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Encyclopedia > America Online
AOL
Image:AOL logo.png
Type Owned by Time Warner (95%), Google (5%)
Founded 1985
Location Dulles in Loudoun County, Virginia
Key people Jonathan Miller, Ted Leonsis
Industry Internet & Communications
Products ISP
Revenue $8.3 billion ( 5%) USD (2005)
Employees about 20,000
Website www.aol.com

AOL, formerly known as America Online, is a U.S.-based online service provider, Internet service provider, and media company operated by Time Warner. Based in Dulles, a community in Loudoun County, Virginia, with regional branches around the world, it is by far the most successful proprietary online service, with more than 32 million subscribers at one point in the US, Canada, Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Latin America (declared bankrupt in 2004), Japan and formerly Russia. In early 2005, AOL Hong Kong stopped its service. In the fall of 2004, AOL reported total subscribers had dropped to 24 million, a drop of over a quarter of its subscribers.[1] In late 1996, AOL suspended all dialup service within Russia in the face of massive billing fraud, forcing the company into a rare case of full market retreat. Image File history File links AOL_logo. ... Time Warner Inc. ... Google Inc. ... Dulles is an unincorporated area in Loudoun County, Virginia. ... Loudoun County, Virginia is part of the Washington-Baltimore Metropolitan Area. ... Ted Leonsis is the majority owner of the NHLs Washington Capitals, purchasing the franchise in 1999 from Abe Pollin for $85 million. ... BlackBerry 7100t Telecommunication refers to the communication of information at a distance. ... An Internet service provider (ISP, also called Internet access provider) is a business or organization that offers users access to the Internet and related services. ... Revenue is a US business term for the amount of money that a company can receive from its activities, mostly from sales of products and/or services to customers. ... Image File history File links Red_Arrow_Down. ... This article is about general United States currency. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... The front page of the English Wikipedia Website. ... An online service provider, in modern usage refers to an entity which provides a service online. ... An Internet service provider (ISP, also called Internet access provider) is a business or organization that offers users access to the Internet and related services. ... Time Warner Inc. ... Dulles is an unincorporated area in Loudoun County, Virginia. ... Loudoun County, Virginia is part of the Washington-Baltimore Metropolitan Area. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 320 km 690 km 7. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ...


For many Americans through the mid to late 1990s, AOL was the Internet, but the rise of high-speed Internet access from cable and telephone companies as well as the increasing sophistication of the public in handling browsers and other Internet utilities has cut into its user base. In 2000 AOL and Time Warner announced plans to merge, and the deal was approved by the Federal Trade Commission on January 11, 2001. This merger was primarily a product of the Internet mania of the late 1990's, known as the Internet bubble. The subsequent massive decline in value of stocks such as AOL resulted in much recrimination over the merger. Also, the merger with AOL allowed for Time Warner to vote off WCW (World Championship Wrestling). The 1990s decade refers to the years from 1990 to 1999, inclusive. ... Time Warner Inc. ... FTC headquarters, Washington, D.C. The Federal Trade Commission (or FTC) is an independent agency of the United States government, established in 1914 by the Federal Trade Commission Act. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Dot-com (also dotcom or redundantly dot. ...


News reports in the fall of 2005 indicated a renewed interest in buying out AOL. Suitors such as Microsoft, Google, Yahoo and Comcast have had discussions with Time Warner about a possible purchase, and on December 16, 2005, Time Warner and Google announced that they were starting exclusive talks for Google to purchase $1 billion in AOL stock, a 5% share. Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT, SEHK: 4338) is an international computer technology corporation with 2005 global annual sales of close to $40 billion USD and about 64,000 employees in 85 countries and regions which develops, manufactures, licenses, and supports a wide range of software products for computing devices. ... Google Inc. ... Yahoo! Inc. ... Comcast Corporation, NASDAQ: CMCSA based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is both the largest cable company and the largest broadband (2nd overall) Internet service provider in the United States. ... Time Warner Inc. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Although its dialup market is shrinking as more members switch to high-speed services, the success of its AOL for Broadband program has helped it to maintain members that would otherwise totally drop the AOL service. This combined with its growing advertising revenue through its relationship with Google, AOL collected 8.7 billion US dollars in revenue for 2004. In early March 2006, AOL informed its members that the narrowband monthly rate would be increasing from $23.95 to $25.90.

Contents


History

The AOL logo used until late 2004
The AOL logo used until late 2004

AOL began as a short-lived venture called Control Video Corporation (or CVC), founded by William von Meister. Its sole product was an online service called Gameline for the Atari 2600 video game console after von Meister's idea of buying music on demand was rejected by Warner Brothers. (Klein, 2003) Subscribers bought a modem from the company for $49.95 and paid a one-time $15 setup fee. Gameline permitted subscribers to temporarily download games and keep track of high scores, at a cost of approximately $1 an hour. This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... Bill von Meister was a brilliant, flamboyant entrepreneur who founded and participated in a number of startup ventures in the Washington, DC area. ... The CVC GameLine was a cartridge for the Atari 2600 which could download games from a phone line. ... The Atari 2600, released in 1977, is the first successful video game console to use plug-in cartridges instead of having one or more games built in. ... A video game console is a dedicated electronic machine designed to play video games. ... Warner Bros. ... A modem (a portmanteau word constructed from modulator and demodulator) is a device that modulates a carrier signal to encode digital information, and also demodulates such a carrier signal to decode the transmitted information. ...


In 1983 the company nearly went bankrupt, and an investor in Control Video, Frank Caufield, had a friend of his, Jim Kimsey, brought in as a manufacturing consultant. That same year, Steve Case was hired as a part-time consultant; later on that year, he joined the company as a full-time marketing employee upon the joint recommendations of von Meister and Kimsey. Kimsey went on to become the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the newly-renamed Quantum Computer Services in 1985 after von Meister was quietly dropped from the company. Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, administration - see text) in the UK. Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organization to pay their creditors. ... Jim Kimsey (James V. Kimsey) was the co-founder, CEO, and first chairman of internet service provider America Online (AOL). ... Steve Case (born August 21, 1958) is a businessman best known as the former chief executive officer and chairman of America Online (AOL). ... A chief executive officer (CEO) or chief executive is the highest-ranking corporate officer or executive officer of a corporation, company, or agency. ...


Case himself rose quickly through the ranks; Kimsey promoted him to vice-president of marketing not long after becoming CEO, and later promoted him further to executive vice-president in 1987. Kimsey soon began to groom Case to ascend to the rank of CEO when he himself retired, which Case did in 1991.


Kimsey changed the company's strategy, and in 1985 launched a sort of mega-BBS for Commodore 64 and 128 computers, originally called Quantum Link ("Q-Link" for short). In May 1988, Quantum and Apple launched AppleLink Personal Edition for Apple II and Macintosh computers. After the two companies parted ways in October 1989, Quantum changed the service's name to America Online. [2], [3] In August 1988, Quantum launched PC Link, a service for IBM-compatible PCs developed in a joint venture with the Tandy Corporation. A bulletin board system or BBS is a computer system running software that allows users to dial into the system over a phone line and, using a terminal program, perform functions such as downloading software and data, uploading data, playing games, reading news, and exchanging messages with other users. ... For the hip hop group, see Commodore 64 (band). ... The Commodore 128 is a home/personal computer, also known as the C128. ... Quantum Link main menu Quantum Link (or Q-Link) was an American online service for Commodore 64 and 128 personal computers that operated from November 5, 1985 to November 1, 1994. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... AppleLink was the name of both Apple Computers online service for its users, and the client software used to access it. ... The 1977 Apple II, complete with integrated keyboard, color high-resolution graphics, sound, a sleek plastic case, and eight expansion slots. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh, or Mac, line of personal computers is designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Diagram of a typical modern PC. A personal computer or PC is usually a microcomputer whose price, size, and capabilities make it suitable for personal usage. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into RadioShack. ...


In February 1991 AOL for DOS was launched using a GeoWorks interface followed a year later by AOL for Windows. In October 1991, Quantum changed its name to America Online. These changes coincided with growth in pay-based BBS services, like Prodigy, CompuServe, and GEnie. AOL discontinued Q-Link and PC Link in the fall of 1994. It has been suggested that X86 DOS Comparison be merged into this article or section. ... For the Japanese English education company or eikaiwa, please see the article GEOS (eikaiwa) GEOS (Graphic Environment Operating System) was an operating system from Berkeley Softworks (later GeoWorks). ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Prodigy Communications Corporation was a dialup service (a sort of mega-BBS) for home computers in the United States before the advent of the Internet. ... CompuServe, (in full, CompuServe Information Services, or CIS), was the first major commercial online service in the United States, dominating the field during the 1980s and remaining a major player through the mid-1990s when it was sidelined by the rise of GUI-based services such as America Online (AOL). ... Ancient Assyrian stone relief of a genie Genie is the English term for the Arabic jinni | جن. In pre-Islamic Arabian mythology and in Islam, a jinni (also djinni or djini) is a member of the jinn (or djinn), a race of creatures. ...

AOL release timeline
1991 AOL for DOS launched
1993 AOL for Windows launched
1994 AOL 2.0 launched
1995 AOL 3.0 launched
1998 AOL 4.0 launched
1999 AOL 5.0 launched
2000 AOL 6.0 launched
2001 AOL 7.0 launched
2002 AOL 8.0 launched
2003 AOL 9.0 Optimized launched
2004 AOL 9.0 SE launched

Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... Windows redirects here. ...

Massive growth

Case drove AOL as the online service for people unfamiliar with computers, in particular contrast to CompuServe, which had long served the technical community. AOL was the first online service to require use of proprietary software, rather than a standard terminal program; as a result it was able to offer a graphical user interface (GUI) instead of command lines, and was well ahead of the competition in emphasizing communication among members as a feature. A computer is a machine for manipulating data according to a list of instructions known as a program. ... CompuServe, (in full, CompuServe Information Services, or CIS), was the first major commercial online service in the United States, dominating the field during the 1980s and remaining a major player through the mid-1990s when it was sidelined by the rise of GUI-based services such as America Online (AOL). ... Proprietary indicates that a party exercises private ownership, control or use over an item of property, usually to the exclusion of other parties. ... A graphical user interface (or GUI, sometimes pronounced gooey) is a method of interacting with a computer through a metaphor of direct manipulation of graphical images and widgets in addition to text. ...


In particular was the Chat Room (borrowed from IRC), which allowed a large group of people with similar interests to convene and hold conversations in real time, including: Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is a form of instant communication over the Internet. ...

  • Private rooms — created by any user. Hold up to 27 people.
  • Conference rooms — created with permission of AOL. Hold up to 48 people and often moderated.
  • Auditoriums — created with permission of AOL. Consisted of a stage and an unlimited number of rows. What happened on the stage was viewable by everybody in the auditorium but what happened within individual rows, of up to 27 people, was viewable only by the people within those rows.

There were also text games played in the chat rooms, known as AOL chatroom game. AOL battlers are external (or 3rd party) programs that are run while in an AOL chatroom. ...


Under Case's guidance, AOL committed to including online games in its mix of products even when it was only a Commodore 64 service. It hosted the first Play by email game from any service Quantum Space (1989-1991); the first graphical online community (Club Caribe from LucasArts); and the first graphical MMORPG, Neverwinter Nights from Stormfront Studios (1991-1997) and the first chat room-based text role-playing game Black Bayou, a horror role-playing game from Hecklers Online and ANTAGONIST, Inc. Internet games (also known as online games) are games that are played online via the Internet. ... Play by mail games are games, of any type, played through postal mail or e-mail. ... Habitat was an early and technologically influentual online role-playing game developed by Lucasfilm Games and made available as a beta test in 1987 by Quantum Link, an online service for the Commodore 64 computer and the corporate progenitor to America Online. ... LucasArts Entertainment Company is a video game developer and publisher. ... Players interacting in Ultima Online. ... Neverwinter Nights is the first graphical Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game (MMORPG), which ran from 1991 to 1997 on AOL. It is the predecessor to BioWares 2002 game, Neverwinter Nights. ... Stormfront Studios is a video game developer based in San Rafael, California, and has one of the longest creative histories in the industry. ...


AOL quickly surpassed GEnie, and by the mid-1990s, it passed Prodigy (which for several years allowed AOL advertising) and CompuServe. Ancient Assyrian stone relief of a genie Genie is the English term for the Arabic jinni | جن. In pre-Islamic Arabian mythology and in Islam, a jinni (also djinni or djini) is a member of the jinn (or djinn), a race of creatures. ... The 1990s decade refers to the years from 1990 to 1999, inclusive. ... Prodigy Communications Corporation was a dialup service (a sort of mega-BBS) for home computers in the United States before the advent of the Internet. ... CompuServe, (in full, CompuServe Information Services, or CIS), was the first major commercial online service in the United States, dominating the field during the 1980s and remaining a major player through the mid-1990s when it was sidelined by the rise of GUI-based services such as America Online (AOL). ...


Originally, AOL charged its users an hourly fee, but in 1996 this changed and a flat rate of $19.99 a month was charged. Within three years, AOL's userbase would grow to 10 million people. During this time, AOL connections would be flooded with users trying to get on, and many canceled their accounts due to constant busy signals. Also, games which used to be paid for with the hourly fee migrated in droves to the Internet.


AOL was relatively late in providing access to the open Internet. Originally, only some Internet features were accessible through a proprietary interface but eventually it became possible to run other Internet software while logged in through AOL. They were the first online service to seamlessly integrate a web browser into content.


AOL introduced the concept of Buddy Lists, leveraging their one-on-one instant messaging technology. A Buddy List is a collection of screen names in an Instant Messenger (IM) program. ... A screenshot of PowWow, one of the first instant messengers with a graphical user interface Instant messaging is the act of instantly communicating between two or more people over a network such as the Internet. ...


Since its merger with Time Warner, the value of AOL has dropped from its $200 billion high and it has seen a similar losses among its subscription rate. It has since attempted to reposition itself as a content provider similar to companies such as Yahoo! as opposed to an Internet service provider which delivered content only to subscribers in what was termed a "walled garden.". In 2005, AOL broadcast the Live 8 concert live over the Internet, and thousands of users downloaded clips of the concert over the following months. Official Live 8 DVD. Released 7th/8th November 2005 Live 8 was a series of benefit concerts that took place in July 2005, in the G8 nations and South Africa. ...


More recently, AOL has announced plans to offer subscribers classic television programs for free with commercials inserted via its new IN2TV service. At the time of launch, AOL made available Warner Bros. Television's vast library of programs, with Welcome Back Kotter as its marquee offering. Other shows include Scarecrow and Mrs. King, The F.B.I., F Troop, and Growing Pains. In2TV is an online television service by Warner Bros. ... Warner Bros. ... Welcome Back, Kotter is an American television sitcom that originally aired on the ABC network from 1975 to 1979. ... Scarecrow and Mrs. ... The F.B.I. was a television series broadcast on ABC in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... F Troop was a satirical American television sitcom that originally aired from 1965-1967 on ABC. 65 thirty-minute episodes were produced; it premiered in the United States on September 14th, 1965, ran for two seasons and finished its first run on April 6th, 1967. ... Growing Pains was a television sitcom that ran on the ABC network from 1985 to 1992. ...


One of AOL's recently added premium services is AOL Total Talk, a VoiP Internet service.


On April 3, 2006, AOL announced that the full name "America Online INC." will be retired, and that the official name of the service is now the acronym "AOL LLC.". [4]


CD-ROM distribution

AOL was able to rapidly bolster its growth by mailing out sign-up diskettes and CD-ROMs containing free trials to hundreds of millions of households. Once offering only a few hours of free service, the discs now include up to a month's worth of free subscription time. Various AOL CD-ROMs with packaging removed. ... A floppy disk is a data storage device that comprises a circular piece of thin, flexible (hence floppy) magnetic storage medium encased in a square or rectangular plastic wallet. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ...


This long and relentless campaign has produced a backlash, however. One program, called No More AOL CDs, seeks to gather one million unwanted AOL CDs and dump them at AOL headquarters. Other organizations have objected upon both environmental and privacy grounds; for example, many environmentalists say that AOL's CDs are largely unwanted and result in massive non-biodegradable plastic waste. No More AOL CDs is an organization dedicated to stemming America Onlines CD distribution methods. ... An environment is a complex of external factors that acts on a system and determines its course and form of existence. ... Privacy is the ability of an individual or group to stop information about themselves from becoming known to people other than those whom they choose to give the information. ...


AOL's mailings have never violated the law, though, and have consistently interested new customers. Although AOL has provided means for people to remove themselves from AOL mailing lists, No More AOL CDs has documented claims that these removal attempts are sometimes ineffective. No More AOL CDs is an organization dedicated to stemming America Onlines CD distribution methods. ...


Others view AOL disks as valuable collectible items due to the vast number of CD-ROM design variations. Various AOL CD-ROMs with packaging removed. ... // The hobby of collecting consists of acquiring specific items based on a particular interest of the collector. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ...


Controversies

Community Leaders

Prior to the middle of 2005, AOL used volunteers called Community Leaders, or CLs, to monitor chatrooms, message boards, and libraries. Some community leaders were recruited for content design and maintenance using a proprietary language and interface called RAINMAN, although most content maintenance was performed by partner and internal employees. America Online Community Leaders Program or AOL CLP was the official name for the large group of volunteers who moderated chat rooms, message boards, and download libraries. ... For the 1988 film, see Rain Man. ...


In 1999, Kelly Hallissey and Brian Williams, former Community Leaders and founders of an anti-AOL website filed a class action lawsuit against AOL citing violations of U.S. labor laws in its usage of CLs. The Department of Labor investigated but came to no conclusions, closing their investigation in 2001. In light of these events, AOL drastically began reducing the responsibilities and privileges of its volunteers in 2000. The program was eventually ended on June 8, 2005. Current Community Leaders at the time were offered 12 months of credit on their accounts. Also for a time AOL had a bot named CATWATCH which would pop into user created private rooms where TOS violations MAY be occuring, and everyone in the room would be disconnected from AOL and get a TOS strike against their account. In law, a class action is an equitable procedural device used in litigation for determining the rights of and remedies, if any, for large numbers of people whose cases involve common questions of law and fact. ... The United States Department of Labor is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for occupational safety, wage and hour standards, unemployment insurance benefits, re-employment services, and some economic statistics. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Billing disputes

AOL has faced a number of lawsuits over claims that it has been slow to stop billing people after their accounts have been cancelled, either by the company or the user. In addition, AOL changed its method of calculating used minutes in response to a class action lawsuit. Previously, AOL would add fifteen seconds to the time a user was connected to the service and round up to the next whole minute (thus, a person who used the service for 11 minutes and 46 seconds would be charged for 13 minutes). AOL claimed this was to account for sign on/sign off time, but because this practice was not made known to its customers, the lawsuit won (some also pointed out that signing on and off did not always take 15 seconds, especially when connecting via another ISP). AOL disclosed its connection time calculation methods to all of its customers and credited them with extra free hours. In addition, the AOL software would notify the user of exactly how long they were connected and how many minutes they were being charged for.


Account cancellation

In response to approximately 300 consumer complaints, New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer’s office began an inquiry of AOL’s customer service policies. The investigation revealed that the company had an elaborate system for rewarding employees who purported to retain or "save" subscribers who had called to cancel their Internet service. In many instances, such retention was done against subscribers’ wishes, or without their consent. Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 27th 141,205 km² 455 km 530 km 13. ... Eliot Spitzer Eliot Laurence Spitzer (born June 10, 1959) is the current Attorney General for New York State and a candidate for the 2006 Democratic nomination for Governor of New York. ...


Under the system, consumer service personnel received bonuses worth tens of thousands of dollars if they could successfully dissuade or "save" half of the people who called to cancel service. For several years, AOL had instituted minimum retention or "save" percentages, which consumer representatives were expected to meet. These bonuses, and the minimum "save" rates accompanying them, had the effect of employees not honoring cancellations, or otherwise making cancellation unduly difficult for consumers.


Many consumers complained that AOL personnel ignored their demands to cancel service and stop billing.


On August 24, 2005, America Online agreed to pay $1.25 million to the state of New York and reformed its customer service procedures. Under the agreement, AOL will no longer require its customer service representatives to meet a minimum quota for customer retention in order to receive a bonus. However, many AOL users outside New York still claim to have problems cancelling their accounts. August 24 is the 236th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (237th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Software

In 2000, AOL was served with an $8 billion lawsuit alleging that its (now dated) AOL 5.0 software caused significant difficulties for users attempting to use third-party Internet service providers. The lawsuit sought damages of up to $1000 for each user that had downloaded the software cited at the time of the lawsuit. AOL later agreed to a settlement of $15 million, without admission of wrongdoing. It is also notable that AOL users are required to use the AOL browser (a variant of Netscape) to access the World Wide Web and their E-Mail accounts. This has brought upon many complaints, as it guarantees that AOL has ultimate control over what the user can access, and clearly restricts the user from using any alternative Web browsers and/or E-Mail clients which most technically proficient users would consider safer and faster. However, the main complaint regarding this factor has undoubtedly concerned the excessive advertising schemes present upon browser startup. This NeXTcube used by Berners-Lee at CERN became the first Web server. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... A web browser is a software package that enables a user to display and interact with documents hosted by web servers. ...


Usenet newsgroups

When AOL gave clients access to Usenet in 1994, they hid at least one newsgroup in standard list view: alt.aol-sucks. AOL did list the newsgroup in the alternative description view, but changed the description to "Flames and complaints about America Online". Usenet is a distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP network of the same name. ...


Terms of Service (TOS)

There have been many complaints over rules that govern AOL's members conduct, called the Terms of Service, which apply to everyone who uses AOL, regardless of age, or where an AOL member is on the Internet. Claims are that these rules are too strict to follow and do not allow swearing. In computing and telecommunication networks (including of course the Internet) terms of service or ToS is an agreement under which a service provider agrees to provide services to the users of the service. ...


Certified e-mail

In early 2005, AOL stated its intention to implement certified e-mail, which will allow companies to send email to users with whom they have pre-existing business relationships, with a visual indication that the email is from a trusted source and without the risk that the email messages might be blocked or stripped by spam filters. This decision has drawn fire from MoveOn, which characterizes the program as an "e-mail tax". Certified e-mail is a system by which an internet service provider allows someone to bypass spam filters when sending e-mail messages to its subscribers, in return for a small pre-paid fee (typically a fraction of a cent) per message sent. ... A mail filter is a piece of software which takes an input of an email message. ... MoveOn. ...


Company purchases

As it grew, AOL purchased many other software companies, including:

  • BookLink bought in December 1994.
  • NaviSoft's NaviServer (later to become AOLserver) in 1994.
  • ImagiNation Network (I.N.N.) from AT&T in 1996.
  • CompuServe in February 1998.
  • Mirabilis (maker of ICQ) in 1998.
  • PLS text-search software in 1998,
  • Nullsoft (maker of Winamp), in 1999 for $86 million
  • Netscape, in 1999 for $4.2 billion.
  • Mapquest in 1999.
  • Tegic in December 1999.
  • Singingfish search engine, November 2003.
  • Advertising.com, an Internet advertising agency, in June 2004.
  • MailBlocks, a personal, Web-based email service, in August 2004.
  • Wildseed, a privately held mobile software vendor, in August 2005.
  • Xdrive, a leading provider of online storage and file sharing services, also in August 2005.
  • Weblogs, Inc., a blogging network that runs such sites as Engadget, Autoblog, Cinematical and TVSquad, in October 2005, for $30 million.
  • Truveo, Inc., a leading video search company, in December 2005, for an undisclosed value.

NaviServer is a high performance web server written in C and Tcl. ... AOLserver is America Onlines open source web server. ... The main GUI interface for the ImagiNation Network shows the colorful art treatment meant to appeal to children. ... AT&T Inc. ... CompuServe, (in full, CompuServe Information Services, or CIS), was the first major commercial online service in the United States, dominating the field during the 1980s and remaining a major player through the mid-1990s when it was sidelined by the rise of GUI-based services such as America Online (AOL). ... Mirabilis was the name of the Israeli company that produced ICQ, a popular instant messenger. ... ICQ is an instant messaging computer program, created by Mirabilis, an Israeli startup company based in Tel-Aviv. ... Nullsoft is a software house founded in 1997 by Justin Frankel. ... Winamp is a multimedia player made by Nullsoft and eventually acquired by America Online. ... Netscape Communications Corporation was the publisher of the Netscape Navigator web browser as well as many other internet and intranet client and server software products. ... Screenshot from MapQuest MapQuest is an Internet map service, owned by AOL. The map creation software was originally developed by GeoSystems to generate maps for customers. ... T9 is a predictive text input method often used for Short message service (SMS) mobile phone text messages. ... Singingfish is an audio/video search engine. ... Weblogs, Inc. ... Engadget is a technology weblog about gadgets. ...

Notable persons associated with AOL

Jim Kimsey (James V. Kimsey) was the co-founder, CEO, and first chairman of internet service provider America Online (AOL). ... Steve Case (born August 21, 1958) is a businessman best known as the former chief executive officer and chairman of America Online (AOL). ... Justin Frankel is an American computer programmer best known for his work on the Winamp media player application, and for inventing the Gnutella peer-to-peer system. ... Ted Leonsis is the majority owner of the NHLs Washington Capitals, purchasing the franchise in 1999 from Abe Pollin for $85 million. ... Michael Powell Michael Kevin Powell (born March 23, 1963) is an American politician and a Republican. ... Time Warner Inc. ... Marc Andreessen (born April 26, 1971) is the chair of Opsware, a software company. ... Jason Smathers is a former employee of America Online. ... Jason Calacanis is a blogger and internet entrepreneur. ...

AOL Computer Check-Up

AOL Computer Check-Up is a service offered by AOL to AOL members. It is a performance and hardware analyzer, not unlike the scans in Norton Utilities. The Norton Utilities releases were collections of software utilities. ...


McAfee

AOL also included McAfee VirusScan and McAfee Firewall Express in some versions


See also

AOHell was a tool which greatly simplified cracking online using AOL. Released in 1994 by a cracker known as Da Chronic, AOHell provided a number of utilities which ran on top of the America Online client software. ... AOHack programs were add-on programs to America Online that violated their Terms of Service, performed illegal activities, and disrupted the service. ... [email protected] is a special avenue of programming conducted by AOL Music. ... AOL Browser as of 2005. ...

References

  • Klein, Alec (2003). Stealing Time: Steve Case, Jerry Levin, and the Collapse of AOL Time Warner. Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-7432-5984-X.
  • Mehta, Stephanie N. & Vogelstein, Fred (Nov. 14, 2005). "AOL: The Relaunch". Fortune, p. 84–88.

The 2004 Fortune 500 issue The magazine Fortune was founded by Time Magazine co-founder Henry Luce in 1930 at the outset of the Great Depression. ...

External links

Time Warner Inc.

Corporate Directors: Jim Barksdale | Steve Bollenbach | Frank Caufield | Robert Clark | Jessica Einhorn | Miles Gilburne | Carla Hills | Reuben Mark | Michael Miles | Ken Novack | Richard Parsons | Ted Turner | Francis Vincent | Deborah Wright Time Warner Inc. ... It has been suggested that Incorporation (business) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Board of Trustees be merged into this article or section. ... Jim Barksdale was the president and CEO of Netscape Communications Corporation from January 1995 until the company merged with AOL in March 1999. ... Jessica Einhorn currently serves as dean of The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of The Johns Hopkins University in Washington, D.C.. Einhorn succeeds Paul Wolfowitz who left in 2001 to become the U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense. ... Carla Anderson Hills (born January 3, 1934) is an American lawyer and public figure. ... Ken Novack is an American lawyer who currently sits on the board of BBN Technologies and is a special advisor to General Catalyst Partners. ... Richard Parsons (born April 4, 1948), is the chairman and CEO of Time Warner. ... Ted Turner Robert Edward Ted Turner III (born November 19, 1938) is an American media mogul and philanthropist. ... Fay Vincent (left) and Bud Selig announce the settlement of the 1990 lockout. ... Deborah C. Wright is President and CEO of Carver Bankcorp, the holding company for Carver Federal Savings Bank. ...

AOL: AOL Instant Messenger | CompuServe | ICQ | MapQuest | Mirabilis | Netscape | Nullsoft | Singingfish | Weblogs, Inc. | Winamp
Time Inc.: Business 2.0 | Entertainment Weekly | Fortune | IPC Media Ltd. | Money | NME | People | Popular Science | Sports Illustrated | TIME magazine | Time Warner Book Group | Wallpaper*
Turner Broadcasting System: Atlanta Braves | Boomerang | Cartoon Network | Cartoon Network (UK) | Cartoon Network Studios | CNN | CNN Airport Network | CNN en Español | CNN Headline News | CNN International | CNN Pipeline | CNN.com | Court TV | TBS | TNT | TNT Latin America | Turner Classic Movies | Turner South | WTBS
Warner Bros. Entertainment: | Dark Castle Entertainment | DC Comics | Warner Bros. Television | The WB (to be The CW in 9/2006, co-owned with CBS) | Warner Independent Pictures | Turner Entertainment | Castle Rock Entertainment
Time Warner Cable: Capital News 9 | News 10 Now | News 14 Carolina | NY1 | R News | Road Runner | SportsNet New York (part ownership) | WRWB Rochester's WB 16
Premium Cable Channels: Cinemax | HBO
Other Studio Assets: New Line Cinema | Picturehouse
The AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) is an ad-supported instant messaging and presence computer program, published by AOL in October of 1997, which uses the OSCAR instant messaging protocol and the TOC protocol. ... CompuServe, (in full, CompuServe Information Services, or CIS), was the first major commercial online service in the United States, dominating the field during the 1980s and remaining a major player through the mid-1990s when it was sidelined by the rise of GUI-based services such as America Online (AOL). ... ICQ is an instant messaging computer program, created by Mirabilis, an Israeli startup company based in Tel-Aviv. ... Screenshot from MapQuest MapQuest is an Internet map service, owned by AOL. The map creation software was originally developed by GeoSystems to generate maps for customers. ... Mirabilis was the name of the Israeli company that produced ICQ, a popular instant messenger. ... Netscape is the general name for a series of web browsers originally produced by Netscape Communications Corporation, but now developed by AOL. The original browser was once the dominant browser in terms of usage share, but it now has only a relatively small number of users. ... Nullsoft is a software house founded in 1997 by Justin Frankel. ... Singingfish is an audio/video search engine. ... Weblogs, Inc. ... Winamp is a multimedia player made by Nullsoft and eventually acquired by America Online. ... Time Inc. ... cover Business 2. ... June 17, 2005 cover of Entertainment Weekly, featuring actor Tom Cruise Entertainment Weekly is a magazine published by Time Warner in the United States which is dedicated to the world of celebrity and popular culture. ... The 2004 Fortune 500 issue The magazine Fortune was founded by Time Magazine co-founder Henry Luce in 1930 at the outset of the Great Depression. ... IPC Media is a large British publishing company, mainly producing consumer magazines. ... Money is a Time Warner financial magazine. ... The New Musical Express (better known as the NME) is a weekly magazine about popular music published in the UK. It is unlike many other popular music magazines due to its intended focus on guitar-based music and indie rock bands, instead of mainstream pop acts. ... This article is not about the magazine, Popular Science Popular science is interpretation of science intended for a general audience, rather than for other scientists or students. ... July 1999 cover showing soccer star Brandi Chastain Sports Illustrated is a popular weekly American sports magazine owned by media giant Time Warner. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Notable Time magazine covers from the dates May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... TWBG, with offices in New York, Boston, Indiana, Nashville and Los Angeles, includes the imprints Warner Books, Little, Brown & Co. ... Wallpaper* is a magazine focusing on travel, design, entertainment, fashion and media. ... Turner Broadcasting System logo The Turner Broadcasting System (often abbreviated to Turner or TBS) is the company managing the collection of cable networks and properties started by Ted Turner in the mid-1970s. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876-present) East Division (1994-present) West Division (1969-1993) Major league titles World Series titles (3) 1995 â€¢ 1957 â€¢ 1914 NL Pennants (17) 1999 â€¢ 1996 â€¢ 1995 â€¢ 1992 1991 â€¢ 1958 â€¢ 1957 â€¢ 1948 1914 â€¢ 1898 â€¢ 1897 â€¢ 1893 1892 â€¢ 1891 â€¢ 1883 â€¢ 1878 1877 East Division titles (11) 2005... Boomerang is the name of at least four TV networks owned by Cartoon Network, one in the United States, one in the United Kingdom, one in Australia and one in Spain, which shows classic animated cartoons, mainly from the Warner Brothers, MGM, and Hanna-Barbera archives. ... Cartoon Network is a cable television channel created by Turner Broadcasting and dedicated to showing animated programming. ... Cartoon Network is a digital television channel created by Turner Broadcasting and dedicated to showing animated programming. ... Cartoon Network Studios, the successor to Hanna-Barbera Cartoons, Inc. ... The Cable News Network, usually referred to as CNN, is a cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner[1] [2]. It is a division of the Turner Broadcasting System, owned by Time Warner. ... CNN Airport Network is a specialized television network and division of Cable News Network (CNN) broadcasting general news, weather, stock market updates and features to airports across North America. ... CNN en Español is a division of Cable News Network (CNN) broadcasting world news in Spanish 24 hours a day from CNNs global headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Headline News can also refer to the song by Weird Al Yankovic. ... CNN International is an English language television network available in most of the world, distributed via satellite and cable. ... CNN Pipeline is an English language video news service operated by the cable television network CNN, providing both live and on-demand video to subscribers computers via broadband Internet connections. ... CNN.com is the news website maintained by CNN. The website debuted on August 30, 1995, and it describes itself as the first major news and information website on the Internet. ... Courtroom Television Network LLC, more commonly known as Court TV, is an American cable television network owned by Time Warner and Liberty Media that launched on July 1, 1991. ... TBS (full station name TBS Superstation) is a popular American cable TV network that shows sports and variety programming. ... Turner Network Television, usually referred to as TNT, is a cable TV network created by media mogul Ted Turner and launched with a showing of his favorite film, Gone with the Wind, on October 3, 1988. ... TNT Latin America is a Time Warner television network based in Latin America and the Caribbean. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel similar to American Movie Classics (AMC) featuring classic movies from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... Turner South is a popular regional cable tv network that shows sports and variety programming. ... WTBS is a TV station on channel 17 (DTV channel 20) in the Atlanta metropolitan area. ... The WB Shield used from 2003 to present day Warner Bros. ... Dark Castle Entertainment is a division of Warner Bros. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Warner Bros. ... The WB Television Network, casually referred to as The WB, or sometimes as The Frog (referring to the networks former mascot, the animated character Michigan J. Frog), is a television network in the United States, founded as a joint venture between the Warner Bros. ... The CW Television Network, or more casually The CW, is a new television network in the United States set to launch for the 2006-07 television season. ... For other uses, see CBS (disambiguation). ... WIPs logo, which looks like half of the WB shield. ... Turner Entertainment Company was established August 4, 1986 to oversee Turner Broadcastings film library after its acquisition of MGM/UA. In addition to the studio, Turner got its library, which included all of MGMs films, Warner Bros. ... Castle Rock Entertainment is an independent film and television studio founded in 1987 by Martin Shafer, director Rob Reiner, composer Marc Shaiman and entertainment mogul Alan Horn. ... Time Warner Cable is a national cable television company that operates in 28 states and has 31 operating divisions. ... Capital News 9 is a cable-only 24-hour news channel on Time Warner Cable in New Yorks Capital District. ... News 10 Now is a 24-hour local news channel headquartered in Syracuse, New York. ... News 14 Carolina is a 24-hour news service offered in North Carolina, USA, by Time Warner Cable. ... NY1 (pronounced New York One) is a twenty-four hour news channel available exclusively to cable television customers within the five boroughs of New York City and nearby Bergen County, New Jersey. ... R News is a 24-hour newscast broadcasted in Rochester, New York on Time Warner Cable Channel 9 and avalible elsewhere on Channel 14. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... SportsNet New York, also known as SNY, is a New York City-based sports cable network which airs in the New York metro area. ... WRWB-TV is the WB affiliate for Rochester, New York that broadcasts exclusively on Time Warner Cable, who is also the owner. ... Cinemax is a cable television network that provides movies, special features, erotica programming for adults, and other services to consumers via subscriptions. ... HBO (Home Box Office) is a premium cable television network with headquarters in New York City. ... New Line Cinema, founded in 1967, is one of the ten major Hollywood movie studios. ... Picturehouse is a specialty film company formed in 2005 as a joint venture of New Line Cinema and HBO. Notable Releases Last Days Rock School Coming Soon A Prairie Home Companion External link Picturehouse website Time Warner Inc. ...

Annual Revenue: $42.1 billion USD ( 11% FY 2004) | Employees: 84,900 | Stock Symbol: NYSE: TWX | Website: www.timewarner.com

  Results from FactBites:
 
America Online - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about America Online (316 words)
America Online was launched in 1986 with a bright, colourful graphical interface and a marketing campaign that issued free disks on almost every US magazine cover.
It quickly became the UK's largest online service, until the arrival of Freeserve.
America Online grew from 500,000 subscribers in 1993 to 5 million in 1996, 15 million in 1998, and 26 million in 2000, and 34 million by April 2002, with 26 million of these in the USA.
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: America Online (732 words)
America Online, or AOL for short, is a corporate online service provider and Internet service provider (ISP).
Case drove AOL as the online service for people unfamiliar with computers, in particular contrast to CompuServe, which had long served the technical community.
To a segment of the online population, an e-mail address ending in aol.com is a sign of ignorance, to be avoided at all costs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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