled 1794 Incorporated 1972 (town) Government  - Mayor Frank Scarpitti  - Deputy Mayor Jim Jones  - Regional Councillors Jack Heath, Tony Wong, Gordon Landon  - MPs Susan Kadis (LPC) - Thornhill...


American Express has a European Service Center in Brighton, England. It is a large 1970s-built white tower block, surrounded by several other smaller offices around the city. The official UK HQ is located in London at Belgrave House on Buckingham Palace Road, SW1; other important UK offices are based in Sussex at Burgess Hill. Brighton is located on the south coast of England, and together with its immediate neighbour Hove forms the city of Brighton and Hove. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Sussex is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. ... , Burgess Hill is a town and civil parish within the Mid Sussex district of West Sussex, England, close to the border with East Sussex. ...


The Asia-Pacific Headquarters is located in Singapore, at 16 Collyer Quay. Map showing general definition of Asia-Pacific The term Asia-Pacific generally applies to littoral East Asia, Southeast Asia and Australasia near the Pacific Ocean, plus the states in the ocean itself (Oceania). ... Collyer Quay Collyer Quay (Chinese: 哥烈码头) is a road in Downtown Core, Singapore that starts after Fullerton Road and ends at the junction of Raffles Quay, Finlayson Green and Marina Boulevard. ...


The headquarters of the Latin America & Caribbean division is in Miami. Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... “West Indian” redirects here. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ...


Diversity

American Express was named one of the 100 Best Companies for Working Mothers living in the U.S. in 2006 by U.S. based Working Mothers magazine.


Acquisition of American Express Bank Ltd. by Standard Chartered plc

On 18th of September 2007, it was announced that Standard Chartered plc agreed to acquire American Express Bank Ltd, a commercial bank, from American Express Co, for an estimated $1.1 billion, through a friendly divestiture process. The transaction is currently subject to regulatory approvals. Lehman Brothers is advising American Express in this deal. Standard Chartered Bank (LSE: STAN, SEHK: 2888) is a British bank headquartered in London with operations in more than fifty countries. ... Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. ...


Management and corporate governance

Key executives include:[9]

Current members of the board of directors of American Express include:[11] Kenneth Irvine Chenault (born 2 June 1951) is a former president (1997-2001) and current Chief Executive Officer (2001-present) of American Express. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... “Chief executive” redirects here. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... “CFO” redirects here. ... This article is about human resources, as it applies to business, labor, and economies. ... John Daniel Hayes, (Born 23 January 1902 in New York City - died on 29 March 1991 in Cary, North Carolina) was a rear admiral in the United States Navy and a naval historian. ... The discipline of brand management was started at Procter & Gamble PLC as a result of a famous memo by Neil H. McElroy. ... The Chief Marketing Officer, or CMO, is a job title for an executive responsible for various marketing-related activities within an organization. ... A General Counsel is the chief lawyer of a legal department, usually in a corporation or government department. ... The chief information officer or CIO is a job title for the head of the information technology group within an organization. ... In relation to a company, a director is an officer (that is, someone who works for the company) charged with the conduct and management of its affairs. ...

Daniel F. Akerson is a Managing Director of The Carlyle Group and is Co-Head of the U.S. Buyout fund. ... Managing director is the term used for the chief executive of many limited companies in the United Kingdom, Commonwealth and some other English speaking countries. ... The Carlyle Group is a Washington, DC based global private equity investment firm with more than $18 billion of equity capital. ... Charlene Barshefsky (Chinese name: 白茜芙) served as United States Trade Representative, the countrys top trade negotiator, from 1997 to 2001. ... The Office of the United States Trade Representative, or USTR, is an arm of the executive branch of the United States government that falls within the Executive Office of the President. ... Ursula M. Burns (New York, New York, September 20, 1958 - ) is president of Business Group Operations at Xerox Corporation, Stamford, Connecticut. ... Xerox Corporation (NYSE: XRX) is the worlds largest supplier of toner-based (dry ink) photocopier machines and associated supplies. ... Kenneth Irvine Chenault (born 2 June 1951) is a former president (1997-2001) and current Chief Executive Officer (2001-present) of American Express. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Peter Chernin (born May 29, 1951 in Harrison, New York) is President and Chief Operating Officer of News Corporation, and Chairman and CEO of the Fox Group. ... A Chief Operating Officer (COO) is a corporate officer responsible for managing the day-to-day activities of the corporation. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest Media conglomerates. ... ... Lazard LLC NYSE: LAZ is a New York-based, independent investment bank with more than 2,500 employees in Asia, North America, and Europe. ... Jan Leschly is the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Care Capital LLC, a private equity firm, May 2000 to present. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Richard Charles Levin (b. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... On September 30, 1996, AT&T spun off its Systems and Technology units (AT&T Technologies, Inc. ... A partnership is a type of business entity in which partners share with each other the profits or losses of the business undertaking in which all have invested. ... Edward D. Miller, former President and Chief Executive Officer of AXA Financial, Inc. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Not to be confused with Sun Life Financial. ... Frank Popoff is the Chairman of Chemical Financial Corporation, a bank holding company, April 2004 to present. ... In 1971 an ambitious 26-year-old Harvard MBA named Robert D. Walter purchased Cardinal Foods, a small Ohio food wholesaler, in a leveraged buyout. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Cardinal Health (NYSE: CAH) is a premier, global healthcare company dedicated to making healthcare safer and more productive. ... Ronald Allen Williams is the Chief Executive Officer of Aetna corporation. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Aetna, Inc. ...

References

  1. ^ BusinessWeek/Interbrand 2006 Global Brand Survey
  2. ^ a b c d Kenneth T. Jackson: The Encyclopedia of New York City: The New York Historical Society; Yale University Press; 1995. P. 23.
  3. ^ a b c New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission; December 12, 1995, Designation List 269; LP-1932
  4. ^ White, Norval & Willensky, Elliot; AIA Guide to New York City, 4th Edition; New York Chapter, American Institute of Architects; Crown Publishers/Random House. 2000. ISBN 0-8129-31069-8; ISBN 0-8129-3107-6. p.23.
  5. ^ a b White, Norval & Willensky, Elliot; AIA Guide to New York City, 4th Edition; New York Chapter, American Institute of Architects; Crown Publishers/Random House. 2000. ISBN 0-8129-31069-8; ISBN 0-8129-3107-6. p.22.
  6. ^ Host With The Most, Time Magazine, 9 April 1956 issue
  7. ^ Snopes
  8. ^ Straight Dope
  9. ^ American Express Investor Relations, accessed 04 November 2006
  10. ^ Business Wire: American Express Names Dan Henry as Acting CFO
  11. ^ American Express Investor Relations, accessed 27 January 2007

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) is a professional organization for architects in the United States. ... The American Institute of Architects (AIA) is a professional organization for architects in the United States. ... “TIME” redirects here. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
American Express - GRATIS erbjudande första året! - Ansök om kreditkort från American Express Sverige (177 words)
Här kan du ansöka om ett gratis American Express kreditkort
American Express har idag cirka 55 miljoner Kortmedlemmar världen över.
Aktuella erbjudanden för American Express Kortmedlemmar från världens alla hörn.
American Express : Credit Card Expert (229 words)
Instead of having a cashback offer or loyalty scheme the American Express Red donates 1.25% of everything spent on the card to the Global Fund - financed programs in Africa which help woman and children affected by HIV / Aids.
American Express Red also offers 24hr global assist, Travel accident insurance, purchase protection and more so it really is a case of helping yourself while you help others.
The American Express Red credit card is a decent value proposition.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m