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Encyclopedia > Ambrose Bierce
Ambrose Bierce

Ambrose Bierce, ca. 1866
Born: June 24, 1842(1842-06-24)
Meigs County, Ohio
Died: 1914?
Chihuahua, Mexico
Occupation: Journalist and Writer
Genres: Satire
Literary movement: Realism
Influences: Jonathan Swift, Voltaire, Edgar Allan Poe
Influenced: H.L. Mencken, William March, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Stephen Crane, Ernest Hemingway

Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (June 24, 18421914?) was an American editorialist, journalist, short-story writer and satirist, today best known for his Devil's Dictionary. Image File history File linksMetadata Abierce_1866. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Meigs County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article needs cleanup. ... This article is about work. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... ... Literary realism most often refers to the trend, in early 19th century French literature, towards depictions of contemporary life and society as it is, in the spirit of general Realism, instead of a romanticized or similarly stylized presentation. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... For the singer of the same name, see Voltaire (musician). ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... H. L. (Henry Louis) Mencken (September 12, 1880 - January 29, 1956) was a twentieth century journalist and social critic, a cynic and a freethinker, known as the Sage of Baltimore and the American Nietzsche. He is often regarded as one of the most influential American writers of the early 20th... William March (born William Edward Campbell September 18, 1893 in Mobile, Alabama) was an American World War I soldier, short-story writer and novelist cited as being the unrecognized genius of our time. His innovative writing style is characterized by a deep compassion and understanding of suffering. ... Jorge Luis Borges (August 24, 1899 – June 14, 1986) was an Argentine writer. ... Julio Cortázar. ... For the U.S. Continental Congress delegate, see Stephen Crane (delegate). ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Editorial and Op-ed. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... This article is in need of attention. ... List of satirists below - writers, cartoonists and others known for their involvement in satire - humourous social criticism. ... The Devils Dictionary, by Ambrose Bierce offers an interesting reinterpretation of the English language in which cant and political double-talk were neatly lampooned. ...


Bierce's lucid, unsentimental style has kept him popular when many of his contemporaries have been consigned to oblivion. His dark, sardonic views and vehemence as a critic earned him the nickname, "Bitter Bierce." Such was his reputation that it was said his judgment on any piece of prose or poetry could make or break a writer's career. Among the younger writers whom he encouraged were the poet George Sterling and the fiction writer W. C. Morrow. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section seems to contain too many examples (or of a poor quality) for an encyclopedia entry. ... Look up reputation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... George Sterling posing for an illustration of Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. ... William Chambers Morrow (born 7 July 1854, Selma, Alabama; died 1923) was an American writer, now noted mainly for his short stories of horror and suspense. ...

Contents

Early life and military career

Ambrose Bierce. Portrait by J.H.E. Partington.
Ambrose Bierce. Portrait by J.H.E. Partington.

Bierce was born in rural Meigs County, Ohio, and grew up in Kosciusko County, Indiana, attending high school at the county seat of Warsaw. Ambrose Bierce, from http://lcweb. ... Ambrose Bierce, from http://lcweb. ... Meigs County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Kosciusko County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Warsaw is a city in, and the county seat of, Kosciusko County, Indiana, United StatesGR6. ...


He was the tenth of 13 children, whose father, Marcus Aurelius Bierce (1799-1876), gave all of them names beginning with the letter "A." In order of birth, the Bierce siblings were Abigail, Amelia, Ann, Addison, Aurelius, Augustus, Almeda, Andrew, Albert, Ambrose, Arthur, Adelia, and Aurelia. His mother Laura Sherwood was a descendant of William Bradford. Bas-relief on Bradford Street in Provincetown depicting the signing of the Mayflower Compact William Bradford (March 19, 1590 – May 9, 1657) was a leader of the separatist settlers of the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts, and was elected Governor of the Colony for 15 two-year terms. ...


At the outset of the American Civil War, Bierce enlisted in the Union Army's 9th Indiana Volunteer Infantry . In February 1862 he was commissioned first lieutenant, and served on the staff of General William Babcock Hazen as a topographical engineer, making maps of likely battlefields. Bierce fought at the Battle of Shiloh (April 1862), a terrifying experience that became a source for several later short stories and the memoir What I Saw of Shiloh. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... William Babcock Hazen William Babcock Hazen (September 27, 1830 – January 16, 1887) was a career U.S. Army officer who served in the Indian Wars, as a Union general in the American Civil War, and as Chief Signal Officer of the U.S. Army. ... Cartography or mapmaking (in Greek chartis = map and graphein = write) is the study and practice of making maps or globes. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant, Don Carlos Buell Albert Sidney Johnston â€ , P.G.T. Beauregard Strength Army of West Tennessee (48,894), Army of the Ohio (17,918)[1] Army of Mississippi (44,699)[1] Casualties 13,047: 1,754 killed, 8... As a literary genre, a memoir (from the French: mémoire from the Latin memoria, meaning memory) forms a subclass of autobiography, although it is an older form of writing. ...


He continued fighting in the Western theater, at one point receiving newspaper attention for his daring rescue, under fire, of a gravely wounded comrade at the Battle of Rich Mountain, West Virginia. In June 1864 he sustained a serious head wound at the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, and spent the rest of the summer on furlough, returning to active duty in September. He was discharged from the army in January 1865. Battle of Rich Mountain Conflict American Civil War Date July 11, 1861 Place Randolph County, West Virginia Result Union victory The Battle of Rich Mountain took place on July 11, 1861 in Randolph County, West Virginia as part of the operations in West Virginia during the American Civil War. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Head injury is a trauma to the head, that may or may not include injury to the brain (see also brain injury). ... Battle of Kennesaw Mountain Conflict American Civil War Date June 27, 1864 Place Kennesaw, Georgia Result Confederate victory The Battle of Kennesaw Mountain was fought on June 27, 1864 during the Atlanta Campaign of the American Civil War. ... Look up Furlough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A furlough (IPA: ) is temporary leave of absence, especially from duty in the armed services or from a prison term. ...


His military career resumed, however, when in the summer of 1866 he rejoined General Hazen as part of the latter's expedition to inspect military outposts across the Great Plains. The expedition proceeded by horseback and wagon from Omaha, Nebraska, arriving toward year's end in San Francisco, California. The Great Plains covers much of the central United States, portions of Canada and Mexico. ... “Omaha” redirects here. ... “San Francisco” redirects here. ...


Marriage and children

Bierce married Mary Ellen ("Mollie") Day on Christmas Day, 1871. They had three children, Day (1872-1889), Leigh (1874-1901) and Helen (1875-1940). Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ...


Both of Bierce's sons predeceased him: Day was shot in a brawl over a woman, and Leigh died of pneumonia related to alcoholism. Bierce separated from his wife in 1888 after discovering compromising letters to her from an admirer, and the couple finally divorced in 1904. Mollie died the following year. Bierce was sick all his life, with asthma and problems from his war wounds. for health reasons, he traveled to London and befriended great literary persons. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Journalism

In San Francisco, Bierce received the rank of brevet major before resigning from the Army. He remained in San Francisco for many years, eventually becoming famous as a contributor and/or editor for a number of local newspapers and periodicals, including The San Francisco News Letter, The Argonaut, the Overland Monthly, The Californian and The Wasp. Bierce lived and wrote in England from 1872 to 1875, contributing to Fun magazine. Returning to the United States, he again took up residence in San Francisco. In 1879–1880, he went to Rockerville and Deadwood, South Dakota, in the Dakota Territory, to try his hand as local manager for a New York mining company, but when the company failed he returned to San Francisco and resumed his career in journalism. In 1887, he published a column called The Prattle and became one of the first regular columnists and editorialists to be employed on William Randolph Hearst's newspaper, the San Francisco Examiner, eventually becoming one of the most prominent and influential among the writers and journalists of the West Coast. In December 1899, he moved to Washington, D.C., but continued his association with the Hearst Newspapers until 1906. In the US military, brevet referred to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to hold a higher rank temporarily, but usually without receiving the pay of that higher rank. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... Brief History The Wasp was founded as a weekly satire magazine by the Bohemian expat Francis Korbel and his two brothers in San Francisco in 1876. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Fun was a Victorian weekly magazine first published on September 21 1861. ... Rockerville, South Dakota is a small, unincorporated community in Pennington County in the Black Hills of South Dakota. ... A photograph of Deadwood in 1876. ... Dakota Territory was the name of the northernmost part of the Louisiana Purchase of the United States. ... “NY” redirects here. ... Chuquicamata, the second largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... The San Francisco Examiner is a daily newspaper in San Francisco, California, where it has been published continuously since the late 19th Century. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... --207. ...


Railroad Refinancing Bill

The Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroad companies had received massive loans from the U.S. government to build the First Transcontinental Railroad—on gentle terms, but Collis P. Huntington persuaded a friendly member of Congress to introduce a bill excusing the companies from repaying the money, amounting to $130 million (nearly 3 billion dollars in 2007 money). In January 1896 Hearst dispatched Bierce to Washington, D.C. to foil this attempt. The essence of the plot was secrecy; the railroads' advocates hoped to get the bill through Congress without any public notice or hearings. Bierce's main effort was therefore publicity. His diatribes on the subject aroused such public wrath that the bill was defeated. Bierce returned to California in November. The Union Pacific Railroad (AAR reporting marks UP) (NYSE: UNP), headquartered in Omaha, Nebraska, is the largest railroad network in the United States. ... The Gov. ... This article refers to a railroad built in the United States between Omaha and Sacramento completed in 1869. ... Collis Potter Huntington (October 22, 1821 – August 13, 1900) was one of the Big Four of western railroading (along with Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins and Charles Crocker) who built the Southern Pacific Railroad and other major interstate train lines. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


McKinley accusation

Because of his penchant for biting social criticism and satire, Bierce's long newspaper career was often steeped in controversy. On several occasions his columns stirred up a storm of hostile reaction which created difficulties for Hearst. One of the most notable of these incidents occurred following the assassination of President William McKinley when Hearst's opponents turned a poem Bierce had written about the assassination of Governor Goebel in 1900 into a cause célèbre. Bierce meant his poem, written on the occasion of the assassination of Governor William Goebel of Kentucky, to express a national mood of dismay and fear, but after McKinley was shot in 1901 it seemed to foreshadow the crime: Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... Look up cause célèbre in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... William J. Goebel (January 4, 1856 – February 3, 1900)[3] was a controversial American politician who served as Governor of Kentucky for a few days in 1900 before being assassinated. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...

"The bullet that pierced Goebel's breast
Can not be found in all the West;
Good reason, it is speeding here
To stretch McKinley on his bier."

Hearst was thereby accused by rival newspapers — and by then Secretary of State Elihu Root — of having called for McKinley's assassination. Despite a national uproar that ended his ambitions for the presidency (and even his membership in the Bohemian Club), Hearst neither revealed Bierce as the author of the poem, nor fired him. Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Elihu Root Elihu Root (February 15, 1845 – February 7, 1937) was an American lawyer and statesman, the son of Oren Root and Nancy Whitney Buttrick. ... This article needs more references or sources. ...


Literary works

Bierce in 1892
Bierce in 1892

His short stories are considered among the best of the 19th century, providing a popular following based on his roots. He wrote realistically of the terrible things he had seen in the war in such stories as "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge", "Killed at Resaca", and "Chickamauga". Image File history File links Size of this preview: 444 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (905 × 1222 pixel, file size: 118 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 444 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (905 × 1222 pixel, file size: 118 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For the Nutsack Zone An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (sometimes called An Incident at Owl Creek Bridge) is a famous short story by Ambrose Bierce. ...


Bierce was reckoned a master of "Pure" English by his contemporaries, and virtually everything that came from his pen was notable for its judicious wording and economy of style. He wrote skillfully in a variety of literary genres, and in addition to his celebrated ghost and war stories he published several volumes of poetry and verse. His Fantastic Fables anticipated the ironic style of grotesquerie that turned into a genre in the 20th century. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article is about the art form. ... This article is about the art form. ...


One of Bierce's most famous works is his much-quoted book, The Devil's Dictionary, originally an occasional newspaper item which was first published in book form in 1906 as The Cynic's Word Book. It offers an interesting reinterpretation of the English language in which cant and political double-talk are neatly lampooned. The Devils Dictionary, by Ambrose Bierce offers an interesting reinterpretation of the English language in which cant and political double-talk were neatly lampooned. ... The word cant can mean more than one thing: Cant is insincere speech, similar to hypocrisy. ...


Under the entry "leonine," meaning a single line of poetry with an internal rhyming scheme, he included an apocryphal couplet written by the apocryphal Bella Peeler Silcox (Ella Wheeler Wilcox) in which an internal rhyme is achieved in both lines only by mispronouncing the rhyming words: This article is about the art form. ... Ella Wheeler Wilcox (November 5, 1850–October 30, 1919) was an American author and poet. ...


The electric light invades the dunnest deep of Hades.
Cries Pluto, 'twixt his snores: "O tempora! O mores!"
Most of the industrialized world is lit by electric lights, which are used both at night and to provide additional light during the daytime. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... Adjectives: Plutonian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... In 63 BC Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 BC), orator, statesman and patriot, attained the rank of consul and in that capacity exposed to the Roman Senate the plot of Lucius Sergius Catilina (approx. ...


Bierce's twelve-volume Collected Works were published in 1909, the seventh volume of which consists solely of The Devil's Dictionary, the title Bierce himself preferred to The Cynic's Word Book. The Devils Dictionary, by Ambrose Bierce offers an interesting reinterpretation of the English language in which cant and political double-talk were neatly lampooned. ...


Disappearance

In October 1913 the septuagenarian Bierce departed Washington, D.C., for a tour of his old Civil War battlefields. By December he had proceeded on through Louisiana and Texas, crossing by way of El Paso into Mexico, which was in the throes of revolution. In Ciudad Juárez he joined Pancho Villa's army as an observer, and in that role participated in the battle of Tierra Blanca. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... El Paso redirects here. ... This article is about the Mexican Revolution of 1910. ... Ciudad Juárez, or simply Juárez, is a city in the Mexican state of Chihuahua formerly known as El Paso del Norte. ... For the Filipino boxer, see Francisco Guilledo. ... This article is about the Mexican Revolution of 1910. ...


Bierce is known to have accompanied Villa's army as far as Chihuahua, Chihuahua. After a last letter to a close friend, sent from there December 26, 1913, he vanished without a trace, becoming one of the most famous disappearances in American literary history. Investigations into his fate proved fruitless, and despite an abundance of theories his end remains shrouded in mystery. The date of his death is generally cited as "1914?". Gringo viejo, a novel by Carlos Fuentes on which the film "Old Gringo" was based, re-imagines the last months and the death of Ambrose Bierce. Nickname: Motto: Bravery, Loyalty, Hospitality Coordinates: Country Mexico State Chihuahua Foundation October 12th, 1709 Government  - Mayor Juan Blanco Zaldívar Elevation 1,415 m (4,642. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A missing person is a person who has disappeared for no known reason. ... Carlos Fuentes Carlos Fuentes Macías (born November 11, 1928) is a Mexican writer and one of the best-known living novelists and essayists in the Spanish-speaking world. ... Old Gringo is a 1989 film, starring Jane Fonda and Gregory Peck. ...


In one of his last letters, Bierce wrote:

"Good-bye — if you hear of my being stood up against a Mexican stone wall and shot to rags please know that I think that a pretty good way to depart this life. It beats old age, disease, or falling down the cellar stairs. To be a Gringo in Mexico — ah, that is euthanasia."

An American woman reads the Gringo Gazette in Cabo San Lucas. ...

Legacy and influence

At least three films have been made of Bierce's story "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge". A silent film version was made in the 1920s. A French version called La Rivière du Hibou, directed by Robert Enrico, was released in 1962. This is a black and white film, faithfully recounting the original narrative using voice-over. Another version, directed by Brian James Egan, was released in 2005. The 1962 film was also used for an episode of the television series The Twilight Zone: "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge". The presentation was rare for commercial television in that it was offered without commercial interruption. A copy of "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" appeared in the ABC television series Lost ("The Long Con", airdate February 8, 2006). Previous to The Twilight Zone, the story had been adapted as an episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents. A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... The Twilight Zone title. ... “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” is an episode of the television series The Twilight Zone. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... “LOST” redirects here. ... This article contains episode summaries for the second season of the American drama/adventure television series Lost , which aired from September 21, 2005 to May 24, 2006. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Screenshot of opening sequence of Alfred Hitchcock Presents Alfred Hitchcock Presents was a half-hour anthology television series hosted by Alfred Hitchcock. ...


Mexican novelist Carlos Fuentes wrote Gringo Viejo (The Old Gringo), a fictionalized account of Bierce's disappearance. Fuentes' keenly observed novel was later adapted as a film, Old Gringo, with Gregory Peck in the title role.[1] This article is about the literary concept. ... Carlos Fuentes Carlos Fuentes Macías (born November 11, 1928) is a Mexican writer and one of the best-known living novelists and essayists in the Spanish-speaking world. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Old Gringo is a 1989 film, starring Jane Fonda and Gregory Peck. ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Oscar-winning American film actor. ...


Lorin Morgan-Richards, a Los Angeles based writer and dark electro artist, wrote and produced an album and modern dance performance in 2001 entitled 'An Occurrence Remembered'. This work was based on Ambrose Bierce's Civil War short stories 'An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge' and 'Chickamauga'. 'An Occurrence Remembered' premiered in NYC under the choreography of Nicole Cavaliere, and co-production of Valerie Stoneking.


Bibliography

Books

  • Cobwebs from an Empty Skull (1874)
  • The Dance of Death (with Thomas A. Harcourt, as William Herman) (1877)
  • Tales of Soldiers and Civilians (also known as In the Midst of Life) (1891)
  • The Monk and the Hangman's Daughter (1892)
  • Can Such Things Be? (1893)
  • Fantastic Fables (1899)
  • The Devil's Dictionary (1911) (first published in book form as The Cynic's Word Book, 1906)
  • Collected Works (1909)
  • Write It Right (1909)
  • A Horseman in the Sky, A Watcher by the Dead, The Man and the Snake (1920)??

The Devils Dictionary, by Ambrose Bierce offers an interesting reinterpretation of the English language in which cant and political double-talk were neatly lampooned. ...

Short stories

  • The Haunted Valley (1871)
  • An Inhabitant of Carcosa (1887)
  • One of the Missing (1888)
  • The Boarded Window (1891)
  • Chickamauga (1891)
  • The Eyes of the Panther (1891)
  • Haita the Shepherd (1891)
  • The Man and the Snake (1891)
  • The Middle Toe of the Right Foot (1891)
  • An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (1891)
  • The Suitable Surroundings (1891)
  • A Tough Tussle (1891)
  • A Watcher by the Dead (1891)
  • An Adventure at Brownville (1893)
  • A Baby Tramp (1893)
  • Bodies of the Dead (1893)
  • The Death of Halpin Frayser (1893)
  • The Famous Gilson Bequest (1893)
  • John Bartine's Watch (1893)
  • The Night-Doings at 'Deadman's' (1893)
  • A Psychological Shipwreck (1893)
  • The Realm of the Unreal (1893)
  • The Secret of Macarger's Gulch (1893)
  • The Damned Thing (1894)
  • A Vine on a House (1905)
  • The Moonlit Road (1907)
  • Beyond the Wall (1909)
  • A Diagnosis of Death (1909)
  • A Jug of Syrup (1909)
  • Moxon's Master (1909)
  • Staley Fleming's Hallucination (1909)
  • The Stranger (1909)
  • The Way of Ghosts (1909)
  • The Affair at Coulter's Notch
  • An Affair of Outposts
  • The Applicant
  • The Baptism of Dobsho
  • A Bottomless Grave
  • The City of the Gone Away
  • The Coup de Grace
  • Curried Cow
  • The Failure of Hope and Wandel
  • George Thurston
  • A Holy Terror
  • A Horseman in the Sky
  • The Hypnotist
  • An Imperfect Conflagration
  • The Ingenious Patriot
  • John Mortonson's Funeral
  • Jupiter Doke, Brigadier-General
  • Killed at Resaca
  • A Lady from Redhorse
  • The Little Story
  • The Major's Tale
  • The Man Out of the Nose
  • The Mocking-Bird
  • The Monk and the Hangman's Daughter
  • Mr Swiddler's Flip-Flap
  • My Favourite Murder
  • Mysterious Disappearances
  • Oil of Dog
  • One Kind of Officer
  • One of Twins
  • One Officer, One Man
  • One Summer Night
  • Parker Adderson, Philosopher
  • Perry Chumly's Eclipse
  • A Providential Intimation
  • The Race at Left Bower
  • A Resumed Identity
  • A Revolt of the Gods
  • Some Haunted Houses
  • A Son of the Gods
  • The Story of a Conscience
  • The Tail of the Sphinx
  • Visions of the Night
  • The Widower Turmore
  • An Arrest

An Inhabitant of Carcosa is a short story written by 19th century critic and occasional horror author Ambrose Bierce. ... For the Nutsack Zone An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (sometimes called An Incident at Owl Creek Bridge) is a famous short story by Ambrose Bierce. ... Moxons Master is a short story by the late 19th Century American author Ambrose Bierce which speculates on the nature of life and intelligence and describes a chess-playing robot automaton that murders its creator. ...

See also

Authorship redirects here. ... Bolesław Prus Bolesław Prus (pronounced: [bɔlεswaf prus]; August 20, 1847 – May 19, 1912), born Aleksander Głowacki, was a Polish journalist, short-story writer, and novelist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A cultural critic is a critic of a given culture, usually as a whole and typically on a radical basis. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is in need of attention. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... This is a list of some (not all notable) authors in the horror fiction genre. ... The following is a compilation of people who have mysteriously disappeared, whose death is not substantiated, whose remains have not been recovered, whose current whereabouts are unknown, and who (except for the most recent cases) may be presumed deceased. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... An atheist is one who disbelieves[1] in the existence of a deity or deities. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Carlos Fuentes, Gringo Viejo (Planeta, 2004) ISBN 9686941673

Carlos Fuentes Carlos Fuentes Macías (born November 11, 1928) is a Mexican writer and one of the best-known living novelists and essayists in the Spanish-speaking world. ...

References

  • Bleiler, Everett (1948). The Checklist of Fantastic Literature. Chicago: Shasta Publishers, 32, 147. 
  • Carey McWilliams, Ambrose Bierce: A Biography, 1929 (reprinted 1967), Archon Books.
  • Richard O'Connor, Ambrose Bierce: a Biography, with illustrations, Boston, Little, Brown and Company, 1967.

Everett Franklin Bleiler (born 1920) is an editor and bibliographer of science fiction and Fantasy. ... Carey McWilliams (13 December 1905–27 June 1980) was an American author, editor, and lawyer best known for a strong commitment to progressive causes. ...

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Ambrose Bierce
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Ambrose Bierce
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Ambrose Bierce
  • Poems by Ambrose Bierce at PoetryFoundation.org
  • The Ambrose Bierce Site
  • The Ambrose Bierce Appreciation Society
  • The Ambrose Bierce Project
  • Laika Poetry Review article
  • Ambrose Bierce Quotes
  • "Ambrose Bierce, 'the Old Gringo': Fact, Fiction and Fantasy"
  • One of Bierce's last letters
  • Biography and quotes of Ambrose Bierce
  • Ambrose Bierce
  • Works by Ambrose Bierce at Project Gutenberg
  • A reading of "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" and a discussion of the life and writing of Ambrose Bierce - RealAudio
  • WikiSource material
  • Ambrose Bierce Stories
Persondata
NAME Bierce, Ambrose
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Bierce, Ambrose Gwinnett
SHORT DESCRIPTION American journalist and writer
DATE OF BIRTH June 24, 1842(1842-06-24)
PLACE OF BIRTH Meigs County, Ohio
DATE OF DEATH Possibly 1914
PLACE OF DEATH Chihuahua, Mexico

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ambrose Bierce - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1731 words)
Bierce was born in a rural area of Meigs County, Ohio and lived during his adolescence in the town of Elkhart, Indiana.
Bierce was reckoned a master of "pure" English by his contemporaries, and virtually everything that came from his pen was notable for its judicious wording and economy of style.
Bierce is depicted as a detective in series of mystery novels by Oakley Hall, including Ambrose Bierce and the Queen of Spades and Ambrose Bierce and the Death of Kings.
Ambrose Bierce - MSN Encarta (234 words)
Ambrose Gwinett Bierce was born in Meigs County, Ohio.
Bierce returned to San Francisco in 1877, writing for the Argonaut, editing the Wasp, and writing a column for the Sunday Examiner, owned by William Randolph Hearst.
Bierce's wit and fascination with death and horror earned him the nickname Bitter Bierce; his mastery of the short story was compared favorably with that of the American writers Edgar Allan Poe and Bret Harte.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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