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Encyclopedia > American Black Bear
American Black Bear

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Ursidae
Genus: Ursus
Species: U. americanus
Binomial name
Ursus americanus
Pallas, 1780
Synonyms

Euarctos americanus Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (650x1031, 67 KB) An American Black Bear (Ursus americanus). ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species remaining extant either in the present day or the near future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn2. ... Least Concern (LC) is an IUCN category assigned to extant species or lower taxa which have been evaluated but do not qualify for any other category. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... For other meanings, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Species Ursus arctos Ursus americanus Ursus maritimus Ursus thibetanus,or Selenarctos thibetanus Asiatic black bear might be classified with Kinowagma belonging Selenarctos. ... Latin name redirects here. ... Peter Simon Pallas (September 22, 1741 - September 8, 1811) was a German-born Russian zoologist. ... In scientific nomenclature, synonyms are different scientific names used for a single taxon. ...

The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) is the most common bear species native to North America. It lives throughout much of the continent, from northern Canada and Alaska south into Mexico, from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This includes 41 of the 50 U.S. states and all Canadian provinces except Prince Edward Island. Populations in the east-central and southern United States remain in the protected mountains and woodlands of parks and preserves, though bears will occasionally wander outside the parks' boundaries and have set up new territories, in some cases on the margins of urban environments in recent years as their populations increase. Although there were probably once as many as two million black bears in North America long before European colonization, the population declined to a low of 200,000 as a result of habitat destruction and unrestricted hunting. By current estimates, more than 800,000 are living today on the continent.[1] For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Atlantic and North Atlantic redirect here. ... Pacific redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Canada consists of ten provinces and three territories. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Historic Southern United States. ...

Contents

Description

The American Black Bear usually ranges in length from 150 to 180 cm (59 to 72 inches) and typically stands about 80 to 95 cm (34 to 48 inches) at the shoulder. Standing up on its hind feet, a black bear can be up to 7 feet tall[2]. Males are 33% larger than females.[3] Females weigh between 40 and 180 kg (90 and 400 pounds); males weigh between 115 and 275 kg (250 and 600 pounds) [1]. Adult black bears seldom exceed 300 kg (660 pounds) [2] but exceptionally large males have been recorded from the wild at up to 240 cm (95 inches) long and at least 365 kg (800 pounds). The biggest American black bear ever recorded was a male from North Carolina that weighed 880 lbs (400 kilograms)[4]. Cubs usually weigh 200 to 450 g (between 7 ounces and 1 pound) at birth. The adult has small eyes, rounded ears, a long snout, a large body, and a short tail. It has an excellent sense of smell. Though they generally have shaggy black hair, the coat can vary in color from white through chocolate-brown, cinnamon-brown and blonde (found mostly west of the Mississippi River), to black in the east (the same is generally true in Canada, the border being between Manitoba and Ontario). They occasionally have a slight V-shaped white chest blaze. The tail is 4.8 inches long.[3] A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Kg redirects here. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about Ounce (unit of mass). ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... This article is about the Canadian province. ...


Although black bears can stand and walk on their hind legs it is more normal for them to walk on all fours. When they do stand, it is usually to get a better scent or to look at something. Their characteristic shuffling gait results from their plantigrade (flat-footed) walk, with the hind legs slightly longer than the forelegs. Another reason for the apparent shuffle is that they commonly walk with a pacing gait. Unlike many quadrupeds, the legs on one side move together instead of alternating, much like a pacer horse.[citation needed] Each paw has five long, strong claws used for tearing, digging, and climbing. Flatfoot redirects here. ... A quadruped is an animal having exactly four walking legs. ... A dogs paw resting on a hard concrete surface. ...


Ecology and behavior

Black bear, Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge
Black bear, Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge
Black bear cub, Glacier Bay National Park
Black bear cub, Glacier Bay National Park
American black bear tracks on a dirt road, Book Cliffs, UT
American black bear tracks on a dirt road, Book Cliffs, UT
American black bear, Parc Oméga, QC, Canada
American black bear, Parc Oméga, QC, Canada

Black bears are found in a wide variety of habitats across their range. They prefer forested and shrubby areas but they are also known to live on ridgetops, in tidelands, burned areas, riparian areas, agricultural fields and, sometimes, avalanche chutes. Black bears can be found from hardwood and conifer swamps to the rather dry sage and pinyon-juniper habitats in the western states. Black bears typically "hibernate" during winter in hollowed-out dens in tree cavities, under logs or rocks, in banks, caves, or culverts, and in shallow depressions. Dens are normally not reused from one year to the next. While they do not eat, drink, defecate, or urinate during hibernation, it is not the true hibernation of smaller mammals since their body temperature does not drop significantly and they remain somewhat alert and active. Females give birth and nurse their young while hibernating. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1050x692, 133 KB)[Us Fish and Wildlife service] Primary Metadata Title: Black bear Alternative Title: (none) Creator: Hollingsworth, John and Karen Source: WV10823 Publisher: U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Contributor: NATIONAL CONSERVATION TRAINING CENTER-PUBLICATIONS AND TRAINING MATERIALS Rights: (public... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1050x692, 133 KB)[Us Fish and Wildlife service] Primary Metadata Title: Black bear Alternative Title: (none) Creator: Hollingsworth, John and Karen Source: WV10823 Publisher: U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Contributor: NATIONAL CONSERVATION TRAINING CENTER-PUBLICATIONS AND TRAINING MATERIALS Rights: (public... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1858x1362, 1615 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): American Black Bear ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1858x1362, 1615 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): American Black Bear ... This article refers to the process of hibernation in biology. ...


After emerging from their winter dens in spring, they seek carrion from winter-killed animals and new shoots of many plant species, especially wetland plants. In mountainous areas, they seek southerly slopes at lower elevations for forage and move to northerly and easterly slopes at higher elevations as summer progresses. Black bears use dense cover for hiding and thermal protection, as well as for bedding. They climb trees to escape danger and use forested areas and rivers as travel corridors.


Females generally reach breeding maturity at 3 to 4 years of age and with adequate nutrition can breed every 2 years. In poor quality habitat, they may not mature until 5-7 and may skip breeding cycles. Males are sexually mature at same age, but may not become large enough to win breeding rights until they are 4-5 years old (they have to be large enough to win fights with other males and be accepted by females). Mating is generally during summer, from Mid-June to mid-August with some variation depending on latitude, but with embryonic diapause, the embryos do not begin to develop until the mother dens in the fall to hibernate through the winter months. Because of this delay, gestation can be 7 to 8 months, but actual development takes about 60 days. However, if food was scarce and the mother has not gained enough fat to sustain herself during hibernation as well as produce and feed cubs, the embryos do not develop. Biological reproduction is the biological process by which new individual organisms are produced. ... Embryonic diapause, in mammals is a condition where pre-implantation blastocysts are maintained in a state of dormancy, often due to environmental cues, until such time as the environment improves. ... This article refers to the process of hibernation in biology. ...


The cubs are generally born in January or February. They are very small, about 10-14 ounces, and are blind, nearly hairless, and helpless when born. Two to three cubs are most common, though up to four and even five cubs has been documented. First-time mothers typically have only a single cub. The mother nurses the cubs with rich milk, and by spring thaw, when the bears start leaving their dens, the cubs are fur-balls of energy, inquisitive and playful. By this time they are about 4 to 8 pounds (2-4 kg). When their mother senses danger, she grunts to the cubs to climb high up a tree. They are weaned between July and September of their first year and stay with the mother through the first winter. The cubs become independent during their second summer (when they are 1.5 years old). At this time, the sow goes into estrus again. Estrus (also spelled œstrus) or heat in female mammals is the period of greatest female sexual responsiveness usually coinciding with ovulation. ...


Cub survival is totally dependent on the skill of the mother in teaching her cubs what to eat, where and how to forage, where to den, and when and where to seek shelter from heat or danger.


Diet

Black bears are omnivores whose diet includes both plants and meat. They are apex predators in North America, with the exception of areas where they coexist with the brown bear. The black bear eats a wide variety of foods, mainly herbs, nuts and berries. In the state of Washington, black bears eat a large amount of skunk cabbage, horsetail and tree bark during the spring.[5] They also commonly feed on spring acorns in Massachusetts.[6] Symplocarpus foetidus, commonly known as Skunk Cabbage. ... Species The horsetails are vascular plants, comprising 15 species of plants in the genus Equisetum. ...

Black Bear by a tree stump
Black Bear by a tree stump

They also feed on carrion and insects (mainly for the larvae) such as carpenter ants, yellow jackets, bees, wasps and termites. They do raid bees' nests for honey, but more importantly for the bee larvae which are an easy source of protein. They also kill and eat small mammals (such as rodents) and ungulates, mostly the young. In Michigan[7] and the state of New York,[8] black bears have preyed on white-tailed deer fawns. In addition they have been recorded preying on elk calves in Idaho[9] and moose calves in Alaska[10] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... An American Black Vulture feeding on squirrel carrion For other uses, see Carrion (disambiguation). ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (Probably paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera (angel insects) Dermaptera (earwigs) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (stick insects) Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Psocoptera... Diversity 1017 species Species See text. ... Yellowjackets are black-and-yellow wasps of the genus Vespula or Dolichovespula. ... For other uses, see Western honey bee and Bee (disambiguation). ... Families See text. ... Families Mastotermitidae Kalotermitidae Termopsidae Hodotermitidae Rhinotermitidae Serritermitidae Termitidae Termites, sometimes known as white ants, are a group of social insects usually classified at the taxonomic rank of order Isoptera. ... For other uses, see Honey (disambiguation). ... Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously-growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing. ... Orders & Clades Order Perissodactyla Eparctocyona Order Arctostylonia (extinct) Order Mesonychia (extinct) Cetartiodactyla Order Cetacea Order Artiodactyla Bulbulodentata (extinct) Family Hyopsodontidae Meridiungulata (extinct) Order Litopterna Notoungulata (extinct) Order Toxodontia Order Typotheria Ungulates (meaning roughly being hoofed or hoofed animal) are several groups of mammals most of which use the tips of... Binomial name Zimmermann, 1780 The White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the Virginia deer, or simply as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer found throughout most of the continental United States, southern Canada, Mexico, Central America, northern portions of South America as far south as Peru, and... For other uses, see Elk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ...


Additionally, black bears will eat salmon, suckers, alligator eggs, crayfish, and trout and will seek out food within orchards, beehives, and agricultural croplands. They may frequent garbage dumps or appropriate food from the trash bins of businesses or private homes. For other uses, see Salmon (disambiguation). ... Genera See text Catostomidae is the sucker fish family of the Cypriniformes order. ... For other uses, see Alligator (disambiguation). ... Families Astacoidea   Astacidae   Cambaridae Parastacoidea   Parastacidae Crayfish, often referred to as crawfish, or crawdads, are freshwater crustaceans resembling small lobsters, to which they are closely related. ... For other uses, see Trout (disambiguation). ... A community apple orchard originally planted for productive use during the 1920s, in Westcliff on Sea (Essex, England) An orchard is an intentional planting of trees or shrubs maintained for food production. ... Domesticated Western honey bees are kept in beehives. ...


Black bears often drag their prey to cover, preferring to feed in seclusion and frequently begin feeding on the udder of lactating females, but generally prefer meat from the viscera. The skin of large prey is stripped back and turned inside out with the skeleton usually left largely intact. Unlike wolves and coyotes, black bears rarely scatter the remains of their kills. Vegetation around the carcass is usually matted down by black bears and their droppings are frequently found nearby. Black bears may attempt to cover remains of larger carcasses, though they do not do so with the same frequency as cougars and grizzly bears.[11] Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1771) Cougar range map The cougar (Puma concolor), also puma, mountain lion, or panther, is a mammal of the Felidae family, native to the Americas. ... For the Brooklyn-based indie rock band, see Grizzly Bear (band). ...


Livestock predation

Livestock depredations by black bears occur mostly in spring. A limitation of food sources in early spring and wild berry and nut crop failures during summer months are probably major contributing factors. Black bears can do extensive damage in some areas of the northwestern states by stripping the bark from trees and feeding on the cambium.


Though black bears will attack adult cattle and horses, they seem to prefer sheep, goats, calves and pigs. They normally kill by biting the neck and shoulders, though they may break the neck or back of prey with blows from the paws. Evidence of a bear attack includes claw marks are being frequently found on the neck, back and shoulders of these larger animals. Surplus killing of sheep and goats are relatively common. Bears have been known to frighten livestock herds over cliffs, causing injuries and death to many animals. Whether or not this is intentional is not known.


Interspecific predatory relationships

In some areas, black bears share their range with the Brown bear. Due to their smaller size, black bears are at a competitive disadvantage against brown bears in open, non-forested areas. Although displacement of black bears by brown bears has been documented, actual interspecific killing of black bears by brown bears has only occasionally been reported. The diurnal black bear's habit of living in heavily forested areas as opposed to the largely nocturnal brown bear's preference for open spaces usually ensures that the two species avoid confrontations in areas where they are sympatric.[12] Black bears are also sympatric with cougars and will sometimes usurp kills from them. Generally, however, black bears prefer not to fight with other predators. Bears are big and have big ass, thats why bears are hot, and thats why cats are not. ...


Attacks on humans

Like many animals, they seldom attack unless cornered, threatened, or wounded. They are less likely to attack humans than grizzly bears and typically flee for cover as soon as they identify a human visitor. Deaths by grizzlies are most often defensive, while black bear fatalities on humans, although extremely rare, are often predatory.[13] This makes feigning death when a black bear attacks ineffective. Although 14 North Americans have been killed since the year 2000, it is estimated that there have been only 56 documented killings of humans by black bears in North America in the past 100 years.


Taxonomy and subspecies ranges

The American Black Bear is classified in the class Mammalia, order Carnivora and family Ursidae. Many subspecies are named, such as the Kermode Bear, Cinnamon bear and Glacier Bear (or American Blue Bear). Currently accepted subspecies (with their respective ranges) include: Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... For other meanings, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Trinomial name Ursus americanus kermodei The Kermode bear is a genetically-unique subspecies of bear found in the central coast of British Columbia. ... This page is about the animal. ... This article is about the zoological term. ...

Ursus americanus altifrontalis Found in the Pacific Northwest coast from central British Columbia through northern California and inland to the tip of northern Idaho and British Columbia
Ursus americanus amblyceps Native to Colorado, New Mexico, west Texas, the eastern half of Arizona into northern Mexico; southeastern Utah
Ursus americanus americanus Found in eastern Montana to the Atlantic coast; from Alaska south and east through Canada to the Atlantic and south to Texas
Ursus americanus californiensis Found in the mountain ranges of Southern California, north through the Central Valley to southern Oregon
Ursus americanus carlottae Queen Charlotte Islands and Alaska
Ursus americanus cinnamomum Idaho, western Montana, and Wyoming, eastern Washington and Oregon, northeastern Utah
Ursus americanus emmonsii southeastern Alaska
Ursus americanus eremicus northeastern Mexico
Ursus americanus floridanus Florida, southern Georgia and Alabama. Threatened.
Ursus americanus hamiltoni the island of Newfoundland
Ursus americanus kermodei the central coast of British Columbia
Ursus americanus luteolus eastern Texas, Louisiana, southern Mississippi Endangered.
Ursus americanus machetes north-central Mexico
Ursus americanus perniger Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
Ursus americanus pugnax Alexander Archipelago, Alaska
Ursus americanus vancouveri Vancouver Island, British Columbia

Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Leaving Skidegate Inlet aboard BC Ferries M/V Queen of Prince Rupert The Queen Charlotte Islands or Haida Gwaii (Land of the Haida) are an archipelago off the northwest coast of British Columbia, Canada, consisting of two main islands, Graham Island in the North, and Moresby Island in the south... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... This page is about the animal. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Newfoundland —   IPA: [nuw fÉ™n lænd] (French: , Irish: ) is a large island off the east coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Trinomial name Ursus americanus kermodei The Kermode bear is a genetically-unique subspecies of bear found in the central coast of British Columbia. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Kenai Peninsula in Alaska The Kenai Peninsula is a large peninsula jutting from the southern coast of Alaska in the United States. ... A MODIS photograph of the Alexander Archipelago The Alexander Archipelago is an archipelago, or group of islands, off the southeast coast of Alaska. ... Vancouver Island is separated from mainland British Columbia by the Strait of Georgia and the Queen Charlotte Strait, and from Washington by the Juan De Fuca Strait. ...

History and controversy

Irish Guards, wearing bearskins
Irish Guards, wearing bearskins
A stuffed albino individual, Rothschild Museum, Tring
A stuffed albino individual, Rothschild Museum, Tring

Because their behavior has been little understood until recently, black bears have been feared and hated. Before the 20th century, these bears were shot intermittently as vermin, food, and trophies, being seen as either a vicious beast or an endless commodity; until recently, in many areas, bounties were paid for black bears. The Queen of the United Kingdom Foot Guard's hat has been for centuries made of black bear fur, and its original name is bearskin. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1122, 528 KB) Irish Guards, wearing bearskins, march to the Cenotaph (Whitehall, London, England) on June 12th 2005, for a service of remembrance for Irish soldiers. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1122, 528 KB) Irish Guards, wearing bearskins, march to the Cenotaph (Whitehall, London, England) on June 12th 2005, for a service of remembrance for Irish soldiers. ... Image File history File linksMetadata White-blackbear. ... Image File history File linksMetadata White-blackbear. ... Albino redirects here. ... The Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum was once the private museum of Lionel Walter, 2nd Baron Rothschild, and is located in the grounds of the former Rothschild family home of Tring Park, Tring, Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom. ... Irish Guards, wearing bearskins, march to the Cenotaph, London, on June 12th 2005 for a service of remembrance for Irish troops For the fairy tale of this title, see Bearskin (fairy tale). ...


Paradoxically, black bears have also been portrayed as harmless and cuddly. For example, the teddy bear owes its existence to a young black bear cub Theodore Roosevelt refused to shoot, and Christopher Milne named his teddy Winnie the Pooh after Winnipeg, a black bear which he and his father often saw at London Zoo. Today, black bears are as much an important game species as they are a point of debate across the continent, especially when it comes to the fact that many are finding life in the suburbs quite comfortable. Given their relatively low reproductive rate, black bear hunting must be carefully controlled and is probably inappropriate in areas where populations are feeble or where habitat is no longer intact. For other uses, see Teddy bear (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Chris Milne (born 1950) is an Australian actor and award winning writer who had scripted numerous episodes of Prisoner, as well as appearing on the show as a performer. ... Pooh redirects here. ... Winnipeg was the name given to the Black Bear cub that inspired the Winnie-the-Pooh stories by A. A. Milne. ... The giant ZSL London Zoo aviary ZSL London Zoo is the worlds oldest scientific zoo. ...


Their tendencies to follow their stomachs and habitat encroachment by humans have created human-bear conflicts. This is especially true in areas where they may have been uncommon or absent for a long time, as in many parts of the eastern United States. An excellent example is the state of New Jersey. In New Jersey, now the nation's most densely populated state, bears were quite common before the modern era. Because so much land was cleared for homes and farming and as a result of poor policies regarding hunting and forestry; by 1970 only about 100 bears remained. However, because of changes in land use, management, and bear population increases in neighboring Pennsylvania and New York, that number increased to an estimated 3529 by 2003. The result is that the residents increasingly encounter bears near their homes and workplaces. Education and precaution is needed, especially in areas such as New Jersey where bear encounters are a fairly new phenomena in recent history. Fear of bear attacks is a common concern for these residents. Attacks can happen when a bear has lost its fear of humans and has come to associate people with food. This is a cause for concern among civilians and scientists alike. Similar events have unfolded in other states and in Canada. The rate of contact between black bears in search of food and humans rose to record levels in the western United States in autumn 2007.[14] State, provincial, and federal agencies are working to address the issue with trap-and-release programs, limited hunting, and hazing bears with rubber bullets, other aversion techniques, and dogs. In agricultural areas, electric fences have been very effective. This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the state. ...


Legal status

Captive black bears at a zoo in Florida
Captive black bears at a zoo in Florida

Today, a major threat to the American black bear is poaching, or illegal killing, to supply Asian markets with bear galls and paws, considered to have medicinal value in China, Japan, and Korea. The demand for these parts also affects grizzly and polar bears. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), a treaty among more than 120 nations, provides measures to curb illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife products across international boundaries, helping to protect the black bear from poaching. Perpetrators caught poaching or smuggling either item out of the United States or Canada may face very serious legal ramifications, and park rangers within both countries are charged with the protection of the bears under their jurisdictions up to and including arrest. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (917x523, 238 KB) Captive black bears at a zoo in Florida. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (917x523, 238 KB) Captive black bears at a zoo in Florida. ... For other uses, see Poaching (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... The gallbladder (or cholecyst) is a pear-shaped organ that stores bile (or gall) until the body needs it for digestion. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is an international agreement between Governments, drafted as a result of a resolution adopted in 1963 at a meeting of members of the World Conservation Union (IUCN). ...


Black bears are abundant in most of the western states and in most of Canada, but its presence in the Midwest is uneven by comparison. For example, Ontario is home to about 100,000 bears, with at least as many in neighboring Quebec, while the Upper Midwest has a very healthy population with 30,000 bears in Minnesota alone. In contrast, nearby places like Iowa, Kansas and Illinois have virtually none. Most typical Midwestern states have not had a native population of bears since the turn of the 19th century and many[citation needed] are still heavily used for agriculture today. This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...


Most populations east of the Mississippi River are seeing a marked, steady increase in population: bears are moving back into places where they typically have been absent for over a century as suitable habitat has returned. In eastern states with heavily wooded areas, populations are growing rapidly; in North Carolina there were 11,000 bears at last count in 2004, Pennsylvania estimates 15,000 bears currently, New Jersey (a heavily urbanized state) estimated 3,529 in 2003, and even tiny Rhode Island has seen evidence of bears moving into areas where they haven't been in decades. The Florida black bear has also seen increases in numbers in recent decades, in 2004 the Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission estimated over 2,400 bears were in the state. Unfortunately, not all is well. Continued development may reduce connectivity between the already separated populations in Florida. The Louisiana subspecies continues to be at critically low levels, although several successful reintroduction projects have added bears to new areas of the state. For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


In Mexico, the indigenous black bear population is listed as endangered and is mostly limited to increasingly fragmented habitat in the mountainous northern parts of the country. Individuals from this area seem to have naturally recolonized parts of southern Texas and along the Rio Grande. “Río Bravo” redirects here. ...


In 1992, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Louisiana black bear subspecies as "threatened" under the Endangered Species Act, meaning it could be in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range in the near future. The American black bear is also protected by legislation in the affected states (Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas), owing to its close resemblance to this subspecies. The Florida black bear was denied protection under the Endangered Species Act in 1998 and 2004 due to its adequate protection and management by the State of Florida. Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Endangered Species Act (, et seq. ...


Miscellaneous

Black bear tracks on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.
Black bear tracks on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.
  • There has been considerable evidence of black bear activity that seems to suggest that the population may be extending its range back into historical territories in Ohio, Kentucky, Texas and other areas where bear were eradicated and have not been present for a considerable amount of time. It is suspected that adolescent males seeking new territory are wandering far and wide, literally hundreds of miles, by following natural and manmade corridors (rivers and highways) back into their ancestral lands. It has generally been recent policy that if the animal does not become a nuisance, is not a danger, or is not in any imminent peril, that it be allowed to exist unmolested and without hindrance. Most cases remain out of the general public's knowledge until there has been a significant human-bear encounter. Note that while dispersing male bears wander far, females generally stay near where they were born. Because of this, although bears may show up in unexpected places, reproducing populations are slower to expand from core areas.[15]
  • The sports teams of the University of Maine are known as Black Bears; it is also the mascot for Baylor University where two bears are kept on campus.
  • Ursus americanus kermodei, commonly known as the spirit bear, is a rare white (not albino) subspecies found in temperate rain forests on the Pacific coast of North America. Native tradition credits these animals with supernatural powers.
  • Smokey Bear, mascot of the United States Forest Service is based on an actual black bear cub found in New Mexico after a forest fire. The black bear is also the state animal for New Mexico.
  • In August 2004, several news media outlets[3] reported that a wild black bear was found passed out after drinking about 36 cans of beer in Baker Lake, Washington, USA. The bear opened a camper's cooler and used its claws and teeth to puncture the cans. It was found the bear selectively opened cans of Rainier Beer and left all but one Busch beer unconsumed.
  • The largest black bear on record was legally harvested in North Carolina in 1999 and was weighed by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission at 400 kg (880 pounds). It was reported to have been eating hogs from an industrial hog farm.
Honey, the world's largest female black bear in captivity, at the North American Bear Center.
Honey, the world's largest female black bear in captivity, at the North American Bear Center.
Ted, the world's largest male black bear in captivity, at the North American Bear Center.
Ted, the world's largest male black bear in captivity, at the North American Bear Center.
  • The North American Bear Center, located in Ely, Minnesota, is home to the world's largest captive male and female black bears. Ted, the male, weighed 430-453.6 kg (950-1,000 pounds) in the Fall of 2006.[16] Honey, the female, weighed 252 kg (555.5 pounds) in the Fall of 2007.[17] Both bears have a high protein diet.
Harry Colebourne and Winnie 1914
Harry Colebourne and Winnie 1914

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 2. ... Vancouver Island is separated from mainland British Columbia by the Strait of Georgia and the Queen Charlotte Strait, and from Washington by the Juan De Fuca Strait. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... UMO redirects here, but this abbreviation is also used informally to mean the Mozilla Add-ons website, formerly Mozilla Update Should not be confused with Université du Maine, in Le Mans, France The University of Maine, established in 1865, is the flagship university of the University of Maine System. ... {{Infobox_University |image_name = 135px-Baylor_seal. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Kermode bear. ... Albinism is a genetic condition resulting in a lack of pigmentation in the eyes, skin and hair. ... Temperate rain forests often grow right up to the shoreline The Pacific temperate rain forests of North America are the largest temperate rain forest zone on the planet. ... Smokey Bear. ... Logo of the U.S. Forest Service. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... August 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert Bootzin • 8 Fay... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Cat claw A claw is a curved pointed appendage, found at the end of a toe or finger or, in arthropods, of the tarsus. ... Teeth redirects here. ... The aluminum can (North American English spelling) or aluminium can (other English spelling) is a popular beverage container introduced by the Coors Brewing Company. ... 1907 Rainier ad in the Pacific Monthly Rainier Brewing Company was a Seattle, Washington company that brewed Rainier Beer, a very popular brand in the Pacific Northwest. ... Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. ... The term captivity is used to refer to the following meanings: the state of being confined to a space from which it is hard or impossible to escape; see imprisonment. ... The term captivity is used to refer to the following meanings: the state of being confined to a space from which it is hard or impossible to escape; see imprisonment. ... Ely is a city in St. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin showing coloured alpha helices. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Pooh redirects here. ... Winnipeg was the name given to the Black Bear cub that inspired the Winnie-the-Pooh stories by A. A. Milne. ... White River (population 1000), is a township located in Ontario, Canada. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Royal Winnipeg Rifles are a reserve infantry regiment of the Canadian Armed Forces. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... The giant ZSL London Zoo aviary ZSL London Zoo is the worlds oldest scientific zoo. ... Alan Alexander Milne (IPA pronunciation: ) (January 18, 1882 – January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various childrens poems. ... The Simon Fraser University Pipe Band, winner of 4 World Pipe Band Championships in the past decade, in competition at the 2005 Bellingham Highland Games A pipe band is a musical ensemble consisting of pipers and drummers. ... The Edinburgh Military Tattoo is a show given by military bands and display teams. ... Reading the newspaper: Brookgreen Gardens in Pawleys Island, South Carolina. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... West Milford is a township in Passaic County, New Jersey, United States. ... Binomial name Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Felis lybica invalid junior synonym The cat (or domestic cat, house cat) is a small carnivorous mammal. ...

See also

This is a list of known fatal bear attacks that occurred in North America by decade in reverse chronological order. ...

References

  1. ^ http://biology.usgs.gov/s+t/noframe/c286.htm
  2. ^ http://whozoo.org/Intro2001/natdavis/JNDavis_blackbear.htm
  3. ^ a b Brown, Gary (1996). Great Bear Almanac, pp.340. ISBN 1558214747. 
  4. ^ http://www.helium.com/tm/379331/american-black-lives-north
  5. ^ Efficacy of Black Bear Supplemental Feeding to Reduce Conifer Damage in Western Washington, Georg J. Ziegltrum, The Journal of Wildlife Management, Vol. 68, No. 3 (Jul., 2004), pp. 470-474
  6. ^ Effects of Spring acorn availability on Black Bear diet, milk composition, and cub survival, John E. McDonald Jr.A, B and Todd K. Fuller, Journal of Mammalogy Article: pp. 1022–1028
  7. ^ Ozoga, J. J., and R.K Clute. 1988. Mortality rates of marked and unmarked fawns. Journal of Wildlife Management 52:549-551.
  8. ^ Mathews, N. E., and W. F Porter. 1988. Black bear predation on white-tailed deer neonates in the central Adirondacks, Canadian Journal of Zoology 66:1241-1242.
  9. ^ Schlegal. M. 1976, Factor affecting calf elk survival in north central Idaho. Western Association of State Game and Fish Commission 56:342-355.
  10. ^ Franzmann. A. W. C. C, Schwartz and R.O. Peterson, Moose calf mortality in summer at Kenai Pennisula, Alaska. Journal of Wildlife Management 44:764-768
  11. ^ http://texnat.tamu.edu/ranchref/predator/bears/t-bears.htm
  12. ^ http://www.nrmsc.usgs.gov/products/Predation_Papers.pdf
  13. ^ Black Bear Problems and Control - FAQ
  14. ^ Reuters (2007-09-25). Bear havoc at record heights in US West. Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  15. ^ Wecker, David. "Boone County bear still on the lam", The Kentucky Post, E. W. Scripps Company, 2004-07-14. Archived from the original on 2007-03-17. 
  16. ^ http://www.bear.org/website/Ted/How-Big-is-Ted.html
  17. ^ http://www.bear.org/website/Honey/

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cincinnati Post is an afternoon daily newspaper published since 1881 in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... The E.W. Scripps Company (NYSE: SSP) is an American media conglomerate founded by Edward W. Scripps on November 2, 1878, originally known as the Cleveland Penny Press. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... The Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS) is a partnership designed to provide consistent and reliable information on the taxonomy of biological species. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Image File history File links Wikispecies-logo. ... Wikispecies is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation that aims to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species (including animalia, plantae, fungi, bacteria, archaea, and protista). ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Phyla Subkingdom Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subkingdom Agnotozoa Placozoa Orthonectida Rhombozoa Subkingdom Metazoa Radiata Cnidaria Ctenophora - Comb jellies Bilateria Protostomia Acoelomorpha Platyhelminthes - Flatworms Nemertina - Ribbon worms Gastrotricha Gnathostomulida - Jawed worms Micrognathozoa Rotifera - Rotifers Acanthocephala Priapulida Kinorhyncha Loricifera Entoprocta Nematoda - Roundworms Nematomorpha - Horsehair worms Cycliophora Mollusca - Mollusks Sipuncula - Peanut worms Annelida - Segmented... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals primarily characterized by the presence of mammary... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... Families Canidae Felidae Herpestidae Hyaenidae Mephitidae Mustelidae Nandiniidae Odobenidae Pinnipedia Procyonidae Ursidae Viverridae The diverse order Carnivora includes over 260 placental mammals. ... Binomial name Ailuropoda melanoleuca The Giant Panda (Chinese: 熊貓; pinyin: xióng māo), Ailuropoda melanoleuca (black-and-white cat-foot), is a mammal now usually classified in the bear family, Ursidae, that is native to central China. ... Binomial name Ailuropoda melanoleuca The Giant Panda (Chinese: 熊貓; pinyin: xióng māo), Ailuropoda melanoleuca (black-and-white cat-foot), is a mammal now usually classified in the bear family, Ursidae, that is native to central China. ... Panda Bear redirects here. ... Binomial name (Cuvier, 1825) Synonyms Ursus ornatus Cuvier, 1825 The Spectacled Bear (Tremarctos ornatus), also known as the Andean Bear and locally as ukuko, jukumari or ucumari, is the last of the lineage of short-faced bears of the Middle Pleistocene to Late Pleistocene age. ... Binomial name (Cuvier, 1825) Synonyms Ursus ornatus Cuvier, 1825 The Spectacled Bear (Tremarctos ornatus), also known as the Andean Bear and locally as ukuko, jukumari or ucumari, is the last of the lineage of short-faced bears of the Middle Pleistocene to Late Pleistocene age. ... Binomial name (Cuvier, 1825) Synonyms Ursus ornatus Cuvier, 1825 The Spectacled Bear (Tremarctos ornatus), also known as the Andean Bear and locally as ukuko, jukumari or ucumari, is the last of the lineage of short-faced bears of the Middle Pleistocene to Late Pleistocene age. ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Species Ursus arctos Ursus americanus Ursus maritimus Ursus thibetanus, or Selenarctos thibetanus Asiatic black bear might be classified with Kinowagma belonging Selenarctos. ... Binomial name (G. Cuvier, 1823) Thibetanus bear range Synonyms Selenarctos thibetanus The Asiatic Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus or Selenarctos thibetanus), also known as the Tibetan black bear, the Himalayan black bear, or the moon bear, is a medium sized, sharp-clawed, black-coloured bear with a distinctive white or cream... Bears are big and have big ass, thats why bears are hot, and thats why cats are not. ... This article is about the animal. ... Binomial name (Raffles, 1821) Synonyms Ursus malayanus Raffles, 1821 Helarctos euryspilus Horsfield, 1825 Helarctos malayanus Horsfield, 1825 Helarctos anmamiticus Heude, 1901 The Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus) is a bear found primarily in the tropical rainforests of Southeast Asia. ... Binomial name (Raffles, 1821) Synonyms Ursus malayanus Raffles, 1821 Helarctos euryspilus Horsfield, 1825 Helarctos malayanus Horsfield, 1825 Helarctos anmamiticus Heude, 1901 The Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus) is a bear found primarily in the tropical rainforests of Southeast Asia. ... Binomial name Melursus ursinus (Shaw, 1791) The Sloth Bear (Melursus ursinus) is a nocturnal bear, inhabiting the lowland forests of India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. ... Binomial name Melursus ursinus (Shaw, 1791) The Sloth Bear (Melursus ursinus) is a nocturnal bear, inhabiting the lowland forests of India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. ... Game is any animal hunted for food or not normally domesticated (such as venison). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... North American redirects here. ... Binomial name Colinus virginianus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Bobwhite Quail or Northern Bobwhite, Colinus virginianus, is a ground-dwelling bird native to North America. ... Binomial name Alectoris chukar (Gray, JE, 1830) The chukar, Alectoris chukar, is a gamebird in the pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. ... Binomial name Perdix perdix (Linnaeus, 1758) The Grey Partridge (Perdix perdix) is a gamebird in pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. ... Binomial name Tympanuchus cupido (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies Tympanuchus cupido attwateri Tympanuchus cupido cupido Tympanuchus cupido pinnatus The Greater Prairie Chicken, Tympanuchus cupido, is a large bird in the grouse family. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Winter only (blue), summer only (light green), and year-round (dark green) range Subspecies See text The Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) is a member of the dove family Columbidae. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), otherwise known as the Ring-necked Pheasant or Chinese Pheasant is a gamebird in the pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. ... Binomial name Lagopus mutus (Montin, 1781) The Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus) is a small (31-35 cm) bird in the grouse family. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) The Ruffed Grouse, Bonasa umbellus, is a medium-sized grouse occurring in forests across Canada and the Appalachian and northern United States including Alaska. ... Binomial name Tympanuchus phasianellus (Linnaeus, 1758) Introduction The Sharp-tailed Grouse, Tympanuchus phasianellus, is a medium-sized prairie grouse similar in size to the Greater Prairie-Chicken, males weigh an average of 33. ... Binomial name Gallinago gallinago Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies (Wilsons Snipe) The Common Snipe, Gallinago gallinago, is a small, stocky shorebird. ... Binomial name Falcipennis canadensis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Spruce Grouse, Falcipennis canadensis, is a medium-sized grouse. ... Species Eurasian Woodcock, Amami Woodcock, Bukidnon Woodcock, Dusky Woodcock, Sulawesi Woodcock, Moluccan Woodcock, American Woodcock, The woodcock are a group of seven very similar wading bird species in the genus Scolopax, characterised by a long slender bill and cryptic brown and blackish plumage. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Binomial name Anas rubripes Brewster, 1902 The American Black Duck (Anas rubripes) is a large-sized dabbling duck. ... For the outerwear manufacturer, see Canada Goose (clothing). ... Binomial name Aythya valisineria (Wilson, 1814) The Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) is a larger-sized diving duck. ... Binomial name Anas strepera Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies (Common Gadwall) (Washington Island Gadwall) - extinct The Gadwall (Anas strepera) is a common and widespread duck which breeds in the northern areas of Europe and Asia and central North America. ... Binomial name Aythya marila (Linnaeus, 1761) The Greater Scaup (Aythya marila), or just Scaup in Europe, is a small diving duck. ... Binomial name Aythya affinis (Eyton, 1838) The Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) is a small diving duck. ... For other uses, see Mallard (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Anas acuta Linnaeus, 1758 The Pintail or Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) is a common and widespread duck which breeds in the northern areas of Europe and Asia and across most of Canada, Alaska and the mid-western United States. ... Binomial name Aythya americana (Eyton, 1838) The Redhead (Aythya americana) is a medium-sized diving duck. ... Binomial name Anser rossii Cassin, 1861 Synonyms The Rosss Goose (Anser rossii) is a North American species of goose. ... Binomial name Anser caerulescens (Linnaeus, 1758) The Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) is a North American species of goose. ... Binomial name Aix sponsa Linnaeus, 1758 Nesting (light green), wintering (blue) and year-round (dark green) ranges of . ... Binomial name Shaw, 1804 Synonyms Desmarest Cuvier[1] Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis)[2] is one of three species of mountain sheep in North America and Siberia; the other two species being Ovis dalli, that includes Dall Sheep and Stones Sheep, and the Siberian Snow sheep Ovis nivicola. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The wild boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ... Bears are big and have big ass, thats why bears are hot, and thats why cats are not. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... Caribou redirects here. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1771) Cougar range map The cougar (Puma concolor), also puma, mountain lion, or panther, is a mammal of the Felidae family, native to the Americas. ... For other uses, see Elk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Zimmermann, 1780 The White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the Virginia deer, or simply as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer found throughout most of the continental United States, southern Canada, Mexico, Central America, northern portions of South America as far south as Peru, and... For other uses, see Wolf (disambiguation), Gray Wolves (disambiguation), or Timber Wolf (comics). ... Rocky Mountain Goat and Mountain Goats redirect here. ... Binomial name (Rafinesque, 1817) The mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) is a deer whose habitat is in the western half of North America. ... Binomial name (Zimmermann, 1780) Range map. ... Binomial name Nelson, 1884 The Dall Sheep (originally Dalls Sheep, sometimes called Thinhorn Sheep), Ovis dalli, is a wild sheep of the mountainous regions of northwest North America, ranging from white to slate brown and having curved yellowish brown horns. ... This article is about the animal. ... restoring version with Binomial name (Daudin, 1801) American Alligator range map The American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is one of the two living species of Alligator, a genus within the family Alligatoridae. ... For other uses, see Bobcat (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Sciurus niger Linnaeus, 1758 The Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger) is the largest species of tree squirrels native to North America. ... For other uses, see Gray Fox (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Gmelin, 1788 The eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) is a tree squirrel native to the eastern and midwestern United States and to the southerly portions of the eastern provinces of Canada. ... Genera Several; see text Didelphimorphia is the order of common opossums of the Western Hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... For the river, see Raccoon River. ... For other uses, see Red Fox (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Lepus americanus Erxleben, 1777 The Snowshoe Hare (Lepus americanus) is a species of hare found in North America. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into hunting. ... Theodore Roosevelt in 1885 with his highly-decorated deer-skin hunting suit, and Tiffany-carved hunting knife and rifle. ... Duck hunters spring from their blind to take a shot at an incoming bird. ... Main article: Gray Wolf Wolf hunting is the practice of hunting wolves, especially the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus). ... Upland hunting is an American term for a form of bird hunting in which the hunter pursues upland birds including quail, pheasant, grouse, prairie chicken, chuckar, grey partridge, and others. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Black Bears in Massachusetts (2310 words)
Black bears have good eyesight and hearing and have an extraordinary sense of smell which is used to locate food and recognize potential danger.
American fl bears are found in most of Canada south of the tree line and still occupy 85% of their original range there.
Black bears have recently reoccupied much of their original range in the U.S., especially in the east, and their status is generally favorable.
American Black Bear (1161 words)
While fl bears are capable of standing and walking on their hind legs, the usual posture is on all fours.
Black bears hibernate during winter and may build dens in tree cavities, under logs, rocks, in banks, caves, or culverts, and in shallow depressions.
Black bears may occasionally prey on domestic sheep and pigs when their natural foods are scarce.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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