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Encyclopedia > American Bittern
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American Bittern
American Bittern
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Ciconiiformes
Family: Ardeidae
Genus: Botaurus
Species: B. lentiginosus
Binomial name
Botaurus lentiginosus
(Rackett, 1813)

The American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus *) is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae. American Bittern from USFWS Title: American Bittern Source: WO4399-006 Publisher: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Rights: public domain File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Phyla Porifera (sponges) Ctenophora (comb jellies) Cnidaria (coral, jellyfish, anenomes) Placozoa (trichoplax) Subregnum Bilateria (bilateral symmetry) Acoelomorpha (basal) Orthonectida (flatworms, echinoderms, etc. ... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicatas Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Orders Many - see section below. ... Families Ardeidae Cochlearidae Balaenicipitidae Scopidae Ciconiidae Threskiornithidae Traditionally, the order Ciconiiformes has included a variety of large, long-legged wading birds with large bills: storks, herons, egrets, ibises, spoonbills, and several others. ... Genera Ardea Zebrilus Philherodias Tigrisoma Ardeola Bubulcus Egretta Agamia Butorides Tigriornis Tigrisoma Gorsachius Syrigma Zonerodius Nycticorax see also: Bittern Heron and reeds, Haronobu Suzuki (1754-1770) Herons are medium to large long-legged, long-necked wading birds of the family Ardeidae, which also includes the egrets and bitterns. ... † see also: Heron The bitterns are members of the heron family Ardeidae. ... In biology, binomial nomenclature is the formal method of naming species. ... Genera Ardea Zebrilus Philherodias Tigrisoma Ardeola Bubulcus Egretta Agamia Butorides Tigriornis Tigrisoma Gorsachius Syrigma Zonerodius Nycticorax see also: Bittern Heron and reeds, Haronobu Suzuki (1754-1770) Herons are medium to large long-legged, long-necked wading birds of the family Ardeidae, which also includes the egrets and bitterns. ... Genera See text The Ardeidae family of birds is the heron, egret and bittern family of wading birds. ...


It is a large, chunky, brown bird, very similar to the Eurasian Great Bittern, Botaurus stellaris. It is 59-70 cm in length, with a 95-115 cm wingspan. Orders Many - see section below. ... Binomial name Botaurus stellaris (Linnaeus, 1758) The Great Bittern (Botaurus stellaris) is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae. ...


Although common in much of its range, the American bittern is usually well-hidden in bogs, marshes and wet meadows. Usually solitary, it walks stealthily among cattails or bullrushes. If it senses that it has been seen, the American Bittern becomes motionless, with its bill pointed upward, causing it to blend into the reeds. It is most active at dusk. More often heard than seen, this bittern has a call that resembles a congested pump. Species See text. ... The term bulrush (or sometimes as bullrush) typically refers to tall, herbaceous plants that grow in wetlands. ...


Like other members of the heron family, the American Bittern feeds in marshes and shallow ponds, dining on amphibians, fish, insects and reptiles. Freshwater marsh in Florida In geography, a marsh is a type of wetland, featuring grasses, rushes, reeds, typhas, sedges, and other herbaceous plants (possibly with low-growing woody plants) in a context of shallow water. ... For other uses, see Amphibian (disambiguation). ... Groups Conodonta Hyperoartia Petromyzontidae (lampreys) Pteraspidomorphi (early jawless fish) Thelodonti Anaspida Cephalaspidomorphi (early jawless fish) Galeaspida Pituriaspida Osteostraci Gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates) Placodermi Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fish) Acanthodii Osteichthyes (bony fish) Actinopterygii (ray-finned fish) Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fish) Actinistia (coelacanths) Dipnoi (lungfish) A fish is a poikilothermic (cold-blooded) water-dwelling... Classes & Orders Subclass: Apterygota Orders Archaeognatha (Bristletails) Thysanura (Silverfish) Monura - extinct Subclass: Pterygota Infraclass: Paleoptera (paraphyletic) Orders Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Protodonata - extinct Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Diaphanopteroidea - extinct Palaeodictyoptera - extinct Megasecoptera - extinct Archodonata - extinct Infraclass: Neoptera Orders Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Dermaptera (earwigs) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Protorthoptera - extinct Orthoptera (grasshoppers... Orders  Crocodilia - Crocodilians  Rhynchocephalia - Tuataras  Squamata   Suborder Sauria- Lizards   Suborder Serpentes - Snakes   Suborder Amphisbaenia - Worm lizards Testudines - Turtles Superorder Dinosauria  Saurischia  Ornithischia Reptiles are tetrapods, and also are amniotes, animals whose embryos are surrounded by an amniotic membrane. ...


This bittern winters in the southern United States and Central America. It summers throughout Canada and much of the United States. As a long-distance migrant, it has a occurred as a very rare vagrant in Europe, including Great Britain and Ireland. † see also: Heron The bitterns are members of the heron family Ardeidae. ... Commonly, Central America is the region of North America located between the southern border of Mexico and the northwest border of Colombia, in South America. ... // Long-distance land bird migration Many species of land birds migrate very long distances, the most common pattern being for birds to breed in the temperate or arctic northern hemisphere and winter in warmer regions, often in the tropics or the southern hemisphere. ...


This bird's numbers have declined in the southern parts of its range due to habitat loss.


Folk names include barrel-maker, belcher-squelcher bog-bull, bog hen, bog-trotter, boomer, butterbump, flying fox, Indian hen, Indian pullet, look-up, marsh hen, mire drum, poke, pond guinea, scoggin, shitepoke, sky-gazer, stake-bird, stake-driver, sun, gazer, thunder pumper, and water-belcher.


Many of the folk names are given for its distinctive call made by inhaling and exhaling large qunatities of air.


* Botaurus: Latin for bittern; lentiginosus: Latin for freckled, in reference to its plumage.


Reference

"National Geographic" Field Guide to the Birds of North America ISBN: 0792268776


  Results from FactBites:
 
WRCF - American Bittern (298 words)
The secretive American bittern may be best known for its habit, when it feels threatened, of standing standing upright with its bill pointing upward.
American bitterns build platform nests of reeds and grasses near the water, and normally lay a clutch of three to seven buff- or olive-brown eggs.
The American bittern is considered threatened because of the continuing disappearance of the wetland habitats it needs to exist.
CT DEP: American Bittern Fact Sheet (590 words)
Identification: Adult American bitterns are large, somewhat stocky birds with yellow eyes, rich brown upperparts, and a white throat that is offset by fl streaks.
Range: American bitterns occur from Central British Columbia east to Newfoundland, south, locally, to the Gulf Coast and west to southern California.
History in Connecticut: The American bittern was common in Connecticut during the late 1800s and it was a regular, but not abundant, resident of freshwater wetlands in the early 1900s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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