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Encyclopedia > Always Look on the Bright Side of Life
The 1991 reissue of "Always Look on the Bright Side of Life"
The 1991 reissue of "Always Look on the Bright Side of Life"

"Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life" is a popular song written by Eric Idle which originally featured in the 1979 film Monty Python's Life of Brian and has gone on to become a common singalong at public events such as football matches. This work is copyrighted. ... This work is copyrighted. ... Eric Idle Eric Idle (born March 29, 1943) is an English comedian, actor and film director, as well as an author and guitarist/songwriter. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... Life Of Brian is a 1979 film by Monty Python which deals with the life of Brian Cohen (played by Graham Chapman), a young man born the same night as, and right down the street from, Jesus. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...

The song, as originally performed in Life Of Brian, comes at the climax of the film. Brian Cohen (played by Graham Chapman) has been sentenced to death by crucifixion for his part in a kidnap plot. After a succession of apparent rescue opportunities all come to nothing, a character on a nearby cross (played by Eric Idle) attempts to cheer him up by singing "Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life" to him. As the song progresses, many of the other crucifixion victims (140 in all, according to the script, though rather fewer are actually seen on screen) begin to dance in a very limited way and join in with the song's whistled hook. The song continues as the scene changes to a long-shot of the crosses and the credits begin to roll. An instrumental version plays over the second half of the credits. Graham Chapman Graham Chapman (8 January 1941—4 October 1989) was a British comedian and writer. ...


"Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life" was conceived as a parody of the style of song often featured in Disney films. It may be considered an 'answer song' to the entire genre, but particularly to songs such as "Give A Little Whistle" from Pinocchio. Its appearance at the end of the film, when the central character seems certain to die, is deliberately ironic. In contemporary usage, parody is a form of satire that imitates another work of art in order to ridicule it. ... The Walt Disney Company (most commonly known as Disney) (NYSE: DIS) is one of the largest media and entertainment corporations in the world. ... Pinocchio is the second animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. ... Irony is best known as a figure of speech (more precisely called verbal irony) in which there is a gap or incongruity between what a speaker or a writer says, and what is understood. ...


The song opens with an introductory verse (half-sung with an acoustic guitar backing on the soundtrack album and most subsequent versions, though simply spoken unaccompanied in the film itself):

'Some things in life are bad,'
'They can really make you mad,'
'Other things just make you swear and curse,'
'When you're chewing on life's gristle,'
'Don't grumble, give a whistle,'
'And this'll help things turn out for the best, and...'

This deviation from the standard rhyme scheme (with 'best' replacing the expected 'worst' to rhyme with 'curse') leads into the first appearance of the chorus, which consists of the title and a whistled tune. A second verse continues in a similar vein, and the third and fourth verses move on to discuss the situation (namely, imminent death) in which Brian now finds himself, and alludes to the Shakespearean cliché that 'all the world's a stage': Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

'You'll see it's all a show,'
'Keep 'em laughing as you go,'
'Just remember that the last laugh is on you.'

The whistled hook is an uncredited contribution from Idle's frequent collaborator Neil Innes. One occurrence in the final chorus was omitted at the insistence of the film's executive producer George Harrison, so as not to obscure a pet phrase in John Altman's orchestral arrangement. Eric Idle Eric Idle (born March 29, 1943) is an English comedian, actor and film director, as well as an author and guitarist/songwriter. ... Neil Innes (born December 9, 1944) is an English writer and performer of comic songs, best known for playing in the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band and later The Rutles. ... George Harrison, MBE (February 24, 1943 – November 29, 2001) was a popular British guitarist, singer, songwriter, record producer, and film producer, best known as a member of The Beatles. ...


The song appeared on the film soundtrack album, listed as "Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life (All Things Dull And Ugly)". The subtitle does not appear in, or apparently have any connection to, the actual song, and is only used on the soundtrack album. Confusingly, "All Things Dull And Ugly" was also the title of an unrelated track on Monty Python's Contractual Obligation Album (released only a few months later), which is a parody of the popular hymn "All Things Bright and Beautiful". Monty Pythons Contractual Obligation Album is an album released by Monty Python in 1980. ...


The song was also released on the B-side of the single "Brian Song", the film's opening theme (performed by Sonia Jones). It is likely that the claim made by Idle in the spoken fade-out that 'this song is available in the foyer' was actually true in some cinemas. In recorded music, the terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 7 inch vinyl records on which singles have been released since the 1950s. ... In music, a single is a short (usually ten minutes or less*) record, usually featuring one or two tracks as A-side, often accompanied by several B-sides, usually remixes or other songs. ...


The song touched a chord with the British trait of stoicism in the face of disaster and became immensely popular. When the destroyer HMS Sheffield was struck by an Exocet cruise missile on May 4, 1982 in the Falklands War, her crew sang it while waiting to be rescued from their sinking ship. HMS Sheffield (D80) was the second Royal Navy ship to bear the name Sheffield, after the city of Sheffield in Yorkshire. ... In older English literature there are some uses of exocet to mean flying fish. There is also a typeface known as Exocet. ... A Tomahawk cruise missile A cruise missile is a guided missile which uses a lifting wing and most often a jet propulsion system to allow sustained flight. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Falklands War (Spanish: Guerra de las Malvinas), was an effective state of war in 1982 between Argentina and the United Kingdom over the Falkland Islands (also known in Spanish as the Islas Malvinas) and South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. ...


When Graham Chapman died in 1989, the five remaining members of Monty Python reunited at his funeral to sing "Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life" after John Cleese's eulogy. Graham Chapman Graham Chapman (8 January 1941—4 October 1989) was a British comedian and writer. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Monty Python troupe in 1969. ... John Cleese as Q in Die Another Day. ... A eulogy is a funeral oration given in tribute to a person or people who have recently died. ...


"Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life" became particularly popular in the early 1990s. The film had retained a cult status in the intervening years. Around 1990 the title refrain and hook (either whistled as in the original, or vocalised as 'da-dum, da-dum, da-da, da-da, da-dum') began to gain currency as a football chant. This came to the attention of BBC Radio 1 DJ Simon Mayo, whose breakfast show had a track record of reviving old novelty songs. Mayo began playing the original version on his show, which led to EMI re-issuing the track as a single in September 1991. The 1990s decade refers to the years from 1990 to 1999, inclusive. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... BBC Radio 1 is a British radio station, specialising in popular music aimed at the 16-24 age bracket. ... Simon Mayo (born 21st September 1958 in Southgate, London) is one of the most recognised and respected voices of radio in the UK, currently presenting a daily afternoon programme on BBC Radio Five Live. ... A novelty song is a usually intentionally humorous song, usually in published or recorded form. ... Look up September in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The single (which was backed with two tracks from Contractual Obligation, "I Bet You They Won't Play This Song On The Radio" and "I'm So Worried") also doubled up as promotion for the recently-released compilation Monty Python Sings. (The original pressing also featured a German language version of "The Lumberjack Song", though this was quickly withdrawn and is now a collector's item.) The single reached the top ten in October and prompted a deliberately chaotic performance by Idle on Top of the Pops. Despite some perhaps over-enthusiastic predictions, it did not manage to bring an end to Bryan Adams' unprecedented run at the top of the UK Singles Chart with "(Everything I Do) I Do It for You", instead peaking at number 3. Following this attention, the song became more popular than ever. Two cover versions, by Tenor Fly (incorporating the piano riff from Nina Simone's "My Baby Just Cares For Me"), and the cast of Coronation Street, both reached the charts in 1995. Monty Python Sings was a comedy album of songs written by the Monty Python team. ... Michael Palin performs The Lumberjack Song, with Connie Booth as his best Girl. ... Top of the Pops is a long-running British music chart television programme shown each week on BBC Two and now licensed for local versions around the world. ... Bryan Adams, OC, OBC b. ... The UK Singles Chart is currently compiled by The Official UK Charts Company (OCC) on behalf of the British record industry. ... (Everything I Do) I Do It for You is a song co-written and performed by Bryan Adams, featured in the soundtrack for the film Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves in 1991. ... Eunice Kathleen Waymon, better known as Dr. Nina Simone (February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003), was an American singer, songwriter and pianist. ... Coronation Street is Britains longest-running television soap opera, and the UKs consistently highest-rated show. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1993, when the host city for 2000 Summer Olympics was announced as Sydney, the large crowd gathered in Manchester, one of the other rival bid cities, broke out spontaneously into a chorus of the song. 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games held in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Manchester is a city in the United Kingdom, considered by some to be the countrys second city [1][2]. It is a centre of the arts, the media, higher education and big business. ...


In 1997 the song was recorded by Art Garfunkel and included in the soundtrack of James L. Brooks' film As Good as It Gets. It was also performed by Bruce Cockburn and released on his 1990 Live CD. 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Art Garfunkel in Bad Timing (1980) Arthur Ira Garfunkel is an American singer and actor, best known as half of the folk duo Simon and Garfunkel. ... James L. Brooks (born May 9, 1940) is a Hollywood producer, writer, and film director. ... As Good as It Gets is a 1997 film which tells the story of an obsessive-compulsive, cantankerous, racist, homophobic writer named Melvin Udall (Jack Nicholson) who, because of his affective disorder, lives in a world that has shrunk to about the size of his apartment and the books he... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


A singalong version of this song is featured in the musical Spamalot. Monty Pythons Spamalot is a comedic musical based on the film Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975). ...


The song's lyrical theme can be regarded as a modern-day version of the stereotypical British 'stiff upper lip' attitude, and this, combined with the song's high familiarity, had led to it often being jokingly described as Britain's 'alternative national anthem'. Stiff Upper Lip is a 2000 (see 2000 in music) hard rock album by Australian band AC/DC. The album was recorded at The Warehouse Studio in Vancouver, British Columbia and mastered at Sterling Sound in New York City. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogizing the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a nations government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ...


Green Day had an excerpt in their song "King For a Day/Shout" in their Bullet in a Bible album. Green Day is a band from California, consisting of Billie Joe Armstrong (lead vocals, guitar), Mike Dirnt (bass, backing vocals), and Tré Cool (drums, percussion, backing vocals). ... Bullet in a Bible is a live CD, DVD and UMD release by Green Day, which was issued in November 2005. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Always Look on the Bright Side of Life - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1092 words)
"Always Look on the Bright Side of Life" is a popular song written by Eric Idle which originally featured in the 1979 film Monty Python's Life of Brian and has gone on to become a common singalong at public events such as football matches.
"Always Look on the Bright Side of Life" was conceived as a parody of the style of song often featured in Disney films.
"Always Look on the Bright Side of Life" became particularly popular in the early 1990s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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