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Encyclopedia > Amateur Radio Operator

An amateur radio operator is an individual who, typically, uses equipment at an amateur radio station to engage in two-way personal communications with other similar individuals on radio frequencies assigned to the Amateur Radio Service. Most amateur radio operators have been granted an amateur radio license by a governmental regulatory authority. As a component of his or her license, most amateur radio operators are assigned a call sign that they use to identify themselves during communication. There are about three million amateur radio operators worldwide.[1] An amateur radio station is a facility equipped with the apparatus necessary for carrying on radiocommunications in the Amateur Radio Service. ... Two-way communication is a form of transmission in which both parties involved transmit information. ... For other uses, see Frequency (disambiguation). ... Amateur radio station with modern solid-state transceiver featuring LCD and DSP capabilities Amateur radio, often called ham radio, is both a hobby and a service that uses various types of radio communications equipment to communicate with other radio amateurs for public service, recreation and self-training. ... An amateur radio license is a legal document or permit giving official permission to the license holder to operate an amateur radio station. ... Call sign can refer to different types of call signs: Airline call sign Aviator call sign Cosmonaut call sign Radio and television call signs Tactical call sign, also known as a tactical designator See also: International Callsign Allocations, Maritime Mobile Service Identity This is a disambiguation page — a navigational...


Amateur radio operators are also known as radio amateurs or hams. The term 'ham' as a nickname for amateur radio operators originated in a pejorative usage by operators in commercial and professional radio communities. The word was subsequently welcomed by amateur radio operators, and it stuck. An amateur radio operator who has died is referred to by other amateur radio operators as a "silent key", and the suffix /SK is appended to his or her callsign. This article is about the etymology of the term ham radio. ... Silent key refers to an amateur radio operator who is deceased. ...

An amateur radio operator
Amateur radio operator running high-speed computer-generated telegraphy during a competition
Amateur radio operator working HF

Contents


ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 665 KB) Summary An amateur radio operator, copyright Yvette Cendes, 2005 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 665 KB) Summary An amateur radio operator, copyright Yvette Cendes, 2005 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 667 pixel, file size: 616 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 667 pixel, file size: 616 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Country Number of amateur
radio operators[2]
Year of
Report
Japan 1,296,059 1999
USA 722,330 2007[3]
Thailand 141,241 1999
South Korea 141,000 2000
Germany 79,666 2000
Taiwan 68,692 1999
Canada 63,547 2007[3]
Spain 58,700 1999
United Kingdom 58,426 2000
Russia 38,000 1993
Brazil 32,053 1997
Italy 30,000 1993
Indonesia 27,815 1997
France 18,500 1997
Ukraine 17,265 2000
Argentina 16,889 1999
India 10,679 2000
South Africa 6,000 1994
Norway 5,302 2000
Malaysia 2,730 2006
China 800 2000

Demographics of amateur radio operators

Few governments maintain detailed demographic statistics of their amateur radio operator populations, aside from recording the total number of licensed operators. The majority of amateur radio operators worldwide reside in Japan, the United States, Thailand, South Korea, and the nations of Europe. Only the governments of Yemen and North Korea currently prohibit their citizens from becoming amateur radio operators. In some countries, acquiring an amateur radio license is difficult because of the bureaucratic processes or fees that place access to a license out of reach for most citizens. Most nations permit foreign nationals to earn an amateur radio license, but very few amateur radio operators are licensed in multiple countries. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... “Citizen” redirects here. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This article is about the sociological concept. ...


Gender

In the vast majority of countries, the population of amateur radio operators is overwhelmingly male. In the United States, approximately 15% of amateur radio operators are women.[4] In China, only 12% of amateur radio operators are women.[5] Some amateur radio activities have a more balanced male/female ratio, such as Amateur Radio Direction Finding: 33% of the competitors at the 2004 World ARDF Championship were women.[6] The Young Ladies Radio League is an international organization of female amateur radio operators. This article is about the Male sex. ... Image of a woman on the Pioneer plaque sent to outer space. ... A German competitor on a two-meter ARDF course. ... The Young Ladies Radio League is an international organization of women amateur radio operators. ...


A male amateur radio operator can be referred to as an OM, an abbreviation used in Morse code telegraphy for "old man", regardless of the operator's age. A female amateur radio operator can be referred to as a YL, from the abbreviation used for "young lady", regardless of the operator's age. XYL was once used by amateur radio operators to refer to an unlicensed woman, usually the wife of a male amateur radio operator; today, the term has come to mean any female spouse of an amateur radio operator, licensed or not. Although these codes are derived from English language abbreviations, their use is common among amateur radio operators worldwide. 1922 Chart of the Morse Code Letters and Numerals Morse code is a method for transmitting telegraphic information, using standardized sequences of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a message. ... Telegraph and Telegram redirect here. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Age

In most countries there is no minimum age requirement to earn an amateur radio license and become an amateur radio operator. Although the number of amateur radio operators in many countries increases from year to year[citation needed], the average age of amateur radio operators is quite high. In some countries, the average age is over 60 years old, with most amateur radio operators earning their license in their 40s or 50s.


Some national radio societies have responded to this by developing programs specifically to encourage youth participation in amateur radio, such as the American Radio Relay League's Amateur Radio Education and Technology Program.[7] The World Wide Young Contesters organization promotes youth involvement, particularly amongst Europeans, in competitive radio contesting. The ARRL Logo. ... Champions of the 2002 World Radiosport Team Championship (WRTC), Helsinki, Finland. ...


References

  1. ^ Silver, H Ward (2004-04-23). Ham Radio for Dummies. Indianapolis: Wiley Publishing. ISBN 978-0-7645-5987-7. OCLC 55092631. 
  2. ^ Status Summary of Radio Amateurs & Amateur Stations of the World. International Amateur Radio Union (IARU.org). Retrieved on 2007-07-13.
  3. ^ a b Hamdata Database [Presentation of FCC license data]. Hamdata.com. Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  4. ^ Harker, Kenneth E. "A Study of Amateur Radio Gender Demographics", ARRL.org, 2005-03-15. Retrieved on 2007-07-13. 
  5. ^ Chinese Radio Sports Association (2004). "The Current Status of Amateur Radio in the Mainland of China". Proceedings of the International Amateur Radio Union's Region 3 Twelfth Regional Conference. Document No. 04/XII/057. 
  6. ^ 12th World Amateur Radio Direction Finding Championship. Czech ARDF Association (2004). Retrieved on 2006-06-20.[dead link]
  7. ^ The ARRL Amateur Radio Education & Technology Program. ARRL.org. Retrieved on 2007-07-13.

 
 

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