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Encyclopedia > American Chinese cuisine

This article is part of the series:

Chinese cuisine Image File history File links ChineseDishLogo. ... Chinese cuisine (Chinese: 中國菜) originated from different regions of China and has become widespread in many other parts of the world — from East Asia to North America, Australasia and Western Europe. ...

History
Eight Great Traditions
Others
Overseas Chinese
[edit]

American Chinese cuisine refers to the style of food served by Chinese restaurants in the United States. This type of cooking typically caters to Western tastes, and differs significantly from the cuisine of China. The history of Chinese cuisine is, in China, traced back to the Peking Man and his use of fire, and the invention of cuisine some 400,000 years ago. ... Anhui cuisine (Chinese: 徽菜) is one of the Eight Culinary Traditions of China. ... Yue cuisine Chinese: Cantonese (Yue) cuisine originates from Guangdong Province in Southern China, or more precisely, the area around Guangzhou (Canton). ... Fujian cuisine is derived from the native cooking style of the province of Fujian, China. ... Hunan Cuisine, sometimes called Xiang Cuisine (湘菜 pinyin xiāng cài), consists of the cuisines of the Xiangjiang region, Dongting Lake and western Hunan Province, in China. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... [[Image: [[Media: Example. ... Szechuan cuisine, Szechwan cuisine, or Sichuan cuisine (Chinese: ) is a style of Chinese cuisine originating in Sichuan Province of southwestern China which has an international reputation for being hot and numbing (麻辣), because of the common ingredient Sichuan peppercorn (花椒). Although the region Sichuan is now romanized as Sichuan, the cuisine is... Zhejiang cuisine (Chinese: 浙菜 or 浙江菜) is one of the Eight Culinary Traditions of China. ... Beijing cuisine (Chinese: ; pinyin: jÄ«ngcài; lit. ... Chinese imperial cuisine is is derived from a variety of cooking styles of the regions in China, mainly Shandong cuisine and Jiangsu cuisine. ... Chinese aristocrat cuisine traces its origin to the Ming dynasty and the Qing dynasty when the imperial officials stationed in Beijing brought their private chefs and such different variety of culinary styles mixed and developed overtime and formed an unique breed of its own, and thus the Chinese aristocrat cuisine... Liaoning cuisine is derived from the native cooking styles of the Liaoning region in China, and it is the most famous Northeastern Chinese cuisine. ... Tianjin cuisine is derived from the native cooking styles of the Tianjin region in China, and it is heavily influenced by Beijing cuisine. ... Buddhist cuisine is a kind of East Asian cuisine mainly for the believers of Buddhism. ... Chiuchow cuisine, Teochew cuisine or Chaozhou cuisine (潮州菜; pinyin: Cháozhōu cài) originates from Chiuchow (now called Chaozhou), a city of China in Guangdong Province, not far from Canton. ... Hubei cuisine is derived from the native cooking styles of the Hubei region in China. ... Jiangxi cuisine is derived from the native cooking styles of the Jiangxi region in China. ... Hakka cuisine is the cooking style of the Hakka, and originally came from southeastern China (Guangdong and Fujian). ... Shanxi cuisine is derived from the native cooking styles of the Shanxi region in China, and it is famed for noodles and its sour taste. ... Huaiyang cuisine is one the Cuisine of China. ... Chinese Islamic cuisine is cuisine of the Hui (ethnic Chinese Muslims) and other Muslims living in China. ... Northeastern Chinese cuisine (东北菜; pinyin: dōngbÄ›i cài), or Manchurian cuisine, relies heavily on preserved foods and hearty fare due to the harsh winters and relatively short growing seasons. ... Guizhou cuisine is derived from the native cooking styles of the Guizhou region in China. ... Shannxi cuisine is derived from the native cooking styles of the northwestern region in China. ... Shanghai cuisine (上海菜), also known as Hu cai (滬菜, pinyin: hù cài) is a style of Chinese cuisine, and is a popular and celebrated cuisine among the Chinese in China. ... With over 450 years of history, Macanese cuisine is unique to Macao. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Yunnan cuisine is an amalgimation of Han and Chinese minority cuisines. ... Burmese Chinese cuisine is based on Chinese cuisine, particularly from Yunnan, Fujian, and Guangdong Provinces, with local influences. ... Canadian Chinese cuisine or Can/Chinese is a popular style of cooking exclusive to take-out and dine-in eateries found across Canada. ... Caribbean Chinese cuisine is a popular style of food resulting from a fusion of Chinese and West Indian cuisines. ... Chifa is the name given to Peruvian-Cantonese cuisine. ... There are many types of foods in the Philippines because of inhabitants residing in the country. ... Indian Chinese cuisine is the adaptation of Chinese seasoning and cooking techniques to Indian tastes. ... Indonesian Chinese Cuisine is characterized by the mixture of Chinese with local Indonesian style. ... Japanese Chinese cuisine is a unique style of Chinese cuisine served by Chinese restaurants in Japan. ... Korean Chinese cuisine is derived from mainland Chinese cuisine but has been strongly influenced by local ingredients in such as way that it can be regarded as being more Korean than Chinese. ... The cuisine of a country is generally a microcosm of the nation and Malaysian cuisine reflects the multi racial aspects of Malaysia. ... Peranakan or Nonya cuisine combines Chinese, Malay and other influences into a unique blend. ... The cuisine of Singapore is often viewed by her population as a prime example of the ethnic diversity of the culture of Singapore. ... Cuisines in Taiwan (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) have several variations. ... The Thai Chinese is a group of overseas Chinese born in Thailand. ... Chinese culture has roots going back over five thousand years. ... A typical restaurant in uptown Manhattan A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to be consumed on the premises. ... Occident redirects here. ... Chinese cuisine (Chinese: 中國菜) originated from different regions of China and has become widespread in many other parts of the world — from East Asia to North America, Australasia and Western Europe. ...

Contents

History

In the 19th century, Chinese restaurateurs developed American Chinese cuisine when they modified their food for American tastes. First catering to railroad workers, they opened restaurants in towns where Chinese food was completely unknown. These restaurant workers adapted to using local ingredients and catered to their customer's tastes. Dishes on the menu were often given numbers, and often a roll and butter was offered on the side. This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ...


In the process, chefs would invent numerous dishes such as chop suey and General Tso's Chicken. As a result, they developed a style of Chinese food not found in China. Restaurants (along with Chinese laundries which have since all but vanished) provided an ethnic niche for small businesses at a time when Chinese were often excluded from most jobs in the wage economy by discrimination or lack of language fluency. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... General Tsos chicken General Tsos chicken (Chinese: 左公鸡; Hanyu Pinyin: Zuǒ gōng jī; or 左宗堂鸡; pinyin: Zuǒ Zōngtáng jī) is a sweet and spicy deep-fried Hunan Chinese dish that is popularly served in American and Canadian Chinese restaurants. ...


For most of those who run such restaurants, wages tend to be low, and hours long[citation needed] as much of the labor is provided by immigrants or family members, but part of the attraction of Chinese restaurants is the quality and low cost of the food. In modern times, some Asian professionals invest their savings into running restaurants.


Types of restaurants

American Chinese restaurants may be divided into three primary categories:

  • Sit-down dining: These restaurants cater to customers who sit down in a dining room and order from a menu. They tend to provide more authentic Chinese food than fast-food restaurants or places of informal dining.
  • Take-out: These restaurants, which cater primarily to call-in and take-out orders, serve as convenient outlets for traditional American Chinese dishes. Nearly all of them feature delivery to customers' homes, thus allowing the folded, waxed cardboard boxes that are commonly used, to attain similar recognition as that of the pizza box.
  • Buffets: Buffet-style American Chinese restaurants, which have recently seen an increase in popularity, tend to serve a wide variety of food in buffet style; the authenticity of the food may vary from outlet to outlet.

For other uses, see Restaurant (disambiguation). ... Take-out, carry-out ( in American English ) or take-away ( in British English ) is food purchased at a restaurant but eaten elsewhere. ... A Chinese buffet restaurant in the U.S. A buffet is a meal serving system where patrons serve themselves. ...

Differences from native Chinese cuisines

American Chinese food typically treats vegetables as garnish while cuisines of China emphasize vegetables.[citation needed] This can be seen in the use of carrots and tomatoes. Native Chinese cuisine makes frequent use of Asian leafy vegetables like bok choy and kai-lan and puts a greater emphasis on fresh meat and live seafood[citation needed]. As a result, American Chinese food is usually less pungent than authentic cuisine. For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... Garnish is a substance used primarily as an embellishment or decoration to a prepared food or drink item. ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ... Chinese cabbage Swiss chard Leaf vegetables, also called greens or leafy greens, are plant leaves eaten as a vegetable, sometimes accompanied by tender petioles and shoots. ... Trinomial name Brassica campestris L. pekinensis Bok choy (Brassica campestris, Chinese 白菜 báicài) is an Asian relative of the common cabbage. ... Cultivar Group Brassica oleracea Alboglabra Group Kai-lan (Simplified Chinese: 芥兰; Traditional Chinese: 芥蘭; Hanyu Pinyin: , lit. ... Spaghetti with seafood (Spaghetti allo scoglio). ...

A Chinese buffet restaurant in the U.S.
A Chinese buffet restaurant in the U.S.

American Chinese food tends to be cooked very quickly with a great deal of oil and salt. Many dishes are quickly and easily prepared, and require inexpensive ingredients. Stir-frying, pan-frying, and deep-frying tend to be the most common cooking techniques which are all easily done using a wok. The food also has a reputation for high levels of MSG to enhance the flavor. The symptoms of MSG sensitivity have been dubbed "Chinese restaurant syndrome" or "Chinese food syndrome." Market forces and customer demand have encouraged many restaurants to offer "MSG Free" or "No MSG" menus, although some restaurateurs don't believe that people can be allergic to MSG[citation needed]. Photo by Spencer195. ... Photo by Spencer195. ... A Chinese buffet restaurant in the U.S. A buffet (buh-FAY or /bə.ˈfei/) is a meal-serving system where patrons serve themselves. ... Stir frying (爆 bào) in a wok Stir frying is an English umbrella term used to describe two fast Chinese cooking techniques: chǎo (炒) and bào (爆). The term stir-fry was introduced into the English language by Buwei Yang Chao, in her book How to Cook and Eat in... Pan frying is a form of frying characterized by the use of less cooking oil than deep frying; enough oil to, at most, to cover the food to be cooked only half way. ... A Deep fried Twinkie Breaded, deep-fried squid Deep frying is a cooking method whereby food is submerged in hot oil or fat. ... Cooking in a wok The wok is a versatile round-bottomed cooking vessel originating in China. ... This article is about monosodium glutamate as a food additive. ... Chinese restaurant syndrome, also called monosodium glutamate symptom complex, is a collection of symptoms which may include headache, flushing, sweating, and a sensation of pressure in the mouth or face. ...


Most American Chinese establishments cater to non-Chinese customers with menus written in English or containing pictures. If separate Chinese-language menus are available, they typically feature delicacies like liver, chicken feet or other exotic meat dishes that might deter Western customers. In New York's Chinatown, the restaurants are legendary for refusing to offer non-Chinese Americans the "secret" (i.e. authentic) menu. The liver is the largest internal organ in the human body, and is an organ present in vertebrates and some other animals. ...


American Chinese dishes

Dishes that often appear on American Chinese menus include:

  • General Tso's Chicken— dark-meat tidbits of chicken that are deep-fried and seasoned with ginger, garlic, sesame oil, scallions, and hot chili peppers, and often served with steamed broccoli
  • Sesame Chicken— boned, battered, and deep-fried chicken which is then dressed with a translucent but dark red, sweet, slightly sour, mildly spicy, semi-thick, Chinese soy sauce made from corn starch, vinegar, chicken broth, and sugar.
  • Chinese chicken saladSalad, in the form of uncooked leafy greens, does not exist in traditional Chinese cuisine for sanitary reasons, since manure and human feces were China's primary fertilizer through most of its history.[citation needed] It usually contains crispy noodle (fried wonton skin) and sesame dressing. Some restaurants serve the salad with mandarin oranges.
  • Chop suey — connotes "leftovers" in Chinese. It is usually a mix of vegetables and meat in a brown sauce.
  • Chow mein — literally means 'stir-fried noodles.' Chow mein consists of fried noodles with bits of meat and vegetables. It can come with chicken, beef, pork or shrimp.
  • Crab rangoon — Fried wonton skins stuffed with artificial crab meat (surimi) and cream cheese. Rangoon (now Yangon) is the former capital of Burma (now Myanmar).
  • Fortune cookie — Invented at the Japanese Tea Garden restaurant in San Francisco, fortune cookies became sweetened and found their way to American Chinese restaurants. Fortune cookies have become so popular that even some authentic Chinese restaurants serve them at the end of the meal and may feature Chinese translations of the English fortunes.
  • Fried rice — Pan-fried rice, usually with chunks of meat, vegetables, and often egg.
  • Mongolian beef — Usually beef stir-fried with scallions, often served in a brown sauce.

Regional American Chinese dishes: General Tsos chicken General Tsos chicken (Chinese: 左公鸡; Hanyu Pinyin: ZuÇ’ gōng jÄ«; or 左宗堂鸡; pinyin: ZuÇ’ Zōngtáng jÄ«) is a sweet and spicy deep-fried Hunan Chinese dish that is popularly served in American and Canadian Chinese restaurants. ... Sesame chicken (also called sesame seed chicken) is a Chinese American dish commonly found in Chinese take-out and buffet restaurants in the United States. ... Chinese chicken salad, as its name suggests, is a salad with chicken, popular in the United States. ... This article deals with food. ... Animal manure is often a mixture of animals feces and bedding straw, as in this example from a stable. ... Horse feces Feces, faeces, or fæces (see spelling differences) is a waste product from an animals digestive tract expelled through the anus (or cloaca) during defecation. ... Spreading manure, an organic fertilizer Fertilizers (also spelled fertilisers) are compounds given to plants to promote growth; they are usually applied either via the soil, for uptake by plant roots, or by foliar feeding, for uptake through leaves. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A bottle of brown sauce, as defined by British cuisine Brown sauce can refer to one of two different sauces: In French cuisine and other cuisines based on it, it generally refers to a meat stock-based gravy-like sauce. ... Take-out chicken chow mein from an American Chinese restaurant Chow mein is a stir-fried dish in American Chinese cuisine, consisting of noodles, meat, and cabbage and other vegetables. ... A cook making hand-pulled noodles. ... Crab rangoon are deep-fried dumplings served in American Chinese restaurants, stuffed with a combination of cream cheese and imitation crab meat. ... A Cantonese style shrimp wonton Wontons (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: details), also written as wantan, wanton, wuntun, are a type of dumpling common in Chinese cuisine. ... For other uses, see Crab (disambiguation). ... [[[[[[ == Foods made from surimi: artificial shrimp and crab legs Surimi (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; literally fish puree/slurry, Japanese: 擂り身, lit. ... Country of origin United States Region, town Chester, New York Source of milk Cow Pasteurised Texture Soft Aging time none Certification Cream cheese is a sweet, soft, mild-tasting, white cheese that contains at least 33% milkfat (as marketed) with a moisture content of not more than 55%, and a... Yangon (also known as Rangoon) is the largest city of Burma. ... Anthem Kaba Ma Kyei Capital Naypyidaw Largest city Yangon Official languages Burmese Demonym Burmese Government Military junta  -  Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council Than Shwe  -  Prime Minister Soe Win  -  Acting Prime Minister Thein Sein Establishment  -  Bagan 849–1287   -  Taungoo Dynasty 1486–1752   -  Konbaung Dynasty 1752–1885   -  Colonial rule... Fortune Cookies redirects here. ... Fried rice (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) is a popular component of Chinese cuisine and, by extension, various other forms of Asian cuisine. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Chopped spring onion The common name scallion(Or Don Patch sword as on Bobobo) is associated with various members of the genus Allium that lack a fully-developed bulb. ...

Originating in Fall River, Massachusetts in 1930s or 1940s, the chow mein sandwich [1], typically consists of a hamburger style bun with a brown gravy based chow mein mixture placed between and served hot, is popular on Chinese restaurant menus throughout southeastern Massachusetts and parts of neighboring Rhode... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Nickname: Location in Essex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Settled 1626 Incorporated 1626 A City 1836 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kimberley Driscoll Area  - Total 18. ... The St. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ...

Americanized versions of native Chinese dishes

  • Batter-fried meat — Meat that has been deep fried in bread or flour, such as sesame chicken, lemon chicken, orange chicken, sweet and sour pork, and General Tso's chicken, is often heavily emphasized in American-style Chinese dishes. Battered meat occasionally appears in Hunanese dishes, but it generally uses lighter sauces with less sugar and corn syrup.
    • Chicken ball — Uses a large amount of leavening and flour in its preparation and battering process which causes them to be more similar to doughy "hush puppies" than actual batter-fried meat.
  • Egg drop soup — A soup of chicken broth with scrambled egg ribbons. Often served with fried noodles.
Egg foo young
Egg foo young
  • Egg foo young — A Chinese-style omelet with vegetables and meat, usually served with a brown sauce. Also known as egg foo yung or egg foo yaung.
  • Egg roll — While native Chinese spring rolls have a thin crispy skin with mushrooms, bamboo, and other vegetables inside, the Americanized version (specifically the version found in the New York metro area) uses a thick, fried skin stuffed with cabbage and usually bits of meat or seafood (such as pork or shrimp). In other areas of the US outside of New York, egg rolls tend to be of the spring roll/Panda Express variety.
  • Fried rice — Fried rice dishes are popular offerings in American Chinese food due to the speed and ease of preparation and their appeal to American tastes. Fried rice is generally prepared with rice cooled overnight, allowing restaurants to put unserved leftover rice to good use.
  • Kung Pao chicken — The authentic Sichuan dish is very spicy, and the American versions tend to be less so.
  • Lo mein — The term means "stirred noodles"; these noodles are frequently made with eggs and flour, making them chewier than simply using water. Thick, spaghetti shaped noodles are pan fried with vegetables and meat. Sometimes this dish is referred to as "chow mein" (which literally means "fried noodles" in Cantonese).
  • Moo shu pork — The native Chinese version uses more typically Chinese ingredients (including wood ear fungi and daylily buds) and thin flour pancakes while the American version uses vegetables more familiar to Americans and thicker pancakes. This dish is quite popular in Chinese restaurants in the U.S., but not so popular in China.
  • Wonton soup — In most American Chinese restaurants, only wonton dumplings in broth are served, while native Chinese versions may come with noodles. Authentic Cantonese Wonton Soup is a full meal in itself consisting of thin egg noodles and several pork and prawn wontons in a pork or chicken soup broth or noodle broth.
  • Cashew chicken — see Regional variations.
  • Meat "with" a vegetable — Examples of common variations on this dish are pork, chicken, beef or shrimp cooked with mushrooms, snow peas, or other assorted vegetables. This dish is sometimes served with oyster sauce or with garlic sauce. These dishes are primarily variations on Cantonese-style stir-fry.
Beef with broccoli
Beef with broccoli
    • Broccoli beef — This dish exists in native Chinese form, but using gai-lan (Chinese broccoli) rather than Western broccoli. Occasionally western broccoli is also referred to as sai lan fa (in Cantonese) in order not to confuse the two styles of broccoli. Among Chinese speakers, however, it is typically understood that one is referring to the leafy vegetable unless otherwise specified. This is also the case with the words for carrot (lo bac) or (hung lo bac hung meaning red) and onion (chung). Lo bac, in Chinese, refers to the daikon, a large, blandly flavored white radish. The orange western carrot is known in some areas of China as "foreign luobac" (or more properly hung lo bac, hung meaning "red"). When the word for onion, chung, is used, it is understood that one is referring to "green onions" (otherwise known to Westerners as scallions or spring onions). The many-layered onion common to Westerners is called yang chung. This translates as "western onion". These names make it evident that the Western broccoli, carrot, and onion are not indigenous to China and therefore are less common in the cuisines of China. Hence, if a dish contains significant amounts of any of these ingredients, it has most likely been Westernized.
  • Tomatoes — Since tomatoes are New World plants, they are also fairly new to China and Chinese cuisine. Tomato-based sauces can be found in some American Chinese dishes such as the popular "beef and tomato."

Sesame chicken (also called sesame seed chicken) is a Chinese American dish commonly found in Chinese take-out and buffet restaurants in the United States. ... Lemon chicken (Traditional Chinese: ) is a common dish in American Chinese cuisine. ... Orange chicken (陳皮鶺) is a Sichuanese dish. ... Sweet & Sour Pork (咕老肉, pinyin: gÇ”lÇŽoròu) is a Chinese dish that is particularly popular in American Chinese cuisine. ... General Tsos chicken General Tsos chicken (Chinese: 左公鸡; Hanyu Pinyin: ZuÇ’ gōng jÄ«; or 左宗堂鸡; pinyin: ZuÇ’ Zōngtáng jÄ«) is a sweet and spicy deep-fried Hunan Chinese dish that is popularly served in American and Canadian Chinese restaurants. ... Hunan Cuisine, sometimes called Xiang Cuisine (湘菜 pinyin xiāng cài), consists of the cuisines of the Xiangjiang region, Dongting Lake and western Hunan Province, in China. ... For other uses, see Hush puppies. ... A bowl of egg drop soup Egg drop soup (traditional: 蛋花湯; pinyin: dàn huā tāng; literally egg flower soup) is a Chinese soup of beaten eggs, chicken broth, and boiled water. ... Egg fooyung, or egg furong (Chinese: 芙蓉蛋; pinyin: fúróng dàn; Cantonese: fu4 yung4 daan2; literally hibiscus egg) is a dish in American Chinese cuisine that is commonly served in Westernized Chinese restaurants. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A partitioned Taiwanese spring roll (潤餅) whose wheat-based wrapper is unfried. ... Fried rice (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) is a popular component of Chinese cuisine and, by extension, various other forms of Asian cuisine. ... Kung Pao chicken (also spelled Kung Po chicken) is a classic dish in Sichuan cuisine, originating in the Sichuan Province of central-western China. ...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: SzÅ­4-chuan1; Postal map spelling: Szechwan and Szechuan) is a province in the central-western China with its capital at Chengdu. ... Lo mein (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: lāo miàn) is a Chinese dish based on stir-fried wheat noodles. ... Moo shu pork (木须肉; pinyin: mù xÅ« ròu) is a pseudo-Chinese dish served primarily in Chinese restaurants in the United States. ... Wood ear can refer to two different closely related species of edible fungus used primarily in Asian cuisine: Auricularia auricula-judae Cloud ear fungus This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Species See text. ... A shrimp wonton in Cantonese style Wonton (雲吞 or 餛飩;Cantonese IPA: ) (also written wantan, wanton and numerous other variations) are a type of dumpling common in Chinese cuisine. ... Cashew chicken is a simple Chinese-American fusion dish that combines chicken (fried or stir-fried, depending on the variation), cashews, and a thick oyster sauce. ... Oyster Sauce produced by Lee Kum Kee Oyster sauce (蚝油 háo yóu ; 蠔油) is a viscous sauce prepared from oysters and brine, often with chemical preservatives added. ... Stir frying is a common Chinese cooking technique used because of its fast cooking speed. ... Cultivar Group Brassica oleracea Alboglabra Group Kai-lan (Chinese 芥蘭 trad. ... Broccoli is a plant of the Cabbage family, Brassicaceae (formerly Cruciferae). ... This article is about the cultivated vegetable. ... Binomial name Raphanus sativus L. Daikon (Japanese: , literally large root; Traditional Chinese: , literally white carrot; Korean: mu, literally radish), is a mild-flavored East Asian giant white radish. ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ...

Traditional take-out dishes

Most American Chinese restaurants get their supplies from a few companies leading to a similarity in the menus of separate restaurants. While sit-down and buffet restaurants are more varied, most menus have the following sections:

  • Appetizers— usually including ribs, Teriyaki chicken, Pu pu platter, Prawn crackers, Barbecued Pork and egg rolls. Typically dishes that are not soup and are not served with rice.
  • Soups— including egg drop and hot and sour.
  • Fried Rice, Chow Mein, Chop Suey, Lo Mein, Egg Foo Young, Mu Shu and Sweet and Sour- These dishes are served with rice, typically by the pint or quart. They are normally divided into vegetable, roast pork, chicken, beef, shrimp, occasionally lobster, and 'house special' or "combination" usually the first four ingredients together.
  • Roast or Barbecued Pork — Usually the smallest section (due to pork being less popular than beef and chicken today), mostly "with" dishes (Roast pork with mushrooms et al.)
  • Chicken — Moo Goo Gai Pan, Kung Po, and most of the "with" dishes (Such as chicken with cashew nuts or water chestnuts)
  • Beef — Beef with Broccoli, Pepper Steak, and "with " dishes
  • Seafood — Basically shrimp with the occasional scallop or lobster dish.
  • Special Diet Plates and Vegetable and Tofu — Vegetarian and low-calorie dishes
  • Combination platters — More expensive than the previous dishes, these come with fried rice and usually an egg roll. Usually you'll find General Tso's and Sesame Chicken here, along with the most popular of the other dishes.
  • Chef's Specialties — the most expensive dishes that normally include multiple meats and vegetables.

The back of the menu often has Lunch Specials, which are normally a smaller version of the combination platters offered only at lunch for less money. A Pu pu platter, pu-pu platter or pupu platter is a tray American Chinese cuisine consisting of an assortment of small meat and seafood appetizers. ... Freshly made prawn crackers A prawn cracker, also called a shrimp chip, shrimp cracker or similar combination, is a cracker made mostly from shrimp and flour, usually tapioca or potato flour. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Fish heads in hot sour soup Hot and sour soup can refer to soups from three Asian culinary traditions: // Hot and sour soup (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), a Chinese soup claimed variously by Mandarin and Sichuan cuisines as a regional dish. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Regional variations on American Chinese cuisine

San Francisco

Since the early 1990s, many American Chinese restaurants influenced by the cuisine of California have opened in San Francisco and the Bay Area. The trademark dishes of American Chinese cuisine remain on the menu, but there is more emphasis on fresh vegetables, and the selection is vegetarian-friendly. See California Cuisine for the style of cuisine identified with some famous Californian chefs. ...


This new cuisine has exotic ingredients like mangos and portobello mushrooms. Brown rice is often offered as an optional alternative to white rice. Species About 35 species, including: Mangifera altissima Mangifera applanata Mangifera caesia Mangifera camptosperma Mangifera casturi Mangifera decandra Mangifera foetida Mangifera gedebe Mangifera griffithii Mangifera indica Mangifera kemanga Mangifera laurina Mangifera longipes Mangifera macrocarpa Mangifera mekongensis Mangifera odorata Mangifera pajang Mangifera pentandra Mangifera persiciformis Mangifera quadrifida Mangifera siamensis Mangifera similis Mangifera... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Button mushroom. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... White rice is the common term for milled rice which has had its husk, bran, and germ removed. ...


Some restaurants substitute grilled wheat flour tortillas for the rice pancakes in mu shu dishes. This occurs even in some restaurant that would not otherwise be identified as California Chinese, both the more Americanized places and the more authentic places. There is a Mexican bakery that sells some restaurants thinner torillas made for use with mu shu. Mu shu purists do not always react positively to this trend. [1]


In addition, many restaurants serving more native-style Chinese cuisines exist, due to the high numbers and proportion of ethnic Chinese in San Francisco and the Bay Area. Restaurants specializing in Cantonese, Szechuan, Hunan, Mandarin, Taiwanese, and Hong Kong traditions are widely available, as are more specialized restaurants such as seafood restaurants, Hong Kong-style diners and cafes (also known as Cha chaan teng (茶餐廳)), dim sum teahouses, and hot pot restaurants. Many Chinatown areas also feature Chinese bakeries, boba milk tea shops, roasted meat, vegetarian cuisine, and specialized dessert shops. Chop suey is not widely available in San Francisco, and the city's chow mein is different from Midwestern chow mein. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Cha chaan teng is a type of Chinese tea restaurant commonly found in Hong Kong, known for its eclectic and affordable menus which include many dishes from Hong Kong cuisine and localised Hong Kong-style Western cuisine. ... Dim sum (Chinese: 點心; Cantonese IPA: dɪm2sɐm1; Pinyin: diǎnxīn; Wade-Giles: tien-hsin; literally dot heart or order heart, meaning order to ones hearts content; also commonly translated as touch the heart, dotted heart, or snack), a Cantonese term, is usually a light meal or brunch, eaten sometime... Raw meats ready to be cooked. ... Pearl milk tea Bubble tea, pearl milk tea (Chinese: 珍珠奶茶; pinyin: zhēnzhū nǎichá), or boba milk tea (波霸奶茶; bōbà nǎichá) is a tea beverage mixture with milk. ... Cantonese people classified roasted or barbequed foods as Siu mei (燒味), lit. ... Buddhist cuisine is known as 齋菜 (pinyin: zhāi ca ) among Chinese. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


Authentic restaurants with Chinese-language menus may offer 黃毛雞 (Cantonese Yale: wòhng mouh gāai, Pinyin: huángmáo jī, literally yellow-feather chicken), essentially a free-range chicken, as opposed to typical American mass-farmed chicken. Yellow-hair chicken is valued for its flavor, but needs to be cooked properly to be tender due to its lower fat and higher muscle content. This dish usually does not appear on the English-language menu. The Yale romanizations are four systems created during World War II for use by United States military personnel. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Free range is a method of farming husbandry where the animals are permitted to roam freely instead of being contained in small sheds. ...


Dau Miu (Chinese: 豆苗; pinyin: dòumiáo), literally Bean Grass but actually snow pea vines, is a Chinese vegetable that has become popular since the early 1990s, and now not only appears on English-language menus, usually as "pea shoots", but is often served by upscale non-Asian restaurants as well. Originally it was only available during a few months of the year, but it is now grown in greenhouses and is available year-round. Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ...


Hawaii

Hawaiian-Chinese food developed a bit differently from the continental United States. Owing to the diversity of ethnicities in Hawaii and the history of the Chinese influence in Hawaii, resident Chinese cuisine forms a component of the cuisine of Hawaii, which is a fusion of different culinary traditions. Some Chinese dishes are typically served as part of plate lunches in Hawaii. The names of foods are different as well, such as Manapua, from Hawaiian meaning "chewed up pork" for dim sum bao, though the meat is not necessarily pork. Chinese food in Hawaii is also noted for its use of SPAM, much to the puzzlement of outsiders. The Chinese in Hawaii constitute about 4. ... Modern cuisine of Hawaii is a fusion of many cuisines brought by multi-ethnic immigrants to the islands, particularly of American, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Polynesian and Portuguese origins, and including food sources from plants and animals imported for Hawaiian agricultural use from all over the world. ... Fusion cuisine combines elements of various culinary traditions whilst not fitting specifically into any. ... Plate Lunch (Hawaiian: pa mea ai) is a vaguely pan-Asian menu item that is part of local culture in Hawaii. ... Manapua is an Hawaiian slang for the Chinese food cha siu bau (pork-filled bun). ... This article is about the canned meat product. ...


American Chinese chain restaurants

  • China Coast — Now defunct, closed in 1995; owned by General Mills Corp., formerly 52 locations throughout the USA
  • City Wok — Locations in California, Colorado, Florida and North Carolina
  • Leeann Chin — Locations in Minnesota and Wisconsin; owned at one time by General Mills Corp.
  • Manchu Wok — Nationwide in the USA and Canada, as well as Guam, Korea and Japan
  • Panda Express — Nationwide in the USA
  • Pei Wei Asian Diner — Locations in the western and southwestern USA; a subsidiary of P.F. Chang's
  • P. F. Chang's China Bistro — Nationwide in the USA; features California-Chinese fusion cuisine
  • Pick Up Stix — Locations in California, Arizona and Nevada

China Coast was a casual dining American restaurant chain specializing in Chinese food. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Tuong Lu Kim. ... Manchu Wok is a Chinese fast food chain in Canada and similar in concept as Panda Express. ... Exterior view of a Panda Express restaurant. ... P.F. Changs China Bistro, Inc. ... P.F. Changs China Bistro, Inc. ... Pick Up Stix is a fast-casual restaurant chain that serves American Chinese cuisine through franchises in California, Nevada, and Arizona. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
American Chinese cuisine

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Chinese cuisine (Chinese: 中國菜) originated from different regions of China and has become widespread in many other parts of the world — from East Asia to North America, Australasia and Western Europe. ... The Cuisine of the United States is characterized by the broad diversity of the possible foods, but more importantly the willingness of the country as a whole to integrate widely divergent foods. ... Canadian Chinese cuisine or Can/Chinese is a popular style of cooking exclusive to take-out and dine-in eateries found across Canada. ... The oyster pail (more familiarly Chinese food pail, ...box, ...container) is a folded paperboard container, usually with a wire handle, serving as a portable container for hot or cold prepared food, and most often used to bring home take-out food from a restaurant. ... Fortune Cookies redirects here. ... The Imperial Dynasty restaurant was a five-star restaurant in Hanford, California. ...

External links

  • Chinese Restaurant Project — Indigo Som's project to document Chinese-American restaurants
  • Chinese Restaurants Chinese Restaurants in the U.S.
  • Chinese and Chinatown Food Search thousand of Chinese Restaurants in U.S. and Canada.

References

  1. ^ AsianWeek.com
A Chinese American is an American who is of ethnic Chinese descent. ... A Chinese American is an American who is of ethnic Chinese descent. ... An American-born Chinese or ABC is a person born in the United States of Chinese ethnic descent. ... This is a list of notable Chinese Americans, who are famous, have made significant contributions to the American culture or society politically, artistically or scientifically, or have appeared in the news numerous times. ... Cities with large Chinese American populations with a critical mass of at least 1% of the total urban population and at least 10% of the total suburban population. ... Chinese immigration to the United States has come in many waves. ... The Chinese in Hawaii constitute about 4. ... Chinese immigration to Puerto Rico began in the late 19th Century when the United States passed the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Chinese immigrants, such as the one pictured, immigrated to Puerto Rico and South America A Chinese Puerto Rican is a person who was born, or resides, in Puerto... Anti-Chinese legislation in the United States was introduced in America to deal with Chinese migrants following the gold rush in California and those coming to build the railway. ... Californias Anti-Coolie Act of 1862 was an attempt by the State of California to tax the labor of Chinese workers as well as discourage Chinese immigration into the state. ... This article is about the former U.S. law. ... The Geary Act was a United States law passed in 1892 written by California Congressman Thomas J. Geary. ... It has been suggested that National Origins Quota of 1924 be merged into this article or section. ... The Cable Act of 1922 is an American law that reversed former immigration laws regarding marriage. ... The Magnuson Act was an immigration law signed December 17, 1943 in the United States. ... The Immigration and Nationality Services Act of 1965 (also known as the Hart-Celler Act or the INS Act of 1965) abolished the national-origin quotas that had been in place in the United States since the Immigration Act of 1924. ... Chinese Massacre of 1871 refers to a racially motivated riot on October 24, 1871, when a mob of over 500 whites or Caucasians entered Los Angeles Chinatown to attack and eventually murder Chinese-American residents of the city. ... Tape v. ... The Issaquah riot of 1885 took place when white and Native American hops pickers clashed with immigrant Chinese workers in the present-day city of Issaquah, Washington, U.S.A. The city was then known as Squak. ... // The Rock Springs Massacre or Rock Springs Riot (sometimes known as the Rock Springs Attack) occurred on September 2, 1885 in the town of Rock Springs, Wyoming, in present day Sweetwater County. ... The Tacoma riot of 1885 took place in the present day U.S. state of Washington, which was a territory at the time. ... The Seattle riot of 1886 resulted from anti-Chinese sentiment, which was prevalent in the American west during the 19th century. ... Holding Racially discriminatory application of a facially neutral statute violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. ... Chinese Massacre Cove is an area along the Snake River in Wallowa County, Oregon, United States. ... Holding A child born in the United States to foreign parents who are subject to U.S. jurisdiction automatically becomes a U.S. citizen. ... Vincent Chin (Chinese: ) (1955 – June 23, 1982) was a Chinese American industrial draftsman murdered in 1982 in the Detroit, Michigan enclave of Highland Park by two white autoworkers, Chrysler plant superintendent Ronald Ebens and his recently laid off step-son, Michael Nitz. ... This article is about sections of an urban area associated with a large number of Chinese residents or commercial activities. ... This is a list of Chinatowns (urban regions containing a large population of Chinese people within a non-Chinese society) in select countries. ... This article surveys individual Chinatowns in North America. ... Chinatown in San Francisco This article discusses Chinatown patterns in North America. ... The Beach Street gate into Bostons Chinatown. ... The Chinatown Gate in Chinatown, Chicago, Illinois. ... There are two Chinatowns in Houston, Texas. ... The Chinatown of Las Vegas, Nevada (Chinese: 拉斯維加斯中國城 (pinyin: LāsÄ«wéijiāsÄ« Zhōngguóchéng) is a series of large shopping centers with ethnic Chinese and other pan-Asian businesses on Spring Mountain Road, with the original called Chinatown Plaza. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Chinese lion helps usher in the 2006 Chinese New Year. ... Legendary Palace restaurant at the corner of Franklin and 7th st in Oakland. ... Chinese Friendship Arch, 10th and Arch Streets. ... Looking north from Grant Avenue and Sacramento Street in Chinatown, San Francisco. ... Map of Washington, D.C., with Chinatown highlighted in red Chinatowns Friendship Archway, as seen looking west on H St. ... Passengers waiting at the Fung Wah Lines ticket window on Canal Street and the Bowery in Manhattan Chinatown bus lines, also called 野雞車 (yÄ› jÄ« chÄ“, which translates as wild chicken trucks) in Chinese, refers to the private transportation industry that has arisen in the Chinatown communities of the East Coast... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... For the novel, see The Joy Luck Club The Joy Luck Club is a 1993 American movie about the relationships between Chinese-American women and their Chinese mothers. ... Chan Is Missing is a 1982 film which tells the story of two taxi drivers searching the streets of San Franciscos Chinatown for the man who ran off with their money. ... Someone with a Chinamans chance has no chance at all. ... Jook-sing (Cantonese for 竹升 Jyutping: zuk1 sing1), is a pejorative term used in the United States and Canada to describe Westernized East Asians, particularly Chinese, who have lost or denied themselves their Asian heritage. ... A museum is a non-profit making, permanent institution in the service of society and of its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits, for purposes of study, education and enjoyment, the tangible and intangible evidence of people and their environment. ... Founded in 1980, The Museum of Chinese in the Americas is located in Chinatown, New York City (USA), and is dedicated to reclaiming, preserving, and interpreting the history and culture of Chinese and their descendants in the Western Hemisphere. ... The Chinese American Museum is housed in the Garnier Building, the oldest surviving Chinese building in Southern California The Chinese American Museum is a museum located in Downtown Los Angeles as a part of the El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historic Monument. ... The Kam Wah Chung & Co. ... The Wo Hing Society Hall is a building located at 858 Front Street in Lahaina, Hawaii. ... // Bing Kong Benevolent Association 秉公堂 Camau Association of America (Chua Thien Hau) Cambodia Ethnic Chinese Association Chew Lun Association 昭倫公所 Chinese American Association of Minnesota Chinese American Citizens Alliance Chinese American Restaurant Association 華僑餐館會 Chinese Aviation Development Association 航空建設協會 Chinese Cemetery Association Chinese Chamber of Commerce 中華總商會 Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association (NYC) 中華公所 Chinese Culture Center... Chinese American Citizens Alliance is a Chinese American political organization founded in 1895 in San Francisco, California to secure equal rights for Americans of Chinese ancestry. ... The Chinese Six Companies (Chinese:六大公司) or Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association (Chinese:中華公所) or Chong Wa Benevolent Association (Chinese:中華會館) is a historical Chinese Association established in various parts of the United States with large populations of Chinese. ... The former Chee Kung Tong Society Hall site in Wailuku. ... The Ying On Labor & Merchant Association (Chinese:英端工商會) or simply Ying On Association is a historical Chinese American association that was established during the 1800s for the purpose of assisting members of the Chinese community when they were threatened by unfair and discriminatory business practices; for organizing social gathering places for... The Chinese Staff and Workers Association (CSWA) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan workers rights organization based in New York City which educates and organizes workers in the United States so that they may improve their working conditions. ... Chinese for Affirmative Action is an organization with the mission of defending and promoting the civil and political rights of Chinese and Asian Americans. ... The Committee of 100 (Traditional Chinese: 百人會) is a non-partisan group of prominent Americans of Chinese descent with the mission to pool their strengths and experience to address important issues concerning the Chinese American community, as well as issues affecting U.S.-China relations. ... Founded in 1973, Organization of Chinese Americans is a national organization dedicated to advancing the social, political, and economic well-being of Asian Pacific Americans in the United States. ... The Bing Kong Tong was one of the powerful Tongs in San Franciscos Chinatown during the early 20th century. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... Cathay Bank is a Chinese-American bank based in Los Angeles, California. ... United International Bank (國際銀行) is a overseas Chinese bank in the United States, and headquartered in New York City. ... Chinese American Bank (中美銀行) is a overseas Chinese bank in the United States. ... Global Commerce Bank (國際銀行) is a overseas Chinese bank in the United States. ... United Commercial Bank is a Chinese American Bank, based in San Francisco, CA. It is a subsidary of UCBH Holdings. ... Overseas Chinese excelled in commerce, finance, and many other industries. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... See California Cuisine for the style of cuisine identified with some famous Californian chefs. ... Throughout most of the states history before the discovery of coal deposits, Kentucky relied upon the subsistence farming of corn, beans and pigs. ... Modern cuisine of Hawaii is a fusion of many cuisines brought by multi-ethnic immigrants to the islands, particularly of American, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Polynesian and Portuguese origins, and including food sources from plants and animals imported for Hawaiian agricultural use from all over the world. ... Midwestern cuisine is a regional cuisine of the American Midwest. ... The culture of Chicago, Illinois, is known for various forms of performing arts, such as improvisational comedy, and music, such as Chicago blues and soul. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The American lobster, a favorite ingredient in New England cuisine. ... Cuisine of New York City comprises many cuisines belonging to various ethnic groups that have entered the United States through the city. ... Pennsylvania Dutch cuisi == // Headline text == Headline text == Headline text == Headline text == Headline text == == == == == they have migrated to over time. ... The cuisine of Philadelphia was shaped largely by Philadelphia, Pennsylvanias mixture of ethnicities, available foodstuffs and history. ... The cuisine of the Southern United States is defined as the regional culinary form of states generally south of the Mason-Dixon Line westerly to the state of Texas. ... Cajun cuisine originates from the French-speaking Acadian or Cajun immigrants deported by the English from Acadia in Canada to the Acadiana region of Louisiana, USA. It is what could be called a rustic cuisine — locally available ingredients predominate, and preparation is simple. ... Dishes typical of Creole food Louisiana Creole cuisine is a style of cooking originating in Louisiana (centered on the Greater New Orleans area) that blends French, Spanish, French Caribbean, African, and American influences. ... Lowcountry cuisine is the cooking traditionally associated with the coastal plains of South Carolina and Georgia--the Lowcountry. ... For other uses, see Soul food (disambiguation). ... Tex-Mex is a term for a type of American food which is used primarily in Texas and the Southwestern United States to describe a regional cuisine which blends food products available in the United States and the culinary creations of Mexican-Americans that are influenced by the cuisines of... Floribbean cuisine is found in varying forms in both high-end Florida restaurants and in the homes of many Floridians. ... Southwestern cuisine is food styled after the rustic cooking of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, and Colorado. ... Italian American cuisine is what is commonly called Italian food in the United States. ... A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. ... This article is about Christmas food in the United States. ... Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... Native American Cuisine includes all food practices of the native peoples of the Americas. ... New American cuisine is a form of cooking popular in restaurants in the United States. ... Cuisine (from French cuisine, cooking; culinary art; kitchen; ultimately from Latin coquere, to cook) is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a specific culture. ... Asian cuisine is a term for the various cuisines of South, East and Southeast Asia and for fusion dishes based on combining them. ... See the individual entries for: // Belarusian cuisine Bulgarian cuisine Czech cuisine Hungarian cuisine Jewish cuisine Polish cuisine Romanian cuisine Russian cuisine Slovak cuisine Slovenian cuisine Ukrainian cuisine British cuisine English cuisine Scottish cuisine Welsh cuisine Anglo-Indian cuisine Modern British cuisine Nordic cuisine Danish cuisine Finnish cuisine Icelandic cuisine Lappish... Caribbean cuisine is a fusion of African, Amerindian, French, Indian, and Spanish cuisine. ... South Asian cuisine includes the cuisines of the South Asia. ... Latin American cuisine is a phrase that refers to typical foods, beverages, and cooking styles common to many of the countries and cultures in Latin America. ... The term Middle Eastern cuisine refers to the various cuisines of the Middle East. ... North American cuisine is a term used for foods native to or popular in countries of North America. ... Cuisine of Africa reflects indigenous traditions, as well as influences from Arabs, Europeans, and Asians. ... Haute cuisine (literally high cooking in French) or grande cuisine refers to the cooking of the grand restaurants and hotels of the western world. ... Fusion cuisine combines elements of various culinary traditions whilst not fitting specifically into any. ... A classic example of molecular gastronomy is the investigation of the effect of specific temperatures on the yolk and white when cooking an egg. ... Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... For other uses, see Bread (disambiguation). ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sauce (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Soup (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Desert. ... For other uses, see Herb (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Spice (disambiguation). ... Food is any substance, usually composed primarily of carbohydrates, fats, water and/or proteins, that can be eaten or drunk by an animal for nutrition and/or pleasure. ... Cooking is the act of preparing food. ... This is a list of food preparation utensils, some of what is known as kitchenware. ... In recipes, quantities of ingredients may be specified by mass (weight), by volume, or by count. ... A kitchen is a room used for food preparation and sometimes entertainment. ... For the coarsely ground flour, see flour. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Cultural Heritage of China :: Food & Drink :: Cuisine :: Introduction (1559 words)
Chinese cuisine is widely seen as representing one of the richest and most diverse culinary heritages in the world.
In a Chinese meal, each individual diner is given their own bowl of rice while the accompanying dishes are served in communal plates (or bowls) which are shared by everyone sitting at the table, a communal service known as "family style" in Western nations.
A Chinese meal in Suzhou, Jiangsu province, with bowls of white rice, shrimp, eggplant, fermented tofu, vegetable stir-fries, vegetarian duck, and a central dish with meat and bamboo.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Cuisine of China (319 words)
Chinese consider having a knife at the table as barfbaric, so most dishes are prepared in smaller pieces, ready for direct picking and eating.
Yunnan cuisine Yunnan cuisine (云南菜; pinyin: yúnnán cài) is an amalgimation of Han and Chinese minority cuisines.
Shanghai cuisine Shanghai cuisine, known as Hu cai (滬菜 in pinyin: hù cài) among the Chinese, is one of the most popular and celebrated cuisines in China.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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