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Encyclopedia > American Enterprise Institute
The American Enterprise Institute's Logo
The American Enterprise Institute's Logo

The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research (AEI) is a neoconservative think tank, founded in 1943. According to the institute its mission "to defend the principles and improve the institutions of American freedom and democratic capitalism — limited government, private enterprise, individual liberty and responsibility, vigilant and effective defense and foreign policies, political accountability, and open debate."[1] AEI is an independent, non-profit organization. It is supported primarily by grants and contributions from foundations, corporations, and individuals. It is located in Washington, DC. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Neoconservatism refers to the political movement, ideology, and public policy goals of new conservatives in the United States, who are mainly characterized by their relatively interventionist and hawkish views on foreign policy, and their lack of support for the small government principles and restrictions on social spending, when compared with... This article is about the institution. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ... The private sector of a nations economy consists of all that is outside the state. ... For other uses, see Liberty (disambiguation). ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... Accountability is a concept in ethics with several meanings. ... Debate (North American English) or debating (British English) is a formal method of interactive and position representational argument. ... A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ... A charitable foundation is a legal categorization of nonprofit organizations that either donate funds and support to other organizations, or provide the sole source of funding for their own activities. ... A corporation (usually known in the United Kingdom and Ireland as a company) is a legal entity (distinct from a natural person) that often has similar rights in law to those of a Civil law systems may refer to corporations as moral persons; they may also go by the name... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...


AEI has emerged as one of the leading architects of the second Bush administration's public policy.[2] More than twenty AEI alumni and current visiting scholars and fellows have served either in a Bush administration policy post or on one of the government's many panels and commissions.[3] Former United States Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz is a visiting scholar, and Lynne Cheney, wife of Vice President Dick Cheney and former chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, is a senior fellow.[4] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The United States Deputy Secretary of Defense is the second-highest ranking official in the United States Department of Defense. ... Paul Dundes Wolfowitz (born December 22, 1943) is a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, working on issues of international economic development, Africa and public-private partnerships. ... A Visiting Scholar is generally a Professor at another institution that visits a receiving University that hosts the visiting scholar in question where he or she is projected to perform research, teach, and/or lecture on any of the wide array of topics of intellectual pursuit. ... Lynne Ann Vincent Cheney (born August 14, 1941) , is a novelist, conservative scholar, and former talk-show host who is the wife of Vice President Richard B. Cheney. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency of the United States established by the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965 (Pub. ...

Contents

Political stance

AEI is often cited as a right-leaning counterpart to the left-leaning Brookings Institution.[5][6] In 1998, AEI and Brookings established the AEI-Brookings Joint Center for Regulatory Studies.[7] In 2006, the two organizations jointly launched the AEI-Brookings Election Reform Project.[8] The centre-right is a political term commonly used to describe or denote political parties or organizations (such as think tanks) that stretch from the centre to the right on the left-right spectrum, excluding far right stances. ... In politics, the term centre-left is commonly used to describe and denote political parties or organisations that stretch from the centre to the left or are moderately left-wing, as opposed to extreme left wing beliefs such as communism. ... The Brookings Institution is a United States nonprofit public policy think tank based in Washington, D.C.. Described in 1977, by TIME magazine as as the nations pre-eminent liberal think tank,[1] the institution is devoted to public service through research and education in the social sciences, particularly... The Brookings Institution is a United States nonprofit public policy think tank based in Washington, D.C.. Described in 1977, by TIME magazine as as the nations pre-eminent liberal think tank,[1] the institution is devoted to public service through research and education in the social sciences, particularly...


AEI has connections with the neoconservative movement in American politics.[9] Irving Kristol, widely regarded as the movement's founder, is a Senior Fellow at AEI. Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ... Irving Kristol (born January 22, 1920, New York City) is considered the founder of American neoconservatism. ...


President and trustees

Current members of the board are: Gordon Binder, Harlan Crow, Chris DeMuth, Morton Fleischer, Chris Galvin, Raymond Gilmartin, Harvey Golub, Robert Greenhill, Roger Hertog, Martin Koffel, John Luke, Ben Lytle, Alex Mandl, Robert Pritzker, Joe Ricketts, Kevin Rollins, John W. Rowe, Edward Rust, William Stavropoulos, Wilson Taylor, Marilyn Ware, and James Q. Wilson. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Bruce Stanley Kovner (born 1945 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American businessman. ... Lee R. Raymond (born August 13, 1938) was the Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of ExxonMobil from 1999 to 2005. ... For other uses, see Exon (disambiguation). ... Gordon Binder is currently managing director of Coastview Capital, LLC, and previously was chairman of Amgen[1]. He joined Amgen in 1982, and previously had executive roles at the United Geophysical Corporation and the System Development Corporation. ... Raymond Gilmartin is a current member of the board of directors at Microsoft and at General Mills. ... Harvey Golub was chairman of American Express (1994-2001) ... Robert Pritzker (1927-) runs the Pritzker Organizations assets. ... J. Joseph Ricketts is the founder and chairman of Ameritrade, a large online discount brokerage based in Omaha, Nebraska. ... Marilyn Ware is the current US ambassador to Finland. ... James Q. Wilson (born May 27, 1931) is the Ronald Reagan professor of public policy at Pepperdine University in California, and a professor emeritus at UCLA. He has a Ph. ...


Emeritus trustees of the organization are: Willard Butcher, Richard Madden, Robert Malott, Paul McCracken, Paul Oreffice, and Henry Wendt.


Scholars and fellows

AEI lists their scholars and fellows on their web site.[11] Some prominent current or former AEI scholars and fellows include the following:

David Hillel Gelernter is a professor of computer science at Yale University. ... Unabomber is a nickname applied to three people: Theodore Kaczynski, an American terrorist. ... John Robert Bolton (born November 20, 1948), is an jewish American diplomat in several Republican administrations, who served as the Permanent US Representative to the UN from August 2005 until December 2006, on a recess appointment. ... ... Lynne Ann Vincent Cheney (born August 14, 1941) , is a novelist, conservative scholar, and former talk-show host who is the wife of Vice President Richard B. Cheney. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Ted Frank is Resident Fellow and Director of the AEI Liability Project at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research. ... The Federalist Society logo, depicting James Madisons silhouette The Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies, most frequently called simply the Federalist Society, began at Yale Law School, Harvard Law School, and the University of Chicago Law School in 1982 as a student organization that challenged the perceived... David J. Frum (born 1960) is a former speechwriter for President George W. Bush, and the author of the first insider book about the Bush presidency. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Reuel Marc Gerecht is the director of the Project for the New American Centurys Middle East Initiative. ... Project for the New American Centurys Logo The Project for the New American Century (PNAC) is an American neoconservative think tank based in Washington, D.C., co-founded as a non-profit educational organization by William Kristol and Robert Kagan in early 1997. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Newton Leroy Gingrich, (born June 17, 1943), served as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1995 to 1999. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... James K Glassman James K. Glassman (born January 1, 1947 in Washington, DC) is an American conservative editorialist, journalist and author. ... Ayaan Hirsi Ali, MA ( ; Somali: ; born Ayaan Hirsi Magan 13 November 1969[2] in Mogadishu, Somalia) is a Dutch feminist and political writer, daughter of the Somali scholar, politician, and revolutionary opposition leader Hirsi Magan Isse. ... Frederick Kagan, brother to foreign policy analyst Robert Kagan, is a professor of military history at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. ... Project for the New American Centurys Logo The Project for the New American Century (PNAC) is an American neoconservative think tank based in Washington, D.C., co-founded as a non-profit educational organization by William Kristol and Robert Kagan in early 1997. ... The Project for the New American Century, or PNAC, is a Washington, DC, USA based think tank. ... Donald Kagan (born 1932) is a Yale historian specializing in ancient Greece, notable for his four-volume history of the Peloponnesian War. ... Alan Keyes (born August 7, 1950) is an American political activist, author and former diplomat. ... Assistant Secretary Kristen Silverberg The Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs is the head of the Bureau of International Organization Affairs within the American Department of State that creates and executes policy in international organizations such as the United Nations. ... Jeane Kirkpatrick Jeane Jordan Kirkpatrick (November 19, 1926 â€“ December 7, 2006) was an American ambassador and an ardent anticommunist. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... Michael Ledeen (born August 1, 1941) is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. ... In the Iran-Contra Affair, United States President Ronald Reagans administration secretly sold arms to Iran, which was engaged in a bloody war with its neighbor Iraq from 1980 to 1988 (see Iran-Iraq War), and diverted the proceeds to the Contra rebels fighting to overthrow the leftist and... American economist, b. ... Monetarism is a set of views concerning the determination of national income and monetary economics. ... Joshua Muravchik is a Jewish author and a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research. ... Charles Murray Charles Alan Murray (born 1943) is a controversial libertarian American political scientist. ... The Bell Curve is a controversial, best-selling 1994 book by Richard J. Herrnstein and Charles Murray exploring the role of genes in American life. ... Michael Novak (born September 9, 1933) is a conservative Roman Catholic American philosopher and diplomat. ... Norman J. Ornstein is a resident scholar at the conservative leaning Washington D.C. thinktank the American Enterprise Institute. ... Richard Norman Perle (born 16 September 1941 in New York City) is an American political advisor and lobbyist who worked for the Reagan administration as an assistant Secretary of Defense and worked on the Defense Policy Board Advisory Committee from 1987 to 2004. ... The Defense Policy Board Advisory Committee (DPBAC or DPB) is a federal advisory committee to the United States Department of Defense. ... The United States Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) is the head of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and military matters. ... Danielle Pletka (born June 12, 1963 in Melbourne, Australia) is the vice-president for Foreign and Defense Policy Studies at the American Enterprise Institute. ... Sally Satel, M.D., is a practicing psychiatrist, a lecturer at Yale University School of Medicine, the W.H. Brady Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and author of (2001) and Drug Treatment: The Case for Coercion (1999). ... It has been suggested that Equity feminism be merged into this article or section. ... Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... This article is about the actor/politician. ... This article is about the original television series. ... Ben J. Wattenberg is a prominent neo-conservative commentator and writer. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Paul Dundes Wolfowitz (born December 22, 1943) is a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, working on issues of international economic development, Africa and public-private partnerships. ... The Presidency of George W. Bush, also known as the George W. Bush Administration, began on his inauguration on January 20, 2001 as the 43rd and current President of the United States of America. ... John Choon Yoo (born 1967), is a professor of Law at the Boalt Hall School of Law, the University of California, Berkeley. ... The Office of Legal Counsel is an American government legal office. ... Boalt Hall The UC Berkeley School of Law, commonly referred to as Boalt Hall, is one of 14 schools and colleges at the University of California, Berkeley. ...

Global warming

In February 2007, a number of sources, including the British newspaper The Guardian reported that the AEI had sent letters to scientists, offering US$10,000 plus travel expenses and additional payments, asking them to critique a consensus report on global warming by the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The letters alleged that the IPCC was "resistant to reasonable criticism and dissent and prone to summary conclusions that are poorly supported by the analytical work" and asked for essays that "thoughtfully explore the limitations of climate model outputs."[13][14][15] According to the Guardian article, the AEI received $1.6 million in funding from ExxonMobil. The article further notes that former ExxonMobil CEO Lee R. Raymond is the vice-chairman of AEI's board of trustees. For other uses, see Guardian. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... IPCC is the science authority for the UNFCCC The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was established in 1988 by two United Nations organizations, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), to evaluate the risk of climate change brought on by humans, based mainly on... For other uses, see Exon (disambiguation). ... Lee R. Raymond has been the chairman and CEO of ExxonMobil since 1999. ...


The Guardian article has been rebutted both by AEI[16] and in an editorial in the Wall Street Journal.[17] The rebuttals claimed factual errors, distortions and extreme lack of balance, noting the ExxonMobil funding was spread out over a ten-year period and totaled less than 1% of AEI's budget. The Wall Street Journal column stated "AEI doesn't lobby, didn't offer money to scientists to question global warming, and the money it did pay for climate research didn't come from Exxon." The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ...


AEI scholars deny that the organization is skeptical about global warming. Criticizing the story as part of a "climate inquisition" published in "the left-wing press", the AEI's Steven Hayward and Kenneth Green wrote in the The Weekly Standard: The Weekly Standard is an American neoconservative [1] magazine published 48 times per year. ...

[I]t has never been true that we ignore mainstream science; and anyone who reads AEI publications closely can see that we are not "skeptics" about warming. It is possible to accept the general consensus about the existence of global warming while having valid questions about the extent of warming, the consequences of warming, and the appropriate responses. In particular, one can remain a policy skeptic, which is where we are today, along with nearly all economists.[18]

Hayward has also stated that "even though the leading scientific journals are thoroughly imbued with environmental correctness and reject out of hand many articles that don’t conform to the party line, a study that confounds the conventional wisdom is published almost every week."[19] He went on to say "Yet the computer climate models remain plagued with weaknesses and biases--from the doubtful emissions forecasts that go into the front end, to assumptions about the linearity of the relationship between greenhouse gases and temperature that affect the results. As MIT climatologist Richard Lindzen argues, the computer models overestimate the sensitivity of climate to greenhouse gases and don’t adequately account for ‘negative forcings’ (the technical term for natural processes that mitigate potential temperature increases). It is likely, in Lindzen’s judgment, that we have already reached the threshold of diminishing ‘positive forcings’ (that is, increases in temperature) from additional greenhouse-gas emissions."[19] (The models that are used for climate projections do not include an assumption of a linear relationship between greenhouse gases and temperature, but instead predict temperature as a result of radiative physics, surface heat transfer, and other processes.)[20] General Circulation Models (GCMs) are a class of computer-driven models for weather forecasting and predicting climate change, where they are commonly called Global Climate Models. ...


AEI scholar Kenneth Green has referred to efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as "the positively silly idea of establishing global-weather control by actively managing the atmosphere’s greenhouse-gas emissions," and endorsed Michael Crichton's novel State of Fear for having "educated millions of readers about climate science." [21] Michael Crichton, pronounced [1], (born October 23, 1942) is an American author, film producer, film director, and television producer. ... State of Fear is a 2004 novel by Michael Crichton published by HarperCollins on December 7, 2004. ...


Funding

AEI has received more than $30 million (combined) in funding from sources including:[citation needed]

The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is a large and influential foundation with about half a billion US dollars in assets. ... The Castle Rock Foundation was founded in 1993 with an endowment of $36,596,253 from the Adolph Coors Foundation. ... The Coors Brewing Company is a regional division of the world’s fifth-largest brewery companies, the Molson Coors Brewing Company. ... The Earhart Foundation is a foundation that funds research and scholarship. ... For other uses, see Exon (disambiguation). ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... John M. Olin Foundation was a grant-making foundation established in 1953 by John M. Olin, president of the Olin Industries chemical and munitions manufacturing businesses. ... The Rockefeller Brothers Fund (RBF), (Philanthropy for an Interdependent World), is the principal philanthropic organisation created and run by members of the Rockefeller family. ... This article lacks information on the subject matters importance. ... The Scaife Family Foundation is one of the American Scaife Foundations. ... The Smith Richardson Foundation is financed by the Vicks Vaporub fortune. ...

References

  1. ^ "AEI - About AEI", "The American Enterprise Institute", Retrieved April 8, 2007.
  2. ^ "Conservative Anger Grows Over Bush's Foreign Policy", "Washington Post" [Online Edition], Retrieved April 9, 2006.
  3. ^ George W. Bush, Speech to AEI, 26 Feb 2003
  4. ^ "Scholars and Fellows by Name", American Enterprise Institute, retrieved July 5, 2007.
  5. ^ An insider's guide to the upcoming week April 30, 2007
  6. ^ Dana Milbank, “White House Hopes Gas Up A Think Tank: For Center-Right AEI, Bush Means Business,” Washington Post, December 8, 2000, p. A39
  7. ^ "AEI-Brooking - About Us", "AEI-Brookings Joint Center", retrieved April 8, 2006.
  8. ^ "AEI-Brookings Election Reform Project"
  9. ^ Battle of the Washington think tanks 3 April, 2003
  10. ^ Appointment of Christopher C. DeMuth as Administrator for Information and Regulatory Affairs and as Executive Director of the Presidential Task Force on Regulatory Relief September 30th, 1981
  11. ^ Scholars and Fellows
  12. ^ "The Believer: Paul Wolfowitz defends his war." Peter J. Boyer, The New Yorker November 1, 2004 retrieved 4 July 2004
  13. ^ Sample, Ian. "Scientists offered cash to dispute climate study", The Guardian, 2007-02-02. Retrieved on 2007-02-04. 
  14. ^ "AEI Critiques of Warming Questioned: Think Tank Defends Money Offers to Challenge Climate Report", The Washington Post. 
  15. ^ American Enterprise Institute. Untitled letter. ThinkProgress. Retrieved on 2007-02-04.
  16. ^ "Climate Controversy and AEI: Facts and Fictions", "American Enterprise Institute Online", Retrieved April 9, 2006
  17. ^ "Global Warming Smear"
  18. ^ Hayward, Steven F. & Kenneth P. Green (February 19, 2007). "Scenes from the Climate Inquisition: The chilling effect of the global warming consensus". The Weekly Standard 012 (22). 
  19. ^ a b How to Think Sensibly, or Ridiculously, about Global Warming
  20. ^ Climate Models and their Evaluation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report, Working Group I, Chapter 8
  21. ^ http://article.nationalreview.com/?q=MDAyN2Y4OWMzZjQ3ZjFlZDc4ZTAxMTIzZjYxNTUwN2I=
  22. ^ Rockefeller Archive Center (RAC) List of RBF Grantees

George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links


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