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Encyclopedia > Amalthea (mythology)
Infancy of Zeus by Jacob Jordaens, c. 1640
Infancy of Zeus by Jacob Jordaens, c. 1640

In Greek mythology, Amalthea (Greek Αμαλθεια, "tender") is the most often mentioned among foster-mothers of Zeus. She is sometimes represented as the goat which suckled the infant-god in a cave in Mount Aigaion ("Goat Mountain") in Crete, sometimes as a goat-tending nymph of uncertain parentage (daughter of Oceanus, Haemonius, Olen, or Melisseus), who brought him up on the milk of a goat. In order that Cronus should not hear the wailing of the infant, Amalthea gathered about the cave the Kuretes or the Korybantes to dance and shout and clash their spears against their shields (Kerenyi 1951, p 94). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2536x1903, 364 KB) Description: Title: de: Jugend des Zeus (Die Ziege Amalthea ernährt Zeus) Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 150 × 203 cm Country of origin: de: Niederlande (Flandern) Current location (city): de: Paris Current location (gallery): de: Mus... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2536x1903, 364 KB) Description: Title: de: Jugend des Zeus (Die Ziege Amalthea ernährt Zeus) Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 150 × 203 cm Country of origin: de: Niederlande (Flandern) Current location (city): de: Paris Current location (gallery): de: Mus... Self-Portrait with Parents, Brothers, and Sisters by Jacob Jordaens (c. ... Greek mythology consists of an extensive collection of narratives detailing the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, which were first envisioned and disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition. ... Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th-century engraving. ... This article is about goats, the animals. ... Greece and Crete Crete (Greek Κρήτη / Kriti) is the largest of the Greek islands and the fifth largest in the Mediterranean Sea. ... Hylas and the Nymphs by John William Waterhouse In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, sometimes bound to a particular location or landform. ... Oceanus or Okeanos refers to the ocean, which the Greeks and Romans regarded as a river circling the world. ... Olen is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Antwerp. ... In Greek mythology, Melisseus (bee-man), the father of the nymphs Adrasteia and Ide who nursed the infant Zeus on Crete, was the eldest and leader of the nine Kuretes of Crete. ... Cronus receives the Omphalos Stone from his wife Rhea and devours it unaware that Zeus was safe; painting was made between 475 B.C. and 425 B.C. Cronus (of obscure etymology, perhaps related to horned), pronounced: kroh-nuhs , also spelled Cronos or Kronos, is often confused with Chronos/Khronos. ... The Korybantes, called the Kurbantes in (Phrygia), are the crested dancers who worship the Phrygian goddess Cybele with drumming and dancing. ... The Korybantes, called the Kurbantes in Phrygia, were the crested dancers who worshipped the Phrygian goddess Cybele with drumming and dancing. ...


It is the early 4th-century AD Christian writer Lactantius (in Divine Institutions i.22), who asserts that the child was fed by Amalthea and Melissa, whom Lactantius takes to be the daughters of King Minos. There are earlier stories of the child Zeus being nourished by sacred bees. Lucius Caelius (or Caecilius?) Firmianus Lactantius was an early Christian author who wrote in Latin (around A.D. 240 - around 320). ... Melissa is a given name for a female. ... In Greek mythology, Minos was a semi-legendary king of Crete, son of Zeus and Europa. ... Bees are universally the most symbolic of insects. ...


The goat Amalthea's horn, according to the Alexandrian poet Callimachus (Hymn to Zeus) was the original of the drinking vessel called a rhyton, an inverted horn-shape in its most basic form, with an outlet hole in the pointed base, was the very horn from which the child Zeus drank. Callimachus (ca. ... A Rhyton (Greek ῥυτόν rutón) is a ceremonial drinking cup shaped like an animal head or horn. ...


Alternatively, the sacred goat having broken off one of its horns, Amalthea filled it with flowers and fruits and presented it to Zeus, who placed it together with the goat amongst the stars, though the one-horned goat was not identified with the Unicorn by the Greeks. According to another story, Zeus himself broke off the horn and, in an example of mythic inversion, gave it to Amalthea, promising that it would supply whatever she desired in abundance. The goat-nymph, however, was older than the Olympian. Amalthea, in this tradition, gave it to the river-god Achelous (her reputed brother), who exchanged it for his own horn, which had been broken off in his contest with Heracles for the possession of Deianeira. According to ancient mythology, the owners of the horn were many and various. Speaking generally, it was regarded as the symbol of inexhaustible riches, the "horn of plenty" or Cornucopia, and became the attribute of various divinities— of Hades in his manifestation as Plouton, the bringer of wealth, of Gaia, Demeter, Cybele, and of rivers as fertilizers of the land. The gentle and pensive virgin has the power to tame the unicorn, in this fresco in Palazzo Farnese, Rome, probably by Domenichino, ca 1602 The unicorn is a legendary creature embodied like a horse, but slender and with a single — usually spiral — horn growing out of its forehead (whence its... In Greek mythology, Achelous (Greek: Αχελώος), was the patron deity of the river by the same name, which is the largest river of Greece, and thus the chief of all river deities, every river having its own river spirit. ... Statue of Heracles In Greek mythology, Heracles, or Heraklês (glory of Hera, Ηρακλης) was a divine hero, the demigod son of Zeus and Alcmene, and stepson of Alcmenes rightful husband and great-grandson of Perseus. ... Like many mortal women in Greek mythology, Deianira (also Deianeira) occupied a perilous threshold position between the daylit world of Olympian gods and heroes and the dark chthonic primordial world of primitive earth magic. ... Horn of Plenty may mean: Cornucopia, a symbolic, hollow cone filled with festive fruit Black chanterelle, a mushroom resembling the shape of a cornucopia Homunculus Nebula, two mushroom-shaped clouds surrounding the star Eta Carinae This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The cornucopia (Latin Cornu Copiae), also known as the Horn of Plenty, is a symbol of food dating back to the 5th century BC. In Greek mythology, Amalthea raised Zeus on the milk of a goat. ... Hades (Greek: - HadÄ“s or - HáidÄ“s) (unseen) means both the ancient Greek abode of the dead and the god of that underworld. ... Gaia (World Book «JEE uh») (land or earth, from the Greek ; variant spelling Gaea—see also also Ge from ) is a Greek goddess personifying the Earth. ... Demeter, Greek goddess of the harvest. ... Statue of Cybele in a chariot drawn by lions, in the Plaza de Cibeles, Madrid Originally a Phrygian goddess, Cybele (Greek Κυβέλη, sometimes given the etymology she of the hair if her name is Greek, not Phrygian, but more widely considered of Luwian origin, from Kubaba; Roman equivalent: Magna Mater or...


The term "horn of Amalthea" is applied to a fertile district, and an estate belonging to Titus Pomponius Atticus was called Amaltheum. Cretan coins represent the infant Zeus being suckled by the goat; other Greek coins exhibit him suspended from its teats or carried in the arms of a nymph (Ovid, Fasti, v. 115; Metam. ix. 87). Titus Pomponius Atticus (110 BC/109 BC – 32 BC). ... Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC â€“ Tomis, now Constanta AD 17) Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women, and mythological transformations. ...


Amalthea's skin, or that of her goat, killed and skinned by the grown Zeus, became the protective aegis in some traditions, a vivid enough metaphor for the transfer of power to the Olympian gods.. Aegis (Gr. ...


References

  • Kerenyi, Karl, 1951. The Gods of the Greeks (London: Thames & Hudson)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Amalthea (mythology) - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (517 words)
The goat Amalthea's horn, according to the Alexandrian poet Callimachus (Hymn to Zeus) was the original of the drinking vessel called a rhyton, an inverted horn-shape in its most basic form, with an outlet hole in the pointed base, was the very horn from which the child Zeus drank.
Speaking generally, it was regarded as the symbol of inexhaustible riches, the "horn of plenty" or Cornucopia, and became the attribute of various divinities— of Hades in his manifestation as Plouton, the bringer of wealth, of Gaia, Demeter, Cybele, and of rivers as fertilizers of the land.
Amalthea's skin, or that of her goat, killed and skinned by the grown Zeus, became the protective aegis in some traditions, a vivid enough metaphor for the transfer of power to the Olympian gods..
Station Information - Amalthea (mythology) (253 words)
In Greek mythology, Amalthea ("tender") is the foster-mother of Zeus.
Amalthea gave it to Achelous (her reputed brother), who exchanged it for his own horn which had been broken off in his contest with Heracles for the possession of Deianeira.
Speaking generally, it was regarded as the symbol of inexhaustible riches and plenty, and became the attribute of various divinities (Hades, Gaea, Demeter, Cybele, Hermes), and of rivers (the Nile) as fertilizers of the land.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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