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Encyclopedia > Ambrose Burnside
Ambrose Everett Burnside
May 13, 1824(1824-05-13)September 13, 1881 (aged 57)

Portrait of Ambrose Burnside by Mathew Brady, ca. 1862
Nickname Burn
Place of birth Liberty, Indiana
Place of death Bristol, Rhode Island
Allegiance United States of America
Years of service 1847–1865
Rank Major General
Commands Army of the Potomac
Battles/wars Mexican-American War
American Civil War
Other work Governor of Rhode Island, U.S. Senator

Ambrose Everett Burnside (May 23, 1824September 13, 1881) was an American soldier, railroad executive, inventor, industrialist, and politician from Rhode Island, serving as governor and a U.S. Senator. As a Union Army general in the American Civil War, he conducted successful campaigns in North Carolina and East Tennessee, but was defeated in the disastrous Battle of Fredericksburg and Battle of the Crater. His distinctive style of facial hair is now known as sideburns, derived from his last name. is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 830 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Ambrose Burnside Sideburns Categories: U.S. history images ... Mathew B. Brady, circa 1875 For other persons named Matthew Brady, see Matthew Brady (disambiguation). ... Liberty from the air. ... Nickname: Motto: Official website: http://www. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Generals Burnside, Hancock, Couch, Ferro, Patrick, Wilcox, Cochrane, Buford and others. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Irvin McDowell Joseph E. Johnston P.G.T. Beauregard Strength 35,000 32,500 Casualties 2,896 (460 killed, 1,124 wounded, 1,312 captured/missing)[1] 1,982 (387 killed, 1,582 wounded, 13 missing)[1] For other uses... Battle of Roanoke Island Conflict American Civil War Date February 7-8, 1862 Place Dare County, North Carolina Result Union victory The Battle of Roanoke Island, also known as the Battle of Fort Huger, took place from February 7-8, 1862 in Dare County, North Carolina as part of Union... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ambrose E. Burnside Lawrence OB. Branch Strength Expeditionary Force of Fosters, Renos, and Parkes Brigades 5 regiments, militia Casualties 476 609 {{{notes}}} The Battle of New Bern (also known as the Battle of New Berne) was... Confederate dead at Antietam The Maryland Campaign, or the Antietam Campaign, of September 1862 is widely considered one of the major turning points of the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan Ambrose Burnside William B. Franklin Robert E. Lee Strength 28,000 18,000 Casualties 2,325 (443 killed, 1,807 wounded, 75 missing) 2,685 (325 killed, 1560 wounded, 800 missing) The Battle of South Mountain (known... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan Robert E. Lee Strength 87,000 45,000 Casualties 12,401 (2,108 killed, 9,540 wounded, 753 captured/missing) 10,316 (1,546 killed, 7,752 wounded, 1,018 captured/missing) The Battle of Antietam (also... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ambrose E. Burnside Robert E. Lee Strength Army of the Potomac ~114,000 engaged Army of Northern Virginia ~72,500 engaged Casualties 12,653 (1,284 killed, 9,600 wounded, 1,769 captured/missing) 5,377 (608 killed, 4,116... James Longstreet and Ambrose Burnside, principal commanders of the Knoxville Campaign The Knoxville Campaign[1] was a series of American Civil War battles and maneuvers in East Tennessee during the fall of 1863. ... Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee, opposing commanders in the Overland Campaign The Overland Campaign, also known as Grants Overland Campaign and the Wilderness Campaign, was a series of battles fought in Virginia during May and June 1864, in the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 101,895 61,025 Casualties 18,400 11,400 For the French and Indian War battle, see Battle of the Wilderness 1755. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 100,000 52,000 Casualties 18,000 12,000 The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, sometimes simply referred to as the Battle of Spotsylvania, was the second battle in Lieut. ... Battle of Totopotomoy Creek Conflict American Civil War Date May 23–26, 1864 Place Caroline County and Hanover County, Virginia Result Inconclusive The Battle of North Anna (also called Telegraph Road Bridge, Jericho Mill ( May 23), and Ox Ford, Quarles Mill, Hanover Junction ( May 24)) was a battle in Union... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 108,000 62,000 Casualties 13,000 2,500 The Battle of Cold Harbor, the final battle of Union Lt. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant Robert E. Lee Strength 67,000 – 125,000 average of 52,000 Casualties 53,386 ~32,000 The Richmond-Petersburg Campaign was a series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 15, 1864, to March... Belligerents United States (Union) CSA (Confederacy) Commanders Ambrose E. Burnside Robert E. Lee Strength IX Corps Elements of the Army of Northern Virginia Casualties and losses 5,300 total 1,032 total The Battle of the Crater was a battle of the American Civil War, part of the Siege of... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ambrose E. Burnside Robert E. Lee Strength Army of the Potomac ~114,000 engaged Army of Northern Virginia ~72,500 engaged Casualties 12,653 (1,284 killed, 9,600 wounded, 1,769 captured/missing) 5,377 (608 killed, 4,116... Belligerents United States (Union) CSA (Confederacy) Commanders Ambrose E. Burnside Robert E. Lee Strength IX Corps Elements of the Army of Northern Virginia Casualties and losses 5,300 total 1,032 total The Battle of the Crater was a battle of the American Civil War, part of the Siege of... Sideburns (or colloquially sideboards[1] or mutton chops[2]) are patches of facial hair on the sides of a mans face, in front of the ears. ...

Contents

Early life and career

Burnside was born in Liberty, Indiana, the fourth of nine children of Edghill and Pamela (or Pamilia) Brown Burnside, a family of Scottish origin.[1] His father, a native of South Carolina, was a slave owner who freed his slaves when he relocated to Indiana. Ambrose attended Liberty Seminary as a young boy, but his education was interrupted when his mother died in 1841 and he was apprenticed to a local tailor, eventually becoming a partner in the business.[2] His interest in military affairs and his father's political connections obtained an appointment to the U.S. Military Academy in 1843. He graduated in 1847, ranking 18th in a class of 38, and was commissioned a brevet second lieutenant in the 2nd U.S. Artillery. He traveled to Veracruz for the Mexican-American War, but arrived after hostilities ceased and performed mostly garrison duty around Mexico City.[3] Liberty from the air. ... This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ... In the US military, brevet referred to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to hold a higher rank temporarily, but usually without receiving the pay of that higher rank. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... Location within Mexico Country Capital Municipalities 212 Largest City Veracruz Government  - Governor Fidel Herrera Beltrán (PRI)  - Federal Deputies PRI: 6 PAN: 11 PRD: 2 Convergencia: 2  - Federal Senators PRD: 1 PAN: 1 Convergencia: 1 Area Ranked 11th  - Total 71,699 km² (27,683. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ...


At the close of the war, Lt. Burnside served two years on the western frontier, serving under Captain Braxton Bragg in the 3rd U.S. Artillery, a light artillery unit that had been converted to cavalry duty, protecting the Western mail routes through Nevada to California. In 1849, he was wounded by an arrow in his neck during a skirmish against Apaches in Las Vegas, New Mexico. In 1852, he was appointed to the command of Fort Adams, Newport, Rhode Island, and, while there, he married Mary Richmond Bishop of Providence, Rhode Island, on April 27. The marriage, which lasted until Burnside's death, was childless.[4] Braxton Bragg (March 22, 1817 – September 27, 1876) was a career U.S. Army officer and a general in the Confederate States Army, a principal commander in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Apache (disambiguation). ... The Plaza Hotel, built in 1881, on the Plaza of West Las Vegas. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... Providence redirects here. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1853, Burnside resigned his commission in the U.S. Army, although maintaining a position in the state militia, and devoted his time and energy to the manufacture of the famous rifle that bears his name, the Burnside carbine. The Secretary of War under President James Buchanan, John B. Floyd, contracted with the Burnside Arms Company to equip a large portion of the Army with his carbine, and induced him to establish extensive factories for its manufacture. The Bristol Rifle Works were no sooner complete than another gunmaker allegedly bribed Floyd to break his $100,000 contract with Burnside. Burnside ran as a Democrat for one of the Congressional seats in Rhode Island in 1858 and was defeated in a landslide. The burdens of the campaign and the destruction by fire of his factory also contributed to his financial ruin and he was forced to assign his firearm patents to others. He went west in search of employment and became treasurer of the Illinois Central Railroad, where he worked for, and became friendly with, one of his future commanding officers, George B. McClellan.[5] The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The Burnside carbine was a breech-loading carbine that saw widespread use during the American Civil War. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... John Buchanan Floyd (June 1, 1806 – August 26, 1863), was a Virginia politician (legislator and governor), U.S. Secretary of War, and the Confederate general in the American Civil War who lost the crucial Battle of Fort Donelson. ... Nickname: Motto: Official website: http://www. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Illinois Central (AAR reporting mark IC), sometimes called the Main Line of Mid-America, was a railroad carrier in the central United States, with its primary routes connecting Chicago, Illinois with New Orleans, Louisiana and Birmingham, Alabama. ... For the 1960s commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, see George McClellan (police commissioner). ...


Civil War

First Bull Run

Burnside (seated, center) and officers of the 1st Rhode Island at Camp Sprague, Rhode Island, 1861.
Burnside (seated, center) and officers of the 1st Rhode Island at Camp Sprague, Rhode Island, 1861.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Burnside was a brigadier general in the Rhode Island Militia. He raised a regiment, the 1st Rhode Island Volunteer Infantry, and was appointed its colonel on May 2, 1861. Within a month, he ascended to brigade command in the Department of Northeast Virginia. He commanded the brigade without distinction at the First Battle of Bull Run in July, committing his troops piecemeal, and took over division command temporarily for wounded Brig. Gen. David Hunter. After his 90-day regiment was mustered out of service, he was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers on August 6, and was assigned to train provisional brigades in the nascent Army of the Potomac.[3] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 747 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (845 × 678 pixel, file size: 451 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) TITLE: Officers of lst Rhode Island Volunteers - Camp Sprague, 1861 CALL NUMBER: LOT 4187 <item> [P&P] Check for an online group record... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 747 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (845 × 678 pixel, file size: 451 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) TITLE: Officers of lst Rhode Island Volunteers - Camp Sprague, 1861 CALL NUMBER: LOT 4187 <item> [P&P] Check for an online group record... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Insignia of a United States Colonel Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Irvin McDowell Joseph E. Johnston P.G.T. Beauregard Strength 35,000 32,500 Casualties 2,896 (460 killed, 1,124 wounded, 1,312 captured/missing)[1] 1,982 (387 killed, 1,582 wounded, 13 missing)[1] For other uses... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... David Hunter David Hunter (July 21, 1802 – February 2, 1886) was a Union general in the American Civil War. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Generals Burnside, Hancock, Couch, Ferro, Patrick, Wilcox, Cochrane, Buford and others. ...


North Carolina

Burnside commanded the Coast Division, or North Carolina Expeditionary Force—three brigades assembled in Annapolis, Maryland, which formed the nucleus for his future IX Corps—and the Department of North Carolina, from September 1861 until July 1862. He conducted a successful amphibious campaign that closed over 80% of the North Carolina sea coast to Confederate shipping for the remainder of the war.[6] For his successes at Roanoke Island and New Bern, the first significant Union victories in the Eastern Theater, he was promoted to major general on March 18. In July, his forces were transported north to Newport News, Virginia, and became the IX Corps of the Army of the Potomac.[3] Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Annapolis redirects here. ... IX Corps (Ninth Corps) was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War that distinguished itself in combat in multiple theaters: the Carolinas, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Mississippi. ... It has been suggested that Landing operation be merged into this article or section. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Battle of Roanoke Island Conflict American Civil War Date February 7-8, 1862 Place Dare County, North Carolina Result Union victory The Battle of Roanoke Island, also known as the Battle of Fort Huger, took place from February 7-8, 1862 in Dare County, North Carolina as part of Union... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ambrose E. Burnside Lawrence OB. Branch Strength Expeditionary Force of Fosters, Renos, and Parkes Brigades 5 regiments, militia Casualties 476 609 {{{notes}}} The Battle of New Bern (also known as the Battle of New Berne) was... President Lincoln visiting the Army of the Potomac at the Antietam battlefield, September 1862. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ...


Following Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan's failure in the Peninsula Campaign, Burnside was offered command of the Army of the Potomac. Refusing this opportunity—because of his loyalty to McClellan and because he understood his own lack of military experience— he detached part of his corps in support of Maj. Gen. John Pope's Army of Virginia in the Northern Virginia Campaign. Telegrams extremely critical of Pope's abilities as a commander from Maj. Gen. Fitz John Porter that he received at this time and forwarded on to his superiors in concurrence would later play a significant role in Porter's court-martial, in which Burnside would appear as a star witness. Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... For the 1960s commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, see George McClellan (police commissioner). ... McClellan and Johnston of the Peninsula Campaign The Peninsula Campaign (also known as the Peninsular Campaign) of the American Civil War was a major Union operation launched in southeastern Virginia from March through July 1862, the first large-scale offensive in the Eastern Theater. ... Major General John Pope John Pope (March 18, 1822 – September 23, 1892) was a career Army officer and general in the American Civil War. ... The Army of Virginia was organized as a major unit of the Union Army and operated briefly and unsuccessfully in 1862 in the American Civil War. ... Union soldiers at the Orange & Alexandria Railroad The Northern Virginia Campaign, also known as the Second Bull Run Campaign or Second Manassas Campaign, was a series of battles fought in Virginia during August and September, 1862, in the American Civil War. ... Fitz John Porter Fitz John Porter (August 31, 1822 – May 21, 1901) (sometimes written FitzJohn Porter) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Union general in the American Civil War. ...


Again offered command following Pope's debacle at Second Bull Run in that campaign, Burnside again declined.[7] For other uses, see Bull Run (disambiguation). ...


Antietam

Burnside Bridge at Antietam in 2005
Burnside Bridge at Antietam in 2005

Burnside was given command of the "Right Wing" of the Army of the Potomac (the I Corps and IX Corps) at the start of the Maryland Campaign for the Battle of South Mountain, but McClellan separated the two corps at the Battle of Antietam, placing them on opposite ends of the Union battle line, returning Burnside to command of just the IX Corps. Implicitly refusing to give up his higher authority, Burnside treated first Maj. Gen. Jesse L. Reno (killed at South Mountain) and then Brig. Gen. Jacob D. Cox as the corps commander, funneling orders to the corps through him. This cumbersome arrangement contributed to his slowness in attacking and crossing what is now called "Burnside's Bridge" on the southern flank of the Union line.[8] Image File history File links The Burnside Bridge in Portland, Oregon. ... Image File history File links The Burnside Bridge in Portland, Oregon. ... I Corps (First Corps) was the designation of four different corps_sized units in the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... Confederate dead at Antietam The Maryland Campaign, or the Antietam Campaign, of September 1862 is widely considered one of the major turning points of the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan Ambrose Burnside William B. Franklin Robert E. Lee Strength 28,000 18,000 Casualties 2,325 (443 killed, 1,807 wounded, 75 missing) 2,685 (325 killed, 1560 wounded, 800 missing) The Battle of South Mountain (known... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan Robert E. Lee Strength 87,000 45,000 Casualties 12,401 (2,108 killed, 9,540 wounded, 753 captured/missing) 10,316 (1,546 killed, 7,752 wounded, 1,018 captured/missing) The Battle of Antietam (also... Jesse Lee Reno (April 20, 1823 – September 14, 1862) was a Union general in the American Civil War, killed at the Battle of South Mountain. ... Jacob Dolson Cox (October 27, 1828 - August 4, 1900) was an officer in the Union Army during the Civil War and later a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Burnsides Bridge Burnsides Bridge is a landmark on the Antietam National Battlefield near Sharpsburg, Maryland. ...


Burnside did not perform adequate reconnaissance of the area and, instead of taking advantage of several easy fording sites out of range of the enemy, his troops were forced into repeated assaults across the narrow bridge, dominated by Confederate sharpshooters on high ground. By noon, McClellan was losing patience. He sent a succession of couriers to motivate Burnside to move forward. He ordered one aide, "Tell him if it costs 10,000 men he must go now." He increased the pressure by sending his inspector general to confront Burnside, who reacted indignantly: "McClellan appears to think I am not trying my best to carry this bridge; you are the third or fourth one who has been to me this morning with similar orders."[9] The delay allowed Maj. Gen. A.P. Hill's Confederate division to come up from Harpers Ferry and repulse the eventual Union breakthrough. McClellan refused Burnside's requests for reinforcements and the battle ended in a tactical stalemate.[10] Ambrose Powell Hill (November 9, 1825 _ April 2, 1865), was a Confederate States of America general in the American Civil War. ... A group of Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government during the American Civil War. ... Harpers Ferry, West Virginia 1865. ...


Fredericksburg

McClellan was removed after failing to pursue Lee's retreat from Antietam and Burnside was assigned to command the Army of the Potomac on November 7, 1862. He reluctantly obeyed this order, the third such in his brief career. President Abraham Lincoln pressured Burnside to take aggressive action and on November 14, approved his plan to capture the Confederate capital at Richmond, Virginia. This plan led to a humiliating and costly Union defeat at the Battle of Fredericksburg on December 13. His advance upon Fredericksburg was rapid, but later delays due to poor planning in marshaling pontoon bridges for crossing the Rappahannock River and his own reluctance to deploy portions of his army across fording points before Lee arrived in force allowed Gen. Robert E. Lee to concentrate along Marye's Heights just west of town and easily repulse the Union attacks. Assaults south of town, which were supposed to be the main avenue of attack, were also mismanaged and initial Union breakthroughs went unsupported. Upset by the failure of his plan and by the enormous casualties of his repeated, futile frontal assaults, Burnside declared that he himself would lead an assault by his old corps. His corps commanders talked him out of it, but relations between the commander and his subordinates were strained. Accepting full blame, he offered to retire from the U.S. Army, but this was refused.[11] is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ambrose E. Burnside Robert E. Lee Strength Army of the Potomac ~114,000 engaged Army of Northern Virginia ~72,500 engaged Casualties 12,653 (1,284 killed, 9,600 wounded, 1,769 captured/missing) 5,377 (608 killed, 4,116... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Rappahannock at sunset The Rappahannock River is a river in eastern Virginia in the United States, approximately 184 mi (294 km). ... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ...


In January 1863, Burnside launched a second offensive against Lee, but it bogged down in winter rains before it accomplished anything and has been derisively called the Mud March. In its wake, he asked that several officers, who were openly insubordinate, be relieved of duty and court-martialed; he also offered to resign. Lincoln chose the latter option on January 26 and replaced him with Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker, one of the officers who had conspired against Burnside.[12] The Mud March was an abortive attempt at a winter offensive in January, 1863, by Major General Ambrose Burnside in the American Civil War. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the English botanist, see Joseph Dalton Hooker. ...


East Tennessee

Lincoln was unwilling to lose Burnside from the Army and assigned him to command the Department of the Ohio and his old IX Corps. Here, he was forced to deal with copperheads such as Clement Vallandigham and Confederate raiders such as John Hunt Morgan. In the Knoxville Campaign, he advanced to Knoxville, Tennessee, but after Union Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans was defeated at the Battle of Chickamauga, Burnside was pursued by Lt. Gen. James Longstreet, against whose troops he had battled at Marye's Heights. Burnside skillfully outmaneuvered Longstreet at the Battle of Campbell's Station and was able to reach his entrenchments and safety in Knoxville, where he was briefly besieged until the Confederate defeat at the Battle of Fort Sanders outside the city. Tying down Longstreet's corps at Knoxville contributed to Gen. Braxton Bragg's defeat by Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Chattanooga. Troops under Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman marched to Burnside's aid, but the siege had already been lifted and Longstreet withdrew, eventually returning to Virginia.[12] The Department of the Ohio was an administrative military district created by the United States War Department early in the American Civil War to administer the troops in the Northern states near the Ohio River. ... This article is about the Civil War faction. ... Clement Vallandigham Clement Laird Vallandigham (velan´digham, -gam) (July 29, 1820 – June 17, 1871) was an Ohio unionist of the Copperhead faction of anti-war, pro-Confederate Democrats during the American Civil War. ... Confederate Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan John Hunt Morgan (June 1, 1825 – September 4, 1864) was a Confederate general and cavalry officer in the American Civil War. ... James Longstreet and Ambrose Burnside, principal commanders of the Knoxville Campaign The Knoxville Campaign[1] was a series of American Civil War battles and maneuvers in East Tennessee during the fall of 1863. ... Knoxville redirects here. ... William Starke Rosecrans (September 6, 1819 - March 11, 1898), nicknamed Old Rosy, served as an American military officer. ... Belligerents United States (Union) CSA (Confederacy) Commanders William S. Rosecrans George H. Thomas Braxton Bragg James Longstreet Strength Army of the Cumberland (56,965) Army of Tennessee (70,000) Casualties and losses 16,170 (1,657 killed, 9,756 wounded, 4,757 captured/missing) 18,454 (2,312 killed, 14... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... James Longstreet (January 8, 1821 – January 2, 1904) was one of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War and the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his Old War Horse. ... The Battle of Campbells Station was a battle of the American Civil War, occurring on November 16, 1863 in Knox County, Tennessee. ... Battle of Fort Sanders Conflict American Civil War Date November 29, 1863 Place Knox County, Tennessee Result Union victory The Battle of Fort Sanders (precipitated by the Siege of Knoxville, which began on November 17, 1863) was an engagement of the American Civil War fought in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Braxton Bragg (March 22, 1817 – September 27, 1876) was a career U.S. Army officer and a general in the Confederate States Army, a principal commander in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... The third Battle of Chattanooga (popularly known as The Battle of Chattanooga) was fought November 23–25, 1863, in the American Civil War. ... Portrait of William Tecumseh Sherman by Mathew Brady William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, and author. ...


Overland Campaign

Burnside was ordered to take the IX Corps back to the Eastern Theater, where, in Annapolis, Maryland, he built it up to a strength of over 21,000 effectives.[13] The IX Corps fought in the Overland Campaign of May 1864 as an independent command, reporting initially to Grant; his corps was not assigned to the Army of the Potomac because Burnside outranked its commander, Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, who had been a division commander under Burnside at Fredericksburg. This cumbersome arrangement was rectified on May 24 just before the Battle of North Anna, when Burnside agreed to waive his precedence of rank and was placed under Meade's direct command.[14] Annapolis redirects here. ... Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee, opposing commanders in the Overland Campaign The Overland Campaign, also known as Grants Overland Campaign and the Wilderness Campaign, was a series of battles fought in Virginia during May and June 1864, in the American Civil War. ... George Gordon Meade (December 31, 1815 - November 6, 1872) was an American military officer during the American Civil War. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Battle of Totopotomoy Creek Conflict American Civil War Date May 23–26, 1864 Place Caroline County and Hanover County, Virginia Result Inconclusive The Battle of North Anna (also called Telegraph Road Bridge, Jericho Mill ( May 23), and Ox Ford, Quarles Mill, Hanover Junction ( May 24)) was a battle in Union...


Burnside fought at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Court House, where he did not perform in a distinguished manner,[15] attacking piecemeal and appearing reluctant to commit his troops to the frontal assaults that characterized these battles. After North Anna and Cold Harbor, he took his place in the siege lines at Petersburg.[16] Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 101,895 61,025 Casualties 18,400 11,400 For the French and Indian War battle, see Battle of the Wilderness 1755. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 100,000 52,000 Casualties 18,000 12,000 The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, sometimes simply referred to as the Battle of Spotsylvania, was the second battle in Lieut. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 108,000 62,000 Casualties 13,000 2,500 The Battle of Cold Harbor, the final battle of Union Lt. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant Robert E. Lee Strength 67,000 – 125,000 average of 52,000 Casualties 53,386 ~32,000 The Richmond-Petersburg Campaign was a series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 15, 1864, to March...


The Crater

Petersburg Crater with Union soldier in 1865
Petersburg Crater with Union soldier in 1865

As the two armies faced the stalemate of trench warfare at Petersburg in July 1864, Burnside agreed to a plan suggested by a regiment of Pennsylvania coal miners in his corps: dig a mine under a fort in the Confederate entrenchments and ignite explosives there to achieve a surprise breakthrough. The fort was destroyed on July 30 in what is known as the Battle of the Crater. Because of interference from Meade, Burnside was ordered, only hours before the infantry attack, not to use his division of black troops, which had been specially trained for this mission, and was forced to use untrained white troops instead. He could not decide which division to choose as a replacement, so he had his three subordinate commanders draw lots. The division chosen by chance was that commanded by Brig. Gen. James H. Ledlie, who failed to brief the men on what was expected of them and was reported during the battle to be drunk well behind the lines, providing no leadership. Ledlie's men entered the huge crater instead of going around it, becoming trapped, and were subjected to murderous fire from Confederates around the rim, resulting in high casualties.[17] Image File history File links Petersburg_crater_aftermath_1865. ... Image File history File links Petersburg_crater_aftermath_1865. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Belligerents United States (Union) CSA (Confederacy) Commanders Ambrose E. Burnside Robert E. Lee Strength IX Corps Elements of the Army of Northern Virginia Casualties and losses 5,300 total 1,032 total The Battle of the Crater was a battle of the American Civil War, part of the Siege of... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... James Ledlie in the Civil War James Hewett Ledlie (April 14, 1832 – August 15, 1882) was a civil engineer for American railroads and a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. ...


Postbellum career

Postbellum portrait by Mathew Brady or Levin C. Handy
Postbellum portrait by Mathew Brady or Levin C. Handy

After his resignation, Burnside was employed in numerous railroad and industrial directorships, including the presidencies of the Cincinnati and Martinsville Railroad, the Indianapolis and Vincennes Railroad, and the Rhode Island Locomotive Works. He was elected to three one-year terms as Governor of Rhode Island (May 1866 to May 1869). He was commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) veterans' association from 1871 to 1872.[18] At its inception in 1871, the National Rifle Association chose him as its first president.[19] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2074x2959, 580 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ambrose Burnside User:Davepape/Images ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2074x2959, 580 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ambrose Burnside User:Davepape/Images ... Mathew B. Brady, circa 1875 For other persons named Matthew Brady, see Matthew Brady (disambiguation). ... Levin C. Handy Levin Corbin Handy (August 1855 – March 26, 1932) was an American photographer who worked during the 19th and early 20th century. ... Rhode Island Locomotive Works was a steam locomotive manufacturing company of the 19th century. ... This is a partial list of the Governors of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. ... Stephenson GAR Memorial, Washington, D.C. The Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) was a fraternal organization composed of veterans of the Union Army who had served in the American Civil War. ... This article concerns the National Rifle Association of the USA. For the UK organisation, see National Rifle Association of the United Kingdom The National Rifle Association, or NRA, is a non-profit group for the promotion of marksmanship, firearm safety, and the protection of hunting and personal protection firearm rights...


During a visit to Europe in 1870, Burnside attempted to mediate between the French and the Germans in the Franco-Prussian War. In 1874 he was elected a U.S. Senator from Rhode Island, was re-elected in 1880, and served until his death in 1881. During that time, Burnside, who had been a Democrat before the war, ran as a Republican, playing a prominent role in military affairs as well as serving as chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee in 1881.[20] For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Combatants Second French Empire North German Confederation allied with South German states (later German Empire) Commanders Napoleon III François Achille Bazaine Patrice de Mac-Mahon, duc de Magenta Otto von Bismarck Helmuth von Moltke the Elder Strength 400,000 at wars beginning 1,200,000 Casualties 150,000... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... GOP redirects here. ... U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ...


Assessment and legacy

Personally, Burnside was always very popular—both in the army and in politics—he made friends easily, smiled a lot, and remembered everyone's name. His professional military reputation, however, was less positive, and he was known for being obstinate, unimaginative, and unsuited both intellectually and emotionally for high command.[21] Grant stated that he was "unfitted" for the command of an army, and that no one knew this better than Burnside himself. Knowing his capabilities, he twice refused command of the Army of the Potomac, only accepting when told that the command would otherwise go to Hooker. Historian Jeffry D. Wert described Burnside's relief after Fredericksburg in a passage that sums up his military career:[22] Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... For the English botanist, see Joseph Dalton Hooker. ...

He had been the most unfortunate commander of the Army, a general who had been cursed by succeeding its most popular leader and a man who believed he was unfit for the post. His tenure had been marked by bitter animosity among his subordinates and a fearful, if not needless, sacrifice of life. A firm patriot, he lacked the power of personality and will to direct recalcitrant generals. He had been willing to fight the enemy, but the terrible slope before Marye's Heights stands as his legacy.

Jeffry D. Wert, The Sword of Lincoln

Historian Bruce Catton summarized Burnside:[23] Bruce Catton (October 9, 1899 — August 28, 1978) was a journalist and a notable historian of the American Civil War. ...

... Burnside had repeatedly demonstrated that it had been a military tragedy to give him a rank higher than colonel. One reason might have been that, with all his deficiencies, Burnside never had any angles of his own to play; he was a simple, honest, loyal soldier, doing his best even if that best was not very good, never scheming or conniving or backbiting. Also, he was modest; in an army many of whose generals were insufferable prima donnas, Burnside never mistook himself for Napoleon. Physically he was impressive: tall, just a little stout, wearing what was probably the most artistic and awe-inspiring set of whiskers in all that bewhiskered Army. He customarily wore a high, bell-crowned felt hat with the brim turned down and a double-breasted, knee-length frock coat, belted at the waist—a costume which, unfortunately, is apt to strike the modern eye as being very much like that of a beefy city cop of the 1880s.

Bruce Catton, Mr. Lincoln's Army

Sideburns

Burnside was noted for his unusual facial hair, joining strips of hair in front of his ears to his mustache, but with chin clean-shaven; the word burnsides was coined to describe this style. The syllables were later reversed to give sideburns.[21] One kind of modern beard. ... Sideburns (or colloquially sideboards[1] or mutton chops[2]) are patches of facial hair on the sides of a mans face, in front of the ears. ...


In popular media

Burnside was portrayed by Alex Hyde-White in Ronald F. Maxwell's 2003 film Gods and Generals, which includes the Battle of Fredericksburg.[24] Alex Hyde-White (born January 30, 1959) is an English actor. ... Ronald F. Maxwell (b. ... For other uses, see Gods and Generals (disambiguation). ...


See also

United States Army Portal

Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_the_Army_Seal. ...

References

Wikisource has the text of the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica article Burnside, Ambrose Everett.
  • Bailey, Ronald H., and the Editors of Time-Life Books, The Bloodiest Day: The Battle of Antietam, Time-Life Books, 1984, ISBN 0-8094-4740-1.
  • Catton, Bruce, Mr. Lincoln's Army, Doubleday and Company, 1951, ISBN 0-385-04310-4.
  • Eicher, John H., and Eicher, David J., Civil War High Commands, Stanford University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-8047-3641-3.
  • Esposito, Vincent J., West Point Atlas of American Wars, Frederick A. Praeger, 1959.
  • Goolrick, William K., and the Editors of Time-Life Books, Rebels Resurgent: Fredericksburg to Chancellorsville, Time-Life Books, 1985, ISBN 0-8094-4748-7.
  • Grimsley, Mark, And Keep Moving On: The Virginia Campaign, May-June 1864, University of Nebraska Press, 2002, ISBN 0-8032-2162-2.
  • Mierka, Gregg A., Rhode Island's Own, MOLLUS biography.
  • Rhea, Gordon C., The Battles for Spotsylvania Court House and the Road to Yellow Tavern May 7–12, 1864, Louisiana State University Press, 1997, ISBN 0-8071-2136-3.
  • Sauers, Richard A., "Ambrose Everett Burnside", Encyclopedia of the American Civil War: A Political, Social, and Military History, Heidler, David S., and Heidler, Jeanne T., eds., W. W. Norton & Company, 2000, ISBN 0-393-04758-X.
  • Sears, Stephen W., Landscape Turned Red: The Battle of Antietam, Houghton Mifflin, 1983, ISBN 0-89919-172-X.
  • Warner, Ezra J., Generals in Blue: Lives of the Union Commanders, Louisiana State University Press, 1964, ISBN 0-8071-0822-7.
  • Wert, Jeffry D., The Sword of Lincoln: The Army of the Potomac, Simon & Schuster, 2005, ISBN 0-7432-2506-6.
  • Wilson, James Grant, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos, eds., Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, D. Appleton & Co., 1887–1889 and 1999.

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... Bruce Catton (October 9, 1899 — August 28, 1978) was a journalist and a notable historian of the American Civil War. ... The Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS) was a fraternity comprised of former Union Army officers organized in the wake of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Mierka, np. The original spelling of his middle name was Everts, for Dr. Sylvanus Everts, the physician who delivered him. Ambrose Everts was also the name of Edghill's and Pamela's first child, who died a few months before the future general was born. The name was misspelled during his enrollment at West Point and he did not correct the record.
  2. ^ Mierka, np., describes the relationship with the tailor as indentured servitude.
  3. ^ a b c Eicher, pp. 155-56; Sauers, pp. 327-28; Warner, pp. 57-58; Wilson, np.
  4. ^ Eicher, pp. 155-56; Mierka, np.; Warner, pp. 57-58.
  5. ^ Eicher, pp. 155-56; Mierka, np.; Sauers, pp. 327-28; Warner, pp. 57-58.
  6. ^ Mierka, np.
  7. ^ Sauers, pp. 327-28; Wilson, np.
  8. ^ Bailey, pp. 120-21.
  9. ^ Sears, pp. 264-65.
  10. ^ Bailey, pp. 126-39.
  11. ^ Battle of Fredericksburg.
  12. ^ a b Wilson, np.; Warner, p. 58; Sauers, p. 328.
  13. ^ Grimsley, p. 245, n. 43.
  14. ^ Esposito, text for map 120.
  15. ^ Grimsley, p. 230, describes Burnside's conduct as "inept." Rhea, p. 317: "[Burnside's] failings were so flagrant that the Army talked about them openly. He stumbled badly in the Wilderness and worse still at Spotsylvania."
  16. ^ Wilson, np.
  17. ^ Battle of the Crater.
  18. ^ Eicher, pp. 155-56.
  19. ^ NRA History
  20. ^ Wilson, np.; Eicher, p. 156.
  21. ^ a b Goolrick, p. 29.
  22. ^ Wert, p. 217.
  23. ^ Catton, pp. 256-57.
  24. ^ Gods and Generals - Internet Movie Database.

An Indentured servant is an unfree labourer under contract to work (for a specified amount of time) for another person, often without any pay, but in exchange for accommodation, food, other essentials and/or free passage to a new country. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ambrose E. Burnside Robert E. Lee Strength Army of the Potomac ~114,000 engaged Army of Northern Virginia ~72,500 engaged Casualties 12,653 (1,284 killed, 9,600 wounded, 1,769 captured/missing) 5,377 (608 killed, 4,116... Belligerents United States (Union) CSA (Confederacy) Commanders Ambrose E. Burnside Robert E. Lee Strength IX Corps Elements of the Army of Northern Virginia Casualties and losses 5,300 total 1,032 total The Battle of the Crater was a battle of the American Civil War, part of the Siege of...

External links

Military offices
Preceded by
none, new corps
Commander of the IX Corps
July 22, 1862-August 3, 1862
Succeeded by
Department of Virginia
Preceded by
George B. McClellan
Commander of the Army of the Potomac
November 9, 1862 - January 26, 1863
Succeeded by
Joseph Hooker
Political offices
Preceded by
James Y. Smith
Governor of Rhode Island
1866 – 1869
Succeeded by
Seth Padelford
Preceded by
William Sprague
United States Senator (Class 1) from Rhode Island
1875 – 1881
Served alongside: Henry B. Anthony
Succeeded by
Nelson W. Aldrich
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Donald L. Don Carcieri (born December 16, 1942) is the governor of the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... Image File history File links State_seal_of_Rhode_Island. ... Rhode Island ratified the Constitution on May 29, 1790. ... Theodore Foster (29 April 1752 - 13 January 1828) was an American politician. ... also see Samuel Gamboa Potter (born February 10, 1970) Actor, Outdoorsman, Producer, Technologists Samuel John Potter (June 29, 1753 - October 14, 1804) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Benjamin Howland (July 27, 1755 - May 1, 1821) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Francis Malbone (March 20, 1759–June 4, 1809) was an American merchant from Newport, Rhode Island. ... Christopher Grant Champlin (April 12, 1768 - March 18, 1840) was a United States Representative and Senator from Rhode Island. ... William Hunter (November 26, 1774 – December 3, 1849) was an American politician and diplomat. ... James De Wolf nicknamed Captain Jim (March 18, 1764 – December 21, 1837) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Asher Robbins (October 26, 1757 - February 25, 1845) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Nathan Fellows Dixon (December 13, 1774 - January 29, 1842) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... William Sprague, also known as William III or William Sprague III (November 3, 1799–October 19, 1856), was a politician and industrialist from the U.S. state of Rhode Island, serving as Governor, U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator. ... John Brown Francis (May 31, 1791 - August 9, 1864) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Albert Collins Greene (April 15, 1792 – January 8, 1863) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Charles Tillinghast James (September 15, 1805 – October 17, 1862) was a United States Democratic Senator from the state of Rhode Island from 1851 to 1857. ... James Fowler Simmons (September 10, 1795 – July 10, 1864) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Samuel Greene Arnold (April 12, 1821 - February 14, 1880) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... William Sprague, (also known as William IV or William Sprague IV) (September 12, 1830–September 11, 1915) was governor of of the U.S. state of Rhode Island from 1860-1863, and U.S. Senator from 1863-1875. ... Nelson Wilmarth Aldrich (November 6, 1841 - April 16, 1915) was an American politician. ... Henry Frederick Lippitt (October 12, 1856 - December 28, 1933) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Peter Goelet Gerry (1879-1957), also known as Peter G. Gerry, was a U.S. Senator from Rhode Island. ... Felix Hebert (December 11, 1874 - December 14, 1969) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Peter Goelet Gerry (1879-1957), also known as Peter G. Gerry, was a U.S. Senator from Rhode Island. ... McGrath (middle left) with Theodore Francis Green (right) and Harry S. Truman (far right). ... Edward Laurence Leahy (February 9, 1886 - July 22, 1953) was a United States Senator and federal judge from Rhode Island. ... John Orlando Pastore (1907-2000) was a Rhode Island, USA politician who was Senator and Governor of the state, and was the first Italian American to hold either position. ... John Lester Hubbard Chafee (October 22, 1922 – October 24, 1999) was an American politician. ... Lincoln Davenport Chafee (IPA pronunciation: , [CHAY-fee]) (born March 26, 1953) is a former United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Sheldon Whitehouse (born October 20, 1955) is the Junior Senator from the state of Rhode Island. ... Joseph Stanton, Jr. ... William Bradford (November 4, 1729 - July 6, 1808) was a physician, lawyer, and United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Ray Greene (February 2, 1765 - January 11, 1849) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Christopher Ellery (November 1, 1768 - December 2, 1840) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... (b 22 January 1771 at Providence, RI; d 17 April. ... Elisha Mathewson (April 18, 1767 - October 14, 1853) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Jeremiah Brown Howell (August 28, 1771 - February 5, 1822) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... James Burrill, Jr. ... Nehemiah Rice Knight (December 31, 1780 - April 18, 1854) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... James Fowler Simmons (September 10, 1795 – July 10, 1864) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... John Hopkins Clarke (April 1, 1789 – November 23, 1870) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Philip Allen (September 1, 1785 – December 16, 1865) was born in Providence, Rhode Island on September 1, 1785 to Zachariah Allen and Nancy Crawford Allen. ... Categories: Stub | 1815 births | 1884 deaths | Governors of Rhode Island | United States Senators ... William Paine Sheffield (August 30, 1820 - June 2, 1907) was a United States Representative and Senator from Rhode Island. ... Jonathan Chace (July 22, 1829 - June 30, 1917) was a United States Representative and Senator from Rhode Island. ... Nathan Fellows Dixon, III (August 28, 1847 - November 8, 1897) was a United States Representative and Senator from Rhode Island. ... George Peabody Wetmore (August 2, 1846 - September 11, 1921) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... LeBaron Bradford Colt (1846 – 1924) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island and a circuit court judge. ... Jesse Houghton Metcalf (November 16, 1860 - October 9, 1942) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Theodore F. Green (1867-1966) was a Democratic politician from Rhode Island. ... Claiborne Pell Claiborne de Borda Pell (born November 22, 1918) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island from 1961 to 1997. ... John Francis Jack Reed (b. ...

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Ambrose Burnside - MSN Encarta (282 words)
Ambrose Everett Burnside (1824-1881) If there is any mitigating circumstance in the failure of Ambrose E.Burnside as commander of the Army of the Potomac it is that he...
Ambrose Everett Burnside was born in Liberty, Indiana, and educated at the U.S. Military Academy.
Burnside was then transferred to the Army of Ohio and successfully resisted the Confederate siege (1863) of Knoxville, Tennessee.
Ambrose Burnside - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1563 words)
Ambrose Everett Burnside (May 23, 1824 – September 13, 1881) was a railroad executive, an industrialist, and a politician from Rhode Island, serving as governor and a U.S. Senator.
Burnside was given command of the "Right Wing" of the Army of the Potomac (the I and IX Corps) during the Maryland Campaign.
Burnside was then ordered to take the IX Corps back to Virginia, where he fought in the Overland Campaign directly under Grant; his corps was not assigned initially to the Army of the Potomac because he outranked its commander, Major General George G. Meade, who had been a division commander under Burnside at Fredericksburg.
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