FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Amenhotep III
Preceded by:
Thutmose IV
Pharaoh of Egypt
18th Dynasty
Succeeded by:
Akhenaten
Amenhotep III
Nibmu(`w)areya in the Amarna letters[3]
Amenophis III
Reign 1388 BC1351 BC/1350 BC
Praenomen


Nebmaatre
The Lord of Truth is Re[2]
Nomen


Amenhotep Hekawaset
Amun is Satisfied, Ruler of Thebes[1]
Horus name

Image:srxtail2.GIF
Kanakht Emkhaimaat
The strong bull, appearing in truth
Nebty name







Semenhepusegerehtawy
One establishing laws, pacifying the two lands
Golden Horus



Aakhepesh-husetiu
Great of valour, smiting the Asiatics
Consort(s) Tiye, Gilukhepa, Tadukhepa
Issues Akhenaten, Crown Prince Tuthmose, Sitamun
Henuttaneb, Iset, Nebetah, Smenkhkare (?), Beketaten
Father Thutmose IV
Mother Mutemwiya
Died 1351 BC
Burial WV22
Major
Monuments
Malkata, Mortuary Temple of Amenhotep III
Colossi of Memnon
Vase in the Louvre with the names Amenohotep III and Tiy. Amenhotep is written in the cartouche on the left.
Vase in the Louvre with the names Amenohotep III and Tiy. Amenhotep is written in the cartouche on the left.

Amenhotep III (sometimes read as Amenophis III) meaning Amun is Satisfied was the ninth pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty. According to different authors, he ruled Egypt from June 1391 BC-December 1353 BC or June 1388 BC to December 1351 BC/1350 BC[4] after his father Thutmose IV died. Amenhotep III was the son of Thutmose IV by Mutemwia, a minor wife of Amenhotep's father.[5] Menkheperure Established in forms is Re Nomen Thutmose Thoth bore him Consort(s) Tiaa, Mutemwiya Issues Amenhotep III, Siatum (?) Father Amenhotep II Mother Tiaa Died 1391 BC or 1388 BC Burial KV43 Thutmose IV (sometimes read as Thutmosis or Tuthmosis IV and meaning Thoth is Born) was the 8th Pharaoh... Pharaoh was the ancient Egyptian name for the office of kingship. ... The Eighteenth Dynasty of ancient Egypt (1550-1292 BCE) – often combined with the nineteenth and twentieth dynasties under the group title, New Kingdom – is perhaps the most famous of all the dynasties of ancient Egypt. ... Neferkheperre-waenre Beautiful are the Manifestations of Re[2] the one of Re Nomen Akhenaten Servant of the Aten[1] (after Year 4 of his reign) Amenhotep Horus name Kanakht-Meryaten The strong bull, beloved of the Aten Nebty name Wernesytemakhetaten Great of kingship in Akhetaten Golden Horus Wetjesrenenaten Who... EA 161, letter by Aziru, leader of Amurru, (stating his case to pharaoh), one of the Amarna letters in cuneiform writing on a clay tablet. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (428x640, 49 KB) Copied from w:de de:Bild:Amenophis-III SMPK asb pict2757 01-Feb-2004 640x428. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (428x640, 49 KB) Copied from w:de de:Bild:Amenophis-III SMPK asb pict2757 01-Feb-2004 640x428. ... Bust of Nefertiti, Ägyptisches Museum The Egyptian Museum of Berlin (German: Ägyptisches Museum und Papyrussammlung) is home to one of the worlds most important collections of Ancient Egyptian artefacts. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... (Redirected from 1388 BC) Centuries: 15th century BC - 14th century BC - 13th century BC Decades: 1430s BC 1420s BC 1410s BC 1400s BC 1390s BC - 1380s BC - 1370s BC 1360s BC 1350s BC 1340s BC 1330s BC Events and Trends Pharaoh Amenhotep II connects the Nile and the Red Sea... (Redirected from 1351 BC) Centuries: 15th century BC - 14th century BC - 13th century BC Decades: 1400s BC 1390s BC 1380s BC 1370s BC 1360s BC - 1350s BC - 1340s BC 1330s BC 1320s BC 1310s BC 1300s BC Events and Trends Significant People 1350 BC - Pharaoh Amenhotep IV Akhenaton rises to... (Redirected from 1350 BC) Centuries: 15th century BC - 14th century BC - 13th century BC Decades: 1400s BC 1390s BC 1380s BC 1370s BC 1360s BC - 1350s BC - 1340s BC 1330s BC 1320s BC 1310s BC 1300s BC Events and Trends Significant People 1350 BC - Pharaoh Amenhotep IV Akhenaton rises to... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... Image File history File links Srxtail2. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... Tiye. ... Gilukhipa, or more probable Kilu-Hepa in Hurrian language, in the Egyptian language Kirgipa, was daughter of Shuttarna II, king of Mitanni. ... Tadukhipa, in Hurrian language Tadu-Hepa, was the daughter of Tushratta, king of Mitanni (reigned ca. ... Neferkheperre-waenre Beautiful are the Manifestations of Re[2] the one of Re Nomen Akhenaten Servant of the Aten[1] (after Year 4 of his reign) Amenhotep Horus name Kanakht-Meryaten The strong bull, beloved of the Aten Nebty name Wernesytemakhetaten Great of kingship in Akhetaten Golden Horus Wetjesrenenaten Who... Crown Prince Tuthmose (or, more accurately, Djehutymos) was the eldest son of pharaoh Amenhotep III, who lived during the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt. ... Sitamun (also Sitamen, Satamun ) c. ... Henuttaneb was one of the daughters of Ancient Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep III of the 18th dynasty and his Great Royal Wife Tiye. ... Iset or Aset was one of the daughters of Ancient Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep III of the 18th dynasty and his Great Royal Wife Tiye. ... Nebetah was one of the daughters of Ancient Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep III of the 18th dynasty and his Great Royal Wife Tiye. ... Ankhkheperure Living are the Manifestations of Re[2] Nomen Smenkhkare-Djeserkheperu Vigorous is the Soul of Re, Holy of Manifestations[1] Consort(s) Meritaten Died 1333 BC Ankhkheperure Smenkhkare (sometimes spelled Smenkhare and Smenkare; meaning Vigorous is the Soul of Ra) was a Pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty, successor of... Beketaten (14th century BCE) was an Ancient Egyptian princess of the 18th dynasty. ... Menkheperure Established in forms is Re Nomen Thutmose Thoth bore him Consort(s) Tiaa, Mutemwiya Issues Amenhotep III, Siatum (?) Father Amenhotep II Mother Tiaa Died 1391 BC or 1388 BC Burial KV43 Thutmose IV (sometimes read as Thutmosis or Tuthmosis IV and meaning Thoth is Born) was the 8th Pharaoh... Mutemwiya (also Mutemwia, Mutemweya; Mut in the divine bark) was a minor wife of Thutmose IV, pharaoh of Egypt, in the Eighteenth Dynasty. ... (Redirected from 1351 BC) Centuries: 15th century BC - 14th century BC - 13th century BC Decades: 1400s BC 1390s BC 1380s BC 1370s BC 1360s BC - 1350s BC - 1340s BC 1330s BC 1320s BC 1310s BC 1300s BC Events and Trends Significant People 1350 BC - Pharaoh Amenhotep IV Akhenaton rises to... Tomb WV22 in the Western arm of the Valley of the Kings was used as the resting of the one the greatest rulers of Egypts New Kingdom, Amenhotep III. It was officially discovered by Prosper Jollois and Eduard de Villiers du Terrage, engineers with Napoleons expedition to Egypt in... Malkata (or Malqata) is a place located on the west bank of Thebes, Egypt, in Egypt, in the desert south of Medinet Habu. ... Amenhotep IIIs mortuary temple from the air The Mortuary Temple of Amenhotep III is located in the Theban necropolis, on the west bank of the Nile, opposiet Luxor in Egypt. ... The Colossi of Memnon The Colossi of Memnon (known to locals as el-Colossat, or es-Salamat) are two massive stone statues of Pharaoh Amenhotep III. For the past 3400 years they have stood in the Theban necropolis, across the River Nile from the modern city of Luxor. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (580x800, 115 KB) // Faïence siliceuse The vase reads, center line, then left, then right, top to bottom: center: The good god, Nebmaatre, given life; left: the son of Re, Amenhotep, eternally; right: the kings great wife, Tiye, [last word... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (580x800, 115 KB) // Faïence siliceuse The vase reads, center line, then left, then right, top to bottom: center: The good god, Nebmaatre, given life; left: the son of Re, Amenhotep, eternally; right: the kings great wife, Tiye, [last word... In Egyptian hieroglyphs, a cartouche is an oblong enclosure with a vertical line at one end, indicating that the text enclosed is a royal name, coming into use during the beginning of the Fourth Dynasty under Pharaoh Sneferu. ... Amun (also spelled Amon, Amoun, Amen, and rarely Imen, Greek Αμμον Ammon, and Άμμον Hammon, Egyptian Yamanu) was the name of a deity, in Egyptian mythology, who gradually rose to become one of the most important deities, before fading into obscurity. ... Pharaoh was the ancient Egyptian name for the office of kingship. ... The Eighteenth Dynasty of ancient Egypt (1550-1292 BCE) – often combined with the nineteenth and twentieth dynasties under the group title, New Kingdom – is perhaps the most famous of all the dynasties of ancient Egypt. ... (Redirected from 1391 BC) Centuries: 15th century BC - 14th century BC - 13th century BC Decades: 1440s BC 1430s BC 1420s BC 1410s BC 1400s BC - 1390s BC - 1380s BC 1370s BC 1360s BC 1350s BC 1340s BC Events and Trends 1397 BC - Pandion, legendary King of Athens dies after a... (Redirected from 1353 BC) Centuries: 15th century BC - 14th century BC - 13th century BC Decades: 1400s BC 1390s BC 1380s BC 1370s BC 1360s BC - 1350s BC - 1340s BC 1330s BC 1320s BC 1310s BC 1300s BC Events and Trends Significant People 1350 BC - Pharaoh Amenhotep IV Akhenaton rises to... (Redirected from 1388 BC) Centuries: 15th century BC - 14th century BC - 13th century BC Decades: 1430s BC 1420s BC 1410s BC 1400s BC 1390s BC - 1380s BC - 1370s BC 1360s BC 1350s BC 1340s BC 1330s BC Events and Trends Pharaoh Amenhotep II connects the Nile and the Red Sea... (Redirected from 1351 BC) Centuries: 15th century BC - 14th century BC - 13th century BC Decades: 1400s BC 1390s BC 1380s BC 1370s BC 1360s BC - 1350s BC - 1340s BC 1330s BC 1320s BC 1310s BC 1300s BC Events and Trends Significant People 1350 BC - Pharaoh Amenhotep IV Akhenaton rises to... (Redirected from 1350 BC) Centuries: 15th century BC - 14th century BC - 13th century BC Decades: 1400s BC 1390s BC 1380s BC 1370s BC 1360s BC - 1350s BC - 1340s BC 1330s BC 1320s BC 1310s BC 1300s BC Events and Trends Significant People 1350 BC - Pharaoh Amenhotep IV Akhenaton rises to... Menkheperure Established in forms is Re Nomen Thutmose Thoth bore him Consort(s) Tiaa, Mutemwiya Issues Amenhotep III, Siatum (?) Father Amenhotep II Mother Tiaa Died 1391 BC or 1388 BC Burial KV43 Thutmose IV (sometimes read as Thutmosis or Tuthmosis IV and meaning Thoth is Born) was the 8th Pharaoh... Menkheperure Established in forms is Re Nomen Thutmose Thoth bore him Consort(s) Tiaa, Mutemwiya Issues Amenhotep III, Siatum (?) Father Amenhotep II Mother Tiaa Died 1391 BC or 1388 BC Burial KV43 Thutmose IV (sometimes read as Thutmosis or Tuthmosis IV and meaning Thoth is Born) was the 8th Pharaoh... Mutemwiya (also Mutemwia, Mutemweya; Mut in the divine bark) was a minor wife of Thutmose IV, pharaoh of Egypt, in the Eighteenth Dynasty. ...

Contents

Family

Amenhotep III fathered two sons with his Great Royal Wife Tiye: the Crown Prince Tuthmose who predeceased his father and his second son Akhenaten who ultimately succeeded him to the throne. Amenhotep may also be the father of a third son—called Smenkhkare who would later succeed Akhenaten and briefly rule Egypt as king.[6] Amenhotep III and Tiye also had four known daughters: Sitamun, Henuttaneb, Isis or Iset and Nebetah.[7] They appear frequently on statues and reliefs during their father's reign and are also represented by smaller objects with the exception of Nebetah.[8] Nebetah is attested only once in the historical records on a colossal limestone group of statues from Medinet Habu.[9] This huge seven metre high sculpture shows Amenhotep III and Tiye seated side by side, "with three of their daughters standing in front of the throne--Henuttaneb, the largest and best preserved, in the centre; Nebetah on the right; and another, whose name is destroyed, on the left."[10] Great Royal Wife (or ḥmt nswt wrt) is the term used to refer to the chief wife of an Egyptian pharaoh on the day of his coronation. ... Tiye. ... Crown Prince Tuthmose (or, more accurately, Djehutymos) was the eldest son of pharaoh Amenhotep III, who lived during the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt. ... Neferkheperre-waenre Beautiful are the Manifestations of Re[2] the one of Re Nomen Akhenaten Servant of the Aten[1] (after Year 4 of his reign) Amenhotep Horus name Kanakht-Meryaten The strong bull, beloved of the Aten Nebty name Wernesytemakhetaten Great of kingship in Akhetaten Golden Horus Wetjesrenenaten Who... Ankhkheperure Living are the Manifestations of Re[2] Nomen Smenkhkare-Djeserkheperu Vigorous is the Soul of Re, Holy of Manifestations[1] Consort(s) Meritaten Died 1333 BC Ankhkheperure Smenkhkare (sometimes spelled Smenkhare and Smenkare; meaning Vigorous is the Soul of Ra) was a Pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty, successor of... Sitamun (also Sitamen, Satamun ) c. ... Iset or Aset was one of the daughters of Ancient Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep III of the 18th dynasty and his Great Royal Wife Tiye. ... Nebetah was one of the daughters of Ancient Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep III of the 18th dynasty and his Great Royal Wife Tiye. ...


Amenhotep III elevated two of his four daughters--Sitamun and Isis--to the role of "great royal wife" during the last decade of his reign. Evidence that Sitamun was already promoted to this office by Year 30 of his reign is known from jar-label inscriptions uncovered from the royal palace at Malkata.[11] It must be stressed that Egypt's theological paradigm encouraged the king to accept female partners from several different generations.[12] The Goddess Hathor herself was both mother, wife and daughter of Ra in Ancient Egyptian religion.[13] Hence, Amenhotep III's marriage to his two daughters should not be considered as incest in our contemporary conception of marriage. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Amenhotep III is known to have married Gilukhepa (the first of a series of diplomatic brides), daughter of Shuttarna II of Mitanni in the tenth year of his reign.[14] Around Year 36 of his reign, he married Tadukhepa, the daughter of his ally Tushratta of Mitanni. Gilukhipa, or more probable Kilu-Hepa in Hurrian language, in the Egyptian language Kirgipa, was daughter of Shuttarna II, king of Mitanni. ... Shuttarna II was king of the Mitanni during most of the reign of Amenhotep III. He was the son of King Artatama of Mitanni. ... Kingdom of Mitanni Mitanni (cuneiform KUR URUMi-it-ta-ni, also Mittani Mi-ta-an-ni, in Assyrian sources Hanigalbat, Khanigalbat cuneiform Ḫa-ni-gal-bat ) was a Hurrian kingdom in northern Mesopotamia from ca. ... Tadukhipa, in Hurrian language Tadu-Hepa, was the daughter of Tushratta, king of Mitanni (reigned ca. ... Tushratta was a king of the Mitanni at the end of the reign of Amenhotep III and throughout the reign of Akhenaten -- approximately the late 14th century BC. He was the son of Shuttarna II, and his daughter Tadukhipa was married to Akhenaten. ...


Life

Amenhotep III enjoys the distinction of having the most surviving statues of any Egyptian Pharaoh depicting his likeness, with over 250 of his statues having been discovered and identified. Since these statues cover his entire life, they provide the only complete set of portraits covering the entire length of any ancient Egyptian ruler.


Another striking characteristic of Amenhotep III's reign is the series of over 200 large commemorative stone scarabs that have been discovered over a large geographic area ranging from Syria (Ras Shamra) through to Soleb in Nubia.[15] Their lengthy inscribed texts extol the pharaoh's deeds. For instance, 123 of these commemorative scarabs record the large number of lions (either 102 or 110 depending on the reading) that Amenhotep III killed "with his own arrows" from his first regnal year up to his tenth year.[16] Similarly, five other scarabs state that the foreign princess Gilukhepa arrived in Egypt with a retinue of 317 women; she was the first of many such princesses who would enter the pharaoh's harem.[17] Another eleven scarabs record the excavation of an artificial lake he had built for Queen Tiye in his eleventh regnal year. Ugarit (modern site Ras Shamra 35°35´ N; 35°45´E) was an ancient cosmopolitan port city, sited on the Mediterranean coast of northern Syria a few kilometers north of the modern city of Latakia. ... Coming from the Arab tradition, the harîm حريم (compare haram) is the part of the household forbidden to male strangers. ...

Regnal Year 11 under the Majesty of...Amenhotep (III), ruler of Thebes, given life, and the great royal wife Tiyi; may she live; her father's name was Yuya, her mother's name Tuya. His Majesty commanded the making of a lake for the great royal wife Tiyi--may she live--in her town of Djakaru. (near Akhmin). Its length is 3,700 (cubits) and its width is 700 (cubits). (His Majesty) celebrated the Festival of Opening the Lake in the third month of Inundation, day sixteen. His Majesty was rowed in the royal barge Aten-tjehen in it [the lake].[18]

Amenhotep appears to have been crowned while still a child, perhaps between the ages of 6 and 12. His lengthy reign was a period of unprecedented prosperity, and artistic splendour when Egypt reached the peak of her artistic and international power. Proof of this is shown by the diplomatic correspondence from the rulers of Assyria, Mitanni, Babylon and Hatti which is preserved in the archive of Amarna Letters; they document these rulers frequent requests for gold and numerous other gifts from the pharaoh. The letters cover the period from Year 30 of Amenhotep III until at least the end of Akhenaten's reign. In one famous correspondence--Amarna letter EA 4--Amenhotep III is quoted by the Babylonian king Kadashman-Enlil I in firmly rejecting the latter's entreaty to marry one of this pharaoh's daughters: Akhmim Akhmim (Arabic اخميم) is a town of Upper Egypt, on the right bank of the Nile, 67 mi by river south of Asyut, and 4 mi above Suhaj, on the opposite side of the river where there is railway communication with Cairo and Aswan. ... Kingdom of Mitanni Mitanni (cuneiform KUR URUMi-it-ta-ni, also Mittani Mi-ta-an-ni, in Assyrian sources Hanigalbat, Khanigalbat cuneiform Ḫa-ni-gal-bat ) was a Hurrian kingdom in northern Mesopotamia from ca. ... Hatti is the reconstructed ancient name of a region in Anatolia inhabited by the Hattians between the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC, and later by the Hittites, who were at the height of their power ca 1400 BC–1200 BC. The capital city of both peoples was Hattusa (modern... EA 161, letter by Aziru, leader of Amurru, (stating his case to pharaoh), one of the Amarna letters in cuneiform writing on a clay tablet. ... Neferkheperre-waenre Beautiful are the Manifestations of Re[2] the one of Re Nomen Akhenaten Servant of the Aten[1] (after Year 4 of his reign) Amenhotep Horus name Kanakht-Meryaten The strong bull, beloved of the Aten Nebty name Wernesytemakhetaten Great of kingship in Akhetaten Golden Horus Wetjesrenenaten Who... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wikisource. ...

"From time immemorial, no daughter of the king of Egy[pt] is given to anyone."[19]

Amenhotep III's refusal to allow one of his daughter to be married to the Babylonian monarch may indeed be connected with Egyptian traditional royal practices or be viewed as a shrewd attempt on his part to enhance Egypt's prestige over those of her neighbours in the international world.


The pharaoh's reign was relatively peaceful and uneventful. The only dated military activity by the king is commemorated by three rock-carved stelas from his fifth year found near Aswan and Sai island in Nubia. The official account of Amenhotep III's military victory emphasizes his martial prowess. Aswan (Arabic: أسوان Aswān) (, population 200,000) is a city in the south of Egypt, the capital of the Aswan Governorate. ...

Regnal Year 5, third month of Inundation, day 2. Appearance under the Majesty of Horus: Strong bull, appearing in truth; Two Ladies: Who establishes laws and pacifies the Two Lands;...King of Upper and Lower Egypt: Nebmaatra, heir of Ra; Son of Ra: [Amenhotep, ruler of Thebes], beloved of [Amon]-Ra, King of the Gods, and Khnum, lord of the cataract, given life. One came to tell His Majesty, "The fallen one of vile Kush has plotted rebellion in his heart." His Majesty led on to victory; he completed it in his first campaign of victory. His Majesty reached them like the wing stroke of a falcon, like Menthu (war god of Thebes) in his transformation...Ikheny, the boaster in the midst of the army, did not know the lion that was before him. Nebmaatra was the fierce-eyed lion whose claws seized vile Kush, who trampled down all its chiefs in their valleys, they being cast down in their blood, one on top of the other [20]

Amenhotep III celebrated three Jubilee festivals in his Year 30, Year 34 and Year 37 respectively at his Malkata summer palace in Western Thebes.[21] The palace, called as Per-Hay or "House of Rejoicing" in ancient times, comprised a temple of Amun and a festival hall built especially for this occasion.[22] One of the king's most popular epithets was Aten-tjehen which means "the Dazzling Sun Disk"; it appears in his titulary at Luxor temple and, more frequently, was used as the name for one of his palaces as well as the Year 11 royal barge and denotes a company of men in Amenhotep's army.[23] Malkata (or Malqata) is a place located on the west bank of Thebes, Egypt, in Egypt, in the desert south of Medinet Habu. ... Per is the hieroglyph for house, the floor-plan of a walled building with an open doorway. ...


Monuments

He built extensively at the temple of Karnak including the Luxor temple which consisted of two pylons, a colonnade behind the new temple entrance, and a new temple to the goddess Ma'at. Amenhotep III dismantled the Fourth pylon of the Temple of Amun at Karnak to construct a new pylon--the third pylon--and created a new entrance to this structure where he erected "two rows of columns with open papyrus capital[s]" down the centre of this newly formed forecourt.[24] The forecourt between the third and fourth pylons of Egypt, sometimes called an obelisk court, was also decorated with scenes of the sacred barque of the gods Amun, Mut and Khonsu being carried in funerary boats.[25] the king also started work on the Tenth pylon at the Temple of Amun here. Amenhotep III's first recorded acts as king--in his Years 1 and 2--was to open new limestone quarries at Tura, just south of Cairo and at Dayr al-Barsha in Middle Egypt in order to herald his great building projects.[26] He oversaw construction of another temple to Ma'at at Luxor and virtually covered Nubia with numerous monuments Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Colossi of Memnon The Colossi of Memnon (known to locals as el-Colossat, or es-Salamat) are two massive stone statues of Pharaoh Amenhotep III. For the past 3400 years they have stood in the Theban necropolis, across the River Nile from the modern city of Luxor. ... Map of Karnak, showing major temple complexes Interior of Temple First pylon of precinct of Amun viewed from the west Al-Karnak (Arabic الكرنك, in Ancient Egypt was named Ipet Sut, the most venerated place) is a small village in Egypt, located on the banks of the River Nile some 2. ... Luxor Temple, from the east bank of the Nile Luxor Temple is a large Ancient Egyptian temple complex located on the east bank of the River Nile in the city today known as Luxor (ancient Thebes). ... Pylon is the Greek term for a monumental gateway of an Egyptian temple. ... [1] Maat, reconstructed to have been pronounced as * (Muh-aht)[2], was the Ancient Egyptian concept of law, morality, and justice[3] which was deified as a goddess. ... A barc is a type of sailing vessel. ... Amun (also spelled Amon, Amoun, Amen, and rarely Imen, Greek Αμμον Ammon, and Άμμον Hammon, Egyptian Yamanu) was the name of a deity, in Egyptian mythology, who gradually rose to become one of the most important deities, before fading into obscurity. ... For other uses, see Mut (disambiguation). ... In Egyptian mythology, Chons (alternately Khensu, Khons, Khonsu or Khonshu) is a lunar deity, and a son of Amun and Mut. ... Dayr al-Barsha is a Coptic village in middle Egypt. ... Luxor Temple, from the east bank of the Nile Luxor Temple is a large Ancient Egyptian temple complex located on the east bank of the River Nile in the city today known as Luxor (ancient Thebes). ... Nubia is the region in the south of Egypt, along the Nile and in northern Sudan. ...

Amenhotep III and Sobek, from Dahamsha, now in the Luxor Museum

"...including a small temple with a colonnade (dedicated to Thutmose III) at Elephantine, a rock temple dedicated to Amun 'Lord of the Ways' at Wadi es-Sebuam, and the temple of Horus of Miam at Aniba...[as well as founding] additional temples at Kawa and Sesebi."[27] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 373 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (420 × 675 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Statue of Sobek and Amenhotep III, currently in the Luxor Museum, in Egypt. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 373 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (420 × 675 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Statue of Sobek and Amenhotep III, currently in the Luxor Museum, in Egypt. ... Sobek (from the Temple of Kom Ombo) or In Egyptian mythology, Sobek (also spelt Sebek, Sochet, Sobk, Sobki, Soknopais, and in Greek, Suchos) was the deification of crocodiles, and was originally a demon, as crocodiles were deeply feared in the nation so dependent on the Nile River. ... Luxor Museum Luxor Museum is located in the Egyptian city of Luxor (ancient Thebes). ... Menkheperre Lasting is the Manifestation of Re[1] Nomen Thutmose Neferkheperu Thoth is born, beautiful of forms Horus name Kanakht Khaemwaset Mighty Bull, Arising in Thebes Nebty name Wahnesytmireempet Enduring in kingship like Re in heaven Golden Horus Sekhempahtydsejerkhaw Powerful of strength, holy of diadems Consort(s) Hatshepsut-Meryetre, Nebtu... Elephantine Island, showing the nilometer (lower left) and the Aswan Museum. ...

Luxor Temple of Amenhotep III
Luxor Temple of Amenhotep III

His enormous mortuary temple on the west bank of the Nile was, in its day, the largest religious complex in Thebes but, unfortunately, the king chose to build it too close to the floodplain and less than 200 years later, it stood in ruins. Much of the masonry was purloined by Merneptah and later pharaohs for their own construction projects.[28] The Colossi of Memnon — two massive 18-metre stone statues of Amenhotep that stood at the gateway of his mortuary temple — are the only elements of the complex that remained standing. Amenhotep III also built the Third Pylon at Karnak and erected 600 statues of the goddess Sekhmet in the Temple of Mut, south of Karnak.[29] Some of the most magnificient statues of New Kingdom Egypt date to his reign "such as the two outstanding courchant rose granite lions originally set before the temple at Soleb in Nubia" as well as a large series of royal sculptures.[30] Several beautiful black granite seated statues of Amenhotep wearing the nemes headress have come from exavations behing the Colossi of Memnon as well as from Tanis in the Delta.[31] One of the most stunning finds of royal statuary's dating to his reign was made as recently as 1989 in the courtyard of Amenhotep III's colonnade of the Temple of Luxor where a cache of statues including "a superb 6-ft (1.83 m) high pink quartzite statue of the king standing on a sleigh and wearing the Double Crown" was uncovered.[32] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Amenhotep IIIs mortuary temple from the air The Mortuary Temple of Amenhotep III is located in the Theban necropolis, on the west bank of the Nile, opposiet Luxor in Egypt. ... The Nile (Arabic: , transliteration: , Ancient Egyptian iteru, Coptic piaro or phiaro) is a major north-flowing river in Africa, generally regarded as the longest river in the world. ... Thebes Thebes (, ThÄ“bai) is the Greek designation of the ancient Egyptian niwt (The) City and niwt-rst (The) Southern City. It is located about 800 km south of the Mediterranean, on the east bank of the river Nile (). Thebes was the capital of Waset, the fourth Upper Egyptian nome... This picture shows the flood plain following a 1 in 10 year flood on the Isle of Wight. ... Merneptah (occasionally: Merenptah) was pharaoh of Ancient Egypt (1213 – 1203 BC), the fourth ruler of the 19th Dynasty. ... The Colossi of Memnon The Colossi of Memnon (known to locals as el-Colossat, or es-Salamat) are two massive stone statues of Pharaoh Amenhotep III. For the past 3400 years they have stood in the Theban necropolis, across the River Nile from the modern city of Luxor. ... Pylon is the Greek term for a monumental gateway of an Egyptian temple. ... Two statues of Sekhmet (standing) in the Egyptian Museum of Berlin. ...


Proposed coregency

There is currently no conclusive evidence of a coregency between Amenhotep III and his son, Akhenaten. A letter from the Amarna palace archives dated to Year 2--rather than Year 12--of Akhenaten's reign from the Mitannian king Tushratta (Amarna letter EA 27) preserves a complaint about the fact that Akhenaten did not honor his father's promise to forward Tushratta statues made of solid gold as part of a marriage dowry for sending his daughter, Tadukhepa into the pharaoh's harem.[33] This correspondence implies that if any coregency occurred between Amenhotep III and Akhenaten, it lasted no more than a year at the most.[34] Lawrence Berman observes in a 1998 biography of Amenhotep III that A Co-regency is the situation where a monarchical position (such as King, Queen, Emperor or Empress), normally held by only a single person, is held by two. ... Kingdom of Mitanni Mitanni (cuneiform KUR URUMi-it-ta-ni, also Mittani Mi-ta-an-ni, in Assyrian sources Hanigalbat, Khanigalbat cuneiform Ḫa-ni-gal-bat ) was a Hurrian kingdom in northern Mesopotamia from ca. ... Tadukhipa, in Hurrian language Tadu-Hepa, was the daughter of Tushratta, king of Mitanni (reigned ca. ...

"it is significant that the proponents of the coregency theory have tended to be art historians [ie: Raymond Johnson], whereas historians [such as Donald Redford and William Murnane] have largely remained unconvinced. Recognizing that the problem admits no easy solution, the present writer has gradually come to believe that it is unnecessary to propose a coregency to explain the production of art in the reign of Amenhotep III. Rather the perceived problems appear to derive from the interpretation of mortuary objects."[35]

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Final years

Reliefs from the wall of the temple of Soleb in Nubia and scenes from the Theban tomb of Kheruef, Steward of the King's Great Wife (TT192) depict Amenhotep as a visibly weak and sick figure.[36] It has generally been assumed by some scholars that Amenhotep requested and received from his father-in-law Tushratta of Mitanni, a statue of Ishtar of Nineveh--a healing goddess--in order to cure him of his various ailments which included painful abscesses in his teeth.[37] A forensic examination of his mummy shows that he was probably in constant pain during his final years due to his worn and cavity pitted teeth. However, more recent analysis of Amarna letter EA 23 by William L. Moran, which recounts the dispatch of the goddess to Thebes, does not support this popular theory. The goddess' arrival is known to have coincided with Amenhotep III's marriage with Tadukhepa, Tushratta's daughter, in the pharaoh's 36th year; letter's EA 23's arrival in Egypt is dated to "regnal year 36, the fourth month of winter, day 1" of his reign.[38] Furthermore, Tushratta never mentions in EA 23 that the statue's dispatch was meant to heal Amenhotep from his maladies. Instead, Tushratta merely writes Tushratta was a king of the Mitanni at the end of the reign of Amenhotep III and throughout the reign of Akhenaten -- approximately the late 14th century BC. He was the son of Shuttarna II, and his daughter Tadukhipa was married to Akhenaten. ... Kingdom of Mitanni Mitanni (cuneiform KUR URUMi-it-ta-ni, also Mittani Mi-ta-an-ni, in Assyrian sources Hanigalbat, Khanigalbat cuneiform Ḫa-ni-gal-bat ) was a Hurrian kingdom in northern Mesopotamia from ca. ... Ishtar is the Assyrian and Babylonian counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna and to the cognate northwest Semitic goddess Astarte. ... , For other uses, see Nineveh (disambiguation). ... William Lambert Moran (August 11, 1921 — December 19, 2000), was an American Assyriologist, he was born in Chicago, USA. In 1939, Moran joined the Jesuit order. ... Tadukhipa, in Hurrian language Tadu-Hepa, was the daughter of Tushratta, king of Mitanni (reigned ca. ... Tushratta was a king of the Mitanni at the end of the reign of Amenhotep III and throughout the reign of Akhenaten -- approximately the late 14th century BC. He was the son of Shuttarna II, and his daughter Tadukhipa was married to Akhenaten. ...

Say to Nimmureya (ie: Amenhotep III), the king of Egypt, my brother, my son-in-law, whom I love and who loves me: Thus Tušratta, the king of Mitanni, who loves you, your father-in-law. For me all goes well. For you may all go well. For your household for Tadu-Heba (ie: Tadukhepa), my daughter, your wife, who you love, may all go well. For your wives, for your sons, for your magnates, for your chariots, for your horses, for your troops, for your country, and for whatever else belongs to you, may all go very, very well.

Thus Šauška of Nineveh, mistress of all lands: "I wish to go to Egypt, a country that I love, and then return." Now I herewith send her, and she is on her way. Now, in the time, too, of my father,...[she] went to this country, and just as earlier she dwelt there and they honored her, may my brother now honor her 10 times more than before. May my brother honor her, (then) at (his) pleasure let her go so that she may come back. May Šauška (ie: Ishtar), the mistress of heaven, protect us, my brother and me, a 100,000 years, and may our mistress grant both of us great joy. And let us act as friends. Is Šauška for me alone my god(dess), and for my brother not his god(dess)?[39] Ishtar is the Assyrian and Babylonian counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna and to the cognate northwest Semitic goddess Astarte. ...

The likeliest explanation is that the statue was sent to Egypt "to shed her blessings on the wedding of Amenhotep III and Tadukhepa, as she had done previously for Amenhotep III and Gilukhepa."[40] As Moran writes: "One explanation of the goddess' visit is that she was to heal the aged and ailing Egyptian king, but this explanation rests purely on analogy and finds no support in this letter...More likely, it seems, is a connection with the solemnities associated with the marriage of Tušratta's daughter; sf. the previous visit mentioned in lines 18f., perhaps on the occasion of the marriage of Kelu-Heba (ie: Gilukhepa)...and note, too, Šauška's role along with Aman, of making Tadu-Heba answer to the king's desires."[41] Gilukhipa, or more probable Kilu-Hepa in Hurrian language, in the Egyptian language Kirgipa, was daughter of Shuttarna II, king of Mitanni. ... Amun (also spelled Amon, Amoun, Amen, and rarely Imen, Greek Αμμον Ammon, and Άμμον Hammon, Egyptian Yamanu) was the name of a deity, in Egyptian mythology, who gradually rose to become one of the most important deities, before fading into obscurity. ...


The contents of Amarna letter EA 21 from Tushratta to his "brother" Amenhotep III strongly affirms this solution. In this correspondence, Tushratta explicitly states

I have given...my daughter (Tadukhepa) to be the wife of my brother, whom I love. May Šimige and Šauška go before her. May they m[ake he]r the image of my brother's desire. May my brother rejoice on t[hat] day. May Šimige and Šauška grant my brother a gre[at] blessing, exquisi[te] joy. May they bless him and may you, my brother, li[ve] forever.[42]

Death

Amenhotep III's highest attested date are a pair of Year 38 wine jar-label dockets from Malkata[43]; however, he may have lived briefly into an unrecorded 39th year[44] since wine from his royal estate in that year was only processed in the Autumn by which time he would have been dead while his son Akhenaten now sat on the throne. Amenhotep III was buried in the Western Valley of the Valley of the Kings, in Tomb WV22. An examination of his mummy by the Australian anatomist, Grafton Elliott Smith concluded that the pharaoh was aged between forty and fifty years old at death.[45] His chief wife Tiye is known to have outlived him for as long as 12 years since she is mentioned in several Amarna letters dating to her son's reign and is depicted at a dinner table with Akhenaten and his royal family in scenes from the tomb of Huya which bears reliefs dating to Year 9 and Year 12 of her son's reign.[46][47] Malkata (or Malqata) is a place located on the west bank of Thebes, Egypt, in Egypt, in the desert south of Medinet Habu. ... Location of the valley in the Theban Hills, West of the Nile, October 1988 (red arrow shows location) The Valley of the Kings (Arabic: وادي الملوك Wadi Biban el-Muluk; Gates of the King)[1] is a valley in Egypt where for a period of nearly 500 years from the 16th to... Tomb WV22 in the Western arm of the Valley of the Kings was used as the resting of the one the greatest rulers of Egypts New Kingdom, Amenhotep III. It was officially discovered by Prosper Jollois and Eduard de Villiers du Terrage, engineers with Napoleons expedition to Egypt in...


When Amenhotep died, he left behind a country that was at the very height of its power and influence and which commanded immense respect in the international world; however, he also bequeated an Egypt that was wedded to its traditional political and religious certainties under the Amun priesthood.[48] The resulting upheavals from his son Akhenaten's reforming zeal would shake these old certainties to their very foundations and bring forth the central question of whether pharaoh was more powerful than the existing domestic order as represented by the Amun priests and their numerous temple estates. Neferkheperre-waenre Beautiful are the Manifestations of Re[2] the one of Re Nomen Akhenaten Servant of the Aten[1] (after Year 4 of his reign) Amenhotep Horus name Kanakht-Meryaten The strong bull, beloved of the Aten Nebty name Wernesytemakhetaten Great of kingship in Akhetaten Golden Horus Wetjesrenenaten Who...


Notes

  1. ^ [1] Amenhotep III
  2. ^ Clayton, Peter. Chronicle of the Pharaohs, Thames & Hudson Ltd., 1994. p.112
  3. ^ William L. Moran, The Amarna Letters, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, (1992), EA 3, p.7
  4. ^ Beckerath, Jürgen von, Chronologie des Pharaonischen Ägypten. Philipp von Zabern, Mainz, (1997) p.190
  5. ^ O'Connor, David & Cline, Eric. Amenhotep III: Perspectives on His Reign, University of Michigan Press, 1998, p.3
  6. ^ The Amarna Succession by James P. Allen, pp.16-17
  7. ^ O'Connor, David & Cline, Eric., op. cit,p.7
  8. ^ Kozloff, Arielle. & Bryan, Betsy. Royal and Divine Statuary in Egypt’s Dazzling Sun: Amenhotep III and his World, (Cleveland, 1992), nos. 24, 57, 103 & 104
  9. ^ Kozloff & Bryan, op. cit., fig. II, 5
  10. ^ O'Connor, David & Cline, Eric., op. cit,p.7
  11. ^ O'Connor, David & Cline, Eric., op. cit., p.7
  12. ^ Troy, Lana. Patterns of Queenship in Ancient Egyptian Myth and History. University of Uppsala, Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations 14, (1986), 103, 107, 111
  13. ^ O'Connor, David & Cline, Eric., op. cit., p.7
  14. ^ Dodson, Aidan & Hilton, Dyan The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt, Thames & Hudson (2004), p.155
  15. ^ O'Connor, David & Cline, Eric., op. cit., pp.11-12
  16. ^ O'Connor, David & Cline, Eric., op. cit, p.13
  17. ^ O'Connor, David & Cline, Eric., op. cit., p.13
  18. ^ Kozloff & Bryan, op. cit., no.2
  19. ^ William L. Moran, op. cit., p.8
  20. ^ Urk. IV 1665-66
  21. ^ David O'Connor & Eric Cline, op. cit., p.16
  22. ^ David O'Connor & Eric Cline, op. cit., p.16
  23. ^ David O'Connor & Eric Cline, op. cit., pp. 3 & 14
  24. ^ Amenhotep III
  25. ^ The Obelisk Court of Amenhotep III
  26. ^ Urk. IV, 1677-1678
  27. ^ Nicolas Grimal, A History of Ancient Egypt, Blackwell Books: 1992. p.223
  28. ^ Grimal, op. cit., p.224
  29. ^ Grimal, op. cit., p.224 & 295
  30. ^ Clayton, op. cit., p.118
  31. ^ Clayton, op. cit., p.118
  32. ^ Clayton, op. cit., p.118
  33. ^ William L. Moran, translation, op. cit., pp.87-89
  34. ^ Nicholas Reeves, Akhenaten: Egypt's False Prophet, Thames & Hudson, 2000, pp.75-78
  35. ^ Lawrence M. Berman, 'Overview of Amenhotep III and His Reign,' in Amenhotep III: Perspectives on his Reign, ed: David O'Connor & Eric Cline, op. cit, p.23
  36. ^ Grimal, op. cit., p.225
  37. ^ William Hayes, "Internal affairs from Thutmosis I to the death of Amenophis III," in CAH Pt 1, Vol 2, The Middle East and the Aegean Region, c.1800-1380 BC, 1973, p.346
  38. ^ Cyril Aldred, Akhenaten: King of Egypt, Thames & Hudson, 1991, pl.13
  39. ^ William L. Moran, translation, op. cit., pp.61-62
  40. ^ David O'Connor & Eric Cline, op. cit., p.22
  41. ^ William L. Moran, translation, op. cit., p.62 n.2
  42. ^ William L. Moran, translation, op. cit., p.50
  43. ^ Kozloff & Bryan, op. cit., p.39, fig. II.4
  44. ^ Clayton, op. cit., p.119
  45. ^ Grafton Elliot Smith, The Royal Mummies, 1912, Cairo, p.50
  46. ^ El-Amarna North tombs
  47. ^ David O'Connor & Eric Cline, op. cit., p.23
  48. ^ Grimal, op. cit., pp. 223 & 225

William Lambert Moran (August 11, 1921 — December 19, 2000), was an American Assyriologist, he was born in Chicago, USA. In 1939, Moran joined the Jesuit order. ... Jürgen von Beckerath (born 19 February 1920) is a prominent German Egyptologist. ...

References

  • Aldred, Cyril. Akhenaten: King of Egypt, Thames & Hudson, 1991
  • Allen, James P. The Amarna Succession
  • Beckerath, Jürgen von, Chronologie des Pharaonischen Ägypten. Philipp von Zabern, Mainz, (1997)
  • Clayton, Peter. Chronicle of the Pharaohs, Thames & Hudson Ltd., 1994.
  • O'Connor, David & Cline, Eric. Amenhotep III: Perspectives on His Reign, University of Michigan Press, 1998
  • Dodson, Aidan & Hilton, Dyan. The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt, Thames & Hudson (2004)
  • Grimal, Nicolas. A History of Ancient Egypt, Blackwell Books: 1992.
  • Hayes, William. "Internal affairs from Thutmosis I to the death of Amenophis III," in CAH Pt 1, Vol 2, The Middle East and the Aegean Region, c.1800-1380 BC, 1973
  • Kozloff, Arielle. & Bryan, Betsy. Royal and Divine Statuary in Egypt’s Dazzling Sun: Amenhotep III and his World, (Cleveland, 1992)
  • Moran, William L., The Amarna Letters, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, (1992)
  • Reeves, Nicholas. Akhenaten: Egypt's False Prophet, Thames & Hudson, 2000
  • Troy, Lana. Patterns of Queenship in Ancient Egyptian Myth and History. University of Uppsala, Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations 14, (1986)

Jürgen von Beckerath (born 19 February 1920) is a prominent German Egyptologist. ... William Lambert Moran (August 11, 1921 — December 19, 2000), was an American Assyriologist, he was born in Chicago, USA. In 1939, Moran joined the Jesuit order. ...

External links

  • Commemorative scarab of Amenhotep III

See also

Main article: Ancient Egypt The history of ancient Egypt began around 3100 BC when Egypt became a unified Egyptian state, but archaeological evidence indicates that a developed society had formed much earlier. ... The Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt family tree is complex and unclear, especially at its end. ... Kingdom of Mitanni Mitanni (cuneiform KUR URUMi-it-ta-ni, also Mittani Mi-ta-an-ni, in Assyrian sources Hanigalbat, Khanigalbat cuneiform Ḫa-ni-gal-bat ) was a Hurrian kingdom in northern Mesopotamia from ca. ... ... The Early Dynastic Period of Egypt is taken to include the First and Second Dynasties, lasting from 2920 BC, following the Protodynastic Period of Egypt, until 2575 BC, or the beginning of the Old Kingdom. ... Narmer was an Egyptian pharaoh who ruled in the 31st century BC. Thought to be the successor to the predynastic Serket, he is considered by some to be the founder of the First dynasty, and therefore the first pharaoh of all Egypt. ... Hor-Aha was the 2nd Pharaoh of the 1st dynasty of Ancient Egypt. ... Menes was an Egyptian pharaoh of the First dynasty, to some authors the founder of this dynasty, to others the Second. ... Image File history File links Ankh. ... The Old Kingdom is the name commonly given to that period in the 3rd millennium BC when Egypt attained its first continuous peak of civilization complexity and achievement – this was the first of three so-called Kingdom periods, which mark the high points of civilization in the Nile Valley (the... Netjerikhet Consort(s) Inetkawes, Hetephernebti Unknown Father Khasekhemwy? Mother Nimaethap? Major Monuments Pyramid of Djoser Netjerikhet Djoser (Turin King List Dsr-it; Manetho Tosarthros) is the best-known pharaoh of the Third dynasty of Egypt, for commissioning the official Imhotep to build his Step Pyramid at Saqqara. ... Sneferu He of Beauty[1] Horus name Neb-maat[2] Nebty name Neb-maat-nebty[2] Golden Horus Bik-nub[2] Consort(s) Hetepheres I Issues Khufu Father Huni Mother Meresankh I Died 2589 BC Major Monuments Bent Pyramid, Red Pyramid Sneferu, also spelt as Snefru or Snofru (in Greek... Khufu Protected by Khnum[1] Horus name Medjedu Nebty name Nebty-r-medjed Golden Horus Bikwy-nub Consort(s) Meritates, Henutsen, plus two other queens whose names are not known[2] Issues Djedefra, Kawab, Khafre, Djedefhor, Banefre, Khufukaef, Hetepheres II, Meresankh II, Khamerernebty[2] Father Sneferu Mother Hetepheres I Died... The Pyramid of Khafra and the Great Sphinx of Giza Portrait of Khafra, originally found at Mit Rahina, now residing in the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo. ... Men-kau-re[1] Eternal like the Souls of Re Nomen Consort(s) Khamerernebty II Issues Khuenre, Shepseskaf, Khentkawes Father Khafre Mother Khamaerernebty I Died 2504 BC Burial Pyramid at Giza Major Monuments Pyramid at Giza Menkaura (or Men-Kau-Re; Mycerinus in Latin; Mykerinos in Greek) was a pharaoh... nomen or birth name Pepi II (c. ... The Middle Kingdom is a period in the history of ancient Egypt stretching from the establishment of the Eleventh Dynasty to the end of the Fourteenth Dynasty, roughly between 2030 BC and 1640 BC. The period comprises of 2 phases, the 11th Dynasty, which ruled from Thebes and the 12th... nomen or birth name Nebhotepre Mentuhotep II (2046-1995 BCE) was a Pharaoh of the 11th dynasty, the son of Intef III of Egypt and a minor queen called Iah. ... nomen or birth name Nebtawyre Mentuhotep IV was the last king of the 11th Dynasty. ... Khakhaure (The king of the two lands, The kas of Ra have appeared) Nomen Senusret (The son of Ra, man of the strong one) Horus name Netcher Kheperu (Horus, divine of form) Nebty name Netcher Mesut (The two ladies, divine of birth) Golden Horus Kheper (The golden Horus has... ny m3ˁt rˁ (Nimaatre)[1] Belonging to the truth of Re Nomen Amenemhat[1] Amun is in front Horus name Wahankh[1] Long of life Nebty name Itjijautawy[1] Who comes to the inheritance of the two lands Golden Horus ˁ3 ba(u) (Aabaw)[1] Great of power Issues... Sobek-kare Sobek is the Ka of Re Nomen Sobekneferu The beauties of Sobek Horus name Meritra Beloved of Re Nebty name Satsekhem Nebettawy Daughter of the powerful one, Mistress of the two lands Golden Horus Djedetkhau Established of crowns Died 1802 BC Sobekneferu (sometimes written Nefrusobek) was an Egyptian... The New Kingdom is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BCE and the 11th century BC, covering the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Dynasties of Egypt. ... Maatkare[1] Truth is the Ka of Re Nomen Khnumt-Amun Hatshepsut[1] Joined with Amun, Foremost of Noble Ladies Horus name Wesretkau [1] Mighty of Kas Nebty name Wadjrenput[1] Flourishing of years Golden Horus Netjeretkhau [1] Divine of appearance Consort(s) Thutmose II Issues Neferure Father Thutmose I... Menkheperre Lasting is the Manifestation of Re[1] Nomen Thutmose Neferkheperu Thoth is born, beautiful of forms Horus name Kanakht Khaemwaset Mighty Bull, Arising in Thebes Nebty name Wahnesytmireempet Enduring in kingship like Re in heaven Golden Horus Sekhempahtydsejerkhaw Powerful of strength, holy of diadems Consort(s) Hatshepsut-Meryetre, Nebtu... Neferkheperre-waenre Beautiful are the Manifestations of Re[2] the one of Re Nomen Akhenaten Servant of the Aten[1] (after Year 4 of his reign) Amenhotep Horus name Kanakht-Meryaten The strong bull, beloved of the Aten Nebty name Wernesytemakhetaten Great of kingship in Akhetaten Golden Horus Wetjesrenenaten Who... Nebkheperure Lord of the forms of Re Nomen Tutankhaten Living Image of the Aten Tutankhamun Hekaiunushema Living Image of Amun, ruler of Upper Heliopolis Horus name Kanakht Tutmesut The strong bull, pleasing of birth Nebty name Neferhepusegerehtawy One of perfect laws, who pacifies the two lands[1] Wer-Ah-Amun... Menpehtyre Eternal is the Strength of Re[2] Nomen Ra-messes Re has fashioned him[1] Consort(s) Queen Sitre Issues Seti I Died 1290 BC Burial KV16 Menpehtyre Ramessu I (traditional English: Ramesses, also Ramses or Rameses) was the founding Pharaoh of Ancient Egypts 19th dynasty. ... Menmaatre Eternal is the Strength of Re[1] Nomen Seti Merenptah He of the god Seth, beloved of Ptah[2] Horus name Kanakht Khaemwaset-Seankhtawy Nebty name Wehemmesut Sekhemkhepesh Derpedjetpesdjet Golden Horus Wehemkhau Weserpedjutemtawnebu[3] Consort(s) Queen Tuya Issues Ramesses II, Tia, Henutmire (?) Father Ramesses I Mother Sitre Died... Usermaatre-setepenre The Justice of Re is Powerful, Chosen of Re Nomen Ramesses (meryamun) Born of Re, (Beloved of Amun) Horus name Kanakht Merymaa Nebty name Mekkemetwafkhasut Golden Horus Userrenput-aanehktu Consort(s) Isetnofret, Nefertari Maathorneferure Issues Bintanath, Khaemweset, Merneptah, Amun-her-khepsef, Meritamen see also: List of children of... nomen or birth name Hedjkheperre Setepenre Shoshenq I (Egyptian ššnq), also known as Sheshonk or Sheshonq I (for discussion of the spelling, see Shoshenq), was a Meshwesh Libyan king of Egypt and founder of the Twenty-second Dynasty. ... Piye, whose name was once transliterated as Py(ankh)i. ... Taharqa (also spelled Tirhakah, Taharka, Manethos Tarakos) was king of Egypt, and a member of the Nubian or Twenty-fifth dynasty of Egypt, whose reign is usually dated 690 BC to 664 BC. He was also the son of Piye, the Nubian king of Napata who had first conquered... Wahibre Nomen Psamtik Horus name Aaib Nebty name Neba Golden Horus Qenu Issues Nitocris I Died 610 BC Burial Sais Psammetichus, or Psamtik I, was the first of three kings of the Saite, or Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt. ... Wahemibre Nomen Necho Horus name Maaib Nebty name Maakheru Golden Horus Merynetjeru Consort(s) Khedebarbenet Died 595 BC Necho II (or more accurately, Nekau II) was a king of the Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt (610 - 595 BC), and the son of Psammetichus I. His prenomen or royal name Wahemibre... nomen or birth name Ankhkaenre Psammetichus III (Psamtik III) was the last Pharaoh of the Twenty-sixth Dynasty of Egypt, 526 BC–525 BC. He was defeated by King Cambyses II of Persia at Pelusium, carried to Susa in chains, and executed. ... Ptolemy I Soter (Greek: , Ptolemaios Soter, i. ... For other uses, see Cleopatra (disambiguation). ... Ptolemy XIII (lived 62 BC/61 BC -January 13? 47 BC, reigned 51 BC - January 13?, 47 BC) was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. ... Tetisheri was the matriarch of the Egyptian royal family of the late 17th Dynasty and early 18th Dynasty. ... Queen Ahmose-Nefertari of Egypt was the sister-wife of Egypts Pharaoh King Ahmose I. She had two children-Amenhotep I and Aahhotep II, who wed each other and had the Princess Aahmes. ... Queen Ahmose was the mother of Hatshepsut of Egypt. ... Tiye. ... Bust of Nefertiti from Berlins Altes Museum. ... Ankhesenamun, also known as Ankhesepaaten, was the third of six known daughters of the Pharaoh Akhenaten by his wife Nefertiti. ... A picture of Nefertari taken in her Abu Simbel temple. ... Bust of Mark Antony Marcus Antonius (Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) ( January 14 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. ... Statuette of Imhotep in the Louvre another image of the same statue Imhotep (sometimes spelled Immutef, Im-hotep, or Ii-em-Hotep, Egyptian ) is the first architect and physician known by name in written history. ... Weni the Elder was a court official of the 6th dynasty of Ancient Egypt. ... Ahmose, son of Ebana served in the Egyptian military under the pharaohs Tao II Seqenenre, Ahmose I, Amenhotep I, and Thutmose I. His autobiography has survived intact on the wall of his tomb and has proven a valuable source of information on the late 17th Dynasty and the early 18th... Ineofficial of the 18th Dynasty, responsible for major constructions un Egypt| Thutmose II]], Hatshepsut, and Thutmose III. Ineni came from an aristocratic family and likely began his career as an architect under Amenhotep I. Amenhotep I commissioned Ineni to expand the Temple of Karnak. ... Senemut was an 18th dynasty Ancient Egyptian architect and government official. ... Rekhmire was an 18th dynasty official, serving as Governor of the Town (Thebes) and Vizier during the reigns of Tuthmosis III and Amenhotep II. He is noted for constructing a lavishly decorated tomb for himself in the Valley of the Nobles, containing lively, well preserved scenes of daily life during... Yuya (left), suspected of being foreign, compared with his Egyptian wife Tuya (right). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Maya (Egyptian official). ... Yuny was an official through the reign of Ramesses II, in the 19th Dynasty, serving as chief scribe of the court, the overseer of priests, and royal steward. ... Manetho, also known as Manethon of Sebennytos, was an Egyptian historian and priest from Sebennytos who lived during the Ptolematic era, circa 3rd century BC. Manetho recorded Aegyptiaca (History of Egypt). ... Pothinus (early 1st Century BC - 48 or 47 BC) was regent for Pharaoh Ptolemy XIII of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Ancient Egypt. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: Amenhotep III (3184 words)
Amenhotep IIIs mortuary temple from the air The Mortuary Temple of Amenhotep III is located in the Theban necropolis, on the west bank of the Nile, opposiet Luxor in Egypt.
Amenhotep III was also the first pharaoh to issue royal news bulletins about his marriages, hunting trips and building projects, the information inscribed on large stone scarab seals and sent out across the empire.
Although Amenhotep III has long been overshadowed by his infamous son, it is clear that many of the innovations attributed to Akhenaten, including the popularisation of the Aten and more expressive art and literary styles actually began in the reign of Amenhotep III, the true instigator of the so-called 'Amarna Period'.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m