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Encyclopedia > American Academy of Arts and Sciences
The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

The American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS) is an organization dedicated to scholarship and the advancement of learning. It serves as a nationwide honor society for the United States. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1033 KB) National headquarters of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1033 KB) National headquarters of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Cambridge City Hall Cambridge is a city in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts, United States. ...


James Bowdoin, John Adams, and John Hancock founded the Academy in Boston during the American Revolution. Their objective, as stated in its charter, was to "cultivate every art and science which may tend to advance the interest, honour, dignity, and happiness of a free, independent, and virtuous people." They were joined by Robert Treat Paine and 58 local community leaders to charter the organization in 1780. Other prominent men soon joined, and early members included Benjamin Franklin (whose American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia provided a spur to the Boston leaders to create a more politically oriented society), George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton. In terms of prestige, a Fellowship or a Foreign Honorary Membership of the Academy is regarded as second only to the Nobel Awards; in fact most of the Nobel winners have been elected to the Fellowship beforehand in recent years. James Bowdoin James Bowdoin (August 7, 1726-November 6, 1790) was an American political and intellectual leader from Boston, Massachusetts during the American Revolution. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was the first (1789–1797) Vice President of the United States, and the second (1797–1801) President of the United States. ... Portrait of Hancock (full portrait) Hancocks signature on the United States Declaration of Independence John Hancock (January 12, 1737 (O.S.) – October 8, 1793 (N.S.)) was President of the Continental Congress, and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ... -1... Robert Treat Paine; Signer of the Declaration of Independence For others with the same name, see Robert Treat Paine (disambiguation). ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Benjamin Franklin by Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1777 Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most prominent of Founders and early political figures and statesmen of the United States. ... The American Philosophical Society, founded in 1743 by founding father Benjamin Franklin, continues to operate to this day. ... Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected twice (1789-1797). ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), author of the United States Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... A portrait of Alexander Hamilton by John Trumbull, 1792. ...


The modern academy is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It sponsors conferences, organizes research projects, and publishes a quarterly journal, D├Ždalus. Today's Academy boasts 4,000 fellows and several hundred foreign honorary members. Throughout the academic year, members are invited to regularly scheduled talks and meetings in Cambridge and at regional centers headquartered at the University of Chicago and the University of California, Irvine. Cambridge City Hall Cambridge is a city in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts, United States. ...


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  Results from FactBites:
 
Harvard Gazette: American Academy of Arts and Sciences announces fellows (427 words)
The American Academy of Arts and Sciences recently announced the names of 209 distinguished scholars, scientists, artists, business executives, educators, and public officials who have been elected to membership in the nation's leading learned society.
Founded in the midst of the American Revolution by John Adams, James Bowdoin, John Hancock, and other leaders of the young nation, the Academy was chartered "to cultivate every art and science which may tend to advance the interest, honor, dignity, and happiness of a free, independent, and virtuous people."
The Academy has numbered among its members each generation's finest minds and most influential leaders, from George Washington and Ben Franklin in the 18th century to Daniel Webster and Ralph Waldo Emerson in the 19th, and Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill in the 20th.
Four elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1175 words)
Frieden, Ph.D., is the the Wittcoff Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics; Gordon, Ph.D., is the Dr. Robert J. Glaser Distinguished University Professor; McDonnell is chairman of the board of trustees; and Phillips is professor of English and of African and Afro-American Studies, both in Arts and Sciences.
In 1988, Frieden was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and selected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Phillips is the recipient of, among others, an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Witter Bynner Foundation Fellowship from the Library of Congress, two Pushcart Prizes and the Academy of American Poets Prize.
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